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  1. #1
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    Don't Let Rain Dampen Your Passion! Video Tips

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    The rainy season is just about here. We wanted to get our BIKESKILLS Wet Weather Riding Tips & Video article out there. We all know what it's like to hit those snot-slick roots at an odd angle, have mud and grit flying in our eyes from the front tire - not to mention having to deal with a whole new set of bike maintenance issues. This article and video will help with the basics of wet-weather riding, bike set-up, and maintenance.

    If you have additional tips and ideas to make the article and video better, send them on and we'll include them in a revised article and video!

    BIKESKILLS Wet Weather Riding Video and Tips


  2. #2
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    I have a suggestion

    How about an intro that includes making sure that the trails you decide to ride wet and muddy are all-weather trails and that your ride does not FUBAR them.
    Monte
    Lodging & Guiding for SW Utah Trails
    http://www.vrbo.com/298759
    www.UtahMountainBikingAdventures.com
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  3. #3
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    That's a great idea. Out here in NorCal some of the trail area, like Camp Tamarancho send out alerts to that effect. Likewise there are almost always trails that are less sensitive to the rain, and can be ridden.

    Thanks for the suggestion.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    I have a suggestion

    How about an intro that includes making sure that the trails you decide to ride wet and muddy are all-weather trails and that your ride does not FUBAR them.
    Good post. First thing I thought of.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by rhoward View Post
    That's a great idea. Out here in NorCal some of the trail area, like Camp Tamarancho send out alerts to that effect. Likewise there are almost always trails that are less sensitive to the rain, and can be ridden.

    Thanks for the suggestion.
    You're welcome.

    Same here. We're in SW Utah and it's hard because of the differing soils. We have sand... which we wait until it rains to ride, slickrock...rain or shine, gypsum soils which hold water and take forever to dry and lots of mixed trails.
    Monte
    Lodging & Guiding for SW Utah Trails
    http://www.vrbo.com/298759
    www.UtahMountainBikingAdventures.com
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  6. #6
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    There must be lots of places in the Pacific NW, Canadia, Alaska, Asia, S and Central America, tropical wherever, northern Australia and the Alps in Europe that are wet a lot. In those places building trail that not only survives but makes riding fun, has to utilise what works well in the wet. Or you wouldn't ever ride!

    Everywhere else, riding in the wet can either ruin or establish a durable trail. Most likely the former, although if you don't ride trail in and after the wet, you cannot know which lines will cope with water or not and sometimes there can be a surprise. Also, desert areas erode more than anywhere else under the influence of water, with or without the influence of man, so predicting how erosion can be used to advantage over time makes sense. A well thought-out trail can be sustainable wet and dry, but it relies on good builders and good building.

    The video in the OP's link was innocent and had some good information for newbie riders. It goes to show that the majority of riders will never, ever consider what is best for the trails they ride. It's not malicious (like tampering with an established trail), but just simply the assumption that the trail is there for "me" to use. Most of them won't be out there in inclement weather anyway.

    I don't have a problem with the link, but it could be the death knell for some at-risk trails - read made OK, but not good enough, or ridden so much they can't survive forever. So long as MTBR forumites know this, things will sort out in time. Pass the message that trail sustainability, plus equipment contamination, destruction and exponential increases in MTB expenditure and maintenance = the trail fairies' message that most rides in the slop are a bad idea. Ride to the pub instead.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ridnparadise View Post
    There must be lots of places in the Pacific NW, Canadia, Alaska, Asia, S and Central America, tropical wherever, northern Australia and the Alps in Europe that are wet a lot. In those places building trail that not only survives but makes riding fun, has to utilise what works well in the wet. Or you wouldn't ever ride!

    Everywhere else, riding in the wet can either ruin or establish a durable trail. Most likely the former, although if you don't ride trail in and after the wet, you cannot know which lines will cope with water or not and sometimes there can be a surprise. Also, desert areas erode more than anywhere else under the influence of water, with or without the influence of man, so predicting how erosion can be used to advantage over time makes sense. A well thought-out trail can be sustainable wet and dry, but it relies on good builders and good building.

    The video in the OP's link was innocent and had some good information for newbie riders. It goes to show that the majority of riders will never, ever consider what is best for the trails they ride. It's not malicious (like tampering with an established trail), but just simply the assumption that the trail is there for "me" to use. Most of them won't be out there in inclement weather anyway.

    I don't have a problem with the link, but it could be the death knell for some at-risk trails - read made OK, but not good enough, or ridden so much they can't survive forever. So long as MTBR forumites know this, things will sort out in time. Pass the message that trail sustainability, plus equipment contamination, destruction and exponential increases in MTB expenditure and maintenance = the trail fairies' message that most rides in the slop are a bad idea. Ride to the pub instead.
    Great post with one exception.

    In the desert we absolutely know 100% for certain that we cannot ride gypsum or bentonite clay based soils when wet or saturated no matter how "well built" they might be.

    We do many exceptional and competent trail builders a gross disservice by inferring that it must be a poorly built trail if it cannot be ridden wet.
    Monte
    Lodging & Guiding for SW Utah Trails
    http://www.vrbo.com/298759
    www.UtahMountainBikingAdventures.com
    MTBR Discounts

  8. #8
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    excellent post .. our local cycling club warns of impeding weather which makes it easy to decide to ride or die

  9. #9
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    I wish we had more trails close to Durham, NC that allow wet trail riding. Although, I would be hesitant to ride trails that have a lot of slippery rocks because I could seriously get injured if I slip and fall. Not really worth the risk for me.

  10. #10
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    Been raining so much here when the sun popped out this a.m. I headed off to my back up trail, a MUT. About 10 miles with lots of hills. About a mile in is a wooden bridge which is green around the edges because it sits in the shade 24/7. Kind of fun because it has some good down slope in all four 90* turns so I can warm up my tech riding...

    Barely on the bridge and just through the first turn the front wheel washes out. I catch myself with my foot and it slips out too like I was standing on oily snot.

    Tried to roll but was going too slow and ended up crashing in the most ungraceful of ways. It was so slippery I had trouble standing to remount. Glad no one was around to watch. lol

  11. #11
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    We do many exceptional and competent trail builders a gross disservice by inferring that it must be a poorly built trail if it cannot be ridden wet.

    Certainly didn't mean to imply that. Reactive earth and bogland and even steep grades are places that have to have local rules and sound understanding of the land is needed to build there at all. It sounds like you have all that covered STT GUY and are passing that knowledge on at a local level as well as here.

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