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  1. #1
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    Cancer Survivors Thread How are you kicking butt??

    There are several of us on here who have dealt with the big C and come back to "normal" life. I know there are tons of us who are still dealing with it an need some pick-me-up, a message that life ain't over, and for me it will probably never be the same again, but it just might be better!
    After AML Leukemia, endless rounds of chemo, remission, relaps, more rounds of chemo, bone marrow stem cell transplant, and a very lengthy rehab I am riding my bike as much as ever. I ride all three of them (road/mtn/cx) with a lot more people and I see more of the country. I'm slower by quite a bit but there are a lot more people to ride with now. At nearly 40 I am getting stronger, making new personal records all the time (post transplant). Most guys my age are just getting slower. I may get faster for another 4-5 years.
    I recently had to change careers for health reasons (you can't really be a plumber with a compromised immune system) and am about to start work as a bike mechanic, and I'm absolutely stoked about it! I'm not going to buy a yat with the money I make but a much better environment. Find a job you love and it will be the last day you ever "work".
    Every video in my Vimeo and YouTube channels were made post-transplant (see the links in my sig line below).
    I know there are people out there just starting the "bad trip" and really need to read about what is after.

    For those of you that haven't read it there is a thread on here of the ongoing, start to present, play-by play, of one of our own MTBRers with AML. It is long but interesting and worth reading if you are on a similar path.
    https://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=500278

    Anyway, if you have a good story I know I'd love to hear it and I'm sure there some that Need it. How are you kicking ass now?




  2. #2
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    Awsome man, but lose the cross bike and stay on the Yeti!

  3. #3
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    I'm there. Just hit 30 3 months ago and am nearly 2 years post-dx. Chemo alone got me into remission, and I've been there ever since.

    I'm riding more now than I was immediately before my diagnosis, but then again, I'm in the last year of my master's degree work. At the time of my diagnosis, I was in the middle of field work and I had no time to ride.

    I plan to finish my degree by the end of the year and get on with life.

  4. #4
    ol'guy who says hi &waves
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    Not Me, My Daughter

    She was diagnosed with leukemia at age 17.

    Bone marrow transplant at 18

    Told transplant was unsuccesful and unable to bear children due to chemo at 19

    Picture is of her 18 month old son (my grandson) watching his mom playing coed soccer at 23.

    She and two other cancer survivors are members of my 24hr mtb race team in June.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Cancer Survivors Thread How are you kicking butt??-img_4143.jpg  

    .

    I may not have the best of everything, but I have the best everything that matters.

  5. #5
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    Awesome thread!

  6. #6
    Tossin the salad.
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    I applaud to all whom fought and beat cancer.


    I just lost my father this past Sunday to Stage IV Kidney Cancer. He was only 57.
    I miss him so much!!

  7. #7
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    I had what some people call the "good cancer". Let me tell you that's a bunch of crap. Thyroid Cancer SUCKS. 2 years post op and I know my life will never be the same. I had full Thyroid removal and I never knew what the Thyroid did until I lost mine. I'll be on medication the rest of my life. I try to pretend I'm 100% back to normal but I know I'm not and never will be.

    Two months after surgery I did a charity bike ride to prove to my self that cancer had not beat me. That got me motivated and I bought a nice road bike. A few months later I traded in my Hybrid for a real Mountain Bike and upgraded to a 29er in January this year. I walked into the LBS to return a $12 part and walked out with a new 29er.

    I'll be 50 this year. I'm not the fastest guy out there and never will be. I walk around things other people ride right through or over. But I have never felt more alive than I do when I'm out in the woods.

    Cancer SUCKS but I don't know if I would be out in the woods if I never had it.

  8. #8
    9 lives
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    I was diagnosed with stage 3 cancer exactly 1 year ago. I have not stopped riding and have not missed a day of work. DH all last summer, 2 vacation trips including Whiteface Mountain, NY, Mount Ste Anne Que ) Despite surgery, T&C chemo, radiation and all the terrible side effects I kept going.

    I am still receiving IV chemo until October this year so we are fitting in a trip to BC Okanagan in June between treatments

    Winters put a slight damper on riding here so I took lessons and learned to down hill ski. I will not stop doing the things I love. Or learn new things. My husband has been my greatest support. He's built up a new kick-arse DH bike for me .. can't wait to ride it.

  9. #9
    ILIKEBIKES
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    Yppppppppppppppp
    Last edited by tjchad; 03-25-2015 at 03:47 PM.

  10. #10
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    I feel like a cheater here.....

    However, I did have cancer a few years ago but it was stage one prostate and it was caught very early. I had my prostate removed, no chemo nor any other treatments were necessary and three years later I am cancer free. I.E. PSA is zero or whatever the lowest reading is (< 1?).

    Like I said, I feel like I'm cheating to even consider myself a cancer survivor but I suppose I am.

    The biggest problem was a damned foley bag for three weeks and three months to recouperate but no big deal in the end. I'm still having some reconstructive surgery to take care of after effects of the prostate removal but, again, they are not a big deal and I'm fortunate to have a good health insurance plan at work so everything is covered.

    Lets just say that up until the last "reconstuctive surgery" a week ago, I really appreciated a good pad in my bike shorts. Seems that the fourth time on that type of surgery is the charm.

    FYI. I'm 61 now.

  11. #11
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    I lost my little brother to stage IV cancer a year ago. He was only 36. I miss him very much! We used to do everything together growing up. I wish he was a survivor...
    I love you, Henry!
    Danny Santacruz

  12. #12
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    Neuroblastoma when I was 2 months old. Pretty much disappeared by the time I was 3 or 4. I am now 32, married with 3 children. I know I am lucky and am thankful even though I can't really remember any of it, but I still get said knowing how many aren't that lucky. I guess all we can do is live our lives as best we can.

  13. #13
    the moon master
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    good thread. i lost my aunt to cancer about 5 years ago. my fiancee is a survivor, and kicking butt on her mountain and road bikes now...i'll see if she has anything to add. stay strong, folks.
    ridin in bmore

  14. #14
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    Yes, d_m_b's fiancee does have something to add

    Wow. This is a good thread, you all rock, thanks for starting it fullsailbiker!
    I was diagnosed at 21 with a softball-sized tumor called a primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Had chemo, surgery (got a kick ass scar), and radiation. Right after remission I was up for any challenge - I did the polar bear plunge a few years, took spontaneous road trips, performed in a burlesque show...haven't done any of that in a while though.
    I didn't start riding until years after remission. d_m_b is responsible for getting me hooked on mountain and road biking. I love going out riding just us or a big group. I am much more active overall than I ever was pre-cancer. I can't believe I'm almost at 7yrs remission!!
    Cyclelicious, you are especially bad ass considering you are riding while still going thru chemo! I love it!
    Fred-da-trog, I hope I am as lucky as your daughter, we will see.
    tjchad - sorry to be a downer, but cancer has only gotten more curable for certain age-groups. Survival rates for 15-35 yr olds have not improved in 30 yrs. Sucks, but a little awareness goes a long way. So support your charity of choice and keep kicking butt!!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by BottledZen
    Survival rates for 15-35 yr olds have not improved in 30 yrs. Sucks, but a little awareness goes a long way. So support your charity of choice and keep kicking butt!!
    I've heard the upper end of that scale extended to 40.

    Regardless, in light of that info, it really is awesome to see so many young adult survivors kicking @$$ and taking names.

  16. #16
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    Great topic. I just passed my 20 year anniversary since I was diagnosed with Hodgkins in 1991. I was 13 years old a that time. The chemo and radiaiton drained my energy so much I wasn't able to ride much during that time. I remember how bummed I felt when my scout troop took off for a Moab trip and I couldn't go. After 12 cycles of chemotherapy, a catheter in the chest and a month of radiation I was in remission. When I was a teenager it made me uncomfortable to talk about the whole experience but now I am open and grateful to have experienced what I did.

  17. #17
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    Okay, you guys are making me all misty eyed. Lot of freaking awesome stories on here. I'm really stoked at how this thread is going! Gonna go for a ride right now.

  18. #18
    since 4/10/2009
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    Here's how I kicked leukemia's @$$ last weekend.

    from TheGPSGeek on Vimeo.


  19. #19
    humber river advocate
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious
    I was diagnosed with stage 3 cancer exactly 1 year ago. I have not stopped riding and have not missed a day of work. DH all last summer, 2 vacation trips including Whiteface Mountain, NY, Mount Ste Anne Que ) Despite surgery, T&C chemo, radiation and all the terrible side effects I kept going.

    I am still receiving IV chemo until October this year so we are fitting in a trip to BC Okanagan in June between treatments

    Winters put a slight damper on riding here so I took lessons and learned to down hill ski. I will not stop doing the things I love. Or learn new things. My husband has been my greatest support. He's built up a new kick-arse DH bike for me .. can't wait to ride it.
    kicking a$$!!!


    broadcasting from
    "the vinyl basement"

    build trail!

  20. #20
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    April 2nd will be my four year anniversary of being diagnoised with stage 2 testicular cancer. I remember it well as we celebrated my daughter's first first brthday the previous day. Although I am now unable to have any more children I am grateful for what I have and I am riding harder and more often than ever.

  21. #21
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    Whew! you guys are making me well up a bit.....seriously! I am so sorry for your losses...especially the most recent ones.I lost my Pops to lung cancer in 96', an aunt in 06' cancer, grandmother to pancreatic cancer in 07', a good friend to Leukemia in 08', two aunts to pancreatic cancer this past summer, and two very dear friends diagnosed this past summer ........not to mention those stolen by car accidents and murder.

    I mean, I think about the economy and all the 'material' things that I am losing and then I read this and NateHawks recovery thread and reminded that things could be much, much worse and how blessed I am. The strength of you all is inspiring and prayerfully contagious! I am proud to share a common sport with the likes of you! It's time to get off my A$$ and live!

    You all and your family/support networks ROCK!!
    "Just remember, all bikes have front suspension once you put your hands on the handlebars!" - 1SPD

  22. #22
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    I celebrated my 11th year anniversary in December. My cancer was very survivable, but that's not what you think of when the Dr. first dx's you.

    Lost my right testi (sorry, still gives me stomache aches too), followed up with 4 months of external beam radiation...

    It's a one way ticket with no refunds kids, get out and do something with the gift of life

  23. #23
    Retro on Steroids
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    My friend had a rough year a couple back. In the spring he went down in front of me and broke his clavicle. Then he was diagnosed and did a few months of chemo and radiation, lost 30 lb. Getting back on the bike and starting to recover, he went down in front of me (again) and was unconscious on the road, needed 33 stitches to close the head wound (Yes he was wearing a helmet.).

    He can't put the weight back on, and the radiation pretty much destroyed his teeth so he looks kind of scary until he gets massive dentistry, but he rides a lot and with the reduced weight he is kicking my butt on the climbs.

    On the downhills, with his record of falling off, not so much.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by arkon11
    Awsome man, but lose the cross bike and stay on the Yeti!
    Funny you should mention the cross bike, I love that bike btw. It was given to me by a bunch of the guys in the cycling community here in Boise.
    About a year after my transplant I was dog-eyeing that bike at my LBS. I had it worked out with the boss (my wife) on how to pay for it and then out of the blue there were some new expenses and the money was gone. Later that week I was out on a ride with a team-mate and mentioned that I was a little bummed and would probably have to wait another year for CX or just use my mtn bike. He got on facebook and mentioned it to a bunch of cyclists, some on our team, some I had raced with in the past, some who I have always raced against, and four of them were unemployed. About a month later (my birthday) my buddy and I finish a ride and head down to the LBS "to pick up some parts." While we were there they pulled the bike off the rack and I was really kinda pissed seeing that it was being sold to someone else right in front of me. When he stopped in front of me and told me that he got it down for me I was confused and told him I wasn't going to be able to get it after all....he said, "Yes you are". My buddy, Rich, handed me the list of 18 names that put money in for my bike. No stopping the waterworks at that point, it was a fine day. I could hardly sleep that night thinking about it.
    So there you go, I'm keeping the cx bike, thank you very much. I rode it today 50 miles of a gravel and paved route through the mud, muck, snow, and a paved road with a stiff headwind. The trails are all closed out but no way I'm getting fat!
    Have fun.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fullsailbiker
    Funny you should mention the cross bike, I love that bike btw. It was given to me by a bunch of the guys in the cycling community here in Boise.
    About a year after my transplant I was dog-eyeing that bike at my LBS. I had it worked out with the boss (my wife) on how to pay for it and then out of the blue there were some new expenses and the money was gone. Later that week I was out on a ride with a team-mate and mentioned that I was a little bummed and would probably have to wait another year for CX or just use my mtn bike. He got on facebook and mentioned it to a bunch of cyclists, some on our team, some I had raced with in the past, some who I have always raced against, and four of them were unemployed. About a month later (my birthday) my buddy and I finish a ride and head down to the LBS "to pick up some parts." While we were there they pulled the bike off the rack and I was really kinda pissed seeing that it was being sold to someone else right in front of me. When he stopped in front of me and told me that he got it down for me I was confused and told him I wasn't going to be able to get it after all....he said, "Yes you are". My buddy, Rich, handed me the list of 18 names that put money in for my bike. No stopping the waterworks at that point, it was a fine day. I could hardly sleep that night thinking about it.
    So there you go, I'm keeping the cx bike, thank you very much. I rode it today 50 miles of a gravel and paved route through the mud, muck, snow, and a paved road with a stiff headwind. The trails are all closed out but no way I'm getting fat!
    Have fun.

    Awesome bunch of friends you have, there. I'd keep the bike, too.

  26. #26
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    Just found this thread. Great and inspirational stories...!
    Feb. 4th 2010 I was diagnosed with Stage 3 colon cancer. Wasn't something I was expecting at the time...
    Spent 8 days in the hospital and 6 months of chemo and so far so good. I'm a stay at home dad so couldn't really "quit" my job but alot of people in the community stepped up to help. You truly find the good in people.
    Tried my best to ride when I was up to it and it helped so much mentally. If anyone ever asks me how to cope, all I say is "keep moving , stay positive and don't lose your sense of humor".
    All these stories are inspirational and you're all heroes in my book!
    Check out my blog if you want to read my story...it's in my sig.

  27. #27
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    I'm very jealous of you folks who were able to ride (at least somewhat) throughout your treatment.

    My treatment erased my immune system every month for about 9 months. I MAYBE could go outside one or two days per cycle. And even then, I couldn't do much for most of that time. I couldn't even walk for the first few months. I think it was about a year after my diagnosis that I was able to get back on my bike...and only then just barely.

  28. #28
    ol'guy who says hi &waves
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fullsailbiker
    Funny you should mention the cross bike, I love that bike btw. It was given to me by a bunch of the guys in the cycling community here in Boise.........
    There, you went and did it, now, Fullsail, got me all teary eyed. My daughter had a similar experience with a great many of the the fine people right here at mtbr.com.

    The story is long, but if your bored or curious http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=490156

    The are links at the beginning are in chronological order.
    .

    I may not have the best of everything, but I have the best everything that matters.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by fred-da-trog
    There, you went and did it, now, Fullsail, got me all teary eyed. My daughter had a similar experience with a great many of the the fine people right here at mtbr.com.

    The story is long, but if your bored or curious http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=490156

    The are links at the beginning are in chronological order.
    I did read through most of it and it is a wonderful story. These kinds of stories makes me keep it all in perspective and not start complaining when health is not perfect when I see how others transplants were not a "easy" as mine. Thanks for sharing the cool story.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fullsailbiker
    I did read through most of it and it is a wonderful story. These kinds of stories makes me keep it all in perspective and not start complaining when health is not perfect when I see how others transplants were not a "easy" as mine. Thanks for sharing the cool story.
    In a weird way, I was lucky to have cancer... it totally changed the way I look at life now ....

  31. #31
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    Congrats to my fellow survivors!

    I was diagnosed at age 38 with a stage 3 colorectal disease with pretty extensive lymph node involvement - through me for a loop. Over the next six months I had surgery, 2 series of chemo, then chemo/radiation, then another chemo series. I ended the final chemo cycle pretty wasted after losing a third of my body weight. Close to the end of my treatment I was sitting getting a chemo bolus and they brought in this kid about 8 years old getting his first round. It really broke me up so I decided that moment to ride the Pan Mass challenge - about a 180 mile cancer fundraiser, in August. Problem was I was ending chemo in late May and was exhausted after walking 50 feet. Riding my bike turned out to be my route back. I started not being able to go more than a couple of minutes without resting but kept at it and ended up completing the Pan Mass - not fast, but with an unbelievable sense of gratitude and achievement crossing the end line.

    Part of that experience is with me every time I get on my bike. I ride only dirt now, much of it solo. I don't know if other people share the relationship and special feeling I have for riding, but for me my bike is my method of returning to health, to being alive. The sheer joy I find in riding contains a level of purity that never leaves, even when the sweat, cold, cramps or pain dominate.

    I am 47 now and feeling great. I will ride as long as I can walk.

  32. #32
    No known cure
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    I was diagnosed with testicular cancer the same time as Lance Armstrong, and traded my left nut for my life. I didn't win seven Tours, but did win two consecutive state Super D Titles four years later.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  33. #33
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    Just now finding this thread. Glad to see so many fellow survivors out there. I was diagnosed in Apr 07 with stage 4 Hodgkin's. 6 months of chemo, and was clear. Up until my 6 month scans. So, went in for a stem cell bone marrow transplant. Received my stem cells in Nov 08, and thankfully have been clear since. For me though, I wasn't able to ride at all. I've gained a bunch of weight, and just in the past 8 months or so have began getting my strength back. So, I'm trying my best to get back into riding, but with some other prior problems I've had with my knee and some nerve damage to my leg, it's just taking longer. Part of me feels guilty because I haven't tried harder to get back in shape and do something to give back, but I know I can't be too hard on myself. Knowing there's so many people out there in sort-of the same situation gives me hope that I can do it. Thanks everyone for sharing.

  34. #34
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    Life's too short to feel bad about how cancer has affected you personally.

    Everybody's experiences are so entirely unique that everybody has their own battles to fight.

    The after-effects of my fight were extremely similar in some ways to people who suffer traumatic brain injuries in accidents and stuff. That's most of what I've had to adapt to/come back from. I have some lasting mental deficits from it. My short term memory is shot. My concentration is horrible. I'm determined to finish my master's degree, but it's a real challenge because I need both short term memory and concentration. It used to be pretty easy for me, and now I'm having to adapt to all that.

    But then I was fortunate that I had very very few side-effects from chemotherapy. In 9 months of chemo, I had very very little nausea, no affect to my ability to taste things, only lost a little bit of hair (to the point that only my wife and myself really noticed it), and I functioned pretty well day-to-day. We have yet to learn about how the chemo may or may not have affected my reproductive system. My oncologist told me to wait 2yrs before I got tested. That's this year, so I'll find out soon enough. Probably toward the end of the year, though.

    In light of that, sometimes it makes me feel like I didn't even really go through it as rough as some folks...but then I'm reminded of the fact that for awhile, I couldn't even stand up. I had a Foley bag and I had to use a bedpan. It was messy.

  35. #35
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    Reading this thread has been bittersweet. I lost one of my brothers to AML in 2008. He would have been 45 on his next birthday.

    All of you survivors have my utmost respect and I'm proud of you. Keep on fighting and smiling, to the best of your ability!

    If anyone can put me in touch with bike rides for Leukemia research, please send a PM. Thank you.
    Just a Kitty cruisin' in the Rockies with her Pumpkin (TREK 820)

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTBkitty
    Reading this thread has been bittersweet. I lost one of my brothers to AML in 2008. He would have been 45 on his next birthday.

    All of you survivors have my utmost respect and I'm proud of you. Keep on fighting and smiling, to the best of your ability!

    If anyone can put me in touch with bike rides for Leukemia research, please send a PM. Thank you.
    PM sent.
    I did want to let anyone else that is interested know that the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society has been a real blessing to my wife and I and provided tons of information but also helped us out financially probably more than any other single entity, and we got a lot of help.

    The team in training is one of their biggest fund raisers and it appears that they have a good time.

    http://www.teamintraining.org/

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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTBkitty
    If anyone can put me in touch with bike rides for Leukemia research, please send a PM. Thank you.
    Definitely get in touch with the Team in Training folks. I'm planning on doing their Grand Canyon hike next year. I spoke with some folks there about doing some long distance mountain bike routes as part of their cycling events. It's on their radar, for sure, and I gave them a short list of some potential routes.

  38. #38
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    Not me, but a friend of mine (he posts on here as Heckled) beat leukemia. Here he is with his best buddy Jake:


  39. #39
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    Glad you survivors are doing well! Keep kicking cancer's butt!

    We lost my dad 4/16/10 to glioblastoma. He made it about 10 months after diagnosis. Man oh man do I hate cancer.

  40. #40
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    Fred, so glad to hear your daughter is doing well! I remember everything she went through.

  41. #41
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    Not me, but my 4 year old was diagnosed about this time last year with a Wilm's tumor on his kidney about the size of a softball. Removed kidney and 5 surgeries in the last year, radiation and chemo and he had a clean scan in December, but they found new lumps in early March.

    He just got back home yesterday from surgery on Monday to remove them. Early indications is that they are not a re-occurrence of cancer, but more likely a cysts on his spleen. They were able to save the spleen, which is awesome. We're going to get results on the second and third labs back in a few days.

    *fingers crossed*

    My wife has been keeping a blog, which is the link in my sig.

  42. #42
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    right on! very cool thread!
    - 1995 Giant ATX 870
    - 2011 Salsa El Mariachi XL
    - 2011 Kona Unit (singlespeed) XL

  43. #43
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    Not me, but my 4 year old was diagnosed about this time last year with a Wilm's tumor on his kidney about the size of a softball. Removed kidney and 5 surgeries in the last year, radiation and chemo and he had a clean scan in December, but they found new lumps in early March.

    He just got back home yesterday from surgery on Monday to remove them. Early indications is that they are not a re-occurrence of cancer, but more likely a cysts on his spleen. They were able to save the spleen, which is awesome. We're going to get results on the second and third labs back in a few days.

    *fingers crossed*

    My wife has been keeping a blog, which is the link in my sig.
    Fingers crossed for your boy. Hope the lab results come back with good news.

  44. #44
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    I am 38 and have been riding for 15 plus years. This was the year I was going to do some racing. I am very involved with my local club and run many events. With the snow this winter I was doing some XC skiing. After a long afternoon I had chest pains the next day. Scared I went to the ER and after some tests and a CAT scan I was diagnosed with Thymoma B3 / Thymic Carcinoma. A rare cancer. Occurance rate is .2 per 100,000 daignosed cancer cases. Had my chest cracked Feb 9th and the Thymus Gland and tumor removed. I jsut started radiation and chemo after that.

    I told myself I would ride within a month od the surgery and did. Most poeple don't understand the need to ride but I am sure we all do. A return to some sort of normalcy. I have a cool scar to add to the collection and outlook is good. They say I was stage 2. This particular cancer they usually do not find unitl it has invaded the lungs and major vessles around the heart. I count my blessings.

    To anyone reading this thread, if you do not feel right go get checked out. Weeks or months can make all the difference.

    Chris

  45. #45
    ballbuster
    Reputation: pimpbot's Avatar
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    Seriously!

    Quote Originally Posted by wmbarace
    I am 38 and have been riding for 15 plus years. This was the year I was going to do some racing. I am very involved with my local club and run many events. With the snow this winter I was doing some XC skiing. After a long afternoon I had chest pains the next day. Scared I went to the ER and after some tests and a CAT scan I was diagnosed with Thymoma B3 / Thymic Carcinoma. A rare cancer. Occurance rate is .2 per 100,000 daignosed cancer cases. Had my chest cracked Feb 9th and the Thymus Gland and tumor removed. I jsut started radiation and chemo after that.

    I told myself I would ride within a month od the surgery and did. Most poeple don't understand the need to ride but I am sure we all do. A return to some sort of normalcy. I have a cool scar to add to the collection and outlook is good. They say I was stage 2. This particular cancer they usually do not find unitl it has invaded the lungs and major vessles around the heart. I count my blessings.

    To anyone reading this thread, if you do not feel right go get checked out. Weeks or months can make all the difference.

    Chris
    My kid was complaining about stomach pain and back pain for months before they decided it was worth getting a CT scan. Good thing my kid was really good with language at the time, and was able to tell us where the owie was. Heh... he's been speaking in complete sentences by the time he was 2. Glad that paid off.

    My wife really pushed them for it, and they finally buckled. I mean, he had a big bump right under his rib cage before she brought him into the ER for tummy pains, which is when they finally figured it was worth a closer look. He had been getting little fevers and odd random headaches for months, but they dismissed it as just the way little kids are.

    Our oncologist told us it had probably been growing for six months before they found it. His tumor was really big... like the size of a softball, or small toy football. It had already burst, and wrapped itself around other organs and intestines. Luckily (if you can call it that), Wilms is the kind of cancer that doesn't spread to other organs very easily. The first surgeon opened him up, wussed out and didn't remove it. He thought it was too wrapped around other stuff, and would bleed too much. He was starting to crash, so they moved him to UCSF, one of the best cancer treatment centers in the country. Two weeks later, UCSF's surgeon removed it. He said it came out pretty easily once he figured out where it all went.

    Anyway, waiting for second and third opinions on his labs early next week for the lumps they removed on Monday.
    Last edited by pimpbot; 03-27-2011 at 07:58 PM.

  46. #46
    ol'guy who says hi &waves
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    on the subject of Get It Checked...

    My daughter's initial leukemia symtom was sore knees and a rash. Who'd a thunk?

    pimbot, continued prayers for Diego's total recovery.
    .

    I may not have the best of everything, but I have the best everything that matters.

  47. #47
    ballbuster
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    Quote Originally Posted by fred-da-trog
    My daughter's initial leukemia symtom was sore knees and a rash. Who'd a thunk?

    pimbot, continued prayers for Diego's total recovery.
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    Fingers crossed for your boy. Hope the lab results come back with good news.

    Thanks, Fred and Nate!

    If I'm at Sea Otter this year, it's because we got good news.

    September 15th, 2010:



    We just got him a WeeRide Balance bike. He loves it. He's duckwalking all around the house on it. He's not quite comfortable enough to balance and scoot on it, but he'll get there.

    March 26th, 2011:

    Last edited by pimpbot; 03-28-2011 at 10:47 PM.

  48. #48
    since 4/10/2009
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    wow, he's got his hair back and the tube's gone! he's filled out a bit since the fall, too. he's looking great.

  49. #49
    Double-metric mtb man
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    Thanks for the added inspiration, folks.

    I'm not a survivor, but I had a bit of a scare when I was younger. Had to have a cyst removed from the corner of my right eye that, thankfully, turned out to be benign.

    In '08 I lost a co-worker to colon cancer. That's a nasty one as it can hide for years. If you have a family history, a colonoscopy is a much better alternative to a casket...get checked out.

    Since my co-worker passed, I've been doing the Ride to Conquer Cancer up here. Great event, great people and a lot of yellow flags (survivors) out there pedalling to kick cancer's butt. Doing it again in 2011 (on a Knolly, if things go well).

    Cheers
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

    Moran? Let your opinion be free -> F88me

  50. #50
    ballbuster
    Reputation: pimpbot's Avatar
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    Yeah...

    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    wow, he's got his hair back and the tube's gone! he's filled out a bit since the fall, too. he's looking great.
    Oddly enough, he hasn't put on a lot of actual weight. I think he was like 28 pounds back then. Now he's a pretty consistent 31 pounds. He is way less bony all around.

  51. #51
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    My kid was complaining about stomach pain and back pain for months before they decided it was worth getting a CT scan. Good thing my kid was really good with language at the time, and was able to tell us where the owie was. Heh... he's been speaking in complete sentences by the time he was 2. Glad that paid off.

    My wife really pushed them for it, and they finally buckled. I mean, he had a big bump right under his rib cage before she brought him into the ER for tummy pains, which is when they finally figured it was worth a closer look. He had been getting little fevers and odd random headaches for months, but they dismissed it as just the way little kids are.

    Our oncologist told us it had probably been growing for six months before they found it. His tumor was really big... like the size of a softball, or small toy football. It had already burst, and wrapped itself around other organs and intestines. Luckily (if you can call it that), Wilms is the kind of cancer that doesn't spread to other organs very easily. The first surgeon opened him up, wussed out and didn't remove it. He thought it was too wrapped around other stuff, and would bleed too much. He was starting to crash, so they moved him to UCSF, one of the best cancer treatment centers in the country. Two weeks later, UCSF's surgeon removed it. He said it came out pretty easily once he figured out where it all went.

    Anyway, waiting for second and third opinions on his labs early next week for the lumps they removed on Monday.

    One thing that I have learned is patience. Waiting for test results, waiting for doctors appointments. I hope his labs come back with good news.

    CM

  52. #52
    mtbr member
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    Still playing.


  53. #53
    Cereal Killer
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    Good job!

    Awesome video, Fullsailbiker! I enjoyed that. Looks like a very fun trail to ride. I'll mark that on my list of trails to ride one day.

  54. #54
    since 4/10/2009
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    Nice vid. I like the use of the stills in sync with the drums.

  55. #55
    Tigard, Oregon
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    Thanks to everyone for sharing your stories, it means alot...
    2011 Salsa Mukluk / 2006 KTM 400 EXC

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