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  1. #1
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    Afraid to Lose the Passion

    Well I've been riding seriously for a little over a year now. I'm 34 and I've had mountain bikes in the past but never rode them as much as I have during this year (8 hours a week approx.). The "passion" has been in the forefront of my life this year. I read most of the mags religiously. I frequent this board daily. I night ride twice a week and ride both Saturday and Sunday 2 to 4 hours each. I buy bike gear and stuff from the net constantly. I visit bike shops weekly just to browse. I constantly think about tweaking my bike or the next ride coming up.

    OK, to the point. I just started thinking, "when will this all go away?" I am afraid that one day I will not "feel like" getting up in the morning to ride. (Before I started riding, I was one LAZY dude! )

    I want to ride into the twighlight of my life but I know that's not realistic. I want to ride well into my 50's and maybe beyond. I know plenty of people who have been riding for at least two decades and I applaude them. How do they do it? Will I be able to?

    Whats going to be the catalyst that ceases my ride? An accident? A tragedy? Will I just not want to ride anymore? Will it ever get boring?

    Do you guys/gals ever feel like this? Did you ever almost lose the passion? Have you ever lost the passion? Are you on the cusp of losing the passion?

    Sorry for the long rant. I know I should just shut up and ride... and I will! But can you really tell this is bothering me?

  2. #2
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    You're there. Live in the moment. Quit thinking.

  3. #3
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    Newsflash!

    Quote Originally Posted by SabbathU71
    ...I want to ride well into my 50's and maybe beyond...
    Newsflash! You are also going to die someday. So if you insist on worrying about something then how about that? Shut up and just ride. And I didn't start riding until I was 50.

  4. #4
    Perfecting my endos...
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    I can feel the same way. I seem to be one of those people with a new life goal every month. But as for mountain biking, I have a couple friends who are newly getting into it too and should provide me with the needed motivation to keep going. If I were on my own I don't know how long I would last to be honest.
    I do not know myself, and God forbid I should...

  5. #5
    Never worng!
    Reputation: Verewolf's Avatar
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    In the small town where I live there are several bikers 60 to 80 years old riding.
    My favorite is a woman about 75 who rides a red hybrid.
    She has a large yellow helmet that always cocked to one side and she sits with a slight lean to the right.

    When the weather is nice I see her chugging along on Main Street.
    An hour later if I'm driving up the road a few miles out of town I'll see her again.
    Still chugging along at the same pace she was going earlier.

    As long as I'm physically able I'll keep riding till I die.
    Hopefully they'll be able to cram my bike in the casket just in case I need it later.

  6. #6
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    Live the passion

    Don't think too far ahead on this one. You're enjoying your newly found life sport, take one day, week or month at time on this one. I also hate to sound like a self help book, but just eliminate the negative thoughts from your mind.and hang with the people who are also actively engaged in this and other sports. Life is short-Ride hard!

  7. #7
    A Guy Who is Going Places
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    Luckly for you and all of us, Mountain Biking is varied enough to fuel it's own fires. I got into the sport long, long ago, as a gangly, gawky kid on a Schwinn Sierra (ca. 1983) I save up fo this bike for what felt like ages, and used it to escape the doldrums of adolescent anxiety. I took a brief hiatus, but soon returned to the sport after a brief, frustrating affar with sailboats.

    I have raced mountain bikes, I've dabbled in Trials riding. I've done more than a few endurance events. Lately traveling and snapping pics have kept it all engaging and real for me.

    But int the end, it is the desire to get out and ride. Some sort of admixture of wanting to ride, and needing to ride.
    http://www.anthonysloan.com

    Isaiah 15:5

    There are many good bike companies out there, and I work for one of them.

  8. #8
    Bike to the Bone...
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    Hey Sabbath, you could be talking 'bout me! I was a fat lazy bastard... now I'm just a fat bastard

    Don't worry too much of this... just follow what you feel like. I've been riding for almost two years, and I'm always trying to learn stuff and read and talk and bla bla bla

    If you're worried about loosing the passion, I don't think there is a BIG, unmistakable sign, maybe there will be small things... just keep up with what you like, if you find that something comes up in your life that's more intresting, just follow it, or try to do both. But it's not something you have to do because you wrote it in stone a while ago.

  9. #9
    life is a barrel o'fun
    Reputation: Christine's Avatar
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    It's rough to think I'm about as fit and fast as I'll ever get. Sometimes that bums me out.

    But then I realize I *could* be faster and fitter etc.- anybody could if they're willing to train like maniacs and eat like birds. It's not worth it to me- I love food. Food tastes good. Riding is fun. Pushing oneself hard constantly isn't. If I gave up sugar I'd drop 50lbs immediately......but then what would be the point of life?!

    Everything in moderation. My goal is to keep in shape for riding. I enter races now and then as motivation to train harder, if only for a little while. Then it's back to regular fitness.

    Someday I hope to be one of those old folks riding around the neighborhood making the locals worry
    "We sat outside the dentist, tooting a horn on the guy's bike."-overheard in the Underground

  10. #10
    Yes, that's fonetic
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    I started riding/racing seriously when I was 30. I quit racing a few years ago, but still get excited the night before a ride (at least twice weekly 2 hr + rides). I'll be 46 in March.
    Maybe you need to find some new trails or some riding buddies with Passion.....

  11. #11
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    Don't PANIC ! !

    I started riding when I was 5.

    I'm now 63.

    Over the years, I have lost my passion at times, but I have always come back to bicycles....




    Why?

    I have asked myself that question many times.

    What is it about bikes that pulls me back and away from other sports and pursuits.. ??

    For me, it's all about the freedom. The very first time that I rode a bike I loved the speed, and the freedom. The feeling that I am my own master, that I can go anywhere I wish, as long as my legs and body hold out..

    The passion comes and goes, it's like ... sometimes it's white-hot, at other times its just a warmness, a comfortable warmness...a memory of good rides and good times.

    Don't let it worry you. Once you have tasted the passion, you can never forget it. It draws you back to it, again and again.

    The flame does'nt go out or go away. It's always there, and will pull you back like a moth if you let it.

    Sometimes the flame gets very low, but never goes out. It can suddenly flare up again and consume you, draw you back into the white heat of passion for riding. You never know what will trigger it off.

    A glimpse of another bike rider, a frame hanging in a shop window, a memory of a ride, a section of dirt track seen somewhere, a picture in a book...... so many little things can cause the small flame inside to suddenly burst into blazing life again...

    Don't sweat over it. Don't worry about it. Enjoy your riding, and take things as they come.

    The passion will always be there...................waiting for you.




    R.
    It is inevitable ...

  12. #12
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    Reputation: CDtofer's Avatar
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    I didnt want to take the training wheels off my bike...

    It was black and yellow and had a big banana seat. I was already 7 years old (I know late bloomer, leave me alone) and still afraid to fall. One day an older cousin came over and said that I was too old to have training wheels on my bike. He said that other kids would start to tease me, he said "what do you want to be a baby your whole life?" I said no but I was still scared, so my Dad suggested we take one off to start. I said OK but still didnt like the idea, I went inside to get a drink of water and when I came out they said, "you took too long, we got them both off!" I couldnt say anything and we went down to the empty parking lot at the end of the block. It was just of Gratiot road, about a half a mile north of 8 mile. There was an auto parts store across the street with painted sign on the whole side of the building; it was all yellow with a big set of red lips. There was only one old, brown car in the parking lot, which of course I managed to run into. My first fall came when I tried to turn to quickly and the bike went into a tight spiral because the training wheels were not there to keep the bike upright. The centrifugal force threw me right over the handle bars and I landed on my shoulder, ripped my shirt and scrapped the sh!t out of my back.

    My Dad and my cousin ran up to me expecting to have to console me but I was already up on my feet. I was already picking up my bike, the handle bars were twisted 90 degrees in relation to the front wheel. While my Dad checked out my back and kept asking if I was okay my cousin straightened everything back up, looked me in the eye and said "sure he is, get back on the bike." Suddenly a HUGE grin appeared on my face and I said "yeah, Im fine" and let me do it again or something. After that I got back and didnt fall anymore that night, I did of course hit that lone car again.

    When I got home my Mom went crazy over my scratched up back and my torn shirt, I told her it was nothing. The next day I went further away from home than I ever did. (But only on the sidewalk because she forbid to ride in the street) The next day I went even further and as soon as I left our block I rode right out into the street and did so every day thereafter. It was only then that I started to truly think for myself, take some risks on my own and forever stopped being a "mommas boy."

    That was 27 years ago. My bike brought me freedom, new friends and took me to places I had never been before. Most importantly it was the first time that I learned the only real thing to fear is being afraid to try. Over the years Ive rode a lot sometimes and a lot less others. I got my first car and rode less and then rode a LOT more after I got into an accident and couldnt afford to fix it (thanks Dad for not paying for it, I didnt appreciate it then, but I do now) Then I went to college and rode only to class, got lazy and drank way to much. I got fat, and then discovered a cool bike shop near to the Uni and suddenly I started saving to buy a new mountain bike. That was 11 years ago. It took a while but I lost the weight and after school I moved and rode all the time in the desert (still miss those Phoenix trails) I dont ride so much now, too much work and broken frame but Im building up a new one this winter. I plan to hit it again next year with gusto - trips to the Alps, maybe the World Cup course in Kaprun or possibly Garda (Im currently living in Prague) Who knows, maybe even Turkey?

    Dont think about now, go out and ride. If it’s in you, then it’s in you. It may diminish with time but it will never truly burn out, it will ebb and flow...if you have the passion now its not too likely you will let your self just forget about and let it go. It always comes back, sometimes its little itch and other times its a full frontal assault, but it always comes back...

    Go out and ride your bike, worry about it only when you cant anymore...

  13. #13
    Kilted Cyclist
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    I think about that every now and then. I was afraid that I am going to loose my passion for bikes and riding, but It has not happened yet.

    I have been riding for over 17 years and I still do not think I am loosing it. Although with family and work obligations, I am riding as much as I used to, I still tool around with my bikes in my spare time that I have. Even a 15 minutes bike ride keeps me sane.

    Don't worry about it much because biking had already made an impression in your life already. You can always reignite your passion if it ever goes out.

  14. #14
    I throw poo
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    When I was a kid, I rode. That's all I did, ride, ride, ride. It was my escape, the only freedom and control a small boy could have.

    Then I got lazy, started smoking and drinking, stopped riding.

    About a year and a half ago I started riding again, six months ago I quit smoking. I am in control of my life again. I think that this time I'll keep the passion.
    Dang it, now I'm running a coolness deficit for sure.

  15. #15
    That's gonna leave a mark
    Reputation: Upchuck's Avatar
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    Night rides, solo endurance events, group endurance events, local races, DH, XC, Singlespeed, Cyclocross, trials, group riding, solo riding, MTB trips/vacations, local clubs, festivals, building your own bike, helmet camera to make your own MTB movies...

    There's enough to do on two wheels to last a lifetime. Don't sweat it.
    Fat fanatic.

    "Where the Fox Hat?" Endurance Team
    SoCal Colavita Road/MTB club

  16. #16
    Your bike is incorrigible
    Reputation: Guyechka's Avatar
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    Training wheels? What's that? I was riding without them when I was four. Broke my parents' three speed cruiser when I was seven (I blame rust). Ride, ride, ride...until about eight years ago, when grad school happened. I quit completely. Moved around a lot and forgot all about bikes. Then, a year and a half ago I bought an old bike and started up again. Now I have three bikes, all the magazines, tons of gear laying all over the place.

    I think I felt like I was finished with bikes eight years ago. They just weren't that big a part of my life any longer. I was on to "bigger and better" things. But this last 18 months has proved the opposite is true. Once into biking, always into biking.

  17. #17
    Samsonite Tester
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    There are the years of upgradeitus to look foward too. The magazine habit feeds it.

    Ten years after kicking the upgradeitus and look at your nice collection. Go for a short ride on that days choice ride . Look back at those golden years over a cold one.

    Passion never leaves the mind . No worries ,just ride.


    Yeah I gotta question. You got any excuses tonight Roy ? -Antonio Tarver

    There is room for it all, just ride what you like to on what you like to...that's freeriding. -rbn14



  18. #18
    Belltown Brazer
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    I've been a "cyclist" for 30 years and a "mountain biker" for 20 years now.

    The passion has come and gone over the years. I've focused on other things for a while...paddling got a hold of me for a few years there.

    All the while i still rode though. Our whole social structure is family and riding friends.

    I found about 4 years ago (when I was paddling a lot) I was pretty ambivalent about riding. I was posing as a pseudo-freerider and tooling around on my tank of an FSR. I set up my old Yo Eddy as a rigid singlespeed. The passion for riding came back better than ever.

    A couple new bikes since then, a couple of children essentially eliminating paddling time, and I'm once again focused on the riding.

    Don't worry: it comes and goes. If you like it, you'll do it, if you don't you won't. No big deal really.

    B

  19. #19
    pedalphile
    Reputation: BontyRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SabbathU71
    Do you guys/gals ever feel like this? Did you ever almost lose the passion? Have you ever lost the passion? Are you on the cusp of losing the passion?
    My dime-store philosophy: Today it might be mountainbiking, next week it might be something else. If you're into something, immerse yourself as passionately as you can, and if one day your interests change, refocus your passion and don't look back. As long as you're passionate about *something*.

    Highly theoretical and idealistic, but I think it helps me not to worry about what'll happen if one day I stop riding because of force or choice. The passion is the most important thing; mountainbiking is just a vehicle.
    now the world is gone i'm just o n e

  20. #20
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    Silly humans

    Humans are the only animal that are capable of wanting to want something.

    What you are saying is that you want to keep wanting to ride. I've felt like that too.

    I've had my ups and downs in cycling. First I was into XC. then I got into trials, I have some spinal problems and slight nerve damage from 4 years of that. Now I'm more into dirt jumping and north shore type riding.

    Here's a little exercise for you.

    Imagine you have a white piece of paper and you colour in the left half in black. What you will end up with is two rectangles side by side. One black on the left one white on the right side. These two rectangles share a boundary where the black and white halves meet.

    Now try to imagine a boundary between these two areas. If you were able to put a little ant on the white side and told it to walk left and stop on the space between the black and the white you would find that no matter how small you make the ant or how tiny you make it's steps you would never be able to make the ant stand on that spot between the two. It will always either be on the white side or the black side. It can even straddle both sides, but never be in the middle.

    Still with me? What I'm trying to show is that the boundary between the two has no 'width', it is just a concept.

    The point of this whole analogy is that the black side is your past, you can never go into the past, everything there is eternally frozen. The white side is your future, you can try and project what might happen in the future, but you can never be really certain (especially when you look far into the future), everything there is uncertain.

    The only thing that you can experience is that line right in between. Since that line has no width it can't be grasped.

    The way to enjoy life to it's fullest is to always let yourself be in the middle. That place is called 'now.'
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  21. #21
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    I dont think there are many who DONT go through the "blahs" with cycling.

    So put down the bike for a bit and find something else to do. Have a rest. Everyone needs to rest. Personally, I relish that typical month off in February.

  22. #22
    011100000110111101101111
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    Do you guys/gals ever feel like this? Did you ever almost lose the passion? Have you ever lost the passion? Are you on the cusp of losing the passion?

    I'm only 23, so i'm probably a bit early to talk about really losing it, but i got the biking bug 6-7th grade... subscribed to the magazines and went riding with friends on weekends. There was span of about 3-4 years when I got my driver's license until about my 2rd or 3rd year of college when I wasn't really into riding anymore. I just got interested into other things, but I did get a new bike (a considerable upgrade from my older ones) in college and I think that sparked a new flame. fast forward to present, i saved up enough money and really really searched for a solid year for a new sweet bike (which i JUST got). I was on mtbr for hours at a time, reading Bike over and over again, posting photographs from magazines on my walls, learning new tricks on my bike... typical symptoms of addiction.

    so.. for me, taking a rest from biking and a new ride definitely helped me get back into it.
    the latter could be quite dangerous if you get "tired" easily.
    but honestly, it's hard to beat the bike addict hidden in you.
    an ass man always remains an ass man.

  23. #23
    me like bikes
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    i've lost it before

    I used to ride XC non stop when i was in 6th and 7th grade. I was really fast. I'm mean really fast i could run with the guys who were the best locally. People were amazed at the speed i had when i was such a young kid...i was a 7th grader who looked my like an older 5th grader. haha i was small. So i enter a race....a complete mud fest. No one came back with out saying they didn't get stuck in the mud once. I had to ride the whole race with my v brakes undone. well i was in first in my class. a kid from my school was in second. We had big leads. When we finished the race every one else in our class All 7 of them had come back with their bikes spotless. I even had a kid who was riding in our pack give up and say he could take it so he turned off the course...but he had the nerve to go through the finish line. I was soo mad that everyone in our class had cheated. one of the kids dad was accused of cheating too casue they came back together with spotless bikes. it made me so mad i didn't ride a bike for a couple years. i took all my money i had saved up for my kona and bought a dirtbike. i'm a junior in high school now and i just got back into biking. now if someone cheats i'll just knock their lights out. i know wrong of me, but hey...u cheat you pay.

  24. #24
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    You will get burnt-out that's not a bad thing and it happens to everyone, but bikes will always be there for you. I raced as a Junior from the time I was 12, xc, cx, road, crits I did it all. I was fast and raced for a few teams and made great friends. I rode and raced like clockwork until I got a car, then I took a two year break for life. I am 18 now in my first year of college and I am so happy I didn't sell all my bikes for Camaro parts over the last couple years. I got rid of the car, started commuting, got back into recreational riding, and now I am magically getting faster again (don't know how that happened). I even started hanging out at the local races again, the majority of the people are still around and are still amazing.

    The point is that the scene is always going to be here. The bikes, the freedom, the people, they aren't going away. If you want to come back after a future decline in passion (and everyone does) the bike will still be here.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
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    I actually have the opposite problem. I am concerned that my passions (biking and skiing) are a little obsessive. I don't ever seem to have enough of either. On the other hand I have a challenging day job and I generally get to ride/ski in the weekend only. No wonder I need more.
    My rides:
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    KHS CX 550 cyclocross

  26. #26
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    Great post! I think that sums it up.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rainman
    I started riding when I was 5.

    I'm now 63.

    Over the years, I have lost my passion at times, but I have always come back to bicycles....




    Why?

    I have asked myself that question many times.

    What is it about bikes that pulls me back and away from other sports and pursuits.. ??

    For me, it's all about the freedom. The very first time that I rode a bike I loved the speed, and the freedom. The feeling that I am my own master, that I can go anywhere I wish, as long as my legs and body hold out..

    The passion comes and goes, it's like ... sometimes it's white-hot, at other times its just a warmness, a comfortable warmness...a memory of good rides and good times.

    Don't let it worry you. Once you have tasted the passion, you can never forget it. It draws you back to it, again and again.

    The flame does'nt go out or go away. It's always there, and will pull you back like a moth if you let it.

    Sometimes the flame gets very low, but never goes out. It can suddenly flare up again and consume you, draw you back into the white heat of passion for riding. You never know what will trigger it off.

    A glimpse of another bike rider, a frame hanging in a shop window, a memory of a ride, a section of dirt track seen somewhere, a picture in a book...... so many little things can cause the small flame inside to suddenly burst into blazing life again...

    Don't sweat over it. Don't worry about it. Enjoy your riding, and take things as they come.

    The passion will always be there...................waiting for you.




    R.

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