2020 Switchblade ride reports- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    2020 Switchblade ride reports

    I'm in the market for a new bike and want to know how the new Switchblade rides. Any owners out there?

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    2020 SW report

    I've owned 3 pivots all medium with team level builds or more

    The original trail 429 (27.5+)
    Mach 5.5
    2020 switchblade (29)
    Sw riding style, agressive

    Initial reports, the switchblade is the poppyness that I missed from the 429 with amazing descending where the 5.5 seemed to get hung up frequently.

    The back end is proper on the switchblade. it pedals extremely well over chunk and technical climbs and it descends very planted without getting overwhelmed with repeated hits. You feel input from the trail in a positive way.

  3. #3
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    I owned the original Switchblade, now I'm on the new current Switchblade.

    When I first demo'd the original Switchblade 4 years ago, within the first 30 seconds I said out loud, "I love this bike, I've got to own this bike", even when I swapped wheel sizes, I said the same thing. I bought it in 27.5+ and owned it for over 2 years (which is a long time for me, since I work for PIVOT). I then bought the Mach 5.5, which I was hoping since I loved the 27.5+ wheels on the Switchblade, that I would like this bike equally. I did not, though I really enjoyed the 5.5, it didn't feel as planted as the Switchblade did. When the Mach 4 SL came out, I decided to get that bike in FOX LIVE, as I wanted to see how that platform felt. I built that bike up rather heavy duty, I wanted to run 2.4 wide trail tires on that bike. I loved it, I quickly PR'd many of the climbs around here on South Mountain. I planned on keeping that bike for a year or so.

    Two weeks ago, during a company ride, I decided to demo the Switchblade. In my mind I was going to wait until early summer to sell the Mach 4. The moment I got on the Switchblade - this time in 29 - I had that same familiar feeling I had from the original. The amazing thing to me was after the ride, my Strava informed me that I had 9 PR's! I wasn't even trying to beat anything. Since this was a company ride, and we were the "B" group, I didn't expect to have any PR's. Surprisingly many of the PR's were on climbs. The route we took is one I've ridden 3 or 4 dozen times too. I've ridden that trail for 11 years, and taken every PIVOT I've owned on it. So, I'm familiar with the trail, and though I felt good, I didn't feel that I was crushing my former times.

    I went home, and told my wife that, "I accidentally tested the Switchblade", that next morning I cleaned my Mach 4 and listed it for sale... She knows it wasn't an accident, but it made it easier to let her know I was about to spend some money...

    I built it up last Friday, and went on my first ride Saturday. My second ride was a night ride, and this afternoon will be my 3rd. It is an amazing bike, so planted, so much traction on climbs too. It is very playful, I find myself popping off rocks and drops more than usual. I'm on a size large, I'm 6'1" and have only made small adjustments to saddle position to make the bike fit. The suggested settings from the suspension guide feel spot on too. Best bike I've owned, EVER!

    Again, I find myself thinking and dreaming so much about my Switchblade, that I wonder if my Switchblade thinks and dreams about me...
    "The face of a child can say it all, especially the mouth part of the face".
    Jack Handy

  4. #4
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    First ride today on fairly tame trails in Southern OH. I felt right at home on it from the start. My first impression was it's super playful, corners like a slot car and begs to let off the brakes to go faster descending.
    It pedals better on the flat trails and is equal in climbing ability as compared to Yeti SB 130. The Pivot has an advantage on climbing in rooty and chucking sections. The suspension just absorbs everything without sucking your power away.

    Only issue is that I've come to the conclusion that Fox Transfer posts don't like cold weather. It was sticky going up in the morning but improved as it warmed up outside.

    Real test is coming in three weeks riding a week in Sedona/Prescott/Phoenix.

    Thanks,
    EDventure

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    Quote Originally Posted by edbraunbeck View Post
    Only issue is that I've come to the conclusion that Fox Transfer posts don't like cold weather. It was sticky going up in the morning but improved as it warmed up outside.
    I ride around freezing temperatures over here and never had issue with the Fox Transfer. Especially if it's new. Usually they will need a service after 1 1/2 years or so to run smooth again.
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  6. #6
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    Rode it on a demo about a month ago and got 50 miles on one last week in Phoenix. If I hadn't just bought a 5.5, I'd be in this bike. My take is much like the above. Lots of miles at SOMO and some at Hawes. Climbs phenomenally well and descends like a beast. takes the corners well too for a slacker bike. I am slow so it wanders just a bit on the steep climbs but it is certainly livable. I feel like my 5.5 corners just a bit better, but that isn't a knock against the Switchblade.
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    I know its not really apples to apples but can anyone compare the climbing efficiency of the Trail 429 to the new SB. Really had my sights on the Trail 429, demoed one last year, really liked it, solid pedaling platform. Great for my midwest area.

    But this new SB has really piqued my interest. Really like the the looks of the updated geo, and new shock tune. The engineering and tech is getting so good. Wondering if this can be my one "do it all" bike? Because as of now a hardtail is my one "do it all" bike. Hope to find a demo in the near future.

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    Quote Originally Posted by makpak42 View Post
    I know its not really apples to apples but can anyone compare the climbing efficiency of the Trail 429 to the new SB. Really had my sights on the Trail 429, demoed one last year, really liked it, solid pedaling platform. Great for my midwest area.

    But this new SB has really piqued my interest. Really like the the looks of the updated geo, and new shock tune. The engineering and tech is getting so good. Wondering if this can be my one "do it all" bike? Because as of now a hardtail is my one "do it all" bike. Hope to find a demo in the near future.
    I previously owned a 2018 Mach 429 Trail, and have demoed the Trail 429 a few times as well. I now own the 2020 Switchblade, and continue to be blown away by this bike. The pedaling efficiency when you are putting the power down is insanely good. I am regularly getting PRs on technical trails I've ridden many times with this bike, and not just descents. The suspension feels plusher and on a parking lot ride makes you think the bike will be less efficient on the trail, but I can assure you that is not the case. The DPX2 tune is amazing - plush and yet supportive. The middle position is great for a slightly poppier/firmer feel while retaining small bump compliance, and the open mode is amazing for technical stuff.

    I also have the Mach 4 SL as an XC race bike, so personally, if I could only have one MTB, it would still be the Trail 429. But if you already have a hardtail for smoother rides/races, I would not hesitate to get the new SB. It's that good.

    One more note - I'm riding in the HIGH flip chip position for techy New England trails, which really increases the versatility of this bike. I'd throw it to LOW for trips to the bike park or a trip out West.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Full Send View Post
    I previously owned a 2018 Mach 429 Trail, and have demoed the Trail 429 a few times as well. I now own the 2020 Switchblade, and continue to be blown away by this bike. The pedaling efficiency when you are putting the power down is insanely good. I am regularly getting PRs on technical trails I've ridden many times with this bike, and not just descents. The suspension feels plusher and on a parking lot ride makes you think the bike will be less efficient on the trail, but I can assure you that is not the case. The DPX2 tune is amazing - plush and yet supportive. The middle position is great for a slightly poppier/firmer feel while retaining small bump compliance, and the open mode is amazing for technical stuff.

    I also have the Mach 4 SL as an XC race bike, so personally, if I could only have one MTB, it would still be the Trail 429. But if you already have a hardtail for smoother rides/races, I would not hesitate to get the new SB. It's that good.

    One more note - I'm riding in the HIGH flip chip position for techy New England trails, which really increases the versatility of this bike. I'd throw it to LOW for trips to the bike park or a trip out West.
    Thanks for the detailed response. You mentioned a lot of things that really stood out to me. Like the efficiency when putting power down. Although i'm not a racer, I don't consider myself a casual trail rider either. I do like some speed and maybe a little air under the wheels. Also your familiarity with Pivot/DW suspension gives me a good reference the SB's efficiency.

    I feel the geo is a good fit for my riding trails, probably similar to yours... rocky, rooty, tighter areas, shorter ups and downs. Its a modern, progressive geo but not extreme. So easy to get caught up in the long, low, super slack, super steep trend. I'm sure it is beneficial to certain areas, just don't think it would be for me. Super excited to get out on a demo.

    Thanks again for your insight.
    Cheers

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    Quote Originally Posted by Full Send View Post
    I previously owned a 2018 Mach 429 Trail, and have demoed the Trail 429 a few times as well. I now own the 2020 Switchblade, and continue to be blown away by this bike. The pedaling efficiency when you are putting the power down is insanely good. I am regularly getting PRs on technical trails I've ridden many times with this bike, and not just descents. The suspension feels plusher and on a parking lot ride makes you think the bike will be less efficient on the trail, but I can assure you that is not the case. The DPX2 tune is amazing - plush and yet supportive. The middle position is great for a slightly poppier/firmer feel while retaining small bump compliance, and the open mode is amazing for technical stuff.

    I also have the Mach 4 SL as an XC race bike, so personally, if I could only have one MTB, it would still be the Trail 429. But if you already have a hardtail for smoother rides/races, I would not hesitate to get the new SB. It's that good.

    One more note - I'm riding in the HIGH flip chip position for techy New England trails, which really increases the versatility of this bike. I'd throw it to LOW for trips to the bike park or a trip out West.
    Good response!

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    Quote Originally Posted by makpak42 View Post
    Thanks for the detailed response. You mentioned a lot of things that really stood out to me. Like the efficiency when putting power down. Although i'm not a racer, I don't consider myself a casual trail rider either. I do like some speed and maybe a little air under the wheels. Also your familiarity with Pivot/DW suspension gives me a good reference the SB's efficiency.

    I feel the geo is a good fit for my riding trails, probably similar to yours... rocky, rooty, tighter areas, shorter ups and downs. Its a modern, progressive geo but not extreme. So easy to get caught up in the long, low, super slack, super steep trend. I'm sure it is beneficial to certain areas, just don't think it would be for me. Super excited to get out on a demo.

    Thanks again for your insight.
    Cheers
    Yeah I think it's definitely easy these days to purchase a bike that goes too far in terms of "modern" geometry for riding in certain areas with slower, up/down technical trails. The Switchblade (at least in the HIGH position) is really really good in this stuff - better than I thought it would be. The steep(ish) seat angle helps you grind up the steep climbs - in fact, I have regularly been making it up tough climbs that my brain says "nope"... just keep pedaling and the bike finds traction out of nowhere and keeps going. One of the major differences I find between it and the Trail 429 is that the rear suspension has a notably plusher feel (makes sense with about an inch more rear travel). The Trail 429 to me feels like a solid, beefed-up, capable XC bike in how it rides - it encourages you to stand up and sprint and the platform is incredible. The SB "feels" softer, and on a gradual climb may not encourage standing and hammering (partly due to the 160mm fork), but in reality it is not slower, at least on anything remotely technical. Also, I've found that the third (firmest) position of the DPX2 still has enough compliance that you can use it in this setting for hammering on a smoother trail if you want. Much more usable than the third position on a DPS, for example, which is fully locked out and only useful on road or gravel.

    The last thing, and the real reason I got the SB instead of the Trail 429, is that the capability on bigger drops is much better (I was bottoming my Trail on some of the bigger drops we have here), while the weight is essentially the same, build-for-build. When I demoed the Trail 429, I was surprised that the weight was 29+lbs with carbon rims and XC tires! My Switchblade is about 30 lbs with a 175mm dropper and 970g trail tires.

    Hope this helps. Summary - smoother trails and/or hammering out of the saddle like an XC racer = Trail 429. Rougher trails and/or bigger drops/steeps = SB.

  12. #12
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    I never took the SB off the open position when I rented and it just stuck to the trail when climbing. My 5.5 is much the same. The platform of this particular iteration of the dw link is just phenomenal IMO. I am just so impressed with how these Pivots climb. I am regularly cleaning stuff I could never make it up before (now it's about finding the right gear) I pretty much know the bike will climb it if I do my part.

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    Full Send - The info you provided has been very helpful. Nice to hear some real world user feedback. Sounds like you have really been exploring the capabilities of this bike. I never considered the Switchblade before, just seemed like more travel than I needed. Came across some reviews of the new Swithchblade and that's what got me rethinking the Trail 429.

    The engineering and tech is getting so good now. That extra bit of travel comes at little cost to peddle efficiency. I like the sound of that 3rd position on the shock. That's the kind of details you don't get from standard reviews. That would work great for some tamer trails in my area.

    I also think you bring up a good point about the weight, comparing the Switchblade to the Trail 429. Again all that extra capability comes at little to no cost in performance. Sounds like a win win to me.

    With the, costs of bikes today i can only afford to have one, do it all, kick ass bike. One that can cover a variety of terrain wherever my trail riding may take me. This new Switchblade is looking more and more like "the one".

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    Quote Originally Posted by SoDakSooner View Post
    I never took the SB off the open position when I rented and it just stuck to the trail when climbing. My 5.5 is much the same. The platform of this particular iteration of the dw link is just phenomenal IMO. I am just so impressed with how these Pivots climb. I am regularly cleaning stuff I could never make it up before (now it's about finding the right gear) I pretty much know the bike will climb it if I do my part.
    Watched a Youtube video of the Loam Wolf interviewing Chris Cocalis talking about the new Switchblade. Maybe you've seen it? Anyway he talks about working with Fox to revamp the Dpx2 shock specifically for the switchblade. Listening to him explain it supports what you're saying about it. Good stuff

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=flIj2aOKdnE

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    Quote Originally Posted by makpak42 View Post
    Watched a Youtube video of the Loam Wolf interviewing Chris Cocalis talking about the new Switchblade. Maybe you've seen it? Anyway he talks about working with Fox to revamp the Dpx2 shock specifically for the switchblade. Listening to him explain it supports what you're saying about it. Good stuff

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=flIj2aOKdnE
    I had a standard DPX2 on my Mach 429 Trail, and liked it, but I agree the hard work that Chris did with Fox on the Switchblade-specific DPX2 design paid off.

    Makpak - don't mean to talk you out of the Trail 429, as it really is an amazing bike. I'd say demo both on the same trails if you can and make your choice based on which fits your style and needs the best. They have similarities, but different feels for sure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Full Send View Post

    Makpak - don't mean to talk you out of the Trail 429, as it really is an amazing bike. I'd say demo both on the same trails if you can and make your choice based on which fits your style and needs the best. They have similarities, but different feels for sure.
    Yeah, that's sound advice. You've provided some good input about the Switchblade. It's been about a year since demoing the 429. It would be good to demo both closer together for a better comparison. Unfortunately the state lock down due to this pandemic is slowing the process. But as long as we can all get through this with our health, that's all that really matters. And at least the trails are still open!!

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    Iím a FB29 owner, and love this bike. Demoed the Sb2 over the weekend:

    Quality and finish is second to none. I think Pivot and Santa Cruz are the best youíre going to get. I love the chain protection, the cable ports, the finish. All 10/10.

    Climbing: climbing up fireroads, on road it climbs like a 140mm travel bike, nothing special. Not nearlt as efficient as my intense primer mk1. MaxxGrip 2.5 tyres probably have something to do with this mind! Once you get it in technical climbs it excels. Doesníf get hung up at all. Only bike Iíve ridden which climbs nearly as well is the evil offering and Iíd say the switchblade is better due to a steeper seat angle at my saddle height.

    Descending: Initially I was a little disappointed. It was quick but not that quick (bear in mind I ride a FB29!). The shock tune is very very progressive. I set sag correctly yet I could not use anywhere near full travel even on sizeable drops. I would be taking volume spacers out I think. However its a very stiff frame and feels great, no baggy flex here like the Sb130. I thought it would suit me well with an offset bushing and a -1 anglesst to slacken it out a bit and drop the BB but it wasnít my bikes. The I had an Ideas...

    Tried mulleting a bike for the first time. Stuck a 27.5x2.35 wheel in the rear. WOW, what a difference. Seat angle is steep enough to just slam saddle forward and get away with it. Makes the bike come alive. Much more confident - Ha measured 65, BB dropped to 425mm (so maybe better run in high mode).

    Its number one on my Ďbuy list nowí!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by richt2000 View Post
    The shock tune is very very progressive. I set sag correctly yet I could not use anywhere near full travel even on sizeable drops. I would be taking volume spacers out I think.
    This is an astute observation.

    We ship the bike stock with a 0.6 volume spacer in the air can, because we knew a lot of people would be using this bike not just for trail riding, but also for enduro racing; and we wanted to make sure the shock would offer enough support for that.

    If it's mostly a trail bike for you (as mine is for me), you can swap that out for a 0.4, a 0.2 or no spacer at all. I tried mine a few different ways and found that a 0.4 was my sweet spot.

    Spacers are pretty cheap and easy to install, so I encourage everyone to do some tinkering!

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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    This is an astute observation.

    We ship the bike stock with a 0.6 volume spacer in the air can, because we knew a lot of people would be using this bike not just for trail riding, but also for enduro racing; and we wanted to make sure the shock would offer enough support for that.

    If it's mostly a trail bike for you (as mine is for me), you can swap that out for a 0.4, a 0.2 or no spacer at all. I tried mine a few different ways and found that a 0.4 was my sweet spot.

    Spacers are pretty cheap and easy to install, so I encourage everyone to do some tinkering!

    JP
    Hi John,
    Ha ha, I'm the biggest tinkerer there is.
    I've tested and owned enough bikes to know if/how I can ride right for me!

    Dis you test with a 51mm offset fork? Be interesting to see how it handles.

    Great bike. And I love the fact you've got a steep actual seat angle now. Fhats my only negative of the fb19.

    Great bike. Likely will own one soon!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ineedmorecowbell View Post
    I'm in the market for a new bike and want to know how the new Switchblade rides. Any owners out there?

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    I've got about four hours of riding on the new switchblade, the xt build. I rented a demo at the LBS.

    I almost immediately realized it climbed alot better than my old bike. Unfortunately I wore my ass out after about four hours of climbing and didn't have time to get too rowdy on a jump or flow line, just rode rocky chunder all day which it handled exceptionally well.

    I placed my order today for a team xtr build. The wheels on the xt build left alot to be desired and were awfully heavy, so i'm glad the team build comes with i9 and reynolds carbon.

    I'm coming from a 2018 santa cruz hightower lt xx1 build with a 160mm front fork, and x2 rear shock and santa cruz reserve wheels with i9 hubs, weighing around 30lbs.

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    Does anyone know which I9 hub comes on the carbon wheel upgrade?

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    I was in the same boat. I was on a 2018 mach 6. Sold that and went to my local shop and put a down payment to order the 429 trail LE. I started looking at the switchblade that they had on the floor and the blue color was just too dam awesome. Owners said it was their demo bike and told me to take it for a few days to ride , because the switchblade is just that good. The next day I got to the trail and right away I was blown away at how dam good the thing climbed. It just wants to go , and go fast. ( I was on the Large xt/xtr build ) Then I pointed it downhill and it was just incredible. Much different than my mach 6, in a good way. It was super poppy and felt great on the DH.
    I got to the bottom and felt like a kid on xmas. I called the shop later that day and told them cancel my 429 order, and I bought the SB. Best bike I have owned by far, the way it climbs over anything and decends just as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrSocko View Post
    I was in the same boat. I was on a 2018 mach 6. Sold that and went to my local shop and put a down payment to order the 429 trail LE. I started looking at the switchblade that they had on the floor and the blue color was just too dam awesome. Owners said it was their demo bike and told me to take it for a few days to ride , because the switchblade is just that good. The next day I got to the trail and right away I was blown away at how dam good the thing climbed. It just wants to go , and go fast. ( I was on the Large xt/xtr build ) Then I pointed it downhill and it was just incredible. Much different than my mach 6, in a good way. It was super poppy and felt great on the DH.
    I got to the bottom and felt like a kid on xmas. I called the shop later that day and told them cancel my 429 order, and I bought the SB. Best bike I have owned by far, the way it climbs over anything and decends just as well.
    Ha, yeah, you really need to ride this bike to believe how good it is. I took a demo SB out on my local trails after three years on a Mach 429 Trail, and let the shop know the next day to order one up for me.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by rushman3 View Post
    Does anyone know which I9 hub comes on the carbon wheel upgrade?
    Hydras.

    FYI,
    JP
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    Quote Originally Posted by richt2000 View Post
    Dis you test with a 51mm offset fork? Be interesting to see how it handles.
    I'm not 100% certain whether it was tested with a 51mm, but given our absolutely obsessive testing protocols, I imagine it was at some point. For example, I know we went through more than 10 rear shock iterations before we settled on the current format (which has all custom internals, by the way; it's not just a particular tune).

    Theoretically, with the wheel a little further out in front of you, it'll feel 'safer' on super steep roll-ins. The trade-off is that it's more likely to feel a little less stable/predictable with that wheel so far out in front of you (it's hard to get your weight over it), and the reduced mechanical will make the front wheel feel a little more likely to 'flop' over if you're not careful.

    FYI,
    JP
    Last edited by John P.; 04-08-2020 at 08:04 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    Hydras.

    FYI,
    JP
    @John P.
    Any idea if orders placed today will ship with the new fox forks?

    Lbs told me Iím looking at maybe the end of the month for a large green team xtr.

    Thanks for being available.

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    John P. Thanks...Hydra's was answer I wanted to hear....nice upgrade for $1,300

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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    I'm not 100% certain whether it was tested with a 51mm, but given our absolutely obsessive testing protocols, I imagine it was at some point. For example, I know we went through more than 10 rear shock iterations before we settled on the current format (which has all custom internals, by the way; it's not just a particular tune).

    Anyway, I imagine the increased mechanical trail associated with 51mm offset will give the bike more stability at speed, but it will come at the expense of being less precise when going slower. Effectively, it'll be like slacking the bike out a hair, even though the actual head angle does not change.

    FYI,
    JP
    Isnít it the reverse? Doesnít 44mm offset have more trail than 51mm offset and provide more stability at speed? So 51mm offset gives quicker steerer compared to 44mm?

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmm1985 View Post
    @John P.
    Any idea if orders placed today will ship with the new fox forks?

    Lbs told me Iím looking at maybe the end of the month for a large green team xtr.

    Thanks for being available.
    Not sure; we don't have an exact delivery date from Fox. If this is a necessity for you, you may want to hold off on that order until sometime later.

    The very good news is that the 2020 36 is still more fork than 99% of us can handle, so either way you're in good shape.

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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by cesjr View Post
    Isnít it the reverse? Doesnít 44mm offset have more trail than 51mm offset and provide more stability at speed? So 51mm offset gives quicker steerer compared to 44mm?
    Ugh. You're right. I have quarantine brain going on over here. I'll update my post.

    Thanks for catching that.

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    2020 Switchblade ride reports

    So, I got a good deal on a demo. Iím a tweener, 5í11Ē with a 35in inseam. I bought a large. My V1 SB had a 160mm fork, no spacer. Because of the extra fork travel, reach was slightly shortened. I am running a 32mm stem on both bikes. At first I was disappointed with the ride of V2. After some tweaking, it felt much better and it truly felt like a Pivot.

    Fit - V1. This is personal and I have freaky proportions. A shorter reach on the large would be nice. I run a shite load of post and Iím heavy which is why Iím not on the medium.

    Poppiness/fun - V1. Shorter CS and feels more slack.

    Acceleration - V2.

    Climbing - V2. Longer CS. Slightly more efficient suspension. Steeper STA. V1 likes to wander.

    Trail efficiency - V2. Once again slightly more efficient suspension. Also more aggressive position second to longer reach.

    Slow speed handling - V2? Iím trying to adjust to the different geo.

    High speed handling - V1? But then again Iím not used to the bike.

    Reasons I like the SB over the Ripmo. Donít get me wrong - I wouldnít kick a Ripmo out of bed.
    1. Bearings. I donít like bushings.
    2. 157 hub. Iím a Clyde and I have noticed the lack of need for retensioning.
    3. Finish
    4. Stiffness
    5. PF BB is an nonissue for me.

    V2 is 31lb. Heaviest trail bike Iíve had in a long time. My V1 was lighter, but was weighed with lighter tires and a shorter dropper. But I cracked many frames, alloy and carbon, including a Following I fell on. I donít worry about this beast.

    Is it worth the upgrade? Eh... V1 was the best bike I ever owned. V2 is a better all day machine but seems to lost some soul. But V2 climbs so much more easily which out weighs V1ís slight edge in fun factor with the 160 fork. BTW, I donít crush double blacks, but do ride a lot of chunk.


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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrDon View Post
    So, I got a good deal on a demo. Iím a tweener, 5í11Ē with a 35in inseam. I bought a large. My V1 SB had a 160mm fork, no spacer. Because of the extra fork travel, reach was slightly shortened. I am running a 32mm stem on both bikes. At first I was disappointed with the ride of V2. After some tweaking, it felt much better and it truly felt like a Pivot.

    Fit - V1. This is personal and I have freaky proportions. A shorter reach on the large would be nice. I run a shite load of post and Iím heavy which is why Iím not on the medium.

    Poppiness/fun - V1. Shorter CS and feels more slack.

    Acceleration - V2.

    Climbing - V2. Longer CS. Slightly more efficient suspension. Steeper STA. V1 likes to wander.

    Trail efficiency - V2. Once again slightly more efficient suspension. Also more aggressive position second to longer reach.

    Slow speed handling - V2? Iím trying to adjust to the different geo.

    High speed handling - V1? But then again Iím not used to the bike.

    Reasons I like the SB over the Ripmo. Donít get me wrong - I wouldnít kick a Ripmo out of bed.
    1. Bearings. I donít like bushings.
    2. 157 hub. Iím a Clyde and I have noticed the lack of need for retensioning.
    3. Finish
    4. Stiffness
    5. PF BB is an nonissue for me.

    V2 is 31lb. Heaviest trail bike Iíve had in a long time. My V1 was lighter, but was weighed with lighter tires and a shorter dropper. But I cracked many frames, alloy and carbon, including a Following I fell on. I donít worry about this beast.

    Is it worth the upgrade? Eh... V1 was the best bike I ever owned. V2 is a better all day machine but seems to lost some soul. But V2 climbs so much more easily which out weighs V1ís slight edge in fun factor with the 160 fork. BTW, I donít crush double blacks, but do ride a lot of chunk.


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    what build is your demo? I canít find any published weights for the team xtr in large.

    nice write up!

  33. #33
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    2020 Switchblade Demo Review- hopefully this helps any prospective buyers out there.
    Iím looking for my next bike to change from my first gen carbon switchblade to see if there is something better for my needs. I love my SB but looking for something to handle the rough stuff a bit better and not loose much if anything everywhere else. Iíve been itching to do some local enduros so that is helping steer my direction. My SB is set up as 29 with carbon wheels, extended 160 factory fork and 17mm extended cup for pedal clearance (170 cranks too), factory DPS shock, Assegai front & Dissector rear tires. My home trails are on South Mountain down the street from Pivot HQ. National is my favorite trail by far, and I usually spend my Saturdays on it. I typically ride 6-7 hrs per week with long 4hr rides on Saturday. I have been looking into the Firebird for a while mainly because of its rave reviews and no loss of climbing prowess for how it handles the descents. But before I pull the trigger I needed to see how the new Switchblade works.

    I demoíd a medium XT/XTR pro with dt swiss wheels, factory grip 2 fork and dpX2 rear shock. DHF and HRII tires. It was 31.6 lbs with my pedals on my scale. (For reference my SB is 31.4 on same scale) I set up the suspension to Pivotís baseline from their website. Which felt really good right out of the gate. Very impressive and I am picky about suspension tuning.

    I did a 34 mile ride with 3600 ft of climbing. (mix of desert classic, National up to telegraph and back down, javelina, secret and lower Corona for those of you familiar)I did a very similar loop a few weeks back on my SB and a Firebird demo to compare the numbers to see which is faster. I was typically 5 beats per minute higher with my overall average HR 7 beats higher on the new SB. Overall times were basically the same and took me the same time to get to various landmarks within a minute or two over 50 minute spans. My overall average speed was 8.9 mph on my current SB, 8.6 on FB and 8.7 on 2020SB. Keep in mind air temps were 20-30 degrees warmer on the FB and 2020SB up in the mid 80s. Generally the new SB was a few seconds faster everywhere but the downs and steep tech climbs. My old switchblade was faster than it as well by a few seconds but it was cooler and I used less energy to do it.

    The positives: it really does do everything better than older SB and doesnít sacrifice anything. It is smoother but still poppy and fun. More plush but still supportive and still feels just as efficient. It does take bigger hits and drops better and climbs the steep tech a little better too. Still not on same level as FB, but closer than old version is. Bottom bracket height is right on the money (I was in low mode) Old bb height was way too low for my trails. Frame is stiffer laterally too. Itís super silent.. zero noise other than gravel on the tires. The fork works so much better than my mine. The grip 2 damper is legit. I was impressed. Definitely had better small bump compliance that I have been looking for. I had a bit more confidence and more willingness to jump over nasty sections when it was possible, but not just throw caution to the wind like on the FB. It would land 3 ft drops to flat better and was on the verge of getting into trouble going down steep rock chutes like waterfall. If old SB was a 1 and FB a 10 for rough downhill, I would say the new SB is a 5. Right about in the middle. Dpx2 shock performed really well

    Climbing.. feels very similar to old SB and is more efficient feeling than FB. The FB is a little better and takes less effort in steep tech and ledges. But the new SB is faster on the easier stuff very similar to the old SB.

    Negatives.. there really isnít any for its intended purpose. Itís a super well rounded bike that can do pretty much anything with little compromise at the extreme ends of the spectrum. I did feel more weight in my hands as you are positioned a little more up front as compared to how I have my SB set up.

    Overall, itís a very impressive bike that gained more capability and composure but didnít loose anything anywhere else. My hats off to Pivot. Also the new 12 spd shimano drivetrain and new xt brakes are legit. Awesome shifting and the brakes were silent and performed really well with a little more modulation than past versions.

    If I could only get one bike, this would be it. But since I have a 429SL in the garage, the Firebird fits my needs better and I have one on the way! My Switchblade will be on the market next week after new fork and shock seals and oil and a detailed cleaning.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2020 Switchblade ride reports-8ef2ffc9-c575-4246-b513-fd446f25a694.jpg  


  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmm1985 View Post
    what build is your demo? I canít find any published weights for the team xtr in large.

    nice write up!
    Sorry. Weighed it after I swapped parts from my old SB to the XT/XTR variant. I doubt I saved significant weight.


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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by greginaz View Post
    2020 Switchblade Demo Review- hopefully this helps any prospective buyers out there.
    Iím looking for my next bike to change from my first gen carbon switchblade to see if there is something better for my needs. I love my SB but looking for something to handle the rough stuff a bit better and not loose much if anything everywhere else. Iíve been itching to do some local enduros so that is helping steer my direction. My SB is set up as 29 with carbon wheels, extended 160 factory fork and 17mm extended cup for pedal clearance (170 cranks too), factory DPS shock, Assegai front & Dissector rear tires. My home trails are on South Mountain down the street from Pivot HQ. National is my favorite trail by far, and I usually spend my Saturdays on it. I typically ride 6-7 hrs per week with long 4hr rides on Saturday. I have been looking into the Firebird for a while mainly because of its rave reviews and no loss of climbing prowess for how it handles the descents. But before I pull the trigger I needed to see how the new Switchblade works.

    I demoíd a medium XT/XTR pro with dt swiss wheels, factory grip 2 fork and dpX2 rear shock. DHF and HRII tires. It was 31.6 lbs with my pedals on my scale. (For reference my SB is 31.4 on same scale) I set up the suspension to Pivotís baseline from their website. Which felt really good right out of the gate. Very impressive and I am picky about suspension tuning.

    I did a 34 mile ride with 3600 ft of climbing. (mix of desert classic, National up to telegraph and back down, javelina, secret and lower Corona for those of you familiar)I did a very similar loop a few weeks back on my SB and a Firebird demo to compare the numbers to see which is faster. I was typically 5 beats per minute higher with my overall average HR 7 beats higher on the new SB. Overall times were basically the same and took me the same time to get to various landmarks within a minute or two over 50 minute spans. My overall average speed was 8.9 mph on my current SB, 8.6 on FB and 8.7 on 2020SB. Keep in mind air temps were 20-30 degrees warmer on the FB and 2020SB up in the mid 80s. Generally the new SB was a few seconds faster everywhere but the downs and steep tech climbs. My old switchblade was faster than it as well by a few seconds but it was cooler and I used less energy to do it.

    The positives: it really does do everything better than older SB and doesnít sacrifice anything. It is smoother but still poppy and fun. More plush but still supportive and still feels just as efficient. It does take bigger hits and drops better and climbs the steep tech a little better too. Still not on same level as FB, but closer than old version is. Bottom bracket height is right on the money (I was in low mode) Old bb height was way too low for my trails. Frame is stiffer laterally too. Itís super silent.. zero noise other than gravel on the tires. The fork works so much better than my mine. The grip 2 damper is legit. I was impressed. Definitely had better small bump compliance that I have been looking for. I had a bit more confidence and more willingness to jump over nasty sections when it was possible, but not just throw caution to the wind like on the FB. It would land 3 ft drops to flat better and was on the verge of getting into trouble going down steep rock chutes like waterfall. If old SB was a 1 and FB a 10 for rough downhill, I would say the new SB is a 5. Right about in the middle. Dpx2 shock performed really well

    Climbing.. feels very similar to old SB and is more efficient feeling than FB. The FB is a little better and takes less effort in steep tech and ledges. But the new SB is faster on the easier stuff very similar to the old SB.

    Negatives.. there really isnít any for its intended purpose. Itís a super well rounded bike that can do pretty much anything with little compromise at the extreme ends of the spectrum. I did feel more weight in my hands as you are positioned a little more up front as compared to how I have my SB set up.

    Overall, itís a very impressive bike that gained more capability and composure but didnít loose anything anywhere else. My hats off to Pivot. Also the new 12 spd shimano drivetrain and new xt brakes are legit. Awesome shifting and the brakes were silent and performed really well with a little more modulation than past versions.

    If I could only get one bike, this would be it. But since I have a 429SL in the garage, the Firebird fits my needs better and I have one on the way! My Switchblade will be on the market next week after new fork and shock seals and oil and a detailed cleaning.
    I agree the BB is higher with the suspension being loaded.

    I feel stiffness is about the same. I wonder if Pivot didnít maximize stiffness for ride compliance - pure speculation.

    Since Iím speculating(talking out my arse), V1 is a better Evil Following, and V2 is a better Ripmo(subjective opinion). Pivot following trends?

    Less confidence on steeps than my old SB. Going to firm up fork mid stroke to see if that helps which it should. My old SB has an Avy cartridge.

    Because of my weight, Iím thinking of putting a 38 on it. The AC is 8mm higher. Of course cost, weight, and loss climbing ability are concerns.

    Speaking of weight, it is heavy. A Ripmo would come in a little lighter, but not as stiff. I wouldnít consider like minded bikes in non chunky terrain.

    Climbs so much better than V1 in the saddle. A cross between V1 and first gen 429 Trail.

    Most importantly, it is fun. My 429T is fun for the first hour. Then, the loss of traction with lesser tires, diminished stiffness, and pinging off rocks on the downs relative to my SB, makes it less enjoyable.




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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    This is an astute observation.

    We ship the bike stock with a 0.6 volume spacer in the air can, because we knew a lot of people would be using this bike not just for trail riding, but also for enduro racing; and we wanted to make sure the shock would offer enough support for that.

    If it's mostly a trail bike for you (as mine is for me), you can swap that out for a 0.4, a 0.2 or no spacer at all. I tried mine a few different ways and found that a 0.4 was my sweet spot.

    Spacers are pretty cheap and easy to install, so I encourage everyone to do some tinkering!

    JP
    Thanks John. I popped in a .4 this weekend which was a nice improvement but more rowdy saddle time is needed. Dialing it back lately to stay healthy and out of hospital.

    For those looking to change these out, you'll want to remove the shock to make it easier. Also, Snap-ring pliers which expand when squeezed worked nicely to remove the old spacer.
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by edbraunbeck View Post
    Thanks John. I popped in a .4 this weekend which was a nice improvement but more rowdy saddle time is needed. Dialing it back lately to stay healthy and out of hospital.

    For those looking to change these out, you'll want to remove the shock to make it easier. Also, Snap-ring pliers which expand when squeezed worked nicely to remove the old spacer.
    What do you mean by ďmore rowdy saddle time is requiredĒ?
    Thanks

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by richt2000 View Post
    What do you mean by ďmore rowdy saddle time is requiredĒ?
    Thanks
    I passed on hitting a drop and gap jump I normally hit.
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    I tested the swap to the 0.4 spacer this weekend but wasn't satisfied. So I changed back to the stock spacer and it felt better to me.

    The thing I like the most on the Switchblade V2 over the V1 and also the Trail429 is the pop on the rear end. The bike stands higher in the travel when riding and pops back better. This allows me to ride more over the front tire which I love now after needed some trails to get rid of it.
    After swapping to the 0.4 spacer I felt that exactly this ride feeling is less significant and that it felt more similar to the Switchblade V1 which tends to sink away in the mid travel.
    Climbing was also less perfect with the rear end soaking a little more into the travel and I also wasn't able to squeeze out more travel on the rear end. After the change back to the 0.6 spacer all the satisfaction was back. It's a personal choice of course...

    The biggest difference of the new Switchblade to the Switchblade V1 and also to the Trail 429 is the sitting "in the bike" instead of "on top of the bike". This is really a big improvement. Also it climbs the best of all because I can ride steep uphills without moving my body to the top front of the saddle. The front wheel stays perfect planted on steep climbs and tends not to become light.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by maettu View Post
    I tested the swap to the 0.4 spacer this weekend but wasn't satisfied. So I changed back to the stock spacer and it felt better to me.

    The thing I like the most on the Switchblade V2 over the V1 and also the Trail429 is the pop on the rear end. The bike stands higher in the travel when riding and pops back better. This allows me to ride more over the front tire which I love now after needed some trails to get rid of it.
    After swapping to the 0.4 spacer I felt that exactly this ride feeling is less significant and that it felt more similar to the Switchblade V1 which tends to sink away in the mid travel.
    Climbing was also less perfect with the rear end soaking a little more into the travel and I also wasn't able to squeeze out more travel on the rear end. After the change back to the 0.6 spacer all the satisfaction was back. It's a personal choice of course...

    The biggest difference of the new Switchblade to the Switchblade V1 and also to the Trail 429 is the sitting "in the bike" instead of "on top of the bike". This is really a big improvement. Also it climbs the best of all because I can ride steep uphills without moving my body to the top front of the saddle. The front wheel stays perfect planted on steep climbs and tends not to become light.
    I'm not an expert but didn't experience the same climbing degradation. It's my understanding the spacer effects the progression more towards the end of the travel. Assuming the sag is setup properly, climbing wouldn't be effected. The beauty of all this is it's easy to change to suit the riders preference.
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  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by maettu View Post
    I tested the swap to the 0.4 spacer this weekend but wasn't satisfied. So I changed back to the stock spacer and it felt better to me.

    The thing I like the most on the Switchblade V2 over the V1 and also the Trail429 is the pop on the rear end. The bike stands higher in the travel when riding and pops back better. This allows me to ride more over the front tire which I love now after needed some trails to get rid of it.
    After swapping to the 0.4 spacer I felt that exactly this ride feeling is less significant and that it felt more similar to the Switchblade V1 which tends to sink away in the mid travel.
    Climbing was also less perfect with the rear end soaking a little more into the travel and I also wasn't able to squeeze out more travel on the rear end. After the change back to the 0.6 spacer all the satisfaction was back. It's a personal choice of course...

    The biggest difference of the new Switchblade to the Switchblade V1 and also to the Trail 429 is the sitting "in the bike" instead of "on top of the bike". This is really a big improvement. Also it climbs the best of all because I can ride steep uphills without moving my body to the top front of the saddle. The front wheel stays perfect planted on steep climbs and tends not to become light.
    Did you adjust air pressure (higher) when you swapped to the smaller spacer? It's been my experience that a larger volume spacer requires lower pressure to achieve a similar ride feel, and vice versa.

    I've been really happy with the stock spacer setup in mine. I can run the bike super plush off the top and still have enough pop and support through the mid-stroke and end of travel. I'm definitely using all of the travel on larger drops to flat, though not bottoming harshly. I bought the bike expecting to swap out the spacer, but have no desire to at this point. I'm 165lbs for reference. YMMV obviously, depending on the terrain you ride and your style etc.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Full Send View Post
    Did you adjust air pressure (higher) when you swapped to the smaller spacer? It's been my experience that a larger volume spacer requires lower pressure to achieve a similar ride feel, and vice versa.
    Yes I did. And I needed to add more pressure. Of course, the spacers have the greatest effect towards the end of the stroke but not only there. As I said, it is a question of taste.

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    I owned Switchblade v1 and it has been a great bike for me. Had a 170mm grip 2 cartrige and i felt that the rear wasnt always on pair with the front with stock dps shock. Did roughly 10 rides on the new v2. Mostly steep and rowdy trails. Bike climbs better, more traction, on the descents its just rock solid and planted. And generally feels more like an enduro bike. Heavier i would say. On the same setup xt/xtr it feels more slugish going up but down is another league. Have to tweek suspension a bit but generaly iam really satisfied, the new design is much cleaner, large water bottle in. I may buy a carbon wheelset. 200mm disc on front just work better. I sometimes use it for XC and long days in the mountains and i guess its feels kinda heavier than v1 but its a start of the season and i have to put some riding in my legs. Switch blade always felt like a really nimble bike, seatpost down its a joy to ride going steep descents. Went for a green color and its gorgeous. Have a brooks cambium c15 seat on it. Anyone know if there is a tool mount for top tube or is it just for live valve?
    Good job, Pivot!

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tikej View Post
    Anyone know if there is a tool mount for top tube or is it just for live valve?
    Pivot has working together with Topeak on a tool or something to add to this mounts.
    It should have been presented to the sea otter festival.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by maettu View Post
    Pivot has working together with Topeak on a tool or something to add to this mounts.
    It should have been presented to the sea otter festival.
    I just ordered this:
    https://www.zine-sports.com/shop/tube-cage/

    Will report back in the other thread how it works..
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  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by maettu View Post
    Pivot has working together with Topeak on a tool or something to add to this mounts.
    It should have been presented to the sea otter festival.
    Might look at the oneup stuff. I did the multitool in the headset thing... Works pretty well. Frame stays clean too.

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    Interesting comparison and discussion here:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXom9W6bliQ

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    Well, My current bike store sells Ibis and Pivot and Yeti. Iím not really interested in the Yeti at this current time, although I do think it is a great climber.
    I cannot get an Ibis until November due to all the back log apparently. I have demoed the v1 Ripmo, not the v2. I also considered that since Iím on the heavier side I wanted a stiffer more robust bike. Now Iím not sure pivots actually are or not, but I considered all the marketing hype about super boost and frame design etc.
    So I hopped on a 2020 Switchblade to see what it was all about. I actually took it out twice.
    First ride: Honestly was kind of meh. It was okay, didnít climb as fast as my current bike, was a little quicker on the flat and it did seem to pick up speed very quick going down. But after all that, I was kind of just okay about the whole thing.
    Now I should mention my current bike is a 2016 Giant Trance Advanced 27.5Ē. The geometry was way different, it just felt weird. I knew that so again I was taking that into account. It was very foreign feeling and didnít seem to accelerate as quick as my current bike. I left feeling like it could be my bike but most certainly was not sure it would be my bike. It was just meh.

    I asked for a second demo ride and went out again to a specific steep climb that I usually do on my Trance.
    Climb: It climbed up better than the Trance, I was surprised. I usually have to scoot forward in the saddle on my Trance but didnít need to on the switchblade. Ahhh modern geometry. I was within 3 seconds of my PR up the hill without even trying. Okay so it climbs pretty decent after all. Maybe not quite the same speed, but whatever, Iíll get to the top when I get there. As long as I get there. And if I hammered on it Iím sure I could easily make up the missing 3 seconds.

    Down: well I set my PR on some single track...lots of grip, didnít feel any chatter like I did on my 4 year old trance, just butter smooth. Rails the corners. Grip due to geometry and big tires. It was effortless. Easy.

    Flat: still flickable, maybe not quite as much as a 27.5Ē tire, but could lean bike over more, still,felt just great. Again, all the small bumps were gone, I felt everyone of the small bumps on the trance.

    Somehow, I think I was already starting to get used to the bigger 29Ē wheels and new geometry. I did have a few pedal strikes on the switch blade, but I think itís more a timing issue and not being used to the bike, plus Iím not sure the shock was set up exactly for my weight.

    Now, I take all this with a grain of salt, as Iím comparing a brand new 29Ē to a 4 year old 27.5Ē with 4 year old components, of course they are going to feel different. But I did find the new geometry made a big difference. Mountain biking is great now a days no matter what bike or brand you like.

    The components were even better and have come along way since my 2016 trance. The bike was mostly quiet, but the cables at the front of cockpit were noisy. Otherwise it was quiet. No brake pad noise from the xt brakes.

    I tested the pro xt/xtr build in large, Iím 5í10Ē, with dt Swiss wheels. It weighed in at 31.5 lbs in case anyone wants to know with store pedals included.
    My trance weighs in at 28.5 lbs. so there is a weight/acceleration penalty.

    So I thought about it and pulled the trigger. Bought a blue same build with Reynolds wheels. See how it goes. Iím hoping that this will do me for 5 years of more fun. My wife has the Trail 429 and loves it as well. My bike will be at least another 3 weeks as I asked for the 2021 fork and they have to import it into Canada first. They currently have builds available with the older fork. Not sure I will be able to tell the difference but if I am spending the money and not in a hurry, I might well get the newer items. Iím also getting a slight knee surgery around time the bike comes in, so I will have time to throw some tape down to protect some of frame and it can help rehabilitate me as we get used to each other on our first easy rides together. Looking forward to it.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by bachey View Post
    Well, My current bike store sells Ibis and Pivot and Yeti. Iím not really interested in the Yeti at this current time, although I do think it is a great climber.
    I cannot get an Ibis until November due to all the back log apparently. I have demoed the v1 Ripmo, not the v2. I also considered that since Iím on the heavier side I wanted a stiffer more robust bike. Now Iím not sure pivots actually are or not, but I considered all the marketing hype about super boost and frame design etc.
    So I hopped on a 2020 Switchblade to see what it was all about. I actually took it out twice.
    First ride: Honestly was kind of meh. It was okay, didnít climb as fast as my current bike, was a little quicker on the flat and it did seem to pick up speed very quick going down. But after all that, I was kind of just okay about the whole thing.
    Now I should mention my current bike is a 2016 Giant Trance Advanced 27.5Ē. The geometry was way different, it just felt weird. I knew that so again I was taking that into account. It was very foreign feeling and didnít seem to accelerate as quick as my current bike. I left feeling like it could be my bike but most certainly was not sure it would be my bike. It was just meh.

    I asked for a second demo ride and went out again to a specific steep climb that I usually do on my Trance.
    Climb: It climbed up better than the Trance, I was surprised. I usually have to scoot forward in the saddle on my Trance but didnít need to on the switchblade. Ahhh modern geometry. I was within 3 seconds of my PR up the hill without even trying. Okay so it climbs pretty decent after all. Maybe not quite the same speed, but whatever, Iíll get to the top when I get there. As long as I get there. And if I hammered on it Iím sure I could easily make up the missing 3 seconds.

    Down: well I set my PR on some single track...lots of grip, didnít feel any chatter like I did on my 4 year old trance, just butter smooth. Rails the corners. Grip due to geometry and big tires. It was effortless. Easy.

    Flat: still flickable, maybe not quite as much as a 27.5Ē tire, but could lean bike over more, still,felt just great. Again, all the small bumps were gone, I felt everyone of the small bumps on the trance.

    Somehow, I think I was already starting to get used to the bigger 29Ē wheels and new geometry. I did have a few pedal strikes on the switch blade, but I think itís more a timing issue and not being used to the bike, plus Iím not sure the shock was set up exactly for my weight.

    Now, I take all this with a grain of salt, as Iím comparing a brand new 29Ē to a 4 year old 27.5Ē with 4 year old components, of course they are going to feel different. But I did find the new geometry made a big difference. Mountain biking is great now a days no matter what bike or brand you like.

    The components were even better and have come along way since my 2016 trance. The bike was mostly quiet, but the cables at the front of cockpit were noisy. Otherwise it was quiet. No brake pad noise from the xt brakes.

    I tested the pro xt/xtr build in large, Iím 5í10Ē, with dt Swiss wheels. It weighed in at 31.5 lbs in case anyone wants to know with store pedals included.
    My trance weighs in at 28.5 lbs. so there is a weight/acceleration penalty.

    So I thought about it and pulled the trigger. Bought a blue same build with Reynolds wheels. See how it goes. Iím hoping that this will do me for 5 years of more fun. My wife has the Trail 429 and loves it as well. My bike will be at least another 3 weeks as I asked for the 2021 fork and they have to import it into Canada first. They currently have builds available with the older fork. Not sure I will be able to tell the difference but if I am spending the money and not in a hurry, I might well get the newer items. Iím also getting a slight knee surgery around time the bike comes in, so I will have time to throw some tape down to protect some of frame and it can help rehabilitate me as we get used to each other on our first easy rides together. Looking forward to it.
    If you're worried about climbing speed, I'm betting that largely comes down to tires. The stock DHF/DHR aren't exactly rocketships in terms of rolling resistance. Yes, there's a few pounds of weight penalty too, but I've found in a couple months of riding my SB that it climbs both capably (in terms of traction) and really fast/efficient (in terms of speed) on anything that is remotely technical. I'm not running the stock tires though.

    Something to consider.

  50. #50
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    What tires are you using?

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by bachey View Post
    What tires are you using?
    Vittoria Agarro 2.6 - I have many posts in that thread if you want more info.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Full Send View Post
    Vittoria Agarro 2.6 - I have many posts in that thread if you want more info.
    Okay, perfect thanks.

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by bachey View Post
    Well, My current bike store sells Ibis and Pivot and Yeti. Iím not really interested in the Yeti at this current time, although I do think it is a great climber.
    I cannot get an Ibis until November due to all the back log apparently. I have demoed the v1 Ripmo, not the v2. I also considered that since Iím on the heavier side I wanted a stiffer more robust bike. Now Iím not sure pivots actually are or not, but I considered all the marketing hype about super boost and frame design etc.
    So I hopped on a 2020 Switchblade to see what it was all about. I actually took it out twice.
    First ride: Honestly was kind of meh. It was okay, didnít climb as fast as my current bike, was a little quicker on the flat and it did seem to pick up speed very quick going down. But after all that, I was kind of just okay about the whole thing.
    Now I should mention my current bike is a 2016 Giant Trance Advanced 27.5Ē. The geometry was way different, it just felt weird. I knew that so again I was taking that into account. It was very foreign feeling and didnít seem to accelerate as quick as my current bike. I left feeling like it could be my bike but most certainly was not sure it would be my bike. It was just meh.

    I asked for a second demo ride and went out again to a specific steep climb that I usually do on my Trance.
    Climb: It climbed up better than the Trance, I was surprised. I usually have to scoot forward in the saddle on my Trance but didnít need to on the switchblade. Ahhh modern geometry. I was within 3 seconds of my PR up the hill without even trying. Okay so it climbs pretty decent after all. Maybe not quite the same speed, but whatever, Iíll get to the top when I get there. As long as I get there. And if I hammered on it Iím sure I could easily make up the missing 3 seconds.

    Down: well I set my PR on some single track...lots of grip, didnít feel any chatter like I did on my 4 year old trance, just butter smooth. Rails the corners. Grip due to geometry and big tires. It was effortless. Easy.

    Flat: still flickable, maybe not quite as much as a 27.5Ē tire, but could lean bike over more, still,felt just great. Again, all the small bumps were gone, I felt everyone of the small bumps on the trance.

    Somehow, I think I was already starting to get used to the bigger 29Ē wheels and new geometry. I did have a few pedal strikes on the switch blade, but I think itís more a timing issue and not being used to the bike, plus Iím not sure the shock was set up exactly for my weight.

    Now, I take all this with a grain of salt, as Iím comparing a brand new 29Ē to a 4 year old 27.5Ē with 4 year old components, of course they are going to feel different. But I did find the new geometry made a big difference. Mountain biking is great now a days no matter what bike or brand you like.

    The components were even better and have come along way since my 2016 trance. The bike was mostly quiet, but the cables at the front of cockpit were noisy. Otherwise it was quiet. No brake pad noise from the xt brakes.

    I tested the pro xt/xtr build in large, Iím 5í10Ē, with dt Swiss wheels. It weighed in at 31.5 lbs in case anyone wants to know with store pedals included.
    My trance weighs in at 28.5 lbs. so there is a weight/acceleration penalty.

    So I thought about it and pulled the trigger. Bought a blue same build with Reynolds wheels. See how it goes. Iím hoping that this will do me for 5 years of more fun. My wife has the Trail 429 and loves it as well. My bike will be at least another 3 weeks as I asked for the 2021 fork and they have to import it into Canada first. They currently have builds available with the older fork. Not sure I will be able to tell the difference but if I am spending the money and not in a hurry, I might well get the newer items. Iím also getting a slight knee surgery around time the bike comes in, so I will have time to throw some tape down to protect some of frame and it can help rehabilitate me as we get used to each other on our first easy rides together. Looking forward to it.
    Stick a 27.5 wheel in the back and the bike comes alive....

  54. #54
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    Anyone know if this will be available as a frame only option?

    Pivot always has my eye. Not only do they make very well thought out bikes, their customer service is unbeatable.

    On paper this bike looks as close as possible to a true AM, do it all, bike.

    Suprised there is not more talk about it.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Anyone know if this will be available as a frame only option?

    Pivot always has my eye. Not only do they make very well thought out bikes, their customer service is unbeatable.

    On paper this bike looks as close as possible to a true AM, do it all, bike.

    Suprised there is not more talk about it.
    Here in the UK they really donít like doing frame only for the super boost frames.
    Its a case of getting a good dealer to persuade them to sell a frame and crankset, but I was told you would probably have to buy a fork as well.

  56. #56
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    Anyone have an new SB with the new 2021 Fox 36? Wondering if the small bump compliance got any better. The RS Pike and Lyrik are crazy good. Any feedback on the update would be appreciated.
    2020 Revel Rascal
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  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by bachey View Post
    Well, My current bike store sells Ibis and Pivot and Yeti. Iím not really interested in the Yeti at this current time, although I do think it is a great climber.
    I cannot get an Ibis until November due to all the back log apparently. I have demoed the v1 Ripmo, not the v2. I also considered that since Iím on the heavier side I wanted a stiffer more robust bike. Now Iím not sure pivots actually are or not, but I considered all the marketing hype about super boost and frame design etc.
    So I hopped on a 2020 Switchblade to see what it was all about. I actually took it out twice.
    First ride: Honestly was kind of meh. It was okay, didnít climb as fast as my current bike, was a little quicker on the flat and it did seem to pick up speed very quick going down. But after all that, I was kind of just okay about the whole thing.
    Now I should mention my current bike is a 2016 Giant Trance Advanced 27.5Ē. The geometry was way different, it just felt weird. I knew that so again I was taking that into account. It was very foreign feeling and didnít seem to accelerate as quick as my current bike. I left feeling like it could be my bike but most certainly was not sure it would be my bike. It was just meh.

    I asked for a second demo ride and went out again to a specific steep climb that I usually do on my Trance.
    Climb: It climbed up better than the Trance, I was surprised. I usually have to scoot forward in the saddle on my Trance but didnít need to on the switchblade. Ahhh modern geometry. I was within 3 seconds of my PR up the hill without even trying. Okay so it climbs pretty decent after all. Maybe not quite the same speed, but whatever, Iíll get to the top when I get there. As long as I get there. And if I hammered on it Iím sure I could easily make up the missing 3 seconds.

    Down: well I set my PR on some single track...lots of grip, didnít feel any chatter like I did on my 4 year old trance, just butter smooth. Rails the corners. Grip due to geometry and big tires. It was effortless. Easy.

    Flat: still flickable, maybe not quite as much as a 27.5Ē tire, but could lean bike over more, still,felt just great. Again, all the small bumps were gone, I felt everyone of the small bumps on the trance.

    Somehow, I think I was already starting to get used to the bigger 29Ē wheels and new geometry. I did have a few pedal strikes on the switch blade, but I think itís more a timing issue and not being used to the bike, plus Iím not sure the shock was set up exactly for my weight.

    Now, I take all this with a grain of salt, as Iím comparing a brand new 29Ē to a 4 year old 27.5Ē with 4 year old components, of course they are going to feel different. But I did find the new geometry made a big difference. Mountain biking is great now a days no matter what bike or brand you like.

    The components were even better and have come along way since my 2016 trance. The bike was mostly quiet, but the cables at the front of cockpit were noisy. Otherwise it was quiet. No brake pad noise from the xt brakes.

    I tested the pro xt/xtr build in large, Iím 5í10Ē, with dt Swiss wheels. It weighed in at 31.5 lbs in case anyone wants to know with store pedals included.
    My trance weighs in at 28.5 lbs. so there is a weight/acceleration penalty.

    So I thought about it and pulled the trigger. Bought a blue same build with Reynolds wheels. See how it goes. Iím hoping that this will do me for 5 years of more fun. My wife has the Trail 429 and loves it as well. My bike will be at least another 3 weeks as I asked for the 2021 fork and they have to import it into Canada first. They currently have builds available with the older fork. Not sure I will be able to tell the difference but if I am spending the money and not in a hurry, I might well get the newer items. Iím also getting a slight knee surgery around time the bike comes in, so I will have time to throw some tape down to protect some of frame and it can help rehabilitate me as we get used to each other on our first easy rides together. Looking forward to it.

    Post an update after you get some rides in!

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde Ride View Post
    Post an update after you get some rides in!
    I definitely will post up once the bike comes in. A ride review of my bike will have to wait another 4 weeks roughly for my knee to get better. Iím hoping to use it rehab a bit on some easy spins.

  59. #59
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    John P. - Do you recommend taking the shock off the bike to change the spacers, or can you do the job with it still on? Taking your suggestion on this one.

    Thanks -

    Spine Shank

    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    This is an astute observation.

    We ship the bike stock with a 0.6 volume spacer in the air can, because we knew a lot of people would be using this bike not just for trail riding, but also for enduro racing; and we wanted to make sure the shock would offer enough support for that.

    If it's mostly a trail bike for you (as mine is for me), you can swap that out for a 0.4, a 0.2 or no spacer at all. I tried mine a few different ways and found that a 0.4 was my sweet spot.

    Spacers are pretty cheap and easy to install, so I encourage everyone to do some tinkering!

    JP
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    CAUTION: ADJUSTABLE SUSPENSION CONFUSES ME

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spine Shank View Post
    John P. - Do you recommend taking the shock off the bike to change the spacers, or can you do the job with it still on? Taking your suggestion on this one.

    Thanks -

    Spine Shank
    It's much easier to get a grip around the canister by removing the shock. Plus, the mounting bolts only take a a minute to remove.
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  61. #61
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    Well I thought I would update my ride review of 2020 SB. I have finally taken delivery of it, I waited and asked for the 2021 fork. I got the Large blue (still not sure on the colour - I do like the green, but too late now). Pro xt with 29Ē Reynolds wheels. 32 lbs. Iím coming from 2016 Trance Advanced 1 27.5Ē weighed 28.5 lbs.

    Bikes are so much better. I will leave the comparison there. Because they donít compare. Obviously the SB is good, really good. More travel, stiffer, donít notice the extra weight.

    I will keep this short. Still getting suspension set up, itís close. The one thing I canít get over is how poppy it is. Iím jumping whatever I can on purpose. Iím older so itís brought my youth back into action. Itís a fun bike. Plain and simple. Now I havenít rode a lot as I had knee surgery about 3.5 weeks ago. But the few times have been a surprise. Now I am looking at a drop and thinking itís doable for me.

    The only drawback I see is the bike is VERY CAPABLE and I am not or near the same level. This could be to my detriment as the bike is eyeing up stuff that I am not sure of. But damn it, itís fun. Soaks up little bumps like they are not there with the shock. The fork Iím still working on. Itís a setup thing.

    If you want to know anything else let me know.

  62. #62
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    After a 3 day demo, I ordered a Large Switchblade and am currently waiting for it to ship. I compared it directly against a Large SB130LR.

    Me: Riding Front Range Colorado. My other bike is an Epic with a StepCast 120, so I was looking for something that handled chunky and steep better than my "efficient" bike.

    As was mentioned above, the Switchblade is a fun bike. I felt like I could go fast, sure, but I also felt like I could go slower and pop off things, slam it into corners and goof around. In chunky terrain the rear suspension was terrific.

    Pedaling, the bike is not XC bike efficient, let's be honest. Don't take this to mean the bike is inefficient, as I am sure that there was more inefficiencies from the DHR rear tire than the suspension. When climbing techy sections, I felt like the SB helped me keep momentum as the suspension absorbed the terrain very well with little to no input into pedaling. I will say, however, I did notice the suspension sinking a bit deep into travel during chunky climbing. I remedied this with by flipping the shock to the "trail" position, but feel I can address is with more tuning in the future.

    I also felt very confident on this bike; I trusted the tires because it felt like I both had a great connection with the ground, but that the suspension also helped smooth things out and kept me isolated. I had the best descent at Heil Ranch that I've ever had, with the most confidence and fun. I'm typically holding on for dear life, but on the SB I was smiling and hooting (Top 5% of Strava times this year).

    The SB130LR was a different animal all together. In all honesty, I don't think the LR is the right set-up for this bike. The SB130 is a very efficiently pedaling platform. It feels like a shorter travel bike. In chunky sections, it was harsh. In smooth sections, when you could open it up, it railed. In my opinion that's how a bike with 120mm should behave, not 130+.

    Back to pedaling: I was faster uphill on the SB130. When Climbing technical terrain, the suspenion did not isolate you like the Pivot, but, the high pedaling efficiency felt very positive; with each pedal stroke the SB130 wanted to claw over any obstacle in it's way.

    When I was able to into more flowy terrain, I immediately got why people like the SB130: it does rail at high speeds. It's very confident inspiring and it feels like it has your back when you eyes start to water. It also handled single-drops (up to 4 feet) with composure. I liked the extra length in the reach compared to the Pivot. It had a lot of things going for it, but I believe a better comparison for the SB130 is the Trail 429.

    For me, in my terrain and my bike stable, the Switchblade was the better choice.

  63. #63
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    ^Good review.

  64. #64
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    how is everyone liking the rear shock tune? I am hearing mixed feelings. I am currently on a V1 and loving it, but its 3 years old with lots of miles!

  65. #65
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    The stock rear shock on the V2 is simply amazing! You can feel that they put a lot of effort into the setup.
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  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by bliz2z View Post
    The stock rear shock on the V2 is simply amazing! You can feel that they put a lot of effort into the setup.
    Yeah I can't think of what I'd improve. It's plush but supportive, and all three compression modes are useful on trail. No complaints here.

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark194 View Post
    how is everyone liking the rear shock tune? I am hearing mixed feelings. I am currently on a V1 and loving it, but its 3 years old with lots of miles!
    I'm surprised you're hearing mixed reviews. I worked our launch events in the US, Australia, and NZ with some very seasoned dealers and journalists, most of whom were not afraid to tell us about the smallest imperfection. The one part of the bike that was universally praised was the rear shock.

    We worked a LONG time with Fox to get this right - we tested 10 different iterations and eventually settled on a completely custom base valve design that increased oil flow over any stock tune they had. The result is a rear end that stays very planted but is still very "poppy".

    FYI,
    JP
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  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    I'm surprised you're hearing mixed reviews. I worked our launch events in the US, Australia, and NZ with some very seasoned dealers and journalists, most of whom were not afraid to tell us about the smallest imperfection. The one part of the bike that was universally praised was the rear shock.

    We worked a LONG time with Fox to get this right - we tested 10 different iterations and eventually settled on a completely custom base valve design that increased oil flow over any stock tune they had. The result is a rear end that stays very planted but is still very "poppy".

    FYI,
    JP
    Thank you, I watched many of the video's and was surprised when I heard the mixed reviews, so I will ignore trolls and get me a new blade!

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    I'm surprised you're hearing mixed reviews. I worked our launch events in the US, Australia, and NZ with some very seasoned dealers and journalists, most of whom were not afraid to tell us about the smallest imperfection. The one part of the bike that was universally praised was the rear shock.

    We worked a LONG time with Fox to get this right - we tested 10 different iterations and eventually settled on a completely custom base valve design that increased oil flow over any stock tune they had. The result is a rear end that stays very planted but is still very "poppy".

    FYI,
    JP
    I can see Bernhard Kerr running an X2 as well on his new 2020 Switchblade.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark194 View Post
    Thank you, I watched many of the video's and was surprised when I heard the mixed reviews, so I will ignore trolls and get me a new blade!
    I ordered a new 2021 Fox dhx2 w/ orange sls coil the same day I ordered my new switchblade, the 2021 coil has still not arrived and Iíve been riding the stock dpx2 for the last two months. I have zero complaints even doing low speed 6 foot drops to flat and being a 220lb rider.

    When this dhx2 comes in I may just sell it because I donít feel like this dpx2 is limiting any of my riding.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by superted View Post
    I can see Bernhard Kerr running an X2 as well on his new 2020 Switchblade.
    Couple reasons for this:
    1. The factory team sources their suspension directly from Fox, not through us at Pivot.
    2. Fox wants all their sponsored riders on the highest-end stuff they make.

    That being said, we did test the Switchblade with the X2, and it does work great. The X2 is quite a bit more expensive than the DPX2, so from an OEM point of view the cost/benefit analysis of the situation led us to spec the DPX2.

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  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    Couple reasons for this:
    1. The factory team sources their suspension directly from Fox, not through us at Pivot.
    2. Fox wants all their sponsored riders on the highest-end stuff they make.

    That being said, we did test the Switchblade with the X2, and it does work great. The X2 is quite a bit more expensive than the DPX2, so from an OEM point of view the cost/benefit analysis of the situation led us to spec the DPX2.

    JP
    Is the X2 a better option for heavier 90kg + riders for smoothing out rough stutter and chunk then the new pivot tuned dpx2?

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by superted View Post
    Is the X2 a better option for heavier 90kg + riders for smoothing out rough stutter and chunk then the new pivot tuned dpx2?
    Can't speak from experience, but the DPX2 was so good in chunky terrain that I would start there unless you've had a negative experience with the DPX2 already.

    (I'm 75kg not kitted up)

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by xtrpickels View Post
    Can't speak from experience, but the DPX2 was so good in chunky terrain that I would start there unless you've had a negative experience with the DPX2 already.

    (I'm 75kg not kitted up)
    Hi xtr. thanks for yr reply... i was asking John P as he seemed to actually have experience with the X2 and dpx2 and no doubt its performance with different rider weights. So would still like to know what the actual crossover kg point would be where the X2 is better then the new pivot dpx2.

    (yes i do have experience with both shocks on a SB130LR)

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by superted View Post
    Hi xtr. thanks for yr reply... i was asking John P as he seemed to actually have experience with the X2 and dpx2 and no doubt its performance with different rider weights. So would still like to know what the actual crossover kg point would be where the X2 is better then the new pivot dpx2.

    (yes i do have experience with both shocks on a SB130LR)

    I asked a similar question of Pivot, directly through their website. I weigh more than you (100kg in peak fitness, more in the winter ;-)), and they thought I should start with the DPX2 in stock configuration. I think Chris Cocalis is a tall dude too, right? It seems like Pivot builds bikes that work for slightly-larger-than-average riders.

  76. #76
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    Thanks Clyde will have to demo one now

  77. #77
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    I was impressed with the DPX2. I was 100kg+ when I rented the bike(XT/XTR). It was fantastic in the chunky Phoenix area stuff. I was very impressed. I had the x2 on my 5.5 and dumped it in favor of a DVO topaz t3. Never could get that thing set up right.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoDakSooner View Post
    I was impressed with the DPX2. I was 100kg+ when I rented the bike(XT/XTR). It was fantastic in the chunky Phoenix area stuff. I was very impressed. I had the x2 on my 5.5 and dumped it in favor of a DVO topaz t3. Never could get that thing set up right.
    Same here regarding the DPS on T429. So Pivots work with Fox on DPX2 has paid off? Only way I seem to be able to get Fox stuff to work to my liking is to have someone else(Push, etc) retune it.


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    I think they did well with this tune for sure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by superted View Post
    Hi xtr. thanks for yr reply... i was asking John P as he seemed to actually have experience with the X2 and dpx2 and no doubt its performance with different rider weights. So would still like to know what the actual crossover kg point would be where the X2 is better then the new pivot dpx2.

    (yes i do have experience with both shocks on a SB130LR)
    Having ridden both the Switchblade and SB130LR (Both with DPX2), the Switchblade is in another league in chunky terrain while the SB130LR was (IMO) lacking for a 137mm bike.

  81. #81
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    looking at revel rascal and pivot switchblade for riding really rocky/rooty east coast stuff.. how do you like your rascal? demo d the switchblade and it was awesome! climbed great and was so much fun on descents

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    Quote Originally Posted by xtrpickels View Post
    Having ridden both the Switchblade and SB130LR (Both with DPX2), the Switchblade is in another league in chunky terrain while the SB130LR was (IMO) lacking for a 137mm bike.
    Thanks great to know. (My SB130 LR i settled on the X2 after running a DB coil. Eventually sold the bike but never got to try a progressive coil.)

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by kayakmom View Post
    looking at revel rascal and pivot switchblade for riding really rocky/rooty east coast stuff.. how do you like your rascal? demo d the switchblade and it was awesome! climbed great and was so much fun on descents
    I was looking at both of these bikes - I chose the Rascal over the SB. But I live in Idaho and most of our trails are long, flowy, buff singletrack with a lot of climbing. We don't get much tight, rocky, rooty stuff. I thought the Rascal would be better for the climbs but still capable for the DH. The Ripley, or even a more XC oriented bike like the Top Fuel is probably a better choice, but the Rascal is so fun.

    I think for you it depends on whether you want a little more performance in the climbs or DH. People really seem to love the SB. Give CyclePath in Portland (OR) a call - Bill sells a ton of SBs and a few Rascals, and he can give you a proper comparison.

    To answer your question, I think the SB might be a bit better for you in the trails you're running.

  84. #84
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    I raced the Switchblade at China Peak(gnarly rocks and slabs with a good amount of pedaling in the stages) a couple of weeks ago and was able to pilot it into 2nd place for Sport class 40-49. I think it could handle just about anything i threw at it. I wasn't wishing for a slacker head angle or more travel. I only bottomed it a couple times. I run 3 spacers in the front and the stock .6 in the dpx2. I think it is a great bike and am totally happy with the improvements from the V1 switchblade which I owned for 3 years and 4200 miles.

  85. #85
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    Just ordered my Pro X01 build in green, time to sell the V1!

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    Just some early thoughts on fork setup here. Similar to an earlier post, I'm more of a trails Rider. I wasn't seeing nearly enough sag and removed the spacer and still have the same sag problem.

    Talked to super cool guy at Fox and he recommended that I still stick with the recommended air pressure so I set that up and put a shockwiz on the bike to test it out... the attached shows the current results. Still running 8% sag.

    I'm going to drop the SAG to about 20% and ride the same trail today to see what kind of report I get back.



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    Following up here for anyone interested. Dropped my PSI to 56 and rode the exact same trail again with much better results.

    Really confused with Fox's reco .. almost makes me wonder if there is something wrong with my fork?



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    I'm a heavier rider with the new 2021 fox 36. My reqs stated like 83 psi.. I"m at 72 psi with 2 tokens. Feels much better. This is from the pivot set up guide. If I go to the Fox web page, it states that I to have around 110 psi.. No way..
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryano4u View Post
    I'm a heavier rider with the new 2021 fox 36. My reqs stated like 83 psi.. I"m at 72 psi with 2 tokens. Feels much better. This is from the pivot set up guide. If I go to the Fox web page, it states that I to have around 110 psi.. No way..
    Yep... Just reread the pivot recos... Much closer to what I'm running.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tomgru View Post
    Following up here for anyone interested. Dropped my PSI to 56 and rode the exact same trail again with much better results.

    Really confused with Fox's reco .. almost makes me wonder if there is something wrong with my fork?
    At the Fox recommended pressure, I get no sag and hurt my wrist trying to compress the fork to 50%.

    Running 55 PSI and it feels much better. Full travel on drops and ~75% on trail.
    Last edited by xtrpickels; 07-31-2020 at 11:59 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by xtrpickels View Post
    At the Fox recommended pressure, I get no sag and hurt my wrist trying to compress the fork to 50%.

    Running 55 PSI and it feels much better. Full travel on drops and ~75% on trail.
    Ironically, I just read the online Pivot guidance and it says to set the PSI to 55 for my weight. Feel dumb I didn't see that, but didn't come with the bike... But the Fox manual did. Go figure.

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  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomgru View Post
    Ironically, I just read the online Pivot guidance and it says to set the PSI to 55 for my weight. Feel dumb I didn't see that, but didn't come with the bike... But the Fox manual did. Go figure.

    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
    The bikes ship to the dealer with a printed version of that same set up guide from the website. That paper work is often lost or forgotten at the dealer. Glad you found the info though, and it's telling that our suggestions and your final set up ended up at the same place. You've have good insight on what it should be set at, nice work!
    "The face of a child can say it all, especially the mouth part of the face".
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    First reaction post after a typical ~10 mile ride w/ 1600' of climb, medium tech

    Old bike: 2017, XL, Pro X01 build, Reynolds wheels
    New bike: 2020, XL, Pro XT/XTR build, DT Swiss wheels

    Interestingly, the bike feels bigger in the cockpit, though the measurement differences are really small. It could be just going from 760mm bars to 800mm. I'm likely to change that out. I'm halfway thinking about going to a shorter (35mm) stem, though I might wait until after I change the bars out and get used to that change first.

    I could feel the extra 20mm of wheelbase in switchbacky corners on the climbs, but nothing I won't get used to. I haven't even begun to think about messing with the suspension yet... will get the geometry sorted out first.

    The difference in climbing was surprisingly large. I'm used to the old bike and have adapted to keep the nose down. This bike pretty much won't lift its nose except in extreme cases. Is that completely due to the chainstays? Or chainstays AND wheelbase?

    It's a little more stable on the downs, though that difference didn't feel as big as the climbing.

    It is a little less nimble, at least at first blush, but perhaps I'll get used to the difference in size and that will go away.

  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde Ride View Post
    First reaction post after a typical ~10 mile ride w/ 1600' of climb, medium tech

    Old bike: 2017, XL, Pro X01 build, Reynolds wheels
    New bike: 2020, XL, Pro XT/XTR build, DT Swiss wheels


    The difference in climbing was surprisingly large. I'm used to the old bike and have adapted to keep the nose down. This bike pretty much won't lift its nose except in extreme cases. Is that completely due to the chainstays? Or chainstays AND wheelbase?
    Longer chainstays and steeper STA - seat tube angle makes a big difference in keeping your weight forward on climbs and thus keeping the front wheel more planted.

  95. #95
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    Clyde Ryde what size are in height and weight?

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    Quote Originally Posted by vicjoe View Post
    Clyde Ryde what size are in height and weight?
    Currently 6'3" and around 220#. The weight sometimes goes up, but the height is always the same.

    Long inseam (~36") and reach (~36-37" sleeve).

  97. #97
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    PSI Starting Point

    I'm confused and need some advice from Pivot Moderators on the recommended starting point for fork PSI.

    The Pivot suspension setup sheets included with my bike say 62 psi for 190 lb rider.
    2020 Switchblade ride reports-pivot.jpg

    That has now changed based on the recent download on the website this morning to 82-94 psi. It does say that some riders need to run 1-2 steps below their weight to achieve full travel. 2020 Switchblade ride reports-pivot-07222020.jpg

    While the Fox site says 80-89 based on DTMX ID #.
    Name:  Fox.jpg
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    Lately, I've been experimenting with 63 psi on my local OH super rooty trails. This seems super plush but is using ~70% of travel.
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    Quote Originally Posted by edbraunbeck View Post
    I'm confused and need some advice from Pivot Moderators on the recommended starting point for fork PSI.

    The Pivot suspension setup sheets included with my bike say 62 psi for 190 lb rider.


    That has now changed based on the recent download on the website this morning to 82-94 psi. It does say that some riders need to run 1-2 steps below their weight to achieve full travel.

    While the Fox site says 80-89 based on DTMX ID #.


    Lately, I've been experimenting with 63 psi on my local OH super rooty trails. This seems super plush but is using ~70% of travel.
    I'm not a moderator, but IMO there's not one magic psi number that is the only correct amount of pressure to run. It depends on the terrain you're riding, your riding style, and preference for fork feel. I think the only requirement would be that if you are regularly bottoming your fork, you need to add pressure or volume spacers.

    Personally, I prefer a plusher feel up front, so I run lower pressure than recommended and have added a couple volume spacers to add progressive ramp-up and prevent bottoming on larger drops/hits. I also dial in more compression damping if I'm about to hit a large roll-down or am on a trail with repeated drops/hits, in order to keep the fork higher in its travel. That works for me and my terrain/preference, but others may desire a different feel or behavior.

    What do you want to change about the current behavior you're getting at 63psi? Do you WANT to use more than 70% travel, or are you happy having some in reserve for bigger hits? Do you like the plush feel, or do you want more stiffness/support?

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by edbraunbeck View Post
    I'm confused and need some advice from Pivot Moderators on the recommended starting point for fork PSI.

    The Pivot suspension setup sheets included with my bike say 62 psi for 190 lb rider.


    That has now changed based on the recent download on the website this morning to 82-94 psi. It does say that some riders need to run 1-2 steps below their weight to achieve full travel.

    While the Fox site says 80-89 based on DTMX ID #.


    Lately, I've been experimenting with 63 psi on my local OH super rooty trails. This seems super plush but is using ~70% of travel.
    Wow good find. This has changed considerably the last version. I'm in the same weight category as you, and will be interested to see what you find out from a Pivot moderator.

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by rocky_mtn18 View Post
    Wow good find. This has changed considerably the last version. I'm in the same weight category as you, and will be interested to see what you find out from a Pivot moderator.
    Per above, I found the earlier chart was right on when validated with a shock wiz.

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    OK, 3 days, 3 rides. I'm starting to adapt to everything, and this is a great bike. For those that are riding the old SB and thinking about the new one, I think it's OK to note that the delta isn't gigantic. If you're very tall and/or have a lot of issue with the light nose, you might really like the upgrade. If money is tight, I wouldn't make the jump. Just my 2 cents.

    The new bike is very stable and predictable in the climbs without getting extreme on the forward shift. It's also a bit more planted on the downs. I did notice the extra wheelbase this morning (in a bad way)... when I rolled over a rock roll, I scuffed a couple of chain links on the way over. That's new compared to the old bike.

    I started paying more attention to the suspension setup. I think the posters above got it sorted out, but would emphasize that the starting point on suspension settings (assuming you don't have your own approach) should come from Pivot's website, not Fox's. Also, I would underline that Pivot recommends the middle compression setting for big riders and the 3mm adjustment on the DPX2 is ONLY for the wide open setting on the 3-way control.

    I'm pretty close to the Pivot recommended settings, and really like everything so far. There's a lot of pedaling support, but without some of the jabby harshness I occasionally felt on the v1/Float X2.

    Great bike.

  102. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by xtrpickels View Post
    After a 3 day demo, I ordered a Large Switchblade and am currently waiting for it to ship. I compared it directly against a Large SB130LR.

    Me: Riding Front Range Colorado. My other bike is an Epic with a StepCast 120, so I was looking for something that handled chunky and steep better than my "efficient" bike.

    As was mentioned above, the Switchblade is a fun bike. I felt like I could go fast, sure, but I also felt like I could go slower and pop off things, slam it into corners and goof around. In chunky terrain the rear suspension was terrific.

    Pedaling, the bike is not XC bike efficient, let's be honest. Don't take this to mean the bike is inefficient, as I am sure that there was more inefficiencies from the DHR rear tire than the suspension. When climbing techy sections, I felt like the SB helped me keep momentum as the suspension absorbed the terrain very well with little to no input into pedaling. I will say, however, I did notice the suspension sinking a bit deep into travel during chunky climbing. I remedied this with by flipping the shock to the "trail" position, but feel I can address is with more tuning in the future.

    I also felt very confident on this bike; I trusted the tires because it felt like I both had a great connection with the ground, but that the suspension also helped smooth things out and kept me isolated. I had the best descent at Heil Ranch that I've ever had, with the most confidence and fun. I'm typically holding on for dear life, but on the SB I was smiling and hooting (Top 5% of Strava times this year).

    The SB130LR was a different animal all together. In all honesty, I don't think the LR is the right set-up for this bike. The SB130 is a very efficiently pedaling platform. It feels like a shorter travel bike. In chunky sections, it was harsh. In smooth sections, when you could open it up, it railed. In my opinion that's how a bike with 120mm should behave, not 130+.

    Back to pedaling: I was faster uphill on the SB130. When Climbing technical terrain, the suspenion did not isolate you like the Pivot, but, the high pedaling efficiency felt very positive; with each pedal stroke the SB130 wanted to claw over any obstacle in it's way.

    When I was able to into more flowy terrain, I immediately got why people like the SB130: it does rail at high speeds. It's very confident inspiring and it feels like it has your back when you eyes start to water. It also handled single-drops (up to 4 feet) with composure. I liked the extra length in the reach compared to the Pivot. It had a lot of things going for it, but I believe a better comparison for the SB130 is the Trail 429.

    For me, in my terrain and my bike stable, the Switchblade was the better choice.
    Do you mind if I ask how tall you are? And how does the large fit? Thanks.

  103. #103
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    I'm really interested in the SB, currently on a large mach 5.5. This would be my first 29er. I'm pretty comfortable on my Large 5.5 at 5'10" and a 40mm stem. Should I stick with a Large for the SB? I've always thought that you should size down a little on a 29er, and I'm right in between sizes usually. Anyone coming from a 5.5 care to compare the two? The posts about turning it into a mullet are also intriguing. TIA.

  104. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by bryanus View Post
    I'm really interested in the SB, currently on a large mach 5.5. This would be my first 29er. I'm pretty comfortable on my Large 5.5 at 5'10" and a 40mm stem. Should I stick with a Large for the SB? I've always thought that you should size down a little on a 29er, and I'm right in between sizes usually. Anyone coming from a 5.5 care to compare the two? The posts about turning it into a mullet are also intriguing. TIA.
    I'm in the same situation as you. I own a 5.5 and am about your height. I was very comfortable on the large SB. Got enough time on it to gather a decent opinion. IMO, It's not a lot different than the 5.5. With the exception of the wheel size, the specs are pretty close. I really loved the bike but my 5.5 is fantastic too. Honestly unless you just want to get into the 29" wheel club, IMO there isn't enough difference to switch. That said, between the two if I were buying right now, I'd pick the SB all day.

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    I have 9 rides in now. I don't claim to be a suspension wizard, but this is where I am right now, for reference. I'm running about 220lbs right now, and usually carry a ~10lb pack.

    ē Rear
    ○ 225psi
    ○ Rebound - 12 clicks CW from open
    ○ Compression - middle setting

    ē Front
    ○ 110 psi
    ○ LSR - 13 CW
    ○ HSR - 5 CW
    ○ HSC (blue) - 2 CW
    ○ LSC (black) - 5 CW

    I haven't bottomed out the fork much and am thinking about dropping some pressure out of that, though it's felt good and I'm also tempted to not screw with it and know I have some reserve.

  106. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde Ride View Post
    I have 9 rides in now. I don't claim to be a suspension wizard, but this is where I am right now, for reference. I'm running about 220lbs right now, and usually carry a ~10lb pack.

    ē Rear
    ○ 225psi
    ○ Rebound - 12 clicks CW from open
    ○ Compression - middle setting

    ē Front
    ○ 110 psi
    ○ LSR - 13 CW
    ○ HSR - 5 CW
    ○ HSC (blue) - 2 CW
    ○ LSC (black) - 5 CW

    I haven't bottomed out the fork much and am thinking about dropping some pressure out of that, though it's felt good and I'm also tempted to not screw with it and know I have some reserve.
    Based on my (and other's) experience, you may want to try to lower the fork pressure to match the chart with lower values posted above.

    You can always go back. Keep in mind you may need to speed up rebound and slow-down compression.

  107. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoDakSooner View Post
    I'm in the same situation as you. I own a 5.5 and am about your height. I was very comfortable on the large SB. Got enough time on it to gather a decent opinion. IMO, It's not a lot different than the 5.5. With the exception of the wheel size, the specs are pretty close. I really loved the bike but my 5.5 is fantastic too. Honestly unless you just want to get into the 29" wheel club, IMO there isn't enough difference to switch. That said, between the two if I were buying right now, I'd pick the SB all day.
    Thanks for talking some sense into me! Yes, I have been wondering what I'm missing by not running 29, but I went for a great ride yesterday on the 5.5 and just had a huge grin on my face thinking "Man, this is a great bike!". I do think the 5.5 may be due for an update soon though, as it is 3 seasons in now, but for now it's a keeper. Thanks for talking some sense into me; you saved me $9K! lol

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    Does anyone know if they will be using the same color scheme on their 2021 switchblade line?

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    Quote Originally Posted by rocky_mtn18 View Post
    Wow good find. This has changed considerably the last version. I'm in the same weight category as you, and will be interested to see what you find out from a Pivot moderator.
    @John P. Can you chime in here?

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  110. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomgru View Post
    @John P. Can you chime in here?

    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
    I think what you're seeing here is the difference between a 2020 36 and a 2021 36. The 2021 needs more air pressure to achieve the same sag at a given weight.

    I'm about 170lbs in riding gear and ride 'light' (read: 'like a pansy'), and I always ShockWiz everything. On my 2020 Fox 36 I ran 57PSI; on my 2021 Fox 36 I'm at 74psi, and if anything I've lost a couple pounds of blubber.

    As always, these settings are meant to be starting point, and from there, go off personal preference. If you want to get a little more precise, buy or borrow a ShockWiz, and that will really help (related note: I upgraded the shock on my Shuttle Race from a DPX2 Performance to an X2 Factory. I was sort of mildly impressed by the X2 until today when I finally ShockWiz'ed it. Holy smokes... what a huge difference. It's like a different bike with the proper settings).

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    Hello, Iím a former Yeti SB130 owner who is going to buy a 2020 Pivot Switchblade. I sold my Yeti because I was really angry with Yetiís decision to remove the words: ďThe TribeĒ from their company literature. This was a terrible decision Yeti made because it destroyed the soul of the company. Before I sold my bike, I looked again at the beautiful owners manual they included with my SB130. In the manual, they proudly declare me to be a new member of ďThe TribeĒ and go on to list my responsibilities as a tribe member. Iíll never forget how captivated and excited I was when I first read that manual. I felt really special to be a member of such an elite group! Now, whenever I think of Yeti; I feel nothing but disgust and contempt.

    I posted this because I hope that Pivot Bikes will stand up for themselves and not become a victim of political correctness as Yeti has. Remember, if you stand for nothing, you can fall for anything!!!

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    So you're saying the new X2 possibly outperforms the custom DPX2 when setup correctly? Can you elaborate on the differences. Thanks


    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    I think what you're seeing here is the difference between a 2020 36 and a 2021 36. The 2021 needs more air pressure to achieve the same sag at a given weight.

    I'm about 170lbs in riding gear and ride 'light' (read: 'like a pansy'), and I always ShockWiz everything. On my 2020 Fox 36 I ran 57PSI; on my 2021 Fox 36 I'm at 74psi, and if anything I've lost a couple pounds of blubber.

    As always, these settings are meant to be starting point, and from there, go off personal preference. If you want to get a little more precise, buy or borrow a ShockWiz, and that will really help (related note: I upgraded the shock on my Shuttle Race from a DPX2 Performance to an X2 Factory. I was sort of mildly impressed by the X2 until today when I finally ShockWiz'ed it. Holy smokes... what a huge difference. It's like a different bike with the proper settings).

    JP

  113. #113
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Quote Originally Posted by vicjoe View Post
    So you're saying the new X2 possibly outperforms the custom DPX2 when setup correctly? Can you elaborate on the differences. Thanks
    I'm saying the new 2021 X2 Factory outperforms the 2020 DPX2 Performance I had on my Shuttle. No big surprise there.

    Regarding the 2021 X2 Factory vs a 2021 DPX2 Factory on the Switchblade, I haven't personally tried the X2 on my SB, but I know we did some testing with the X2 when we were developing the new bike. We liked the X2 vs the stock DPX2, but then we had them completely redesign the DPX2 base valve to allow more oil flow, and we found that the performance difference was negligible and the cost difference was not.

    If you have "f*ck-you money" and you love to tinker, sure, get an X2 for your Switchblade and go nuts (be aware that finding a trunion-style 185x55 X2 is not easy). You'll love it. Otherwise, spend some time tuning your DPX2 (I CANNOT EMPHASIZE THIS ENOUGH) and you'll find that it's way more shock than you'll ever need on that bike. Take the $650 you would have spent on that X2 and buy yourself a season pass to your local bike park.
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  114. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    spend some time tuning your DPX2[/B] (I CANNOT EMPHASIZE THIS ENOUGH) and you'll find that it's way more shock than you'll ever need on that bike. Take the $650 you would have spent on that X2 and buy yourself a season pass to your local bike park.
    Hi John, I conversed with you quite a bit years ago when you were with Yeti. For the first time in 12 years I no longer have a Yeti, and I'm getting and new Switchblade Pro XTR with the Reynolds wheels. Once it's in hand, I will be contacting you guys for the best starting point on the shock. I do have a question about the stock spacer that will come with it. I'm 185 kitted up, is the spacer in the shock (medium size frame) going to be a good start for me?

    So excited about the SB!

  115. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by swade View Post
    Hi John, I conversed with you quite a bit years ago when you were with Yeti. For the first time in 12 years I no longer have a Yeti, and I'm getting and new Switchblade Pro XTR with the Reynolds wheels. Once it's in hand, I will be contacting you guys for the best starting point on the shock. I do have a question about the stock spacer that will come with it. I'm 185 kitted up, is the spacer in the shock (medium size frame) going to be a good start for me?

    So excited about the SB!
    Not John, but the suspension setup guide on their site is (I think) still their starting point. I'm a lot heavier than you at 220 BA naked, but they suggested starting with the stock spacer configuration. I like it, and probably won't change it.

    https://store.pivotcycles.com/file/download/64944

    Great bike, and I think the Pro XTR build is a great sweet spot on price performance. Enjoy.

  116. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by swade View Post
    Hi John, I conversed with you quite a bit years ago when you were with Yeti. For the first time in 12 years I no longer have a Yeti, and I'm getting and new Switchblade Pro XTR with the Reynolds wheels. Once it's in hand, I will be contacting you guys for the best starting point on the shock. I do have a question about the stock spacer that will come with it. I'm 185 kitted up, is the spacer in the shock (medium size frame) going to be a good start for me?

    So excited about the SB!
    First off, welcome to the Pivot family!!!

    Clyde's advice above is good - start with our setup guide. If you want to get nerdier and more precise (like me), get your hands on a ShockWiz and commit some serious time to doing the small, iterative changes required to get the shock dialed in - change only ONE variable at a time until it's perfect, then adjust the next one on the screen.

    If you don't want to use a ShockWiz, the test for which volume spacer to use is really simple:
    1. Setup your shock for proper sag.
    2. If you have your sag set correctly and you're never bottoming out, you have too much ramp-up and you should reduce the spacer.
    3. If you're bottoming out a lot, you probably need a bigger spacer.

    For me, it made the most sense to reduce the spacer from a 0.6 (stock) to a 0.4. Personally, I like the more linear feel of a smaller spacer, and I find I'm using more of the travel.

    Hope this helps,

    JP
    PIVOT Cycles

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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    First off, welcome to the Pivot family!!!

    JP
    Thanks man, I'm super excited. I demoed a bunch of bikes including all the latest Yetis and was absolutely set on a new Ibis Ripmo, but then new V2 Switchblade came out and I just loved all the frame specs and details on paper and started wanting one. I still think the Ripmo is phenomenal and like a few things about each better than the other. But the Pivot is incredible and it's just dead sexy looking too.

    I'll just roll with the .6 spacer to start and go by those recommended starting settings. Thanks for sharing JohnP and Clyde Ride. If anything I would probably end up with the smaller spacer because I like an active and more plush suspension as I'm getting older and wimpier. Some days I rip, other days I just want the smoothest ride possible.

  118. #118
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    Last edited by EV07; 08-28-2020 at 09:13 AM.

  119. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardrake View Post
    Hello, Iím a former Yeti SB130 owner who is going to buy a 2020 Pivot Switchblade. I sold my Yeti because I was really angry with Yetiís decision to remove the words: ďThe TribeĒ from their company literature. This was a terrible decision Yeti made because it destroyed the soul of the company. Before I sold my bike, I looked again at the beautiful owners manual they included with my SB130. In the manual, they proudly declare me to be a new member of ďThe TribeĒ and go on to list my responsibilities as a tribe member. Iíll never forget how captivated and excited I was when I first read that manual. I felt really special to be a member of such an elite group! Now, whenever I think of Yeti; I feel nothing but disgust and contempt.

    I posted this because I hope that Pivot Bikes will stand up for themselves and not become a victim of political correctness as Yeti has. Remember, if you stand for nothing, you can fall for anything!!!
    The tribe thing always turned me off. It has nothing to do with Native Americans. People who aggregate because of Harleys, Airstreams, Ford, Ferrari, etc make me uncomfortable. However, Steeler fans are noticeably superior to others.


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  120. #120
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    I like that Pivot riders don't drag a bunch of drama around.

  121. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrDon View Post
    However, Steeler fans are noticeably superior to others.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
    Hahahaha... well played.

    When I worked at Yeti and lived in CO, I randomly wound up at that Steelers/Broncos playoff game where Tebow threw that TD pass to win it in overtime. It was a crushing loss for Pittsburgh, but I had to hand it to the Steelers fans that they were all pretty good-natured about it.

    JP
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  122. #122
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    Out of Curiosity what heights vs what size Switchblade are you guys running? I am waiting for my Local to get a few in but he said they didn't, and won't be, ordering smalls.
    The mind, like a parachute, works best when open.

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    What has everyone's order time looked like? I know they are waiting to get brakes/suspension right now.

  124. #124
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    ordered on 7/9, being told end of October... Glad I still have the V1!

  125. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muggsly View Post
    Out of Curiosity what heights vs what size Switchblade are you guys running? I am waiting for my Local to get a few in but he said they didn't, and won't be, ordering smalls.
    5' 10" and change. Size large. Fit very well. My 5.5 is a large as well.

    FWIW, I don't own a SB. I rented for 3 days and have about 50 miles on it.

  126. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark194 View Post
    ordered on 7/9, being told end of October... Glad I still have the V1!
    Dang, I am not sure how I am going to make it... Looks like I can count it as a Christmas present, haha. Ordered a week ago and they said 60-90 days. Was hoping people were getting them earlier then that, either way stoked to be joining the Pivot family. Coming from a 2015 Giant Trance so it should be a bit of an upgrade.

  127. #127
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    yea, I was told they are waiting for forks...

  128. #128
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    We'll have SRAM kits back in stock much sooner than Shimano, but we're still waiting on forks, saddles, and various other parts.

    The best source of when your bike will be delivered will be your dealer. They know exactly how much they have on order with us and estimated ship dates of everything. When people email me and ask when their bike will arrive, I honestly have no idea. If your dealer happened to order one for stock in your model/size/color/build, it could be on it's way. If your dealer has not yet ordered with us and needs something very specific, it could be a very long time. It could also be anywhere in between those extremes depending on a hundred different variables.

    JP
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  129. #129
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    FWIW, there is a medium xt/xtr build at the shop I frequent in Tulsa if anyone is looking for one. I think they are having trouble moving it because of the size.

  130. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark194 View Post
    ordered on 7/9, being told end of October... Glad I still have the V1!
    Oooof. What build kit?

    I ordered on 8/1 (an XT/XTR build). At the time I was told 30-45 days. I asked my dealer for an update last week - he reached out to his rep who told him a batch of bikes with mine in it would be shipped out sometime this month, so if that holds, I'll be somewhere in a 55-75 day window from placing the order.

  131. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by lvrpl View Post
    Oooof. What build kit?

    I ordered on 8/1 (an XT/XTR build). At the time I was told 30-45 days. I asked my dealer for an update last week - he reached out to his rep who told him a batch of bikes with mine in it would be shipped out sometime this month, so if that holds, I'll be somewhere in a 55-75 day window from placing the order.
    Mine the Pro XO1 build, looks like I will be closer to 80ish days?

  132. #132
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    Mine should be here next week. Ordered mine 4 weeks ago. Ordered the race xt 29. Dealer said I could get the next build up quicker as sram was more readily available then shimano....but I wanted the slx instead of gx. Can't wait...hope it shows in time. Anyone know what the fox suspension upgrades are on the 2021 compared to the 2020?

  133. #133
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    What do you guys think about the difference between the Hightower V2 and the Switchblade? I assume the the SB climbs better, and perhaps the HT is slightly more capable downhill? Which bike rides lighter, and accelerates better?

  134. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    I think what you're seeing here is the difference between a 2020 36 and a 2021 36. The 2021 needs more air pressure to achieve the same sag at a given weight.

    I'm about 170lbs in riding gear and ride 'light' (read: 'like a pansy'), and I always ShockWiz everything. On my 2020 Fox 36 I ran 57PSI; on my 2021 Fox 36 I'm at 74psi, and if anything I've lost a couple pounds of blubber.

    As always, these settings are meant to be starting point, and from there, go off personal preference. If you want to get a little more precise, buy or borrow a ShockWiz, and that will really help (related note: I upgraded the shock on my Shuttle Race from a DPX2 Performance to an X2 Factory. I was sort of mildly impressed by the X2 until today when I finally ShockWiz'ed it. Holy smokes... what a huge difference. It's like a different bike with the proper settings).

    JP
    Thanks John. I used a shockwiz for 10plus rides, and it kept telling me to lower PSI... I'm around 53 now, we'll off the 2021 reco. I ride light as well

    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

  135. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    First off, welcome to the Pivot family!!!

    Clyde's advice above is good - start with our setup guide. If you want to get nerdier and more precise (like me), get your hands on a ShockWiz and commit some serious time to doing the small, iterative changes required to get the shock dialed in - change only ONE variable at a time until it's perfect, then adjust the next one on the screen.

    If you don't want to use a ShockWiz, the test for which volume spacer to use is really simple:
    1. Setup your shock for proper sag.
    2. If you have your sag set correctly and you're never bottoming out, you have too much ramp-up and you should reduce the spacer.
    3. If you're bottoming out a lot, you probably need a bigger spacer.

    For me, it made the most sense to reduce the spacer from a 0.6 (stock) to a 0.4. Personally, I like the more linear feel of a smaller spacer, and I find I'm using more of the travel.

    Hope this helps,

    JP
    Thanks John,
    After a few rides, and many small adjustments it's now feeling like ďmyĒ bike. Iím settled in at 215 psi in the shock at 190-195 lbs with full gear and water. Iím just below but still touching the red sag indicator line. I hit it pretty hard today on a trail that I feel like I should have used all the travel, but didnít get all of it. I think I will try the .4 spacer. Will I need to add or reduce psi when I do this? If so, how much in general?

    I ride pretty light too and like a linear feel like you described. It feels good right now, but does ramp up quite a bit.

  136. #136
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    Purchased a green Race XT yesterday, first ride today. Absolutely great on east coast chunk. I'm coming off of a 2015 Devinci Troy, so the upgrade is significant.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2020 Switchblade ride reports-21564877-8a39-4590-853f-4eb4582276cf.jpg  


  137. #137
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    Gorgeous new bike!

    Question: Have any Switchblade riders had any issues/complaints about the more conservative geometry the bike has?

  138. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokee300 View Post
    Purchased a green Race XT yesterday, first ride today. Absolutely great on east coast chunk. I'm coming off of a 2015 Devinci Troy, so the upgrade is significant.
    Are you riding the flip chip in high or low?

  139. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by lvrpl View Post
    Are you riding the flip chip in high or low?
    I'm running it in low. After 2 rides/25 miles, with rooty/rocky stuff, and some fairly tight lower . speed turns, I am pleasantly surprised with both the clearance and handling. Better than my Troy in terms of clearance, and at least equal to the Troy(which is 27.5 and has a shorter WB) in terms of slow speed handling.

    Higher speed handling, the SB kills the Troy.

  140. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardrake View Post
    Gorgeous new bike!

    Question: Have any Switchblade riders had any issues/complaints about the more conservative geometry the bike has?
    I wouldn't say the geo is conservative, I would say that it is a good all-around long travel trail bike. This is exactly what I bought the bike for.

    Yes, there are times when I wish I had a slacker HTA because I'm riding steep blown out trails that are too steep and loose to slow down. And there are other times I wish the STA was a touch steeper for grinding up super steep climbs.

    But, Frankly, buying a bike around these specific sections or trails would mean a machine that was too specialized for the diversity of my riding.

  141. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by xtrpickels View Post
    I wouldn't say the geo is conservative, I would say that it is a good all-around long travel trail bike. This is exactly what I bought the bike for.

    Yes, there are times when I wish I had a slacker HTA because I'm riding steep blown out trails that are too steep and loose to slow down. And there are other times I wish the STA was a touch steeper for grinding up super steep climbs.

    But, Frankly, buying a bike around these specific sections or trails would mean a machine that was too specialized for the diversity of my riding.
    Yep. Awesome bike.

  142. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by Full Send View Post
    I previously owned a 2018 Mach 429 Trail, and have demoed the Trail 429 a few times as well. I now own the 2020 Switchblade, and continue to be blown away by this bike. The pedaling efficiency when you are putting the power down is insanely good. I am regularly getting PRs on technical trails I've ridden many times with this bike, and not just descents. The suspension feels plusher and on a parking lot ride makes you think the bike will be less efficient on the trail, but I can assure you that is not the case. The DPX2 tune is amazing - plush and yet supportive. The middle position is great for a slightly poppier/firmer feel while retaining small bump compliance, and the open mode is amazing for technical stuff.

    I also have the Mach 4 SL as an XC race bike, so personally, if I could only have one MTB, it would still be the Trail 429. But if you already have a hardtail for smoother rides/races, I would not hesitate to get the new SB. It's that good.

    One more note - I'm riding in the HIGH flip chip position for techy New England trails, which really increases the versatility of this bike. I'd throw it to LOW for trips to the bike park or a trip out West.
    Are you using 175 crankarms?
    How often do you pedal smash in rocky sections?
    Do you have tight switchbacks there and is it good there or too long?
    How is it on flat sections?
    How about 3-4 hour rides?
    Sprints?
    Thank you!

  143. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by richt2000 View Post
    Iím a FB29 owner, and love this bike. Demoed the Sb2 over the weekend:

    Quality and finish is second to none. I think Pivot and Santa Cruz are the best youíre going to get. I love the chain protection, the cable ports, the finish. All 10/10.

    Climbing: climbing up fireroads, on road it climbs like a 140mm travel bike, nothing special. Not nearlt as efficient as my intense primer mk1. MaxxGrip 2.5 tyres probably have something to do with this mind! Once you get it in technical climbs it excels. Doesníf get hung up at all. Only bike Iíve ridden which climbs nearly as well is the evil offering and Iíd say the switchblade is better due to a steeper seat angle at my saddle height.

    Descending: Initially I was a little disappointed. It was quick but not that quick (bear in mind I ride a FB29!). The shock tune is very very progressive. I set sag correctly yet I could not use anywhere near full travel even on sizeable drops. I would be taking volume spacers out I think. However its a very stiff frame and feels great, no baggy flex here like the Sb130. I thought it would suit me well with an offset bushing and a -1 anglesst to slacken it out a bit and drop the BB but it wasnít my bikes. The I had an Ideas...

    Tried mulleting a bike for the first time. Stuck a 27.5x2.35 wheel in the rear. WOW, what a difference. Seat angle is steep enough to just slam saddle forward and get away with it. Makes the bike come alive. Much more confident - Ha measured 65, BB dropped to 425mm (so maybe better run in high mode).

    Its number one on my Ďbuy list nowí!
    Have you ridden the latest Intense Primer? How would you compare?
    Pluses and minuses.
    Tight switchbacks, pedal strikes, sprinting...
    Thank you.

  144. #144
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    Sizing question- according to the Pivot site, at 5'10", I should be on a medium. Speaking to a local dealer, he highly recommended a large, and said to always size up on the frame. I chatted with someone on the Pivot site and he steered me towards a medium. Typical riding is tight, twisty New England singletrack. I am not sure what is the right call here- can anyone weigh in? For reference, I am coming from a 2018 27.5 Giant Trance, size L with a 35mm stem. The medium SB looks to be a hair longer reach-wise than my current bike.

  145. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by gluestick View Post
    Sizing question- according to the Pivot site, at 5'10", I should be on a medium. Speaking to a local dealer, he highly recommended a large, and said to always size up on the frame. I chatted with someone on the Pivot site and he steered me towards a medium. Typical riding is tight, twisty New England singletrack. I am not sure what is the right call here- can anyone weigh in? For reference, I am coming from a 2018 27.5 Giant Trance, size L with a 35mm stem. The medium SB looks to be a hair longer reach-wise than my current bike.
    I just got mine 2 weeks ago and went with a large and im a tad under 6 feet. Imo I'm glad I got the large...it fits perfectly. Not sure if that helps ya...you are right on the line but if you went with a large i dont think you would have a problem.

  146. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by gluestick View Post
    Sizing question- according to the Pivot site, at 5'10", I should be on a medium. Speaking to a local dealer, he highly recommended a large, and said to always size up on the frame. I chatted with someone on the Pivot site and he steered me towards a medium. Typical riding is tight, twisty New England singletrack. I am not sure what is the right call here- can anyone weigh in? For reference, I am coming from a 2018 27.5 Giant Trance, size L with a 35mm stem. The medium SB looks to be a hair longer reach-wise than my current bike.
    I'm probably a hair under 6'1" and have a large. I ride in New England. I rode an Xl and a large, and if I were any taller, I'd def. be on an XL. I would say the Pivot sizing charts are a touch on the small side, so anyone at the upper end of their category size wize, should ride both bikes. The bike handles twisty, rocky, rooty stuff very well IMHO.

  147. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by bachey View Post
    Well, My current bike store sells Ibis and Pivot and Yeti. Iím not really interested in the Yeti at this current time, although I do think it is a great climber.
    I cannot get an Ibis until November due to all the back log apparently. I have demoed the v1 Ripmo, not the v2. I also considered that since Iím on the heavier side I wanted a stiffer more robust bike. Now Iím not sure pivots actually are or not, but I considered all the marketing hype about super boost and frame design etc.
    So I hopped on a 2020 Switchblade to see what it was all about. I actually took it out twice.
    First ride: Honestly was kind of meh. It was okay, didnít climb as fast as my current bike, was a little quicker on the flat and it did seem to pick up speed very quick going down. But after all that, I was kind of just okay about the whole thing.
    Now I should mention my current bike is a 2016 Giant Trance Advanced 27.5Ē. The geometry was way different, it just felt weird. I knew that so again I was taking that into account. It was very foreign feeling and didnít seem to accelerate as quick as my current bike. I left feeling like it could be my bike but most certainly was not sure it would be my bike. It was just meh.

    I asked for a second demo ride and went out again to a specific steep climb that I usually do on my Trance.
    Climb: It climbed up better than the Trance, I was surprised. I usually have to scoot forward in the saddle on my Trance but didnít need to on the switchblade. Ahhh modern geometry. I was within 3 seconds of my PR up the hill without even trying. Okay so it climbs pretty decent after all. Maybe not quite the same speed, but whatever, Iíll get to the top when I get there. As long as I get there. And if I hammered on it Iím sure I could easily make up the missing 3 seconds.

    Down: well I set my PR on some single track...lots of grip, didnít feel any chatter like I did on my 4 year old trance, just butter smooth. Rails the corners. Grip due to geometry and big tires. It was effortless. Easy.

    Flat: still flickable, maybe not quite as much as a 27.5Ē tire, but could lean bike over more, still,felt just great. Again, all the small bumps were gone, I felt everyone of the small bumps on the trance.

    Somehow, I think I was already starting to get used to the bigger 29Ē wheels and new geometry. I did have a few pedal strikes on the switch blade, but I think itís more a timing issue and not being used to the bike, plus Iím not sure the shock was set up exactly for my weight.

    Now, I take all this with a grain of salt, as Iím comparing a brand new 29Ē to a 4 year old 27.5Ē with 4 year old components, of course they are going to feel different. But I did find the new geometry made a big difference. Mountain biking is great now a days no matter what bike or brand you like.

    The components were even better and have come along way since my 2016 trance. The bike was mostly quiet, but the cables at the front of cockpit were noisy. Otherwise it was quiet. No brake pad noise from the xt brakes.

    I tested the pro xt/xtr build in large, Iím 5í10Ē, with dt Swiss wheels. It weighed in at 31.5 lbs in case anyone wants to know with store pedals included.
    My trance weighs in at 28.5 lbs. so there is a weight/acceleration penalty.

    So I thought about it and pulled the trigger. Bought a blue same build with Reynolds wheels. See how it goes. Iím hoping that this will do me for 5 years of more fun. My wife has the Trail 429 and loves it as well. My bike will be at least another 3 weeks as I asked for the 2021 fork and they have to import it into Canada first. They currently have builds available with the older fork. Not sure I will be able to tell the difference but if I am spending the money and not in a hurry, I might well get the newer items. Iím also getting a slight knee surgery around time the bike comes in, so I will have time to throw some tape down to protect some of frame and it can help rehabilitate me as we get used to each other on our first easy rides together. Looking forward to it.
    How did your knee surgery go?
    Do ride any really rocky or tight switchbacks? What size crank arms and do you run? Pedal strikes? Pedal strikes are a problem some of the places I ride. Also thinking about INTENSE Primer, Giant Advance pro 29, PIVOT Trail 429 and Switchblade. Not looking for a sluggish bike. A sprinty bike is nice I ride in the Midatlantic/ Virginia, WVa region. How about customer service and crash replacement? Quality control and overall quality? 6'1 165 pounds. Thank you.

  148. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by gluestick View Post
    Sizing question- according to the Pivot site, at 5'10", I should be on a medium. Speaking to a local dealer, he highly recommended a large, and said to always size up on the frame. I chatted with someone on the Pivot site and he steered me towards a medium. Typical riding is tight, twisty New England singletrack. I am not sure what is the right call here- can anyone weigh in? For reference, I am coming from a 2018 27.5 Giant Trance, size L with a 35mm stem. The medium SB looks to be a hair longer reach-wise than my current bike.
    I'm 5'11", NE singletrack as well, on a Large. I actually got a slightly longer stem. I would go Large for sure, unless you usually ride/prefer smaller bikes.

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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikerva1 View Post
    Are you using 175 crankarms?
    How often do you pedal smash in rocky sections?
    Do you have tight switchbacks there and is it good there or too long?
    How is it on flat sections?
    How about 3-4 hour rides?
    Sprints?
    Thank you!
    Wow, lots of questions. I'll do my best to answer.

    Yes, 175mm crankarms. No issues whatsoever with pedal striking - again I'm in the HIGH setting on the flip chip, and running Vittoria 2.6" tires (measure about 2.5"). I'm sure you'd get more in the LOW position and with 2.3" tires, for example.

    I ride some crazy old school slow techy trails, and it does great once you adjust a bit. Really tight switchbacks require a bit wider line than something with a shorter wheelbase, but I love it in the slow chunky stuff. The HIGH setting helps again here.

    Flat sections are no issue. If I'm really going hard, I'll use the middle setting on the DPX2 just to give it a bit more XC feeling, but otherwise I just leave it in open mode. It's super efficient.

    3-4 hour rides in tech stuff will leave you less beat up than something shorter travel, which is nice. I would imagine 3-4 hour rides on flowy singletrack will likely be more tiring than a lighter bike, but that's the nature of a 30lb+ bike.

    Sprinting efficiency on these DW Link bikes is mostly related to the fork IMO - I find a fork lockout (on my XC bike) is key to putting the power down when sprinting, since the rear suspension is very resistant to pedal-induced compression. With the long-travel 36 up front on the SB, I find the best approach on anything gradual is to sit and put the power down. On steeper climbs, standing and "sprinting" is fine as you end up putting less force on the fork with each pedal stroke. But again, that's nothing to do with the bike itself.

    Hope this helps. Overall, for how capable this bike is, it is very versatile, and I can't think of anything I'd change to make it "better", other than magically dropping 3 pounds to make it weigh the same as my Mach 4 SL.

  150. #150
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    First ride yesterday - fast, fun & intuitive. Still need to dial it in, but was surprised how little really needs to be done. Got the XT/XTR package and it works. Normally would start swapping things out to my liking, but Pivot did a great job on the component package so mostly need to get the suspension set.

    At 6' 2" the XL is a perfect it. Large would be really cramped, and the XL is "just" big enough. No way a taller person would fit on this w/o a new stem. Anyone over 6' 3" should think twice tho, unless you really like small frames. 6' 7" - no way.

  151. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stroganof View Post
    First ride yesterday - fast, fun & intuitive. Still need to dial it in, but was surprised how little really needs to be done. Got the XT/XTR package and it works. Normally would start swapping things out to my liking, but Pivot did a great job on the component package so mostly need to get the suspension set.

    At 6' 2" the XL is a perfect it. Large would be really cramped, and the XL is "just" big enough. No way a taller person would fit on this w/o a new stem. Anyone over 6' 3" should think twice tho, unless you really like small frames. 6' 7" - no way.
    Any issues with brake dragging that you noticed? I got the slx package and after the first ride my brakes were and are still dragging like crazy.

  152. #152
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    nope, no issues with the brakes.

    Normally ride Hopes, but was impressed with the XTs. Only 1 ride tho . . .

  153. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by cblase10 View Post
    Any issues with brake dragging that you noticed? I got the slx package and after the first ride my brakes were and are still dragging like crazy.
    Occasional adjustment of the calipers is just a standard part of owning a bike with disc brakes. Have you tried that? I'm assuming that the rotor isn't out of true and that you already checked that.

  154. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stroganof View Post
    First ride yesterday - fast, fun & intuitive. Still need to dial it in, but was surprised how little really needs to be done. Got the XT/XTR package and it works. Normally would start swapping things out to my liking, but Pivot did a great job on the component package so mostly need to get the suspension set.

    At 6' 2" the XL is a perfect it. Large would be really cramped, and the XL is "just" big enough. No way a taller person would fit on this w/o a new stem. Anyone over 6' 3" should think twice tho, unless you really like small frames. 6' 7" - no way.
    I think the Pro XT/XTR bike is perfect. I'm 6'3" with long arms and legs. I don't think I could ride the L without hitting my knees on the bars in techy terrain when I'm out of the saddle.

  155. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde Ride View Post
    Occasional adjustment of the calipers is just a standard part of owning a bike with disc brakes. Have you tried that? I'm assuming that the rotor isn't out of true and that you already checked that.
    Ya the the bike has maybe 10 miles on it so far. Rotors are true. I adjusted them a couple times and they are better then they were. This is my first new bike so maybe there is going to be some rubbing until pads are broken in a little?
    I just feel I shouldn't have to pull the calipers off and push the pistons in on a brand new bike if that is the case.

  156. #156
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    [QUOTE=cblase10;15040889]Ya the the bike has maybe 10 miles on it so far. Rotors are true. I adjusted them a couple times and they are better then they were. This is my first new bike so maybe there is going to be some rubbing until pads are broken in a little?

    Maybe try bleeding the brakes and lubing/cleaning the calipers with mineral oil during the bleeding process. Make sure to clean everything with isopropyl or brake cleaning fluid once the process is done.

  157. #157
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    Well I got my hands on a medium demo. First off, what a different bike than my current 2018 Giant Trance 27.5. Not nearly as nimble, more of a point and shoot in the rough stuff style The bike rolled nicely onto and over rocks and other things. I assume it is the steeper seat tube angle, but the SB climbs like a mountain goat when seated. I was used to having to jockey the Trance a bit to try to keep the front end down. As far as sizing, I had to slam the seat all the way back as it felt like I was hanging off the front of the bike. With a 55mm stem, I could still use more room. I am thinking the large will be right for me and will allow me to run a nice short stem as well. I am about 75% committed to making the leap from my current bike.

  158. #158
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    After reading some of the recent post I was getting a little concerned about the size I ordered. I ordered a large. Last time I measured my height I was 6'2". I was able to get a demo in large and loved it. Felt perfect. I did sit on a XL at another local shop and it felt big. Concerned I may have ordered a little on the small size I decided I would check my height again. The bike didn't feel cramped at all and its been years since I checked my height. Well lets just say I am growing into the large. I'm barely over 6'1" now. Gotta love your 40's. Glasses and shrinking already but at least Im lightening up and faster than ever on a bike. Thats what I keep telling myself anyways. I ordered the XT/XTR build with the DT carbon wheels.

  159. #159
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    Have any of you found super boost plus hubs to build with?
    Complete super boost plus wheels?

  160. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikerva1 View Post
    Have any of you found super boost plus hubs to build with?
    Complete super boost plus wheels?
    I built up a set with Onyx Vespers and We Are One Union rims. I love them.

  161. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikerva1 View Post
    Have any of you found super boost plus hubs to build with?
    Complete super boost plus wheels?
    White Industry has Superboost, hubs too - these are made to order I believe. So lead times might be a few weeks.

    They offer Center Lock too - so that makes me happy. I just ordered a set, I should have them next week.
    "The face of a child can say it all, especially the mouth part of the face".
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  162. #162
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    Got my SB ordered this week. Sounds like 90ish day waits (which really isnt bad... Ripmo is out to July.... And ibis isn't selling to nonstock dealers). Made my decision for me. Should be here right in the dead of winter but hopefully I'll get down to AZ sometime for biking. Maybe even stop by Pivot HQ and say thanks for all the great bikes I've owned from them.

    Out of curiosity, what rear shocks have people experimented with? I have a Mara Pro on my current bike which ironically is the same size. I might play around a bit.

  163. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikerva1 View Post
    Have any of you found super boost plus hubs to build with?
    Complete super boost plus wheels?
    I built up some wheels with I9 Hydras - these are available in superboost.

  164. #164
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    Got my Pro XT/XTR this week. What are people running for the low and high speed compression settings? It feels a bit harsh right now riding over regular roots and rocks, trying to figure out how to adjust as Iím not suspension setup expert. For reference, Iím about 190 lbs and have sag set up correctly.

  165. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by lvrpl View Post
    Got my Pro XT/XTR this week. What are people running for the low and high speed compression settings? It feels a bit harsh right now riding over regular roots and rocks, trying to figure out how to adjust as Iím not suspension setup expert. For reference, Iím about 190 lbs and have sag set up correctly.
    LSC 2 clicks

    HSC 2-3 click depending how "sendy" I'm feeling that day and trail features.

    Both are clockwise from fully open or counter-clockwise.

    My fork is 2020 and I'm about the same weight and running 75 PSI and only one token.

    Hope this helps.
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  166. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by edbraunbeck View Post
    LSC 2 clicks

    HSC 2-3 click depending how "sendy" I'm feeling that day and trail features.

    Both are clockwise from fully open or counter-clockwise.

    My fork is 2020 and I'm about the same weight and running 75 PSI and only one token.

    Hope this helps.
    Thanks, this is very helpful. Just to be clear, youíre talking about your HSC and LSC settings on your fork, correct? If Iíve got that right, do you mind sharing what your compression settings are on your shock also? Thanks for the help.

  167. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by lvrpl View Post
    Thanks, this is very helpful. Just to be clear, youíre talking about your HSC and LSC settings on your fork, correct? If Iíve got that right, do you mind sharing what your compression settings are on your shock also? Thanks for the help.
    On the shock, I'm running it mostly fully open with two clicks of compression (CW). Occasionally, I'll run the lever in middle mode if I'm looking for extra pedal support.

    I'd suggest experimenting with small volume spacers like a .4 or maybe .2. Stock is .6 and makes the shock very progressive.
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  168. #168
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    Undoubtably Switchblade is 2020 Bike of the Year. Anyone hear of any rumblings for 2021? Refresh, color changes?

  169. #169
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    Yeti Snowflakes...

  170. #170
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    Any feedback from people running this machine with a 27.5 rear wheel?

    I'm guessing basically you run it in the "high" setting and you roughly end up with similar geometry to a 29er in the "low" position?
    Cheers!

  171. #171
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    What have you guys been able to demo, ride of other bikes and brands? How would you describe the differences, in ride qualities, and overall cost in maintenance, repair or ownership pluses and minuses vs others?
    Thank you.

  172. #172
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    I've demod' virtually everything out there and about to finally pull trigger on the Switchblade. For me personally it checks all the boxes on what I've been looking for. The fit and finish is outstanding. My final impression has been the bike is bullet proof right on down to the paint job. Its so well protected and done right in every way. High bottom bracket which I love. Cant think of one pedal strike on any of my local trails. DW link speaks for itself. Tired of threading needles now with the different suspension designs. Guys at my lbs swear by the bike and they are a dealer which helps. Inventory has been delayed but not 1/2 as bad as others not to name names. I've been demoing the medium and actually bringing it back to the shop tomorrow. I need to talk to them to see if they can find out anything on any possible 2021 releases, even if its a color change. I can hold off a little at this point if there are any coming. I know Pivot has been delayed due to the forks arriving but other than that they've been pretty ramped up and everything else is getting back on track quicker with them now. There certainly doesn't seem to be any out of ordinary riff raff with this company which is refreshing. You get what you pay for. In fact, it might just be one of, if not the best do-it-all bikes Iíve ridden.

  173. #173
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    Any changes to the Switchblade for 2021 even if just colors?

  174. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by skibum1 View Post
    Any changes to the Switchblade for 2021 even if just colors?
    I just received mine 3 weeks ago and from what I was told by pivot they dont make a their bikes by year. So the 2020 switchblade will be the bike they put out until they do a completely new switchblade. Obviously components change like fox and stuff but I think that's all that will change from what i was told. I know the suspension changed on mine to fox 2021 suspension...but i think that's about it.Maybe someone else can chime in

  175. #175
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    If I was speculating (I am), I don't think anything major (or even minor) will change anytime soon, not even a new colorway. I'll bet they're a year or more away from adding a black or gray colorway.

  176. #176
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    I've run it with a 27.5 wheel and it is awesome. I bought a pretty cheap 27.5 wheel(https://www.worldwidecyclery.com/pro...o-spline-black) when I had to warranty the reynolds 29er wheel. It was so good that I am considering getting a nice carbon 27.5 wheel. The slx hub in the wheel is horrible. I run it in the high mode. By my rough estimate it slackens out the bike to 65 degrees. The biggest difference that I noticed was that it corners much better. I didn't really notice any issues with pedal strikes.

  177. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by skibum1 View Post
    I've demod' virtually everything out there and about to finally pull trigger on the Switchblade. For me personally it checks all the boxes on what I've been looking for. The fit and finish is outstanding. My final impression has been the bike is bullet proof right on down to the paint job. Its so well protected and done right in every way. High bottom bracket which I love. Cant think of one pedal strike on any of my local trails. DW link speaks for itself. Tired of threading needles now with the different suspension designs. Guys at my lbs swear by the bike and they are a dealer which helps. Inventory has been delayed but not 1/2 as bad as others not to name names. I've been demoing the medium and actually bringing it back to the shop tomorrow. I need to talk to them to see if they can find out anything on any possible 2021 releases, even if its a color change. I can hold off a little at this point if there are any coming. I know Pivot has been delayed due to the forks arriving but other than that they've been pretty ramped up and everything else is getting back on track quicker with them now. There certainly doesn't seem to be any out of ordinary riff raff with this company which is refreshing. You get what you pay for. In fact, it might just be one of, if not the best do-it-all bikes Iíve ridden.
    I am in a totally different head space now!
    All the videos and stuff I read, I had talked myself into needing the Switchblade until I actually road one for a short time around a shopping center and townhouse area.

    I tried a Yeti SB115 and a Pivot Switchblade, yesterday. Everyone raves about how great the Switchblade is. Not for me at this point, felt too heavy and sluggish.
    I liked the sb115 but no iscg 5 tab to mount a bash guard. I think any bike I buy needs frame protection of some sort to keep from taking chunks out of my bb area on big rocks, especially And logs. What do you folks do?

    Is the Pivot trail 429 too heavy and sluggish feeling compared to the sb115?
    Also pedal strikes are a pet peeve, I hate too low bikes that pedal strikes or you have to put midget crankset on.

    I am trying to figure out the best bike for my area, and something quick, light, responsive, and efficient, that does not jack hammer my back.
    I ride a xl 2016 trek remedy 9.8 29r now, a little sluggish for what I am looking for.
    I am 6ft and 3/4 about 165 with no gear.
    Thank you.

  178. #178
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    This dude shreds the switchblade

    https://youtu.be/GInSkJ8-clU

  179. #179
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    ^ Just got to ride it in a parking lot? I realize itís hard to demo bikes these days but a quick sit and pedal wouldnít have shown me why the new switchblade is so good. I got to ride a demo 20 miles or so. It wasnít the first mile that sold me on the bike. More like the last. It does everything I asked it to do so well. The Yeti may be a great bike for you and we all have our preferences but there is a reason so many are raving about the switchblade and not the SB115. That doesnít make it a bad bike any more than a parking lot ride makes a bike not for you. If your wanting more of a XC bike then sure the Pivot Switchblade might be a bit much.

  180. #180
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    If its worth anything I just finished demo'ing the new Stumpjumper. You might want to check that bike out if light is what you want. Its not a bad ride but the flex stays I did notice the rear wheel to do some funky voodoo stuff when I really started getting into the chop. My only description when it happened was WTF. I can't say its a bad thing or good thing that was going on back there but I wasn't laughing about it. Maybe the EVO would have been better but I got what they gave me. I think it all comes down to what/where you ride and what feels right for you.

  181. #181
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    Here's a guy doing some tech stuff on his SB.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0oqIdBqXA8

  182. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikerva1 View Post
    I am in a totally different head space now!
    All the videos and stuff I read, I had talked myself into needing the Switchblade until I actually road one for a short time around a shopping center and townhouse area.

    I tried a Yeti SB115 and a Pivot Switchblade, yesterday. Everyone raves about how great the Switchblade is. Not for me at this point, felt too heavy and sluggish.
    I liked the sb115 but no iscg 5 tab to mount a bash guard. I think any bike I buy needs frame protection of some sort to keep from taking chunks out of my bb area on big rocks, especially And logs. What do you folks do?

    Is the Pivot trail 429 too heavy and sluggish feeling compared to the sb115?
    Also pedal strikes are a pet peeve, I hate too low bikes that pedal strikes or you have to put midget crankset on.

    I am trying to figure out the best bike for my area, and something quick, light, responsive, and efficient, that does not jack hammer my back.
    I ride a xl 2016 trek remedy 9.8 29r now, a little sluggish for what I am looking for.
    I am 6ft and 3/4 about 165 with no gear.
    Thank you.
    Bro, you are riding 2 different bikes. Sb115 is and agile trail machine. 115 in the back and 130 in the front. Great bike if that's what ur looking for...now the SB is a whole different animal with 142 in the rear and 160 up front. The SB is able to take on some heavy downhill and tough terrain...that sb115 wouldn't handle that kind of riding imo without taking a beating. Sounds just like the SB is to much bike for what you are doing

  183. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikerva1 View Post
    I am in a totally different head space now!
    All the videos and stuff I read, I had talked myself into needing the Switchblade until I actually road one for a short time around a shopping center and townhouse area.

    I tried a Yeti SB115 and a Pivot Switchblade, yesterday. Everyone raves about how great the Switchblade is. Not for me at this point, felt too heavy and sluggish.
    I liked the sb115 but no iscg 5 tab to mount a bash guard. I think any bike I buy needs frame protection of some sort to keep from taking chunks out of my bb area on big rocks, especially And logs. What do you folks do?

    Is the Pivot trail 429 too heavy and sluggish feeling compared to the sb115?
    Also pedal strikes are a pet peeve, I hate too low bikes that pedal strikes or you have to put midget crankset on.

    I am trying to figure out the best bike for my area, and something quick, light, responsive, and efficient, that does not jack hammer my back.
    I ride a xl 2016 trek remedy 9.8 29r now, a little sluggish for what I am looking for.
    I am 6ft and 3/4 about 165 with no gear.
    Thank you.
    Shopping center rides are good enough to get an idea for sizing, but for selecting a bike? Useless.

    But if you think you need a Yeti SB115, you should buy it. Cross-shopping the SB115 and the Switchblade is pointless. The bikes are completely different.

    I wonder if the fact that there are no ISCG tabs on the SB115 is a clue about that bike's intended purpose? Hmmmm... I wonder.

  184. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbikerva1 View Post
    I am in a totally different head space now!
    All the videos and stuff I read, I had talked myself into needing the Switchblade until I actually road one for a short time around a shopping center and townhouse area.

    I tried a Yeti SB115 and a Pivot Switchblade, yesterday. Everyone raves about how great the Switchblade is. Not for me at this point, felt too heavy and sluggish.
    I liked the sb115 but no iscg 5 tab to mount a bash guard. I think any bike I buy needs frame protection of some sort to keep from taking chunks out of my bb area on big rocks, especially And logs. What do you folks do?

    Is the Pivot trail 429 too heavy and sluggish feeling compared to the sb115?
    Also pedal strikes are a pet peeve, I hate too low bikes that pedal strikes or you have to put midget crankset on.

    I am trying to figure out the best bike for my area, and something quick, light, responsive, and efficient, that does not jack hammer my back.
    I ride a xl 2016 trek remedy 9.8 29r nowa little sluggish for what I am looking for.
    I am 6ft and 3/4 about 165 with no gear.
    Thank you.
    Another bike you might consider from a less boutique brand would be the Giant Trance X in either Advanced (carbon) or aluminum frame. I've ridden quite a few bikes. Parking lot demo of switchblade though. I ended up getting the Trance X 2 and swapping the wheels for lighter ones. The bike weighs 32 pounds with pedals after I swapped some Hunt Trail Wide wheels. That's around what the Switchblades are weighing. Bike climbs VERY well and is a bit longer than Switchblade but with a bit less travel. I'd guess they handle steep trails the same then the length of bike is considered. The bike hits a very good sweet spot. And if you want to save a few bucks you can get the X 2 for half the price or go carbon for still a bit cheaper. Giant really knocked it out of the park and I'm not a Giant fanboy. Reviews of it are similar to what you'll find on the switchblade. As odd as that may seem. Both are great long legged trail bikes that most things well.

  185. #185
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    2020 Switchblade ride reports

    I was not happy with my V2 SB until I got my suspension dialed. It felt kind of piggish, but now rides like what a DWL should ride. In fact, I like that the 38 I put on it slacks it out a little. I softened up the suspension a little and when riding through then parking lot I have to resist the urge to add more air.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

  186. #186
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    This review is really good:
    https://youtu.be/eR0yx6_40i0

    The fact that the tester is giving these calm, articulate thoughts while he sends these huge gaps is incredibly impressive.
    Last edited by John P.; 2 Weeks Ago at 08:29 AM.
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  187. #187
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    ^Thanks for posting that. Great video and review. Canít wait to get mine. Dealer has it and it will be on its way to me next week. Iím waiting for them to get a few more items for it.
    Blue Large XT/XTR with the DT Carbon wheel set up. Itís getting harder and harder to ride my Cannondale Scalpel. 

    p.s. Iíve never spent anywhere near that on a bike. Actually ever spent half that. Thatís how important demoís are. After riding one for a day it wasnít about the money.

  188. #188
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    Has anyone here put a Lyrik rather than Fox as their fork on and if so any thoughts?

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    Like many people here I'm between sizes at 5'10.5, 33.5 cycling inseam. I know this probably comes down to "playful" vs "stable", but tell me if I am thinking about this right:

    I've been riding a V1 Bronson for 5 years in size L, 70mm stem, 760 bars, and the bike feels great, I love the playful feel and if anything I feel like the bars are slightly too "tucked under" me when standing in attack position. Based on this and everyone saying pivot bikes run a little bigger I would have expected to be able to size down to a medium for that playful feel. And yet looking at the geo, a size medium switchblade with a 45mm stem (I believe this is what it ships with?) would mean that for seated riding, the ETT + stem on a medium actually comes to about 15mm shorter than my old L Bronson, similarly the reach + stem would be just about the same as my current bike. So am I crazy, or if I like my current cockpit feel but could stand a little more stretch when standing, would I be better off with a large? A large would have slightly more reach (about 15mm after accounting for stem difference) and an ETT + stem of almost exactly the same for pedaling.

    So disregarding the bike handling differences flowing from the other geo numbers like wheelbase etc. and zeroing in on cockpit feel, am I crazy to think that if I want to run a short stem and like my current Bronson's fit but could use a little more effective reach, the medium switchblade would feel cramped? The blade does have a stack about an inch and half taller, and I'm not sure how that might affect my reasoning here. Does this sound right? I have an Ibis on order that I'm thinking of bailing on, but the pivot size chart starting at 5'11 for large is sorta giving me pause. By comparison, Ibis says L starts at 5'8, yet the reach and ETT look very similar to an L blade. What am I missing?

  190. #190
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    Why don't you just goto your lbs and swing your leg over a medium and large?

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    I was on the same fence as you. I was originally looking at a V2 Ripmo. At 5:10 I was a L. Decided to go FB route instead. Pivot had me at a medium. My shop happened to have a M Ripmo in and L FB getting serviced. Threw a leg over both. The M felt too cramped I went with L.

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    Quote Originally Posted by skibum1 View Post
    Why don't you just goto your lbs and swing your leg over a medium and large?
    The only pivot dealer within 50 miles has no switchblades in stock, and as far as I know isn't going to have any anytime soon. The big brands stocked by the local shops are Santa Cruz, Trek, Yeti, and Spesh, and none of them have bikes that excite me right now.

  193. #193
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    Actually, this might sound crazy, but if anyone with a medium or large could tell me what the actual distance from post to center of bars is with seat at roughly bar height, that might be super helpful in sorting out the cockpit length. I'd like to make the medium work, but I don't want to run a stem longer than 50 and can't imagine a shorter cockpit than what I am running now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ragna View Post
    Actually, this might sound crazy, but if anyone with a medium or large could tell me what the actual distance from post to center of bars is with seat at roughly bar height, that might be super helpful in sorting out the cockpit length. I'd like to make the medium work, but I don't want to run a stem longer than 50 and can't imagine a shorter cockpit than what I am running now.
    I'm essentially the same size as you, and am on a Large. Couldn't imagine riding a Medium, personally. I've got a 60mm stem on mine (started with a 50 and felt too cramped). Measurements below:

    Saddle height (from center of BB) = 78 cm
    Tip of saddle to center of bars = 55.5 cm

    Keep in mind the second measurement will depend on the shape of your saddle - you don't sit on the forward tip, obviously.

  195. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ragna View Post
    So disregarding the bike handling differences flowing from the other geo numbers like wheelbase etc. and zeroing in on cockpit feel, am I crazy to think that if I want to run a short stem and like my current Bronson's fit but could use a little more effective reach, the medium switchblade would feel cramped? The blade does have a stack about an inch and half taller, and I'm not sure how that might affect my reasoning here. Does this sound right? I have an Ibis on order that I'm thinking of bailing on, but the pivot size chart starting at 5'11 for large is sorta giving me pause. By comparison, Ibis says L starts at 5'8, yet the reach and ETT look very similar to an L blade. What am I missing?
    I'm about an inch taller than you are - 5'11" and a little bit - with 32" cycling inseam, and I got a large (with the stock 45mm stem, or is it 40mm?). Fits great. I sat on a medium and it felt cramped. I felt much more like I was "on top" of the medium (and seat post was extended super far out), while I felt more "in" the bike with the large.

    I agonized over the medium vs large, and am very glad I went with the large.

  196. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by Full Send View Post
    I'm essentially the same size as you, and am on a Large. Couldn't imagine riding a Medium, personally. I've got a 60mm stem on mine (started with a 50 and felt too cramped). Measurements below:

    Saddle height (from center of BB) = 78 cm
    Tip of saddle to center of bars = 55.5 cm

    Keep in mind the second measurement will depend on the shape of your saddle - you don't sit on the forward tip, obviously.
    Thanks, this was super helpful. With your 60 stem you seem to have about an extra inch or so from saddle to bars vs what I currently run, though I measure my saddle to be a little lower on my current bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by lvrpl View Post
    I'm about an inch taller than you are - 5'11" and a little bit - with 32" cycling inseam, and I got a large (with the stock 45mm stem, or is it 40mm?). Fits great. I sat on a medium and it felt cramped. I felt much more like I was "on top" of the medium (and seat post was extended super far out), while I felt more "in" the bike with the large.

    I agonized over the medium vs large, and am very glad I went with the large.
    Good info, thanks. I don't mind being a little "on" the bike as I like to aggressively move it around underneath me and ride a lot of trails where being more upright is a plus, but I could use a little extra standing reach. If anything it honestly seems like I could go either way on size with only about .6-.7 inches of difference in cockpit length if I'm willing to go anywhere from 35-50 on the stem. It's kinda nuts how all over the place manufacturers are with effective top tube these days. Some of us still sit and pedal a lot! Lots of overlap between M and L on different bikes. I know there's some six foot pros on mediums. A medium blade has the same top tube as a large Megatower, for example. Go figure. I used geometrygeeks to identify some bikes with similar geo to the L that I can check the fit on locally, so I think that's my next step.

  197. #197
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ragna View Post
    Thanks, this was super helpful. With your 60 stem you seem to have about an extra inch or so from saddle to bars vs what I currently run, though I measure my saddle to be a little lower on my current bike.



    Good info, thanks. I don't mind being a little "on" the bike as I like to aggressively move it around underneath me and ride a lot of trails where being more upright is a plus, but I could use a little extra standing reach. If anything it honestly seems like I could go either way on size with only about .6-.7 inches of difference in cockpit length if I'm willing to go anywhere from 35-50 on the stem. It's kinda nuts how all over the place manufacturers are with effective top tube these days. Some of us still sit and pedal a lot! Lots of overlap between M and L on different bikes. I know there's some six foot pros on mediums. A medium blade has the same top tube as a large Megatower, for example. Go figure. I used geometrygeeks to identify some bikes with similar geo to the L that I can check the fit on locally, so I think that's my next step.
    One thing I neglected to mention - I have my stem slammed all the way down (no spacers), and even swapped the upper headset top cap for a low profile one to get it as low as possible. More spacers and/or a taller top cap under the stem would reduce the saddle-to-bars distance. I keep my position on the SB as similar as possible to my other bike (Mach 4 SL) because I ride them both frequently, and also I find a lower stack height helps me naturally weight the front wheel more. The 55.5 cm measurement is exactly the same on my Large SL.

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    Spur or Switchblade?

    Hi guys,

    My local terrain consists of mainly short ups and downs so I am considering a transition spur. I do occasional overseas trip to bike parks average twice a year.
    I have been eyeing the Switchblade since its out but now the Spur looks really good for my local trails.

    Anyone has experience to share on comparing these 2 bikes? Any advise is welcome too.

  199. #199
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    I don't have direct experience on a Spur, but lots of miles on my Switchblade.

    If I were riding rolling terrain, I'd be looking for a shorter travel bike.

    Bikes in the switchblade class (140+ rear suspension) are more "enduro minded", in my opinion. This means that they excel at getting to the top of climbs and then rallying down. This is when they're in their element and it's a lot of the riding that we have here in Colorado. (It's not uncommon to be descending for 20+ minutes at a time).

    The caveat to that is the terrain that you're riding. If those short descents have a good number of drops or jumps with harsh landings, then the extra travel of the 140+ bike can be nice to have. Otherwise, the 120-130 travel frames can handle nice transitions and rough terrain without any issue.

    However, someone else from the North East or elsewhere with more rolling terrain can chime in with a different opinion.

  200. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by winkplay View Post
    Hi guys,

    My local terrain consists of mainly short ups and downs so I am considering a transition spur. I do occasional overseas trip to bike parks average twice a year.
    I have been eyeing the Switchblade since its out but now the Spur looks really good for my local trails.

    Anyone has experience to share on comparing these 2 bikes? Any advise is welcome too.
    If you haven't already, I would swing over to the Transition forum, describe your terrain and riding speed, and see what they think over there.

    By all accounts the Spur punches above its weight, but these are very, very different bikes and the switchblade will be far more capable at high speed in rowdy terrain. That capability comes with a cost, and if you don't need it, it may feel piggish and slow or fatigue you more. Depending on build spec for each, there will be a 3-6 pound difference between them. The Spur is much, much lighter. That's pretty huge, and no matter what anyone tells you, this is a difference you will feel - especially if you are a lighter rider. I do not own a switchblade (yet), but I have owned a short travel bike in the past and currently ride a 150mm bike.

    Is your rolling terrain generally buff, smooth singletrack? If so, I agree with xtrpickels. I personally wouldn't even be considering anything but a 100-120mm lightweight bike in that situation, and I'd just rent a bike for park days. If you are a heavier rider who values stiffness, or you ride chunky terrain aggressively, or you want to send drops and jumps and take it to a bike park, a 140mm-150mm bike can be a great daily driver if you understand it's never going to feel like a 25lb bike. I'm considering this myself, but I'd be looking at getting a carbon wheelset and some trail oriented tires to get the weight down around 29 lbs. I'm a slim guy, and I can really feel the difference between a light XC-ish bike and a long travel trail bike, no matter how good anyone says a longer travel bike climbs or pedals.

    I live in the northeast where many trails are short ups and downs, but the terrain is unforgiving, and when there are steep fast descents they tend to be pretty gnarly. There is no right answer for my local trails. I see people riding everything from hardtails to enduro sleds. I really recommend demoing bikes in each class (light / short travel, vs heavier / longer travel), and see what feels right. You would not want to spend thousands on a bike only to find it feels like dragging a boat anchor around, or alternatively find you are constantly bottoming out and getting bucked around on gnar.

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