Photographing national parks- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    New question here. Photographing national parks

    I was just looking at Frank Ruggle's book. I started to think that this looks like a good way for me to grow old.

    https://medium.com/@frankleeruggles/...s-29370fe776d8

    Traveling to Yellowstone and 100 other parks. Taking photos to keep myself entertained.

    What kind of a setup would a person want for such an endeavor?

    An old 95 mt bike to park at trail heads? Yellowstone has 1,000 miles of hiking trails and about 30 miles of for cycling of the main road.

    A pickup with a camper shell on the back?

    What about the camera? Nikon Z? Buy the new affordable Z5 full frame mirror less? Save up for the expensive Z8 when it finally comes out?
    Z5 is affordable because they left out some of the features the more expensive cameras have. I make few videos, and don't care about about frames per second. I like to take night shots. Does the Z5 have the same weather resistant body the Z7 does?

    At the age of 56 I am thinking of a way to grow old gracefully. The fed has some nice acres tucked away up in the mountains. I can keep myself entertained with a camera. looking ten years into the future, what kind of photo gear should I be looking at? Nikon mirror less?

  2. #2
    WillWorkForTrail
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    Is there a reason Nikon is the brand you keep bringing up? Do you have Nikon glass that you can get an adaptor for to work with those cameras? Honestly, I bought a Canon EOS R at the beginning of the year because I had Canon glass I could get an adaptor for so it would work the the R, and I haven't been disappointed. But maybe if I was looking for something to carry around I might look at something a little smaller/lighter if I was thinking about "growing old" carrying it around - maybe Fuji? They have some non-full frame mirrorless stuff with some small light glass. Regardless of brand, mirrorless is the future. Nikon has had a bunch of nails hammered into its coffin before and come back, but they currently have a bunch more hammered in (they are WAY behind the curve on mirrorless, and many camera tech folk are very down on them) and one question you may want to ask yourself is what kind of options do you want down the road. If Nikon goes away in the next couple of years, and you turn into Ansel Adams and decide you want a backup camera, that means either buying used, or buying a whole new rig instead of just another body to go with what you already have if you go that route. Lots of things to think about, but I'll say this.....

    Having just upgraded from my 17 year old DSLR a modern mirrorless....you will NOT be disappointed in any of the modern mirrorless stuff. Every camera I played with (all admittedly fairly high end) produced stunning results for me given the kind of shooting I want to do.

  3. #3
    saddlemeat
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    Sounds like a great way to pass time chrisx! Galen Rowell's book, "The Inner Game Of Outdoor Photography", is very good. I adapted his approach to the Sony mirrorless cameras years ago. There are some nice Zeiss and Rokinon lenses available for them. The Nikon mirrorless would be a great start to building a system.
    I ride with the best dogs.




  4. #4
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    Its diffcult to give a specific recommendation, its hard to know what you value and lean toward in style right now. There are many choices, all good performing with strength in certain features overothers. At some point you just needto jump in and start doing to get a feel for whatyou like.
    Remember to budget for accessories, it sounds like youll want a decent tripod.
    For night, generally bigger is better. But as i advance in age i dont like hauling all the weight of a bigger setup. So if your going to be hiking a lot, take that into account.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    Galen Rowell's book, "The Inner Game Of Outdoor Photography", .
    I will take a look, thanks.


    Nikon seems to have the best weather resistant system?

  6. #6
    saddlemeat
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisx View Post
    I will take a look, thanks.


    Nikon seems to have the best weather resistant system?
    I live in the desert SW so weather resistance is not as important for me as much as simple ruggedness. I'll stick with my Sonys, personally, very rugged and I like the image "look" and quality better than my Nikons of the past.
    I ride with the best dogs.




  7. #7
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    A given camera body has a useful life of ~5 years before it is completely outclassed by competitors, which is generally when its successor arrives. Digital camera bodies abide by a less-intense version of Moore's Law: it is a developing tech.

    A high-end lens, if acquired at the beginning of a refresh cycle, is good for about 10-20 years before a higher-performing, updated version comes along. But the older version generally is not outclassed, just improved. Camera lenses abide by physics established a century ago: it is a more-or-less mature tech. A serious photographer generally has 3-to-n-times as many lenses as they have bodies, and the vast majority of their photography investment will be in the lenses.

    A high-end tripod (eg. Gitzo) and head (eg. RRS) will likely last your entire photography life unless you lose it or break it (out of negligence).

    With that in mind... camera bodies are not what you should be focused on. The overall system is what you should consider.

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