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  1. #1
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    Canon 7D II or Nikon 7200

    I don't want to ignite a big debate as I believe both brands have solid merits. I had a recent post here looking for lens suggestions on my current Canon Rebel + my plan to upgrade to a 7D II in the next few months. However, my research did reveal the Nikon 7200 is a strong competitor to the 7D and it is cheaper. I would appreciate any input on the two models.

    As I see it, price is my biggest reason for considering the 7200 plus a strong review on Consumer Reports that ranks it above the 7D. I also know it has a higher ISO range, higher rez and brighter LCD, while the 7D has faster image processing and more auto-focus points.

    I am not too invested in Canon glass to switch over. My photography interest are action & landscape shots while biking, people and I also enjoy noodling with long exposure shots.
    The only trace I leave behind is tire marks.

  2. #2
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    I'm a Nikon guy. There, I said it. I've been using Nikon gear since 1983 when I bought my first SLR which I still have. My cousin is a Canon person and we've used each other's gear over the years. I've considered buying a Canon to have as part of my system but can't justify the expense.

    Nikon has done one thing that is both a blessing and a curse: they have kept their lens mount. I have lenses from the early 1970's and one from the late 1960's that I use regularly on my D610, which is essentially a full frame version of the D7200 (actually closer to the D7100). This backwards compatibility is the blessing. I've bought great lenses for my camera at bargain basement prices and can buy new AF lenses as needed (I own two AF lenses that I regularly use and the rest are MF). Canon has changed their mount and, while you cannot easily use their older lenses, the new mount does not have any limitations as far as lens designs are concerned. Therefore, Canon's lenses are considered more advanced than Nikon's. That's not to say that the Nikon lenses are bad or that the AF performance is poor, it just means that Canon has some interesting lenses that Nikon may never have due to the mount limitations. The question is, would you ever buy one of these specialty lenses?

    If budget is your biggest consideration then I would suggest that you look into a refurbished D7100 and go from there. The D7200 is an evolution of the D7100 and most people would not consider it an upgrade over the earlier model. On the wide angle side I would look at older manual focus lenses since the greater depth of field would alleviate the need for AF for most situations (at least as far as how I use my camera and lenses). Definitely read the lens reviews before spending money on a lens.

    A word about higher megapixels: More isn't everything. I once took a picture with my D70, a 6MP DX DSLR, that my buddy blew up to 36X48 inches to hang in his restaurant. Looking at the photo from 15" away you couldn't tell that it was taken with a digital camera. A 24MP DX sensor camera has photo receptors half the width and half the height of that 6MP camera so you can blow up an image, without any cropping, to twice the size with about the same look up close. The advantage of a higher MP camera is that you have more room to crop the image, but, keep in mind that the larger the sensor the less critical the lens image sharpness needs to be. If you crop you are magnifying a small part of the image which will then magnify any blurriness and defects from the lens.

    In the end you can't go wrong with either system.

  3. #3
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    The megapixel count is sort of a misdirection. Lenses are the rate limiting step at the moment in terms of resolution --the lens aren't sharp enough to go much more the 20m.

    I haven't used the 7d Mii but I've read great things. Canon will be spilling the beans on what is next in their line over the next few weeks. This makes it an ideal time to look for some used gear.
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  4. #4
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    I have used Nikon, now Canon. You don't want a big debate so here it goes; either body will be a significant upgrade and serve you well. If action shots are big for you, the 7DII pulls ahead. Put your hands on both and see what feels best to you.
    Just enjoy the ride...

  5. #5
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    The Rebel has been a great camera for my skill set, minus the times the auto-focus gets a bit squirrelly, and I do like the way Canon products feel and function. Just so everyone knows, I'm not too hung up on megapixels. I was listing the pros and cons of each model as I'm aware of them.

    On average, the 7200 is listing about $300 less than the 7D II with a body only purchase. Price is not my biggest factor though, but when you include the reviews that point to the 7200 being a slightly better camera, it is tempting to consider the switch.

    I really appreciate the feedback on both of my forums posts here. Thanks to all for sharing your insight.
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  6. #6
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    Decided to go with the 7D II. Purchased a refurb from Canon and should be here by the weekend. After some further research (reviews and comparisons on youtube), I think the 7D is worth the extra dollars for its advantage on action shots, plus I can use my existing lenses and the learning curve should be minimal.

    Purchased it with the 18-135mm STM lens, also refurb, which should be a nice all-around lens. I'll let you know what I think after I put it through its paces.
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  7. #7
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    Can't wait to see some test shots. Start reading up on the focus modes and see if you want to try back button focusing.
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    Congrats man, I love getting new toys
    Just enjoy the ride...

  9. #9
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    I had a chance to take out the 7DII this weekend. I thought I'd test the image processor speed with my dog catching a frisbee. I will review the camera more in depth later, but here are a few sample shots:

    The first shot is 1/2000th, ISO 2500, F5. The image has some blur at these settings, but I was also moving the camera to keep the dog in frame.
    Canon 7D II or Nikon 7200-9j5a0366.jpg

    I upped the SS to 1/3200 to improve the clarity and reduced the ISO to 1250 as the sun came back out. Again, I was moving camera during the shot but this image is much sharper.
    Canon 7D II or Nikon 7200-9j5a0454.jpg

    This last one was at 1/2500th, ISO 1250, F5.6. It is also heavily cropped in post-production, but the detail in still pretty nice considering the distance and motion of this shot.
    Canon 7D II or Nikon 7200-9j5a0394.jpg

    I have much to explore with this camera yet, but I will add in addition to being fast, the camera is extremely quiet. It has about 20% more bulk than my Rebel Ti3, but still feels nice in my hand and easy to wield.
    The only trace I leave behind is tire marks.

  10. #10
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    These look nice. While there is a slight softness, this could be a result of a lot of things. Fortunately, rattling off 10-20 shorts right quick tends to give you better odds of having a keeper.

    Do you know what focusing mode you were in? Were you taking one shot at a time or was these the best of the series?

    Have you digested some of the materials on this page?

    https://photographylife.com/recommen...rk-ii-settings


    My camera is always in AI servo mode with focusing set to one of the back buttons. This lets you track the moving subject and focus. When ready to take, you press the shutter release (while holding down the back button focus). If you haven't done this before, it'll feel kind of odd. Once you get the hang of it, it will be very natural and you'll have more focused shots with less fuss.
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  11. #11
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    I was in straight manual shooting continuous shots at high speed to test out the 10 fps aspect. I was in "one shot" mode for the AF. My dog moves a great deal faster than I do on a MTB bike, so I was wanted to see what this camera can do without any auto settings yet.

    The link is really helpful. I had not seen this page yet. A lot of the videos I watched on the 7DII touted the Al servo mode, so I will get to it soon.

    As I said, I'm just an amateur looking to get quality shots. I always had trouble with action shots on my Ti3 if the camera was moving. Capturing the dog and frisbee in frame without some movement was nearly impossible. So for this little test, the 7DII is a big step up over the Ti3.
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  12. #12
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    This video gives some insights into back button focusing.

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  13. #13
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    What lens did you use for the dog shots? Some are just soft compared to others. Don't feel like you need to be in full manual to be a "real" photographer. Auto ISO is a great asset and one less thing to play with.
    Just enjoy the ride...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob5589 View Post
    What lens did you use for the dog shots? Some are just soft compared to others. Don't feel like you need to be in full manual to be a "real" photographer. Auto ISO is a great asset and one less thing to play with.
    I had the 18-135 lens on there, most of the photos were taken at 50-75mm focal length. The photos are all compressed jpegs, so that could be adding to the softness factor. I don't use Auto ISO mode as much as I should, probably because I've been on the Rebel for the past 5 years. On it, I often felt Auto ISO left many photos a bit dark for my taste.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by heyyall View Post
    This video gives some insights into back button focusing.

    Thanks. I like this guy's videos. Definitely a technique to master with the 7DII.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by madreptilian View Post
    I had the 18-135 lens on there, most of the photos were taken at 50-75mm focal length. The photos are all compressed jpegs, so that could be adding to the softness factor. I don't use Auto ISO mode as much as I should, probably because I've been on the Rebel for the past 5 years. On it, I often felt Auto ISO left many photos a bit dark for my taste.
    Yea, that lens is "soft." My wife uses it on her 50D with decent results but could be much sharper.

    I love auto ISO. I am no where near a great photographer so it helps to eliminate one more thing for me to screw up
    The nice part is the 6D handles high ISO pretty well so I have little worry that it won't do the right thing.

    The 7DII will handle higher ISO far better than that Rebel. I would experiment with it until you feel the noise is unacceptable then set the max there or a 1/3 stop less.

    I gotta play with back button focus more myself. That video is helpful.
    Just enjoy the ride...

  17. #17
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    Manual Model + AutoISO is great. It isn't intuitive, but I have had great results with it. You get the select shutter speed and the aperture then let the camera adjust the ISO to acquire proper exposure. You do have to look at the meter to see if you should change shutter speed to keep the ISO below a noise threshold.

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  18. #18
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    So I bought this Canon EFS 17-15 f/2.8 lens a few years back. Mostly I used it for indoor shots of my kids when they were younger. I'm considering selling it since I now have the 18-135 lens that came with the 7Dii. This is a great lens, but bulky with a limited zoom. Just curious if anyone thinks it is worth keeping?
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  19. #19
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    I would keep it. A fast wide angle lens could be for night photography or indoors. That said, I've bought and traded lenses many times over the years. That's half the fun of photography.
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  20. #20
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    Keep, will be much better in low light than the 18-135. Plus it is a higher quality piece of glass.
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    7d mii autofocus mode?

    What AF mode are folks using with their 7dm2? I think Case 2 seems applicable by the description but I'm thinking since I'm panning with the subject often, and the frame is a bit wobbly, I need higher tracking sensitivity. Case 3 is for subjects entering the frame suddenly but I have a feeling both cases the af point auto switching sensitivity is set too low...

    thoughts?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob5589 View Post
    Keep, will be much better in low light than the 18-135. Plus it is a higher quality piece of glass.
    After using the 7Dii for a couple months now, the 17-55 lens gets more use than the 18-135. The zoom is great with 18-135, but I never seem to get enough sharpness in my photos for my liking. Ive been shopping for a better "all-purpose" lens with a sufficient zoom, but it is difficult to tell which Canon lens contain better glass for higher image quality. I was considering this lens:

    Canon EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Lens

    I'm not a Canon fanboy by any means, so let me know if you have similar suggestions. Just keep in mind I really value excellent image quality.
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  23. #23
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    Do you have the STM version of the 18-135mm lens? It was new a couple of years ago, and is a huge improvement over the old version. That's what I use for my MTB shots (on a 70D), and I have no problem getting sharp shots with it.

    That said, the 15-85mm is an awesome lens too- great range, wide enough to eliminate the need for an ultra-wide, super fast focusing, and super sharp. The only thing you'll miss is the long end if you need the reach. It's a little bulkier than the 18-135mm, but I doubt that's an issue for you since you're carrying around the 7DII.

    Here are a few shots I took with my 70D & 18-135 STM lens:










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    Quote Originally Posted by smmokan View Post
    Do you have the STM version of the 18-135mm lens? It was new a couple of years ago, and is a huge improvement over the old version. That's what I use for my MTB shots (on a 70D), and I have no problem getting sharp shots with it.
    It is the STM version. Got a refurb 7Dii with the lens from Canon.

    Your pics look good, but hard to tell how sharp they are with the web versions. I have not shot too many MTB pics with the 7Dii yet, mostly I shoot portraits with my kids and that is where I'm seeing less sharpness and image quality than I like. I typically take a lot of shots and get one or two winners. I'm just surprised at how many are a bit soft. When compared to the 17-55, there is a noticeable difference in crispness and image quality.

    The main reason I bought the lens was to have the longer end of the zoom in my arsenal. As I've researched lenses, it does seem to be one of the best offerings from Canon in that size. It just does not deliver the consistent image quality I would like.
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  25. #25
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    Could it be because of missed focal points or slow shutter speeds? I'm not sure the 18-135 is the best "portrait lens", especially if used in subpar light.


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  26. #26
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    User-error is not out of the question, but most of my shots have been midday & outdoors lately with more than adequate shutter speed. I will continue to play around with settings to see what I can improve.

    This was also to find out what other "all-purpose" lenses others might be using. Thanks for the input.
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  27. #27
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    Gotcha.

    For the 7d2, I think your best options are the two mentioned already. There's the 17-85mm as well, but I don't think it's nearly as good as either the 15-85 or 18-135. If you wanted to carry another lens with your 17-55, then the obvious ones to look at are the Canon 70-300 IS and the 70-200 F4L. I have the 70-200 and it's an awesome action sports lens.

    That said, I almost never want to carry multiple lenses on a long ride, so I usually have just the 18-135.


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  28. #28
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    I agree. It is difficult to carry more than one lens. In fact, I usually ride with my Canon Rebel Ti3, not the 7Dii. That being said, I'm surprised your don't ride with the 70-200. I know its bulky, but would seem like a superior lens for action shots over the 18-135.

    I did a search on B&H for the 70-200. Maybe you can explain why the two models/prices?
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  29. #29
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    There are actually four models of the Canon 70-200:

    70-200 f/4L non-IS
    70-200 f/4L IS
    70-200 f/2.8L non-IS
    70-200 f/2.8L IS

    The 70-200 is an awesome action sports lens, but I like having the option of shooting wide for mountain biking. On a crop camera, if I'm going to take one lens it's going to be my 18-135. I mostly use the 70-200 for landscapes and portraits on my full-frame 6D.

  30. #30
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    I'm surprised they offer it without IS, big price difference. I usually stay with the EF-S mount for all my lenses, since I don't really plan to buy a full-frame camera. I'll let you know if I decide to swap the 18-135.
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  31. #31
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    I have the non-IS version... I almost never shoot in low light, so I have no need for it. (I'll use a tripod for landscapes if needed) Not having IS keeps it WAY lighter too.


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    I have a D7200, I see you went with the Canon, they're both great cameras. Remember that lenses will usually be what you want to spend the majority of your cash on. Fast lenses aren't only good for low light, they tend to focus faster since there's more light getting through the lens during focusing.

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