Bike friendly accomodation - Jim Thorpe- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Bike friendly accomodation - Jim Thorpe

    Hello,

    A few friends and myself are thinking of heading up to Jim Thorpe for a weekend of riding (our first ride in this area). Can anyone recommend somewhere reasonable to stay, somewhere that does not quiver at the sight of a dirty mountain bike? An establishment close to town would be nice too!

    Cheers!

  2. #2
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    I'm sure you'll find the Inn at Jim Thorpe MTB friendly (http://www.innjt.com).

    I always see lots of cars with dirty MTBs on the roof-racks there on the weekends. It's perfectly located in the center of town. They have a nice small bar in the basement of the building, named Molly Maguire's, gets an authentic mix of locals and out-of-towners. It's somewhat of a traditional watering hole for after-the-ride drinking.

    I believe any other lodging in town is of the b&b variety, and I suspect all of them would welcome MTBers. Out of town you have a few more options, some campgrounds, a motel at the base of road up Broad Mountain (forget it's name), and cabins/houses you can rent for a weekend.

    The local chamber of commerce has a nice listing of accomodations: http://www.jimthorpe.org/
    Last edited by XCoalMiner; 08-15-2005 at 08:21 PM. Reason: Added 2nd link

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by XCoalMiner
    I'm sure you'll find the Inn at Jim Thorpe MTB friendly (http://www.innjt.com).

    a motel at the base of road up Broad Mountain (forget it's name)
    That's the Lantern Lodge.

    http://www.lanternlodge.com/

    A bunch of us stayed there 2 yrs ago. Cheap but clean, no-frills motel rooms. Pretty unremarkable, but the attached restuarant (Macaluso's) was surprisingly good. Not a bad place to crash if you aren't interested in walking to/from town.

    Btw, you could very easily bring your bikes inside your room if you're worried about leaving them out on your car.
    "mmmm....Beeeeeeer." - Homer J. Simpson

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys, good info there. I like the idea of bringing the bikes inside too, so the Lantern Lodge may be just the ticket.

    Cheers!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stick
    That's the Lantern Lodge.

    http://www.lanternlodge.com/

    A bunch of us stayed there 2 yrs ago. Cheap but clean, no-frills motel rooms. Pretty unremarkable, but the attached restuarant (Macaluso's) was surprisingly good. Not a bad place to crash if you aren't interested in walking to/from town.

    Btw, you could very easily bring your bikes inside your room if you're worried about leaving them out on your car.
    I think you can also start several rides directly from their parking lot, start by going up the road on Broad Mt, and then take any of the several dirt access roads to the county owned facilities. (Don't ride the entire Broad Mt. highway to the top of the mountain, it's very steep and way too long). On the downside, since that motel is located several miles out of town, besides the restaurant, there's nothing to do there when you're not riding. You'd have to drive to town to for a bar or to hang out. I suppose that is the trade off, save some $, or pay more to stay in town.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by XCoalMiner
    I think you can also start several rides directly from their parking lot, start by going up the road on Broad Mt, and then take any of the several dirt access roads to the county owned facilities. (Don't ride the entire Broad Mt. highway to the top of the mountain, it's very steep and way too long). On the downside, since that motel is located several miles out of town, besides the restaurant, there's nothing to do there when you're not riding. You'd have to drive to town to for a bar or to hang out. I suppose that is the trade off, save some $, or pay more to stay in town.
    Thanks for the trail advice. Still trying to get my bearing regarding what is on offer up there. Would anyone care to recommend some trails suitable for hardtails (2.2 - 2.3 tyres, but hardtails nonetheless). Something along the lines of Wissahickon would be cool.

    I agree that the location of the motel is a bit of a bummer, but as you said, it's all a trade-off :P

  7. #7
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    If I may butt in here

    A large group of us (10 I think) did American Standard, a classic Jim Thorpe Trail, in June and all but one were on hardtails. The wider tires (I had 2.3's) made all the difference.

    Enjoy yourself. Macalluso's (sp?) got a very good recommendation from a local I rode with but I never actually ate there.

    My wife and I always stay at the Inn at Jim Thorpe. Somewhat pricey but elegant and breakfast (included) on the balcony is a wonderful way to start the day plus you can ride out to all the trails around Mauch Chunk Park from there. As others said, the Inn is very bike friendly and provides a place to lock up your bike in the basement. You might want to bring your own locks for added security in the bike storage room though since anyone staying at the Inn has access although it is locked to outsiders.

  8. #8
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    American Standard is on State Game Lands, (no?), and I think it is not a 'designated route' and so is considered closed to MTBing? Unless you ride it on a Sunday, .... in which case all SGL routes are open to MTBs.

  9. #9
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    Thanks Rev Bubba! The trip is on hold for the time being, but I'll keep collecting information, so feel free to share your experiences

    Good to know about the hardtails as well. I've recently gone from a 2.1 to a 2.25 in the rear (with a 2.1-2.3 inner tube), and while it is a bit more sluggish, it is also noticably more forgiving

  10. #10
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    Laws/Rules are made to be broken

    There were probably a 100 people on American Standard the day we rode. As a ranger told us, they did not have the manpower to enforce the ban and really didn't care where you rode.

    I'm sorry if I do not sound like a law abiding citizen but I'm really sick of people telling me what I can and can not do. Near my home I'm no longer supposed to ride trails I rode over 40-years ago (yes I'm that old!). Fcuk 'em. Catch me if you can. I just don't care any longer........

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