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  1. #1
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    Woodworking

    We sort of touched on this before Christmas, but I thought I'd start a thread specific to working with wood.

    Any Woodworkers here?

    I dabbled in woodworking for years until a few years ago, I hit on an Adirondack style chair made entirely from wine barrels. I've always like the look of the classic Adirondack Chair, but was always disappointed when actually seated in one. The chairs were never as comfortable as they looked. Surprisingly, the curves of the wine barrel staves correct for virtually all of the things I found wrong with the classic Adirondack.

    I'll start with these and add some other stuff later.

    Woodworking-img_3904.jpg

    Anyone else enjoy woodworking?
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    Very nice Chuck. I came across some a couple of years ago made out of old skis.

    I like yours better.

    Woodworking-961e3cd2-9750-4e71-a019-b26a16b70ce3.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    I posted this last year in a different thread, but I guess if noone minds, I'll re-post...

    Took a shot at doing some decorative wood carving. The carving is on a Pennsylvania Longrifle. A rifle styled after a flintlock rifle made by an 18th Century Lancaster gunsmith by the name of Issac Haines. The low-relief carving reflects the Baroque/Roccoco furniture style popular in the "Colonies." (The carving typically is no taller than .03" or about 1/32")

    Wood is curly Maple, extra fancy grade.

    This was my first time doing wood carving, so naturally, I made a lot of mistakes. But learning has occured. And that is what matters.

    I plan to start another one this Summer.



    Here it is finished with Aquafortis and hand rubbed Chambers oil.




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    I'm envious of your carving skills Coal Cracker.
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    Keeping with my own wine barrel/reclaimed wood theme, I've also been building wine racks in 18, 30 and 42 bottle configurations.

    Woodworking-594499250.jpg
    Not a great picture of the 18 and 30. I know I have better somewhere.

    Woodworking-img_4635.jpg
    This is a 42 before putting finish on it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    Keeping with my own wine barrel/reclaimed wood theme, I've also been building wine racks in 18, 30 and 42 bottle configurations.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Not a great picture of the 18 and 30. I know I have better somewhere.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    This is a 42 before putting finish on it.
    Very creative (and appropriate )use of barrels! Are they your own design?

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    Thanks C-C. To answer your question, pretty much everyone doing these sorts of things in the wine country were using the concave vertical ends (like my 42 bottle rack) for varying sizes. I looked at them and thought, "why not maintain the barrel look?" and I flipped the staves and added the metal back.

    I also measured the angles necessary to tighten up all the joints and now miter everything to within a degree or two. The ones I saw previously were slapped together using 90 deg. joints everywhere and leaving big gaps. They looked cheap.
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    For Christmas, I ended up making a bunch of cutting boards out of reclaimed wood, all from the winemaking industry. The light oak is from barrel tops and the dark is oak which has been toasted and used to add oak flavor to wines aged in stainless steel.

    Woodworking-img_4891.jpg
    I gave them as gifts for Christmas

    The cutting boards were gluing up so nicely that I decide to try my hand at something a little harder. This took significantly longer, but I'm happy with the result:
    Woodworking-chess-board.jpg
    I gave this one to one son and am making another for my oldest and then one for myself. Learning more and more...

    Woodworking-chess-board-bottom.jpg
    This is what the back side looks like. You can tell the wine origin.
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    Love the gun carving Cracker. Such a unique talent to master. Looks like you are on your way, very nice.

    And Chuck has hidden talents I wasnít aware of. Love the wine theme reclaimed wood ideas.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Anyone else enjoy woodworking?

    Thanks for starting the thread, Chuck! After entertaining a variety of artistic mediums I finally found one that tics all my boxes and haven't looked back!

    I was looking for some of your old posts of your old skool tools but couldn't find them. I had been looking for a band saw like yours for a while and finally found one I could afford for $100 at an estate sale. The classified ad for this particular sale went online the night before the sale, so I made sure I was there early and snagged it. It's rattle-can silver on a funky base, but it works!



    I haven't done much to it yet other than buying some Cool Blocks for it, but plan on doing some restoration in the future. One of my first cuts was re-sawing a 7'x5" 4/4+ piece of white oak down the middle. The board was crooked so I marked a somewhat straight line down the center with a long off cut, then sliced it into two.



    After that I did two more boards. On the first one I thought the saw was really struggling because it wasn't a re-saw blade, I could only go about an inch and would have to let the saw get back up to speed before proceeding, but once I realized there wasn't enough tension on the drive belt it sliced through the rest with ease!

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    I think you are right Corn, the mixed batch looks better than the paired version.

    Beautiful carving coal-croaker and really nice work with the reclaimed wine barrels Chuck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    One of my first cuts was re-sawing a 7'x5" 4/4+ piece of white oak down the middle. The board was crooked so I marked a somewhat straight line down the center with a long off cut, then sliced it into two.
    Korn, love that you are getting into this. Seems to be right up your alley. I as well wish I could get into it. Iím here to correct you on your description of a board. You said you re-sawed a 7í x 5Ē 4/4 board. That should have been in description as: I re-sawed a 4x4x8 to ?

    Be careful with that old machinery. Itís better than the new stuff but the electrical can be bad.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    7 foot long, 5 inches wide, by 4 quarters thick.

    No wait, I forgot I was using metric and it was 4cm thick, so it started out at about 7/4" thick, not 4/4.
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    I'm confused, don't 4 quarters equal 1?

    When are you lot going to get with metric?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    7 foot long, 5 inches wide, by 4 quarters thick.

    No wait, I forgot I was using metric and it was 4cm thick, so it started out at about 7/4" thick, not 4/4.
    Get with the carpenter lingo program if you are headed in that direction. You take kind hearted advice and turn it around as if I was wrong.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Corn, You killed it with that Delta 14". Holy Cow, a $100?!?! SMOKIN Deal! The fact that you can resaw as you have is cool as hell. Once you get comfortable with that, there's a riser block available for that saw that raises the resaw capacity another 4 to 6 inches. the blocks and blades are readily available.

    If I was retired, I'd spend way more time in my shop than I do right now. Have fun with your creations. Stay safe! Those old tools can bite ya.
    Goya! It's got what plants crave. It's got electrolytes. Livin in an Idiocracy.

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    That rifle is an Excellent Work of Art. Finished out beautifully.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    ... Iím here to correct you on your description of a board. You said you re-sawed a 7í x 5Ē 4/4 board. That should have been in description as: I re-sawed a 4x4x8 to ?
    Sorry dude but your way wrong. Softwoods are expressed in round inches, hardwoods are expressed in quarter inches. So a 7'x5" x 4/4 of oak is expressed as 4/4"x5"x7". First number is always thickness, then width and length.
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    Very cool thread idea. I'm a big fan of any project involving wood. Great stuff posted so far. Keep it coming.

    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Get with the carpenter lingo program.
    Actually cutting a board length wise with the grain is called ripping.

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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Very cool thread idea. I'm a big fan of any project involving wood. Great stuff posted so far. Keep it coming.



    Actually cutting a board length wise with the grain is called ripping.

    https://www.google.com/search?source...4dUDCAs&uact=5
    He started with a thick block that he resawed with an antique band saw. Ripping will be part of surfacing.
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    That checker/chess board will make a great family heirloom as well....

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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    Sorry dude but your way wrong. Softwoods are expressed in round inches, hardwoods are expressed in quarter inches. So a 7'x5" x 4/4 of oak is expressed as 4/4"x5"x7". First number is always thickness, then width and length.
    Ahh..you are right. I forgot the difference in expressing between soft and hardwoods. But, Itís still expressed as the first number is always thickness, then width then length on both.

    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Very cool thread idea. I'm a big fan of any project involving wood. Great stuff posted so far. Keep it coming.



    Actually cutting a board length wise with the grain is called ripping.

    https://www.google.com/search?source...4dUDCAs&uact=5
    Ummm.. that goes without saying if you know anything about lumber cuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Get with the carpenter lingo program if you are headed in that direction. You take kind hearted advice and turn it around as if I was wrong.
    Wut? I was just trying to clarify, and as Miles stated below I did get the sequence wrong, and the beginning thickness as well (long day).

    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    Sorry dude but your way wrong. Softwoods are expressed in round inches, hardwoods are expressed in quarter inches. So a 7'x5" x 4/4 of oak is expressed as 4/4"x5"x7". First number is always thickness, then width and length.
    So would it be better if both the width and length were expressed in either inches or feet, not a combination? 4/4"x5"x84" instead of 4/4"x5"x7'?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Wut? I was just trying to clarify, and as Miles stated below I did get the sequence wrong, and the beginning thickness as well (long day)
    And thats all I was trying to get across to you was the correct sequence.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    Corn, You killed it with that Delta 14". Holy Cow, a $100?!?! SMOKIN Deal! The fact that you can resaw as you have is cool as hell. Once you get comfortable with that, there's a riser block available for that saw that raises the resaw capacity another 4 to 6 inches. the blocks and blades are readily available.

    If I was retired, I'd spend way more time in my shop than I do right now. Have fun with your creations. Stay safe! Those old tools can bite ya.
    Yeah, I've seen those riser blocks, just haven't looked for any yet. Next purchase for that saw will be new tires, and maybe a tension spring if it needs one... and a better wiring setup, and a light, and a...

    I've got a few Stanley Baileys I'll post up soon, they're so sexy! Got a #5 soaking in vinegar right now, the #6 I had in there came out great, just wish I had gotten a pic of it when it was a completely rusted out mess!
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    Corn,

    For a cool forum and support for old woodworking tools, go to OWWM.org (old woodworking machines). I use the same username over there.

    Chuck
    Goya! It's got what plants crave. It's got electrolytes. Livin in an Idiocracy.

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    I feel bad basically giving away an old solid metal drill & skill saw plus a full set of planes from the 1940ís to 50ís at a garage sale last week from my dad passing away. Iím sure the plane set was from my great grandfather. Under pressure from my siblings in getting rid of everything cheap I wasnít thinking straight and let them all go for basically nothing.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    I enjoy basic woodworking. Basic because I just have to many other things going to keep me busy.

    Made this chevron patterned headboard for my wife. Finished it with weathered wood accelerator.


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    My built in desk I did.



    Console table.


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    Like that headboard and console table, good work.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Like that headboard and console table, good work.
    Thanks.

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    I like the built in desk.
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    Corn,

    For a cool forum and support for old woodworking tools, go to OWWM.org (old woodworking machines). I use the same username over there.

    Chuck
    Oh jeez, that's all I need, another forum lol!

    I'll check it out, thanks!
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  34. #34
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    Love it! Woodworking is a an art.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    I like the built in desk.
    Yeah, I didnít care much for that.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorCal_In_AZ View Post
    I enjoy basic woodworking. Basic because I just have to many other things going to keep me busy.

    Made this chevron patterned headboard for my wife. Finished it with weathered wood accelerator.

    That's a nice set up there. So cool to get exactly what you want by creating it yourself. I'm not a guy with talent or ww interest but appreciate it when I see it (and have to buy it).

    DJ - those tools and related things may just end up in the hands of those that'll use them, appreciate them and take good care of them. Sometimes the characters shopping that sort of stuff fit the mold, know and appreciate what the see.
    Even though everything seems to come down to the all mighty dollar, the value of a lot of things is they may carry on a useful life.
    "Before you criticize, you should walk a mile in their shoes. You'll be a mile away from them and you have their shoes"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Oh jeez, that's all I need, another forum lol!

    I'll check it out, thanks!
    Yeah... don't start perusing Tools on Craigslist, either. I'm still populating my rabbit hole.
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    Yeah... don't start perusing Tools on Craigslist, either. I'm still populating my rabbit hole.
    On a much smaller scale, I got (borderline) obsessed a couple years ago hunting down quality/vintage chisels and gouges.
    Ebay, Craigslist, flea markets,...etc.,

    My wife is a saint for putting up with me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coal-Cracker View Post
    My wife is a saint for putting up with me.
    Hear, Hear! However, my shop is a mile form my house and my wife seldom visits. I doubt she knows half of what I have squirreled away up there. I've curtailed my activities though. It's been at least a couple of years since a new piece found its way to my hideaway.

    I do have more bandsaws than I can use. I'm down to four. I gave one to a friend as a 40th birthday gift.

    This one:
    Woodworking-img_3002.jpg
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    Here are some examples of what we teach high schools students to make in Australia, mostly from NSW for their HSC.

    https://www.woodreview.com.au/student-awards

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    Quote Originally Posted by bachman1961 View Post
    DJ - those tools and related things may just end up in the hands of those that'll use them, appreciate them and take good care of them. Sometimes the characters shopping that sort of stuff fit the mold, know and appreciate what the see.
    Even though everything seems to come down to the all mighty dollar, the value of a lot of things is they may carry on a useful life.
    Thanks for putting it into perspective. Sometimes we do get caught up in gains for ourselves. When it should be paying it forward.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  42. #42
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    I leave my wood work to the professionals.......

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    Ha! This afternoon while waiting for my PC to reboot, I slipped around the corner from work to a little antique shop and found this chess set. It's a plastic set from 1960 but it's in perfect shape. It'll do for now.

    Woodworking-chess-set.jpg

    For $18, I had to have it. Oh, Funny thing... In the box was a 1960 dated birthday card for the original owner's 21st birthday. The gift was this chess set.
    Goya! It's got what plants crave. It's got electrolytes. Livin in an Idiocracy.

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    Does building IKEA furniture count?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 5k bike 50cent legs View Post
    Does building IKEA furniture count?
    Maybe, but don't build it IN the store.
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    ^Nice!

    Speaking of chess sets, I forgot about this project for another member here. The old top of the chess piece box was in like 4-5 pieces and was in too bad of shape to be restored. I made a new one to match the old one as best as I could, and I refinished the chess board. This was my first time working with walnut, and I think it made the project turn out good because it was easy to work with. I had just scored a bunch of wood from a sale, and in the lot was a nice piece big enough for the top.



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    How many pieces of wood are there in a cord?

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    ^Nice!

    Speaking of chess sets, I forgot about this project for another member here. The old top of the chess piece box was in like 4-5 pieces and was in too bad of shape to be restored. I made a new one to match the old one as best as I could, and I refinished the chess board. This was my first time working with walnut, and I think it made the project turn out good because it was easy to work with. I had just scored a bunch of wood from a sale, and in the lot was a nice piece big enough for the top.



    Very nice indeed!
    Goya! It's got what plants crave. It's got electrolytes. Livin in an Idiocracy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawgzilla View Post
    How many pieces of wood are there in a cord?
    That's a question for the Woodburning thread. I wanna know how many pieces of wood you can fit in an Accord.

    Hey, you have one of my woodworking projects!

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    Very nice indeed!
    Thanks!

    Notice the finger chopper fan in the background that was probably made around the time as that band saw you posted.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    That's a question for the Woodburning thread. I wanna know how many pieces of wood you can fit in an Accord.
    Probably less pieces than you can fit into a Concord.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawgzilla View Post
    How many pieces of wood are there in a cord?
    Please refer to the AMAZING FACT thread.

    https://forums.mtbr.com/off-camber-o...ad-909157.html
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    ^Nice!

    Speaking of chess sets, I forgot about this project for another member here. The old top of the chess piece box was in like 4-5 pieces and was in too bad of shape to be restored. I made a new one to match the old one as best as I could, and I refinished the chess board. This was my first time working with walnut, and I think it made the project turn out good because it was easy to work with. I had just scored a bunch of wood from a sale, and in the lot was a nice piece big enough for the top.



    Good job Mr. Korn.

    Iím a big fan of a ďLovely Chess BoardĒ

    Anybody have some Grey Poupon?

    Nice set Mr. Chuck.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Good job Mr. Korn.

    Iím a big fan of a ďLovely Chess BoardĒ

    Anybody have some Grey Poupon?

    Nice set Mr. Chuck.
    Me too. Wife and I gave this to each other for Christmas around 12 years ago. We have thoroughly enjoyed it. I love the craftsmanship that goes into such things.
    Beautiful work Corn.

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    Thanks guys!

    If it wasn't for the OC saying I was the one to refinish the chess set I wouldn't have taken on the project, I even tried turning it down in the beginning, I had no idea I could make such a thing.
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    Chess got to be a regular thing during lunch and break at work. This guy had a talent for some of the most colorful trash talk Iíve ever heard during a game. But then he used regular old Frenchís mustard......

    We actually had to get a second board so 6 people could rotate through the week. Itís amazing what a compliment to the work day it became.
    Attachment 1306767

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    Quote Originally Posted by OzarkFathom View Post


    Me too. Wife and I gave this to each other for Christmas around 12 years ago. We have thoroughly enjoyed it. I love the craftsmanship that goes into such things.
    Beautiful work Corn.
    Amazing work someone did. I love that chess sets are so unique. I just sold an all glass set. Not my style, I love me some nice hand carved wood pieces and nicely crafted board like what you have.

    Love the game, hard to find someone that enjoys it so is and is on the same skill level or better.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by OzarkFathom View Post
    Chess got to be a regular thing during lunch and break at work. This guy had a talent for some of the most colorful trash talk Iíve ever heard during a game. But then he used regular old Frenchís mustard......

    We actually had to get a second board so 6 people could rotate through the week. Itís amazing what a compliment to the work day it became.
    Attachment 1306767
    Lol
    Awesome! Builds friendship bonds and brings out character traits.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    You are spot on with the friendship part. The guys on that small crew outperformed everyone simply as a result of learning quickly how one anotherís mind worked.
    Best workplace morale booster and cohesion builder Iíve ever seen.
    All of those guys still talk about those Chess days......
    I have some hilarious video of some very disrespectful trash talk concerning opposing Queens along with a few Checkmate Jigs.....
    I have considered getting a stone cut set to leave outside in the woods by the spring in Missouri if I could find one that would resist the elements.
    But I too prefer the well carved wood, and still enjoy looking at whatís available online.

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    Quote Originally Posted by crank1979 View Post
    Here are some examples of what we teach high schools students to make in Australia, mostly from NSW for their HSC.

    https://www.woodreview.com.au/student-awards
    Wow, really impressive! When you say "we" are yo meaning you teach woodworking?

    What is "NSW" and "HSC", High School Credit?
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    Quote Originally Posted by OzarkFathom View Post
    You are spot on with the friendship part. The guys on that small crew outperformed everyone simply as a result of learning quickly how one anotherís mind worked.
    Best workplace morale booster and cohesion builder Iíve ever seen.
    All of those guys still talk about those Chess days......
    I have some hilarious video of some very disrespectful trash talk concerning opposing Queens along with a few Checkmate Jigs.....
    I have considered getting a stone cut set to leave outside in the woods by the spring in Missouri if I could find one that would resist the elements.
    But I too prefer the well carved wood, and still enjoy looking at whatís available online.
    Nice!
    You should get a stone set if you have a place to set it in Missouri. It would be awesome if one had a group of riding friends that rode a specific trail all the time and would stop and play a game mid ride. I guess Iím dreaming again.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Wow, really impressive! When you say "we" are yo meaning you teach woodworking?

    What is "NSW" and "HSC", High School Credit?
    I'm guessing New South Wales, not sure on the other one,.

    Thanks for reminding me to look at that link, impressive for sure! I really like the circular buffet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Nice!
    You should get a stone set if you have a place to set it in Missouri. It would be awesome if one had a group of riding friends that rode a specific trail all the time and would stop and play a game mid ride. I guess Iím dreaming again.


    There is a table and Morel patch next to this spring behind the house.
    Cut the trail to it with the DR the other day. What you have in mind is a great idea. An all weather chess set would be a fantastic break stop.
    Dreams coming true. Work paying off.
    Future home of the Checkmate Riders.......

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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Wow, really impressive! When you say "we" are yo meaning you teach woodworking?

    What is "NSW" and "HSC", High School Credit?
    NSW is New South Wales as mentioned already.

    HSC stands for High School Certificate. Here we have primary school, which is Kindergarten until Yr6, so 5 / 6 yr olds to about 12 years old. Then we move to high school which is Yr7 to Yr12, so 12 / 13 yr olds to 17 / 18 yr olds. Then it is university, Tafe which is tertiary college generally for trades or straight to work. Other states are similar but different. Some start younger some older, all have a Yr12 equivalent but by a different name. That link is some pretty good quality stuff, the best of what Yr 12 would make. Believe me, not all of it is to that standard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Wow, really impressive! When you say "we" are yo meaning you teach woodworking?

    What is "NSW" and "HSC", High School Credit?
    Yes. Industrial Technology is the subject and it includes options for automotive, electronics, graphics, metal, timber and multimedia. At my school we offer graphics and timber. Students design and make a product, so each in the class is different.

    NSW is the state - New South Wales.

    HSC is the Higher School Certificate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OzarkFathom View Post


    There is a table and Morel patch next to this spring behind the house.
    Cut the trail to it with the DR the other day. What you have in mind is a great idea. An all weather chess set would be a fantastic break stop.
    Dreams coming true. Work paying off.
    Future home of the Checkmate Riders.......
    A perfect rest stop for sure. And with an all weather chess set there as a permanent break focus. The trickling stream makes for the perfect back drop so the mind can concentrate on chess strategy. Iíll be looking forward to you making this come to fruition.

    ďCheckmate RidersĒ
    Jerseys in the works as well.

    See what you started Chuck.

    Quote Originally Posted by crank1979 View Post
    Yes. Industrial Technology is the subject and it includes options for automotive, electronics, graphics, metal, timber and multimedia. At my school we offer graphics and timber. Students design and make a product, so each in the class is different.

    NSW is the state - New South Wales.

    HSC is the Higher School Certificate.
    This is a wonderful thing. You are lucky to be a part of it.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  66. #66
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    I wish I had the patience (and the talent) to carve a set of chess pieces. As I build more boards, I'll try to find better sets.

    I was thinking of turning some pieces in the shape of wine bottles, but my lathe is just too big.

    Nice stuff guys!
    Goya! It's got what plants crave. It's got electrolytes. Livin in an Idiocracy.

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    This is a fun watch!

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    Great video, love that canoe.

    Ideas....
    This is where the set in the pictures came from.
    https://thechessstore.com/wood-chess-pieces-by-model/
    WOW, the prices have doubled since I bought mine....
    Some of the knight pieces are really impressive.
    I guess a Dremel tool for the fine detail on the knights and such beyond turning?


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    Man, Ron's shop looks like my high school wood shop classroom! Sweet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coal-Cracker View Post
    I posted this last year in a different thread, but I guess if noone minds, I'll re-post...

    Took a shot at doing some decorative wood carving. The carving is on a Pennsylvania Longrifle. A rifle styled after a flintlock rifle made by an 18th Century Lancaster gunsmith by the name of Issac Haines. The low-relief carving reflects the Baroque/Roccoco furniture style popular in the "Colonies." (The carving typically is no taller than .03" or about 1/32")

    Wood is curly Maple, extra fancy grade.

    This was my first time doing wood carving, so naturally, I made a lot of mistakes. But learning has occured. And that is what matters.

    I plan to start another one this Summer.



    Here it is finished with Aquafortis and hand rubbed Chambers oil.



    That is one sweet long rifle, Coal Cracker!

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    I finished Chess board #2 on Friday afternoon before beginning my FJ40 project. This one will go to #1 son and his wife.

    On board #1, I did a dark border. On this one I wanted to try my hand at creating an inlay of dark wood in a border of white oak.

    This one took less than half the time of the first one and I was able to tighten u the joints a bit, as well.

    Woodworking-img_4994.jpg
    I like the effect.

    I think I'll reverse the inlay on the next one.
    Goya! It's got what plants crave. It's got electrolytes. Livin in an Idiocracy.

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    That ones a beauty chuckha
    DAAAANG...that was janky

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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    I finished Chess board #2 on Friday afternoon before beginning my FJ40 project. This one will go to #1 son and his wife.

    On board #1, I did a dark border. On this one I wanted to try my hand at creating an inlay of dark wood in a border of white oak.

    This one took less than half the time of the first one and I was able to tighten u the joints a bit, as well.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I like the effect.

    I think I'll reverse the inlay on the next one.
    Very cool you are giving these as gifts to your children. Make sure you sign and date them. Your GGG Grandchildren may appreciate this information.

    The FJ40 projects sounds interesting as well.

    I plan to give each of my kids a rifle, carved by myself. Hopefully, they will be passed down and appreciated long after I'm gone.

    I guess this is wood-related, so I'll share this here. Delimbing wood for the fireplace this weekend. Ended in a trip to the ER. (That Combat Medic training continues to come in handy.)

    Note: I decided to remove the image. It was, perhaps, to graphic.

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    Thanks guys! and...

    Damn Coal! That looks nasty. Take care!
    Goya! It's got what plants crave. It's got electrolytes. Livin in an Idiocracy.

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    Dang coal, thatís janky. Did you do that with a hatchet? Quite a clean cut, I bet that stung, makes me cringe. Get well soon
    DAAAANG...that was janky

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir kayakalot View Post
    Dang coal, thatís janky. Did you do that with a hatchet? Quite a clean cut, I bet that stung, makes me cringe. Get well soon
    Did it with a Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe.
    'Cause if your gonna cut off the tip of your thumb, you might as well do it in style.

    Very clean cut. I had the axe shaving sharp. And yes, it stung. Matter of fact, it still stings. A great deal, actually. Haha!

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    Couple of years ago the wife asked for me to make a dining room table with an irregular top in every dimension. The kicker was to keep it smooth enough that plates donít rattle/rock but donít resort to the ďhand distressedĒ look that was all the rage.




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    Quote Originally Posted by yzedf View Post
    Couple of years ago the wife asked for me to make a dining room table with an irregular top in every dimension. The kicker was to keep it smooth enough that plates donít rattle/rock but donít resort to the ďhand distressedĒ look that was all the rage.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    And, looks like you nailed it. Nice work, hope she approved.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    I finished Chess board #2 on Friday afternoon before beginning my FJ40 project. This one will go to #1 son and his wife.

    On board #1, I did a dark border. On this one I wanted to try my hand at creating an inlay of dark wood in a border of white oak.

    This one took less than half the time of the first one and I was able to tighten u the joints a bit, as well.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I like the effect.

    I think I'll reverse the inlay on the next one.
    Very nice, Iím hard pressed with whatís my favorite with what youíve been turning out lately.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    And, looks like you nailed it. Nice work, hope she approved.
    Thanks! And yes, she loves it.


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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    I like the effect.

    I think I'll reverse the inlay on the next one.
    I like the effect also, nice work!

    Check this out, I like the glue up jig: https://youtu.be/IxwL5qs8v5k

    Quote Originally Posted by Coal-Cracker View Post
    Note: I decided to remove the image. It was, perhaps, to graphic.
    Thanks! Hope you're ok!

    Quote Originally Posted by yzedf View Post
    Couple of years ago the wife asked for me to make a dining room table with an irregular top in every dimension. The kicker was to keep it smooth enough that plates donít rattle/rock but donít resort to the ďhand distressedĒ look that was all the rage.
    Looks nice! Wish I could see better pics, and maybe a little more info on it, like what type of wood and how you did the distressing.

    I still have a farmhouse table to build, and I'm not afraid to add a little distressing to it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Looks nice! Wish I could see better pics, and maybe a little more info on it, like what type of wood and how you did the distressing.

    I still have a farmhouse table to build, and I'm not afraid to add a little distressing to it.
    Black walnut finished with Danish oil (easy refinishing since we have two young kids). After the glue up I trimmed the ends by eye with a hand saw. After taking care to scrape excess glue the rest was done fairly heavy handed. We decided to keep the irregularities running with the grain, a dull blade in my shortest plane worked well at peeling thin areas too deeply. Sanding was done with a cheap random orbit sander with some hand touchups.




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    Very nice, love the live edge! I knew it was walnut!

    I'm going to turn one of my SB #5 planes into a scrub plane, was thinking I could add some character that way.
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    Black Walnut is my favorite looking wood. So awesome!
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Looks nice, yzedf. As does the chessboard, Chuck.

    My dad downsized a few years ago and gave me a lot of his old equipment, including some pieces he inherited when my mom's father passed away back in the '60s.

    1920s Delta bandsaw. I have the original owner's manual around somewhere. I don't remember it having the light switch power switch when I was a kid so I guess that was dad's work a bit more recently. I added the casters as my shop doubles as a parking garage for my son's car so I have to move it out of the way.

    Woodworking-bandsaw.jpg

    Woodworking-drillpress.jpg

    Most of my "woodworking" has been building and fixing things around the house and yard, so not real glamorous unless you want to count the playground structure I built for my kids at my old house. I did build an entertainment center that I'll get on here. Also a table for my kids' wooden train set, stove for my daughter, workbench for my son and a desk for my daughter but that stuff's all gone except the desk. Oh, also built some nice built in shelves on the landing on the basement stairs in the old house.

    My father also gave me a bunch of walnut from a tree that fell on my great uncle's farm he had milled and a bunch of cherry he bought off a guy that was moving. I really need to do some projects with that stuff.
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    Cool bandsaw Chaz. I remember my uncle having one very similar, not sure if it was a Delta though.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    I also like to do woodworking. This is a very painstaking and exciting activity that can give a lot of emotions at the end of the work. But I think this is also one of the most expensive activities. I had to spend about 400 bucks on just one table saw that I chose here.
    Last edited by Xiander; 02-28-2020 at 06:19 AM.

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    The property where I rent my shop space has a large house which was built in the mid 40s from mostly old growth redwood. The homeowner is doing a remodel and making a huge indoor/outdoor "event space" on one side of it. He had to remove several original 8"x8" Redwood posts and replace with pressure treated Doug Fir.

    I've convinced him to make a large Live Edged slab Redwood table for the space. I'm going to turn the legs from the original redwood 8x8s.
    Goya! It's got what plants crave. It's got electrolytes. Livin in an Idiocracy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    1920s Delta bandsaw. I have the original owner's manual around somewhere. I don't remember it having the light switch power switch when I was a kid so I guess that was dad's work a bit more recently. I added the casters as my shop doubles as a parking garage for my son's car so I have to move it out of the way.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    That's pretty much identical to mine, with the switch in the same place even, just moar rust and a different logo on the saw.

    So maybe mine is from the '30s.

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    The property where I rent my shop space has a large house which was built in the mid 40s from mostly old growth redwood. The homeowner is doing a remodel and making a huge indoor/outdoor "event space" on one side of it. He had to remove several original 8"x8" Redwood posts and replace with pressure treated Doug Fir.

    I've convinced him to make a large Live Edged slab Redwood table for the space. I'm going to turn the legs from the original redwood 8x8s.
    Awesome, take pictars!!!
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    I posted this in the Chess thread, but to keep it consistent, I'll add it here...

    Chess Board #3, but with homemade hardware chess set.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Woodworking-img_5073.jpg  

    Goya! It's got what plants crave. It's got electrolytes. Livin in an Idiocracy.

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    ^^^ I like it!
    Just call me Ray

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    Although I'm not a woodworker my Dad did it for a long time. He's 87 now and just doesn't have any room to put anything else he could make. But he built fine furniture when my parents retired and moved to FL in '94.

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    It's looking like I'll finally have some time to do some woodworking related projects!

    Over the last few years I've been picking up Stanley Bailey planes when I see them at good prices. Even tho I haven't mastered the technique of hand planing, I'm willing to learn, and these things are sexy!

    The first one I bought, a #5, was in pretty good condition, I thought it would be adequate for my needs when the time came to plane something and put it away for a while. Then I found a #6, and then another #5, both in pretty rough shape. After some U-Toobing I really started to get into it, these things are cool and I'm going to figure out how to use them! After some U-Toob hand plane restoration videos I got even more into it and now I'm in the process of restoring them to a point, not going to go crazy here. Thinking the #6 was fairly rare, and cheap, I didn't hesitate buying it. After that while I was picking up some wood at another sale the day after they had closed, I noticed a #5 that hadn't sold, so I grabbed it and some other things for super cheap!

    Here's the first #5, pretty much as it was when I found it.



    This one is a #6 jointer plane, which is about 4" longer than the #5 and a bit wider. I soaked this one and the second #5 in vinegar overnight to remove the rust, then did some quick buffing and some work on the soles. I do intend to take these a bit further in the restoration, starting with new handles, and then some more buffing. I don't mind the chipped paint at all!



    And finally the second #5. At first I questioned why I bought another #5, but then learned about scrub planes, which have a convex blade used for rough planing. So all I need to do is put a curve on the blade and it'll work as a scrub plane. This one needs some attention as well.



    I wish I'd have taken before pics of the two I soaked in vinegar, quite the transformation from rusty hunks to what they are now. Here's a pic off the net to give you an idea:

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  94. #94
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    Cool stuff Korn. May I suggest not changing out the handles and keeping them as original as possible. From a collector standpoint they would be worth more later. But I guess it doesnít matter as you plan on using them. I personally would keep them as props in an antique setting, or sell them. Then buy modern ones and learn the best way to use them. My dad had some old ones like that. I fully expected to come across them going through his belongings recently after he passed. I guess he gave them away because I never found them.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  95. #95
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    There's thousands of these planes out there for $5-$50, refinished ones get up into the hundreds, very common and not really antiques. The handles on two of them are broken, that's why I'm making new ones.

    Here's one of the vids that inspired me:

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  96. #96
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    Pretty slick.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  97. #97
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    Hand planes are sexy!

    Here are my mine:

    Woodworking-planes.jpg

    The big one is a Craftsman, the Stanley is a #4, smaller one in front is also a Craftsman, the other small one missing pieces and the draw knife say "made in USA" but I can't find a brand.
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  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Hand planes are sexy!

    Here are my mine:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The big one is a Craftsman, the Stanley is a #4, smaller one in front is also a Craftsman, the other small one missing pieces and the draw knife say "made in USA" but I can't find a brand.
    Very cool, a draw knife is a lost art.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  99. #99
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    ^Nice! I would like to get my hands on a draw knife, spoke shave, etc.

    I'm curious about the handle on the Craftsman, is it roughly the same shape as the Stanley? If the Stanley handle will fit on the Craftsman, and the Stanley handle is the same shape as mine, I'd be happy to make you a new one.
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  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    ^Nice! I would like to get my hands on a draw knife, spoke shave, etc.

    I'm curious about the handle on the Craftsman, is it roughly the same shape as the Stanley? If the Stanley handle will fit on the Craftsman, and the Stanley handle is the same shape as mine, I'd be happy to make you a new one.
    Yeah, I guess that is a spoke shave rather than a draw knife. I'll have to look at the handles, though mine are all in pretty good shape, just scratched up a little. Thanks for the offer!
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  101. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Yeah, I guess that is a spoke shave rather than a draw knife. I'll have to look at the handles, though mine are all in pretty good shape, just scratched up a little. Thanks for the offer!
    But the top is broken off on your big plane, just like mine.

    If I'm going to make two I can make three or four at the same time.
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  102. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    But the top is broken off on your big plane, just like mine.

    If I'm going to make two I can make three or four at the same time.
    Oh yeah, that. It's not exactly the same as the Stanley, it's mounted with two screws whereas the Stanley only one, but maybe that's because of the different sizes? I could take it off and mail it to you.
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  103. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Oh yeah, that. It's not exactly the same as the Stanley, it's mounted with two screws whereas the Stanley only one, but maybe that's because of the different sizes? I could take it off and mail it to you.
    Let me see how it goes with mine before you send it out.

    My Staleys have two screws on the handles, maybe the #4 has a smaller handle and only one, and I think it does. I was just watching a video and the guy pulled up a template for #5 and larger at Lee Valley tools, so it must be.

    The handle on a plane is also known as a 'tote'.
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  104. #104
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    Chaz, maybe ship it by plain. . . .
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  105. #105
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    I'm too impatient for hand tools, for the most part. Although, I did learn how to use, maintain and sharpen the blades on hand planes many years ago. Good stuff!
    Goya! It's got what plants crave. It's got electrolytes. Livin in an Idiocracy.

  106. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    I'm too impatient for hand tools, for the most part. Although, I did learn how to use, maintain and sharpen the blades on hand planes many years ago. Good stuff!
    Yeah, me too! I can't imagine flattening a board with hand planes and winding sticks, or even jointing one edge with one, but I will be using them with my shooting board! Once I saw one of these hand planes became even moar sexier! A shooting board allows you to really dial in a cut after rough cutting on the chop saw or even hand saw. You can get a very precise cut, better than any saw will ever give you.

    One of the things I love about woodworking is you can make stuff however you want, I looked at a bunch of shooting board designs and cherry picked the things I liked about each one and combined it all into one. The channel at the top with the tapered side came from Paul Sllers design, but instead of a tapered stop that fits inside the entire channel, I've simply made a wedge that taps into place and anchors any old piece of scrap as a stop, and it also holds a 45į stop and any additional stops I make. I saw a design that had a stop that was held in place by two screws and could be advanced into the blade to keep a zero-clearance stop to eliminate tear out, with mine you can simply move the stop and wedge it back into place. Other than the stop/wedge system it's pretty basic, and all made out of scraps. The only thing on the board that needs to be precise is the 90į faces; where the sole of the plane rides against has to be a perfect 90į to the fence.



    The big #6 Jointer plane feels really solid for the task and is easy to run on the board.



    The #5 works but isn't as stable as the #6. I was using it because the blade was sharp enough to try out on the board. Here I have the 45į stop wedged into place.

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  107. #107
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    Gone down this rabbit hole of woodturning videos...


  108. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Train Wreck View Post
    Gone down this rabbit hole of woodturning videos...

    There's a great way to kill an entire afternoon! Been there....lol.
    Wish I had a wood lathe

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  109. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Train Wreck View Post
    Gone down this rabbit hole of woodturning videos...

    Nice! Seeing this reminds me I need some tools and fixtures for my lathe.
    Goya! It's got what plants crave. It's got electrolytes. Livin in an Idiocracy.

  110. #110
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    My dad offered me his lathe when my folks downsized but I just didn't have room for it.
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  111. #111
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    I've often thought about buying a lathe. *Danny Noonan voice*

    Would be fun and the ultimate rabbit hole.

    I painted the gear that bronze color just to get something on there while I ponder. Will do the rust unless I come up with something else. Also thinking about knocking out another three or four to get it over with.

    I was trying to not round out the bottoms of the gear teeth too much, I think I can do better,. I was looking at 1/4" downcut router bits today.
    I got into a few teeth when I was drilling out the spaces in between on the drill press, need to tighten up that process. Maybe I'll post a shot of the template tomorrow.

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