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  1. #1
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    Santa's Workshop...

    So, anyone in the process of making a gift? People here are pretty handy, so post away.

    I am working on one for my special needs son. He loves to watch me mow the lawn on our zero turn but does not have the fine motor skills to operate it himself (without me walking next to it and the throttle at low). I found something that I think will make a good electric zero turn go-cart if you will.

    A guy on craig's list was selling an unfinished "Electric Bar Stool" project. It's basically a modified electric wheel chair chassis. Here is the before:

    Santa's Workshop...-img_1759.jpgSanta's Workshop...-img_1758.jpg

    As set up it was an instrument of death. With the diameter of the drive wheels it will do 6+ mph which would be a lot to handle bouncing around on the bicycle seat.

    I will have to snap some pictures of the progress tonight, but basically the plan is place seat as low as possible and extend the wheelbase substantially (2x+). I cut off the whole upper level of the frame that holds the current seat. 1x2 steel tube, like the existing frame, will be welded on to extend the location of a front axle. I have forks from a zero turn that will be installed on axle that will place the front wheels as wide as the back wheels. Tires will be suitable for off road. I have a seat from a commercial zero turn that has arms and a seat belt for security. It will mount right in front of the rear wheels. The joystick can extend from one of the arms. The foot well will be expanded metal.

    Parts that do not need to be welded have been cleaned and painted. Chassis will be painted once welding is complete. Hopefully welding will be done tonight.

    It runs on 24v and the control is programmable so that I can set speed and acceleration.

    I think he is going to love it.

    More to come...

    Anyone else got Christmas projects in the works?

  2. #2
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    Iím my BILís secret Santa. Well, not so secret, because I already told him that Iím making him a sugar rocket.

    Have most of the stuff, just have to get building. Will update.


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  3. #3
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    Wow bluecheesehead thatís a cool project! Canít wait to see the finished product.

    Keep us posted Le Duke, rockets are cool for any age!
    DAAAANG...that was janky

  4. #4
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    Cutting Boards

    I have a crap load of old wine barrel parts.

    These are made form the lids (the light oak). The dark pieces are from toasted oak used to flavor wine aged in stainless.

    I've made seven so far and have to make four more.

    Santa's Workshop...-cutting-board.jpg
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    This thread is gonna be an instant hit, at least for me since Iím always building something. I built two picture frames for the wife today. She is an amazing artist and has a lot of drawings that need frames. I also made this kitchen utensil holder for my son for Xmas. It will hold four knives in the little slots, a whole slew of utensils in the top, and a roll of paper towels on the side. I love building stuff with old wood.

    Santa's Workshop...-4bd5d9fc-2ebe-4412-8928-6a97cc4c3caa.jpegSanta's Workshop...-0021e88f-2b79-47e0-bc63-aa84b49ba771.jpegSanta's Workshop...-687d3774-4548-4d4a-ae45-49d6c877070c.jpeg
    DAAAANG...that was janky

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    I have a crap load of old wine barrel parts.

    These are made form the lids (the light oak). The dark pieces are from toasted oak used to flavor wine aged in stainless.

    I've made seven so far and have to make four more.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    That looks really nice, love the look of both oaks and also the contrast and the design!

    I just bought a crapton of red oak, I want to experiment with ammonia fuming. Can you elaborate on the toasted oak, what's the process used to get that color?
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir kayakalot View Post
    I love building stuff with old wood.
    Yah, me too! It's sometimes hard to pick between saw marks/patina and beautiful wood grain, I wish I could have both!

    I didn't know you were crafty like that. I know you can build bridges out of logs and stuff, but also smaller detailed work too, nice looking pieces!
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  8. #8
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    That's an awesome contraption for your kiddo!

    I'm not as handy as most here and am not making anything this year, but last year I made a cornhole (bags, for those not in the know if Midwestern lingo) set. Super easy thing to make, and it works pretty well. The top might be too smooth... Didn't sew the bags myself, though. That's not something anyone ever taught me and I haven't committed to learning it yet..
    dang

  9. #9
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    Way cool stuff in here. Havenít seen a project contribution I donít like yet.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  10. #10
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    Some great looking projects and nothing says giving like building/making it yourself. It's been several years since I've done that but I used to build stuff for my kids, a train table, desk, kitchen set and workbench. They've all been outgrown and sold/given away except the desk, which is still in my daughter's room.
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  11. #11
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    Santa's Workshop...

    Oh. It wasnít originally a Christmas project, but the yurt is almost done. Lexan bubble for the top finally in the mail. Doors not pictured, but they are New Mexico turquoise and gold. Canvas and all the guy lines are done, too.

    I mostly built this for my wife, who is tiny and gets super cold on shoulder season camping trips. Weíll be able to sleep 5+ (and dogs), cook meals, etc.







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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir kayakalot View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    How are you hiding new cuts? I've used a little stain in the past, and have also strategically hidden them, like 45ing all the corners as I did on these floating shelves. This small out of focus pic hides a lot of flaws, I didn't get all the corners to line up perfectly because it wasn't straight lumber.

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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Oh. It wasnít originally a Christmas project, but the yurt is almost done. Lexan bubble for the top finally in the mail. Doors not pictured, but they are New Mexico turquoise and gold. Canvas and all the guy lines are done, too.

    I mostly built this for my wife, who is tiny and gets super cold on shoulder season camping trips. Weíll be able to sleep 5+ (and dogs), cook meals, etc.







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    Quite a piece of work. So it all folds up and goes back up pretty quick?
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Santa's Workshop...

    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Quite a piece of work. So it all folds up and goes back up pretty quick?
    Quick being relative. 15-20min by myself. With 4 people, probably under 10.

    Itís 11.5í in diameter. Folds up and can fit in a roof box. Hereís one of the two lattices/sides folded up, compared to my 5í1Ē, 100lb wife.




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  15. #15
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    ^That yurt is rad!

    One of my favorite words; yurt
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    Le Duke is that a kit, or you designed and built it?
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    How are you hiding new cuts? I've used a little stain in the past, and have also strategically hidden them, like 45ing all the corners as I did on these floating shelves. This small out of focus pic hides a lot of flaws, I didn't get all the corners to line up perfectly because it wasn't straight lumber.

    Most of the new cuts are on bottom, but obviously not all. The secret is using the torch on the new cuts and then light sanding to give it that old look. Takes a little practice but it can really give it that weathered look
    DAAAANG...that was janky

  18. #18
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    Nice portable yurt Le Duke. Not sure Iíve ever seen one that big that was portable.
    Like DJ, Iím interested to know if thatís something that you came up with or is it commercially available?
    DAAAANG...that was janky

  19. #19
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    I've done a bunch of oak staining with steel wool and vinegar. It really makes a nice weathered finish. I'll also hit the grain with a wire brush on my angle grinder to weather even more. I did an accent wall in our house that way along with our fireplace. I used 2nd grade oak flooring and have a bunch left over. I use it to make shelves and display boards and such. No real projects this year, but if you don't look really close you don't know its old. Sample pics included to show the effect.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Santa's Workshop...-fireplace.jpg  

    Santa's Workshop...-accent-wall.jpg  


  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    That looks really nice, love the look of both oaks and also the contrast and the design!

    I just bought a crapton of red oak, I want to experiment with ammonia fuming. Can you elaborate on the toasted oak, what's the process used to get that color?
    Being that it's ultimately food grade (since it's used to flavor wine) it's not chemically altered, it's literally toasted over a fire.

    If you've never seen a cooper making and toasting a wine barrel, take a look at this:



    There's something very satisfying about working with reclaimed products. There's a character when you're done that can't be faked.
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  21. #21
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    Nice wood work and yurt guys!

    I got the chassis welded up last night. Tonight I will mock it up so that I can locate the seat mounts. I want the seat back as far as possible without hitting the tires. I had to elevate the front axle to so that when the forks/tires are installed the frame will sit roughly level. Overall length of frame is about 50". This gives a sense of the frame extension.

    Santa's Workshop...-img_3919.jpg

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    ^^^ Looking forward to seeing the finished product, BCH.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir kayakalot View Post
    Most of the new cuts are on bottom, but obviously not all. The secret is using the torch on the new cuts and then light sanding to give it that old look. Takes a little practice but it can really give it that weathered look
    Instead of sanding after using the torch, try using a wire brush (with the grain, of course).
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir kayakalot View Post
    Most of the new cuts are on bottom, but obviously not all. The secret is using the torch on the new cuts and then light sanding to give it that old look. Takes a little practice but it can really give it that weathered look
    Cool! Never thought of that, I'll have to give it a try!

    Quote Originally Posted by SoDakSooner View Post
    I've done a bunch of oak staining with steel wool and vinegar. It really makes a nice weathered finish. I'll also hit the grain with a wire brush on my angle grinder to weather even more. I did an accent wall in our house that way along with our fireplace. I used 2nd grade oak flooring and have a bunch left over. I use it to make shelves and display boards and such. No real projects this year, but if you don't look really close you don't know its old. Sample pics included to show the effect.
    Cool looking oak walls!

    I've watched a ton of videos on the vinegar and steel wool trick but have never tried it.

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    Being that it's ultimately food grade (since it's used to flavor wine) it's not chemically altered, it's literally toasted over a fire.

    If you've never seen a cooper making and toasting a wine barrel, take a look at this:

    There's something very satisfying about working with reclaimed products. There's a character when you're done that can't be faked.
    Mmm, toasty! Must be tricky to get a usable amount from the inside of a curved wine barrel.

    I've been wanting to try Shou Sugi Ban, which is basically the same thing, toasting the wood.

    https://www.architecturaldigest.com/...wood-furniture
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    Thanks for the tip. Iíve got another project Iím fixing to start and Iíll try the wire brush technique Chuckha
    DAAAANG...that was janky

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    Nice wood work and yurt guys!

    I got the chassis welded up last night. Tonight I will mock it up so that I can locate the seat mounts. I want the seat back as far as possible without hitting the tires. I had to elevate the front axle to so that when the forks/tires are installed the frame will sit roughly level. Overall length of frame is about 50". This gives a sense of the frame extension.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    That's awesome that you're building it as you go, that's the way I roll most of the time! It would be rad if you could make it pop wheelies and add some wheelie bars!

    Welding is another skill I've really been wanting to learn, but I must be patient, I've been bitten hard by the woodworking bug and I'm fully into it right now. I've been thinking of starting a woodworking thread so I don't go OT in any thread that mentions wood.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Le Duke is that a kit, or you designed and built it?
    Designed and built in Fort Collins, CO. My wife has been woodworking with her dad since she was 6 or so, and has taught me enough to be dangerous. With the exception of our kitchen table, all of the wooden furniture in our house is made by either me or my wife. Bed, dresser, chest of drawers, coffee table, couch, etc. She's owed me a Morris chair for half a decade now, but has been holding off because our current abode isn't big enough to accommodate one.

    Bought 6/4 poplar lumber from Sears Trostel on the north side of town, ripped it into 3/8" x 1 1/2" x 10' strips, thickness planed it down to 5/16s. Then took about 6 of them at a time, mounted them on the drill press and drilled all of the holes. Lattice is connected with t-nuts and matching bolts.

    For the center ring, we built a wood steamer out of 10' ABS pipe and my mother-in-law's clothes steamer. We'd toss two or three of the poplar strips in there at a time, steam them for half and hour, then clamp them to an old 26" bicycle rim until they dried. Then, we laminated them together, drilled and lubricated holes, etc.

    Rafters are made out of bamboo, with oak dowels stuck in the ends to provide a uniform insertion end into the center ring. They all have a small cord loop on the lattice/wall end, and are under a bit of compression. I can do pull ups in the center ring with no hint of it dipping.

    The door frames were originally made out of 2x4s, because they were cheap and easy to source. Knocked them together in 20min. We re-built them with matching doors out of poplar, birch laminate panels and plexiglass. My wife did all of the joinery there; the birch panel in each door is actually "floating" to allow for expansion due to temperature and humidity fluctuations. Painted them turquoise and gold last weekend. My wife is figuring out a light weight closure/locking system for them.

    The canvas is the only part I had to outsource. I know the basics of sewing, but that's limited to very small projects. My wife's aunt took our ~30lbs of canvas and made it into two walls and a roof.

    Heating will come from a Kni-Co Trekker stove, with a silicone stove jack sewn into the roof canvas. We set the yurt up in the snow over Thanksgiving and had the stove pipe going out the center ring, and despite a good portion of the heat escaping out of the middle of the roof, were able to melt off what snow remained and keep a bunch of people warm.

    The last thing to do, once I receive the Lexan bubble for the center ring, is to make two U-shaped pieces of plywood, put hinges between them on the flat/non-curved side, and configure a way to raise/lower the bubble so that we can do some temperature and humidity control.
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  28. #28
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    I'm digging that Yurt, LeDuke.

    And Corn, If you start a woodworking thread, I'm sure you'll get a response. I'd be interested to see anyone's turning projects. I've done a little, but really want to turn some bowls. I need a faceplate for my lathe though.
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    There's something very satisfying about working with reclaimed products. There's a character when you're done that can't be faked.
    The local lumber store has a couple of things that I want to build with but don't necessarily want to buy, because their board foot prices are insane:

    1) Reclaimed barn siding
    2) Wyoming wind fence
    3) Reclaimed oak truck bed

    Beetle kill pine was all the rage around here for a while, and that's what I made my living room coffee table out of. It's light, pretty, durable enough. And there's more of it in the mountains west of here than you'd could ever hope to harvest. My BIL built a cabin with his dad, and cut some beetle kill pine siding for it. Looks really cool with the clear finish they put on the siding.
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    I'm digging that Yurt, LeDuke.

    And Corn, If you start a woodworking thread, I'm sure you'll get a response. I'd be interested to see anyone's turning projects. I've done a little, but really want to turn some bowls. I need a faceplate for my lathe though.
    I think I will, a little later tho, I'm right in the middle of wood inventory, got some walnut coming in later today.

    I was watching this last night: https://youtu.be/S2Eq4o3B4d0 That's where I've been lately, either learning about woodworking on U-toob or out in the shop.
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  31. #31
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    That's an amazing yurt. It seems pretty cushy, too, which is nice. Though the only time I've stayed in a yurt was on vacation, so I don't know the ins and outs of yurt comfort. We stayed a night at a yurt resort type place. That was too cushy, but really hot the spot after 4 nights of tent camping.

    Much respect sent your way for the work you put into it.
    dang

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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    The local lumber store has a couple of things that I want to build with but don't necessarily want to buy, because their board foot prices are insane:

    1) Reclaimed barn siding
    2) Wyoming wind fence
    3) Reclaimed oak truck bed

    Beetle kill pine was all the rage around here for a while, and that's what I made my living room coffee table out of. It's light, pretty, durable enough. And there's more of it in the mountains west of here than you'd could ever hope to harvest. My BIL built a cabin with his dad, and cut some beetle kill pine siding for it. Looks really cool with the clear finish they put on the siding.
    My original intent was barnwood, but it was outrageous to buy, and in our neck of the woods it is hard to find. The oak was cheap..$1.25 to $1.50 per square foot for red or white respectively. When growing up our next door neighbor was a custom picture framer and did really nice barnwood frames. People would pay him to rip barns down....not any more.

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    A buddy of mine has family property in Oregon. Apparently, they had an 80' diameter silo that was taken down a few years ago. It was made of vertical grained fir, all T&G 6/4. It was all stacked in a barn on the property and has been there for years.

    He brought down a bunch of wood this past Summer. I'm building several shelves and a sliding barn door out of it. He's installing it in his house which was just rebuilt after being lost in the Tubbs fire in Oct. '17.

    Once I get the door assembled, I'll snap some pics. We're probably a couple of months out though.
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    Those floating shelves I posted above are made out of heart pine, I just studied up on it last night, I don't know how I feel about it now. Here's some offcuts:

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    That's awesome that you're building it as you go, that's the way I roll most of the time! It would be rad if you could make it pop wheelies and add some wheelie bars!

    Welding is another skill I've really been wanting to learn, but I must be patient, I've been bitten hard by the woodworking bug and I'm fully into it right now. I've been thinking of starting a woodworking thread so I don't go OT in any thread that mentions wood.
    The wheel chair actually came with wheelie bars. I think the extended front end will be too heavy to do wheelies on flat ground.

    My welds are serviceable, but NOT pretty. Plenty grinding will take place before paint.

    I am hoping to get this done so that I can get some cedar bat houses built. My wife is tired of hearing them behind the shutters. I like that they eat bugs...

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    Quote Originally Posted by SoDakSooner View Post
    My original intent was barnwood, but it was outrageous to buy, and in our neck of the woods it is hard to find. The oak was cheap..$1.25 to $1.50 per square foot for red or white respectively. When growing up our next door neighbor was a custom picture framer and did really nice barnwood frames. People would pay him to rip barns down....not any more.
    Lol
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    You guys will appreciate the wood in this. It is an 1840's brewery that was recently renovated. Click through the virtual tour. Pan up and you will see logs used floor joists for an upper level. Real and structural. Much of the wood is original. Some was salvaged barn wood for infill. The floor is all reclaimed barnwood.

    https://my.matterport.com/show/?m=vuMSUf8Z3gr&brand=0

    In the lower left you can click on dollhouse mode to get a sense for the various levels. The lower lagering caves are really cool. We found a "Silence of the Lambs" like well down there. When done with dollhouse click on 3d tour in lower left to "walk" through the space.

    The wood beams above the bar were cut open so that they could wrap a steel support structure. Even in person it is near impossible to see the joints.

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    pretty cool!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SoDakSooner View Post
    pretty cool!
    And their beer is pretty good too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    So, anyone in the process of making a gift? People here are pretty handy, so post away.

    I am working on one for my special needs son. He loves to watch me mow the lawn on our zero turn but does not have the fine motor skills to operate it himself (without me walking next to it and the throttle at low). I found something that I think will make a good electric zero turn go-cart if you will.

    A guy on craig's list was selling an unfinished "Electric Bar Stool" project. It's basically a modified electric wheel chair chassis. Here is the before:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    As set up it was an instrument of death. With the diameter of the drive wheels it will do 6+ mph which would be a lot to handle bouncing around on the bicycle seat.

    I will have to snap some pictures of the progress tonight, but basically the plan is place seat as low as possible and extend the wheelbase substantially (2x+). I cut off the whole upper level of the frame that holds the current seat. 1x2 steel tube, like the existing frame, will be welded on to extend the location of a front axle. I have forks from a zero turn that will be installed on axle that will place the front wheels as wide as the back wheels. Tires will be suitable for off road. I have a seat from a commercial zero turn that has arms and a seat belt for security. It will mount right in front of the rear wheels. The joystick can extend from one of the arms. The foot well will be expanded metal.

    Parts that do not need to be welded have been cleaned and painted. Chassis will be painted once welding is complete. Hopefully welding will be done tonight.

    It runs on 24v and the control is programmable so that I can set speed and acceleration.

    I think he is going to love it.

    More to come...

    Anyone else got Christmas projects in the works?
    Will he be able to mow the lawn then? I always say, "put 'em to work"!

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Oh. It wasnít originally a Christmas project, but the yurt is almost done. Lexan bubble for the top finally in the mail. Doors not pictured, but they are New Mexico turquoise and gold. Canvas and all the guy lines are done, too.

    I mostly built this for my wife, who is tiny and gets super cold on shoulder season camping trips. Weíll be able to sleep 5+ (and dogs), cook meals, etc.







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    Man, you ought make and sell them. 'd buy one.

  42. #42
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    We generally only use poplar for structural things. It has a fine, smooth, almost splinter free grain. A bit stronger than pine, but a pretty soft ďhardwoodĒ. But itís strong enough, and very easy to work with.

    Itís can also be relatively attractive, sometimes.


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    Death from Below.

  43. #43
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    Santa's Workshop...-6fb6e906-9eb1-42a2-b4fb-c35bfdd1d002.jpegSanta's Workshop...-edd36010-c7bb-4b6a-8c16-1921d7fa8943.jpegI love working with poplar wood. It can be a real pretty wood too, almost a green color to it. Got some more frames made today. Nothing special, nothing fancy, but matches our primitive decor
    DAAAANG...that was janky

  44. #44
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    ^I like the contrast with the small blond one.

    Some poplar is very green. I've been wanting to build something with all the green and dark parts, some spots can even be purple.

    Santa is tired from moving lumber in the cold, no projects till I get it all sorted.

    I thought maybe a wooden box for personal wipes would be a cool gift. Something to look at while you do business.
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  45. #45
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    Yeah. The pictures donít tell the whole story. Had plenty of brown, green and purple in there.


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  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    The wheel chair actually came with wheelie bars. I think the extended front end will be too heavy to do wheelies on flat ground.

    My welds are serviceable, but NOT pretty. Plenty grinding will take place before paint.

    I am hoping to get this done so that I can get some cedar bat houses built. My wife is tired of hearing them behind the shutters. I like that they eat bugs...
    Bats are cool!

    As long as they are strong welds that's cool too!

    Oh, and I got lost in that Foxtown place, pretty cool also, will spend more time in there.
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  47. #47
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    I always liked poplar.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    I always liked poplar.
    It's very poplar.
    =s
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  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    It's very poplar.
    =s
    As well as popular with the natives.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  50. #50
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    Santa's Workshop...-7396843f-f20c-44f5-b460-ce8233d902ba.jpegSanta's Workshop...-820877d0-dfb2-44bf-8f51-278d3084be11.jpeg
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    ^I like the contrast with the small blond one.

    Some poplar is very green. I've been wanting to build something with all the green and dark parts, some spots can even be purple.

    Santa is tired from moving lumber in the cold, no projects till I get it all sorted.

    I thought maybe a wooden box for personal wipes would be a cool gift. Something to look at while you do business.
    I made one for our bathroom. Called it the toilet topper. Friends and family liked it so much I built several more for them.
    DAAAANG...that was janky

  51. #51
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    Iím liking TTT.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  52. #52
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    Is that a TTTT (toasted toilet tank topper)?
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  53. #53
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    Haha, nice!
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  54. #54
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    The mock up is pretty much done. Time to disassemble, clean up welds and paint.

    Santa's Workshop...-img_3929.jpg

    My only concern is how well it will turn in the grass with the extended frame. I could probably pull the front wheels back 3" with some minor cutting and re-welding.

  55. #55
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    With the majority of the weight being on the rear wheels, I bet it will turn fine. Basically to turn, the inside wheel slows or locks to pivot, correct? Itís looking good
    DAAAANG...that was janky

  56. #56
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    Looks like a mini dragster. Heís going to Love it.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  57. #57
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    Time for a go-cart steering set up and he'll be cruising. Looking great!
    Goya! It's got what plants crave. It's got electrolytes. Livin in an Idiocracy.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir kayakalot View Post
    With the majority of the weight being on the rear wheels, I bet it will turn fine. Basically to turn, the inside wheel slows or locks to pivot, correct? Itís looking good
    Correct. Each rear wheel has it's own drive motor so inside stops and outside continues. The only time it may be a problem is from a stop. The wheels being as far out front as they are will provide some resistance multiplied by the lever arm.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    Time for a go-cart steering set up and he'll be cruising. Looking great!
    It will steer like a zero turn mower, controlled by rear wheels. Control will be via a joystick.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    It will steer like a zero turn mower, controlled by rear wheels. Control will be via a joystick.
    Better!
    Goya! It's got what plants crave. It's got electrolytes. Livin in an Idiocracy.

  61. #61
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    Other than a final cleaning, it's ready to go. I am regretting not going silver on the wheels vs gunmetal grey for more contrast, but I can always change that if I become to OCD about it.

    I was able to shorten the wheelbase by about 3" without cutting it apart. it seems to turn just fine.

    Santa's Workshop...-img_3936.jpg

    Santa's Workshop...-img_3938.jpg

  62. #62
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    Wow, looks great! And I was worried you wouldn't be able to get it done in time.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  63. #63
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    Looks awesome! I like the gunmetal grey and red, more rat rodish.
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  64. #64
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    Good job bluecheese, youíve been a busy elf! Looks great
    DAAAANG...that was janky

  65. #65
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    Thumbs up!!!

  66. #66
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    Your son's going to be stoked, I'm sure!
    Goya! It's got what plants crave. It's got electrolytes. Livin in an Idiocracy.

  67. #67
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    Amazing bluecheese! Congrats!
    Surly Krampus
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    Kona Unit

  68. #68
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    That looks fantastic Bluecheese, awesome job!!

  69. #69
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    Incredible!
    dang

  70. #70
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    Cheese, that is a work of love and art. Or art and love. At any rate, it's beautiful.

  71. #71
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    Thanks guys. I think I bought the chassis 3 years ago. Gathering parts and building it in my mind since. Glad I am not taking abuse for an E-quad.

    Weather looks mild here for Christmas so he should get some good play time with it.

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