People that never retire- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    People that never retire

    There are 2 people at my work that have been here since 1957. In 2 years they will be celebrating a 60th anniversary with the company. Well, maybe. Today one of them collapsed and they had to call paramedics. He came to, but he looked so pale and old, like he's near death. I just cant believe these old dudes who are afraid to retire. It seems like the least scary thing to me. Having all day to do whatever it is you want to do. Relaxing and no "schedule". I'm looking forward to retirement.

  2. #2
    I'm just messing with you
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    My boss was like that. He got real hateful, and eventually he insulted the wrong person and was forced into retirement. It lasted just a few months, then he died. He was only 70.

    Me, I'd retire right now if I could afford to. No hesitation, no ragrets.
    Chasing bears through the woods drunk with a dull hatchet is strongly not advised

  3. #3
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    they told you they were afraid to? why?

  4. #4
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    People keep working for two reasons: They need the money (or think they do), or love the job. For some people working is their recreation.

    As for me, I got burned out and retired a year earlier than I planned. One of the best decisions I ever made. Much happier now. My health improved immediately, doctor took me off meds. When mulling the decision I figured I would lose about $200 per month in disposable income. I miscalculated. My disposable income actually increased by $50 per month.
    Do not take anything I post seriously. I don't.

  5. #5
    ozz
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    A lot of people lost their retirement funds when the market crashed 15 years ago, and again in 08. Many have to work beyond their planned retirement years because of it.
    ...and if you hold off retirement, your social security benefit increases 8% for every year beyond retirement age (up to age 70).

  6. #6
    I'm just messing with you
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    Quote Originally Posted by 53119 View Post
    they told you they were afraid to? why?
    Afraid probably wasn't the right word - more like they put up with him because they didn't want to lose him. The guy was a genius, one of the pioneers in the field.

    The prime contractor changed at the last recompete, and the general consensus is it was done because they were more likely to do whatever management wanted, right or wrong.

    That didn't sit well with him and he was always spun up about something. I think his health started failing about the same time.

    I don't like the way it's going either, but I'm not old enough to walk away and they pay me enough to just keep my mouth shut and do the work. I know how he felt though, since I'm doing his job now.

    The last time I spoke to him he'd mentioned that his blood pressure was way down since leaving work, and I laughed and gave him an "I told you so".

    Anyway ... if they hadn't forced him out he would've probably died at work instead of in the hospital.
    Chasing bears through the woods drunk with a dull hatchet is strongly not advised

  7. #7
    The White Jeff W
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    Quote Originally Posted by dave54 View Post
    People keep working for two reasons: They need the money (or think they do), or love the job.
    Or their home life is so awful that they prefer to be at work. There's one of these where i work. Clay started with the company in 1967, just a few weeks before I was born.
    No moss...

  8. #8
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    I think some people end up being defined by their careers. Possibly not enough other hobbies/interests, etc. Or that's just the culture they grew up with. I know folks that are truly "scared" of the concept of not working, and it has a lot to do with routine, what they would do with their time, and their inherent need to interact with people (which is often forced in a work environment). It seems sad in a way, but maybe that's because I'm the exact opposite. I've had these types challenge me when I say I could retire at any time, saying things like "you can only bike so much in a week" or, "you will get bored". I'd like to take on that challenge...

  9. #9
    I'm just messing with you
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    ^ yeah, my boss used to reply to me like that "sit around all day and do nothing, no thanks". Man I'd get 10x as much stuff done as I do know. Riding, finishing the old car, gardening, landscaping, on and on.
    Chasing bears through the woods drunk with a dull hatchet is strongly not advised

  10. #10
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    I was on the phone to an old electrician I know about an hour ago. He retired from the Electricity Board years ago but still works more or less full time. Not just little domestic stuff, still does big industrial jobs. I don't know what age Charlie is but I reckon in his seventies easy.

    His reason for keeping working is arthritis. He wears glove-shaped bandage things and says that if he doesn't keep moving he'll seize up in no time.

    My sister retired at fifty and she and her husband now seem to spend most of their time travelling around the world. Sounds pretty good to me!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozz View Post
    A lot of people lost their retirement funds when the market crashed 15 years ago, and again in 08. Many have to work beyond their planned retirement years because of it.
    ...and if you hold off retirement, your social security benefit increases 8% for every year beyond retirement age (up to age 70).
    But the market came back and came back strong. Anybody that is still down from 2008 needs a new financial advisor.

    Your second point is valid, defer SS as long as possible.
    It is the Right of the People to Alter or to Abolish It.

  12. #12
    Log off and go ride!
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozz View Post
    A lot of people lost their retirement funds when the market crashed 15 years ago, and again in 08. Many have to work beyond their planned retirement years because of it.
    ...and if you hold off retirement, your social security benefit increases 8% for every year beyond retirement age (up to age 70).
    You can retire whenever you want and not affect SS. When you apply for SS matters. Retire at 50 and wait until 65 or 70 to apply, if you can afford it. Pull more from your other retirement accounts until you start SS, then reduce your retirement withdrawals. There are advantages and disadvantages to this strategy, so think about it carefully. Most people that retire early need to start SS at 62 for financial reasons or want extra income early, figuring they are not going to do as much mountain biking ( or traveling, or golfing, or whatever) when they are 80. So extra income early in retirement and less later makes sense in that scenario.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by AC/BC View Post
    There are 2 people at my work that have been here since 1957. In 2 years they will be celebrating a 60th anniversary with the company. Well, maybe. Today one of them collapsed and they had to call paramedics. He came to, but he looked so pale and old, like he's near death. I just cant believe these old dudes who are afraid to retire. It seems like the least scary thing to me. Having all day to do whatever it is you want to do. Relaxing and no "schedule". I'm looking forward to retirement.
    When we do retire, we must remain active. Those who think they will just sit back and do nothing soon experience heath issues and commonly die within 2-3 years after retirement. Its not the end of an active life style. Its the beginning of a new one.
    life is... "All About Bikes"...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    My sister retired at fifty and she and her husband now seem to spend most of their time travelling around the world. Sounds pretty good to me!
    That's what my parents have been doing for the past dozen years or so, though they didn't retire quite as early as your sister.
    They're happy & in good health so it seems to have done them good.

    I had a retire at 35 plan but it turned out to be a bit optimistic. Definitely going to be retired before I'm 50 though.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozz View Post
    A lot of people lost their retirement funds when the market crashed 15 years ago, and again in 08. Many have to work beyond their planned retirement years because of it.
    ...and if you hold off retirement, your social security benefit increases 8% for every year beyond retirement age (up to age 70).
    This ^^^^
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  16. #16
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    Some people, by the time they get into their 60's, have no friends to speak of or relatives they could hang out with. If they stopped working, they would be alone.

    I've seen it happen. People basically live a solitary life, alone all day every day. The depression and loneliness is horrible for them.

    I knew one woman that fought her family about going to a group home, then got injured and had to go for a couple months to rehab. Initially, it was "I hate this place, get me out of here", then it was "I don't like the food, but Martha is nice", to "well, ok, maybe we can sell my house". Just having people around she could talk to that had shared experiences was huge for her after years and years of solitary living.

    Think about it. Do you have enough of a group around you that you would not be alone if you retired? No one in their right mind wants to be alone, but all too many have difficulty connecting with the people around them. I think a lot of people think they will be alone if they retire. That's why they keep working.

  17. #17
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    I retired at 55 and never looked back. I'm as busy
    now as I've ever been and life is great.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladmo View Post
    Think about it. Do you have enough of a group around you that you would not be alone if you retired?
    I moved out and lived on my own when I was twenty-one. Shortly after that I fell out with my girlfriend (she dumped me ;0). I then realised that I'd lost contact with a lot of my friends as I had been seeing her and her friends most of the time. I wasn't totally friendless but I spent a lot of time in the house on my own. I was going to work but coming home to an empty house was still bad.

    For an elderly person sitting in a house on their own all day, every day I reckon it will be horrible. For some of them anyway. My mother lives on her own and just watches TV all day. She's perfectly happy. It would drive me nuts!

  19. #19
    Hi There!
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    I just want to pay off our house and get our 16 year old daughter thru college; if I can do that...anything is possible. I'll have no problem retiring and I'm sure I'll have stuff to do.

    My wife is from Japan and I lived there for 4 years while in the Navy so we've even talked about moving back there...as long as we're near mountain bike trails.

    We did just go thru a major staff reduction at my company, I think the 6th one in my 20+ years there. Everyone was on pins and needles waiting for the blade to drop, but a couple of us would talk about the fact that there were a good amount of folks in their late '60's that refused early retirement offers which put younger folks with kids in jeopardy.
    NTFTC

  20. #20
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    My dad was one of those. Never retired until physically forced to after getting prostate cancer.

    Me, I've got 7 years to get the house paid off, (I'll be 37), 3 kids to get through school/military and then I'm home free.
    '14 SC Tallboy
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  21. #21
    I'm just messing with you
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladmo View Post
    Some people, by the time they get into their 60's, have no friends to speak of or relatives they could hang out with. If they stopped working, they would be alone.
    I'm alone right now, have always been a loner, but I'm not lonely. I went to a work from home job because I got tired of having to get along with other people instead of just being able to do my job and leave. I guess I'm the ideal person to retire. Anyone want to loan me a mill so I can?
    Chasing bears through the woods drunk with a dull hatchet is strongly not advised

  22. #22
    El Gato Malo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladmo View Post
    Think about it. Do you have enough of a group around you that you would not be alone if you retired? No one in their right mind wants to be alone, but all too many have difficulty connecting with the people around them. I think a lot of people think they will be alone if they retire.
    That's my dream for retirement, secluded acreage away from everyone, I'm never more happy then when I'm by myself.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawg View Post
    When we do retire, we must remain active. Those who think they will just sit back and do nothing soon experience heath issues and commonly die within 2-3 years after retirement. Its not the end of an active life style. Its the beginning of a new one.
    I think you "hit the nail on the head" with this Hawg.I'm an a/c contractor, & do just enough service calls & projects to keep moderately busy with lots of free time for MTB. I'm so old I ain't telling..

  24. #24
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    My boss for years just recently retired--one of those "love my job, my life centers around it," types. She's, I dunno--68 or so. She's an outgoing person with lots of friends and interests and activities, and she's loving being retired. Now that she's gone, she can hardly stand to think about or come back to work, even for her recent retirement party. I'm glad she got out and I hope she has a great retirement--she's a genuinely good person.

    I hope to go early--late 50's. I'm 53 now and I've been in this job since I got out of college--coming up on 32 years. I'd like to leave while I'm still able to ride my bikes and travel and enjoy my life. Hopefully my retirement savings will last long enough to live on until I can draw SS. (and hopefully SS will still be around!)

  25. #25
    Duck Fonald
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wishful Tomcat View Post
    That's my dream for retirement, secluded acreage away from everyone, I'm never more happy then when I'm by myself.
    I'm a loner, too, but it's because of my personality, really.
    "Nobody likes me."

    DJT

  26. #26
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    I think life keep kinda slows down as you age. Sucks cuz when your old, you'll probably have the most disposable income. But no energy.

    I'd retire now if I could. But I'd starve and end up broke. Gotta keep going to build the nest egg.




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  27. #27
    I'm just messing with you
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boomchakabowwow View Post
    I think life keep kinda slows down as you age. Sucks cuz when your old, you'll probably have the most disposable income. But no energy.
    In other words, youth is wasted on the young.
    Chasing bears through the woods drunk with a dull hatchet is strongly not advised

  28. #28
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    Yup. Whippersnappers.


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  29. #29
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    I retire from the military in 3 years after 22 years. Then it's time to work another 10 to 15 years to pad my accounts and pay off the house. Then I will start riding my bike for a living.

    My wife wants to work till she is like 65 or so, she can work, I will play.

  30. #30
    Axe
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    On weekend I have climbed a quite long route on Mount Shasta north side with a 76 year old dude. Most young guys I know about will not keep up with him.

    It is all individual. Some people just like to keep doing something.

  31. #31
    Duck Fonald
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    I have about $15 saved for retirement. It's gonna get ugly.
    "Nobody likes me."

    DJT

  32. #32
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    It just dawned on me, I'm one of "those people".

    I have never retired.
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