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  1. #1
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    Online learning and your kids..

    Those of you w/school-age children, how is the online learning working out?

    I'm just curious how everyone is experiencing this new era of instruction.

    My perception is that for the masses, this is a difficult process except for students who are fairly organized and of the ability to manage a rather independent level of workload management. In addition, access to a caregiver is crucial particularly for younger students.

    I don't believe that there's a good substitution for classroom instruction, or a homeschool setting where a caregiver is trained and available to deliver some type of curriculum.

    These are tough times.
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankout View Post
    Those of you w/school-age children, how is the online learning working out?

    I'm just curious how everyone is experiencing this new era of instruction.

    My perception is that for the masses, this is a difficult process except for students who are fairly organized and of the ability to manage a rather independent level of workload management. In addition, access to a caregiver is crucial particularly for younger students.

    I don't believe that there's a good substitution for classroom instruction, or a homeschool setting where a caregiver is trained and available to deliver some type of curriculum.

    These are tough times.
    This is our experience. Our kids are fairly independent (9 & 11 year old) but they need guidance and input from adults to get the most from online and off line resources. The mistake is letting the kids do everything from online. There is no accountability and it is difficult to oversee if you aren't directly over their shoulders at all times. A lot of the resources are too much like video games as well, so I don't think the learning is there as much as it should.

    I changed the hours I work so I can be available for some of the day. So far it is complicated and I don't think they are getting what they need but we are lucky in that my wife and I can both WFH and be there for the kids without worrying that we will lose our house or not be able to pay for food, which certainly helps the kids.
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  3. #3
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    I think your assessment is pretty spot on. Iím a high school machining and engineering teacher in Utah, and I have kids at home who are in elementary, junior high, high school, & college.

    My own children who are motivated get their work done with very little oversight by me or my wife. My kids who are less motivated require periodic to constant supervision. It isnít any different than it was when they were physically in school, except now, itís all on us as parents because theyíre not in class.

    As a teacher, my students who were motivated and engaged in class are still motivated and engaged in online learning. My students who required periodic, or constant supervision and encouragement are struggling more because Iím not there to supervise them, and parents are either working from home, or are at work while their children are home. Some of my students are also acting as caregivers for siblings while parents work, which only adds to the struggle. School may have also been a refuge from a negative or even dangerous home environment for some of my students. This is obviously a much worse scenario for the student. Food insecurity is also an issue, & school was a secure source of food for at least 2 meals a day. The schools are still providing breakfast & lunch for students in need, so that is a plus. Weíve also checked out laptops and even WiFi hotspots to students who need them so they can engage in online learning.

    This is far from the ideal situation for teaching. I miss my students, & I want to be in the classroom and shop teaching them. My own children also need their teachers. I canít replace them, even though Iím a teacher. All the teachers I work with and know are doing their best to keep in touch with kids online and via phone, but itís not the same.

    My $.02


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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankout View Post
    Those of you w/school-age children, how is the online learning working out?

    I'm just curious how everyone is experiencing this new era of instruction.

    My perception is that for the masses, this is a difficult process except for students who are fairly organized and of the ability to manage a rather independent level of workload management. In addition, access to a caregiver is crucial particularly for younger students.

    I don't believe that there's a good substitution for classroom instruction, or a homeschool setting where a caregiver is trained and available to deliver some type of curriculum.

    These are tough times.
    Personally, I've been homeschooling my girls for the last 5yrs. Their curriculum is online, books and workbooks to accompany it. Our day has it's own sort of rhythm. Their desks are right next to mine, so I keep an eye on what they are doing and step in to ensure they are grasping the concepts being taught, as well as finding additional resources when I think it's necessary. Fortunately their program is actually considered a "public" school and as such they each have a teach who does online classes each day. While the program we use is pretty well set up and easily navigated, I've been hearing some horror stories about some of these hastily set up systems. It doesn't help that people are being thrown into this cold. It takes a while to adjust your language and thought processes to a level that can be comprehended by an elementary age child. Knowing how to explain science and math concepts to kids at their level also requires knowledge of exactly what they've been taught already. If you haven't been very hands on with their education that can be difficult.
    . . . . . . . .

  5. #5
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    My wife is overseeing the grandkid's lessons, since both the parents are 'essential' and still working.
    The school provides weekly packets of lessons. Both the grandkids are finishing their week's lessons in about two days. The problem is holding them back.
    Do not take anything I post seriously. I don't.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dave54 View Post
    My wife is overseeing the grandkid's lessons, since both the parents are 'essential' and still working.
    The school provides weekly packets of lessons. Both the grandkids are finishing their week's lessons in about two days. The problem is holding them back.
    My 11 year old son finishes his daily work about 9:30 am. Nothing wrong with that.


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  7. #7
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    What happens to the poor families who don't have internet at home?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt4x4 View Post
    What happens to the poor families who don't have internet at home?
    That is an inherent problem with online learning. Teachers and schools with students in that situation are coming up with creative ways to still facilitate learning. Never underestimate the power of a determined teacher who cares about their kids.


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  9. #9
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    I thought they were sending out school buses to be used as hotspots for students without access to internet. Could be totally wrong about this though

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Train Wreck View Post
    I thought they were sending out school buses to be used as hotspots for students without access to internet. Could be totally wrong about this though
    Our district checked out WiFi hotspots from T-Mobile.

    Again, lots of creative ways to solve the problem. Weíre doing our best to figure it out and continue teaching our kids.


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  11. #11
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    I wonder if Picard has any kids
    "Nobody likes me."

    DJT

  12. #12
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    This was a bit of tongue-in-cheek fun from the local parents network page.
    Online learning and your kids..-core-math.jpg


    Our schools mostly assign and collect work electronically and have been for a couple of years, so logistically it wasn't too hard to put a plan in place. We also had April vacation land on the second week so there was a chance to roll it out, play test it, get parent/student/teacher feedback , and then re-work the failures. It also gave a chance to work with families that had hurdles to clear.

    As for how it applies in our home, it's been a smooth transition. Chickie, who's in 6th grade, is required to log on at the start time for each class, and always has access to her teachers on her regular schedule. After the first week the decision was made that all daily schoolwork would be finished during class time so that parents wouldn't be overwhelmed. Because of her autism, she's always needed our presence ( if not our help) when she's doing her work so the level of our involvement hasn't changed much.

    It has been enlightening to see which things get easier for her without the stress of being in school. Auditory issues, ADD, DCD are all easier to cope with at home. She has more control of her social interaction...it's easy to ignore the kids who give her trouble and teachers, for the first time, really do see and hear everything the other students say to her.

    We are closed until May 20. Our last day is June 11. I can't imagine she'll be in school again this year.
    Well my days of not taking you seriously are certainly coming to a middle.

  13. #13
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    I have high school sophomore and a college sophomore in the house right now. Both are old enough to work on their own without us constantly on their asses.

    Our high school age daughter is a very good student and she is cruising along. She seems to be MUCH LESS stressed out about schoolwork and has a lot more free time which may, in part, be due to sports being shut down. I also think that schoolwork and homework are kind of blending together. Although there is some classroom video, most of her learning seems to be self taught right now and she is completing her work at her own pace.

    My college age daughter is a nursing student and her classes seem to be going well. I don't really know how the university is conducting her nursing lab practicals online, but my daughter doesn't seem fazed by it all.
    AreBee

  14. #14
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    Our daughter is finishing her freshman year engineering classes at home. She is pretty motivated and fairly disciplined, so doing well. I feel bad that she is missing part of the college experience of living away.

  15. #15
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    I have a HS Freshmen and a 7th grader. My daughter, the HS Freshman, is cruising right along pulling out her average on grades still. She has always been motivated to get her work done and we've never had to push her.

    My son on the other hand, is like most other 12yo boys I know. He'd much rather be doing something else than school work, online or at school. But his online learning has been a huge issue for us. He has 4 teachers using different platforms to teach. This assignment is on Google Docs, go to Google classroom for instructions. Another teacher post everything on Schooligy, but use Google Docs for this or that. Its a PITA even for my wife and I. We've split up subjects, I help him with science and math, while she does reading and writing. The work load and grading has been lightend up, but its still a hassle.

  16. #16
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    4 different platforms
    sheeeeeeeeeeeesh

    Dumb school board.

  17. #17
    Mtn Biker Machinist
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt4x4 View Post
    4 different platforms
    sheeeeeeeeeeeesh

    Dumb school board.
    Not necessarily a school board decision, or a dumb decision either. It may be up to the teacher who is scrambling to get content in electronic format. Easy to cast stones, harder to go from in person teaching to all online teaching in a matter of days.

    I already use online platforms in my machining and engineering classes, and it was tons of work to go completely digital. Also the less effective way to teach.


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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1 cog frog View Post
    I think your assessment is pretty spot on. Iím a high school machining and engineering teacher in Utah, and I have kids at home who are in elementary, junior high, high school, & college.

    My own children who are motivated get their work done with very little oversight by me or my wife. My kids who are less motivated require periodic to constant supervision. It isnít any different than it was when they were physically in school, except now, itís all on us as parents because theyíre not in class.

    As a teacher, my students who were motivated and engaged in class are still motivated and engaged in online learning. My students who required periodic, or constant supervision and encouragement are struggling more because Iím not there to supervise them, and parents are either working from home, or are at work while their children are home. Some of my students are also acting as caregivers for siblings while parents work, which only adds to the struggle. School may have also been a refuge from a negative or even dangerous home environment for some of my students. This is obviously a much worse scenario for the student. Food insecurity is also an issue, & school was a secure source of food for at least 2 meals a day. The schools are still providing breakfast & lunch for students in need, so that is a plus. Weíve also checked out laptops and even WiFi hotspots to students who need them so they can engage in online learning.

    This is far from the ideal situation for teaching. I miss my students, & I want to be in the classroom and shop teaching them. My own children also need their teachers. I canít replace them, even though Iím a teacher. All the teachers I work with and know are doing their best to keep in touch with kids online and via phone, but itís not the same.

    My $.02


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    I work in a high school as well, and very much miss being with the students and co-workers. They give me energy and satisfaction; being at home and somewhat isolated, I find myself feeling damn lazy and a bit anxious. But, this will eventually pass.
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  19. #19
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    I really enjoy reading the experiences that everyone's shared. I believe that online learning will probably work best for families of at least relative means and more of a struggle for families that faced various hardships to begin with. In other words, this may exacerbate our social differences.
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    Our daughter is finishing her freshman year engineering classes at home. She is pretty motivated and fairly disciplined, so doing well. I feel bad that she is missing part of the college experience of living away.
    I have one child in college and another starting in the fall. Who knows if they will return to the physical campus come August.
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by MOJO K View Post
    This was a bit of tongue-in-cheek fun from the local parents network page.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	core math.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	72.7 KB 
ID:	1324589


    Our schools mostly assign and collect work electronically and have been for a couple of years, so logistically it wasn't too hard to put a plan in place. We also had April vacation land on the second week so there was a chance to roll it out, play test it, get parent/student/teacher feedback , and then re-work the failures. It also gave a chance to work with families that had hurdles to clear.

    As for how it applies in our home, it's been a smooth transition. Chickie, who's in 6th grade, is required to log on at the start time for each class, and always has access to her teachers on her regular schedule. After the first week the decision was made that all daily schoolwork would be finished during class time so that parents wouldn't be overwhelmed. Because of her autism, she's always needed our presence ( if not our help) when she's doing her work so the level of our involvement hasn't changed much.

    It has been enlightening to see which things get easier for her without the stress of being in school. Auditory issues, ADD, DCD are all easier to cope with at home. She has more control of her social interaction...it's easy to ignore the kids who give her trouble and teachers, for the first time, really do see and hear everything the other students say to her.

    We are closed until May 20. Our last day is June 11. I can't imagine she'll be in school again this year.
    Hahaha! That's awesome.

    Are you in the US? I'm wondering of your daughter has an IEP, and if so, is she continuing to get her related services (ex. Speech/language, OT, social skills lessons...)?
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    I wonder if Picard has any kids
    Hmmmm....hopefully they learn the ability to drive for over 2 hours before needing a nap.
    The only important thing these days, is rhythm and melody. Rhythm...and melody.

  23. #23
    well mannered lout
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankout View Post
    Hahaha! That's awesome.

    Are you in the US? I'm wondering of your daughter has an IEP, and if so, is she continuing to get her related services (ex. Speech/language, OT, social skills lessons...)?
    We're in CT. Her IEP is focused mostly on in-class accommodations at this point and less about individual services. Her social skills group happens at lunch a couple times a week and study resource group ( study hall with supervision from the para-educators ). All of those things continue in the same video conference style as class time.

    My oldest son is on the BOE in his town and they have been equally successful at replicating a school like experience. My other son lives in a great neighborhood but in a less affluent town. They are having a terrible time with their distant learning program with almost no contact with the teachers. They mostly get assignment packets every week that they need teach to their kids and return completed at the week's end. I don't imagine the extra-needs students in that system are getting the services they should be.
    Well my days of not taking you seriously are certainly coming to a middle.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arebee View Post

    My college age daughter is a nursing student and her classes seem to be going well. I don't really know how the university is conducting her nursing lab practicals online, but my daughter doesn't seem fazed by it all.
    I now know how they are doing lab practicals. Guess who's a guinea pig today? Thankfully she isn't practicing injections!
    AreBee

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