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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Hope Old & Out of Shape.

    Bit of a ramble here but figured I'd introduce myself.

    Used to ride about 1k singletrack miles a year back in the 90’s.
    Turned 44 in January. At 5”11” Im pushing 195lbs but remember my riding days at 175 lbs.

    From 2000-2012 got married, bought a house, reno'ed the house, bought a business, had kids, did the family thing nonstop - and MTB life took a backseat.

    As a newb to the forum here, anyone around my age?

    I had/have a carbon fiber 1997 Trek Y33, but it has sat in my garage for twelve years.
    Bored, out of shape & middle age old me took it out last week & cleaned it up.

    The rear Fox Alps 5 shock “appears” to be fine and doesn’t over sag and rebounds when I bounce while standing. Not too sure about bob bc I cant really ride it.

    Took the stem/headset apart and its all nasty ol' dried grease. Need to repack.

    The front fork is shot bc the elastomers in the JUDY SL were never oiled and have disintegrated into moldy crumbs!

    Didn’t really want to ‘splain to the wife why I should dump $300-400 into an old bike after all this time, but I just needed to replace the fork and get my arse moving. …no matter how slowly.
    Anyway, I just ordered a cheapo XC30. Down the road I would consider total upgrades or a new ride altogether I guess.

    So for now I just went for a ride on my wife’s 98’ ridged frame bike and enjoyed what it brought back to me. I suck for waiting so long but life gets in the way I guess. I suck for getting out of shape too.

    Anyway, don’t laugh too loud when you see me going slow on my old bike with 26's & V’s.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
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    Pretty sure you can get newly made elastomers here suspensionforkparts - Home to get your fork working as good as new. Don't wanna buy old stock elastomers. Gotta use synthetic grease on elastomers and never any petroleum.
    Think the hardest part is staying motivated, not only with doing the exercise but everything that goes along with it. Like making the time, eating around it, stepping up your diet, etc.
    Do something at least 5 days a week. Even if it's just a brisk 30+ minute walk with the dog, if your hurting from your ride the day before. As your stamina and strength improve, hopefully that'll keep you motivated and pushing harder.
    FWIW, I have newer bikes, including fs and 29er, but still ride my older ht and rigid 26er with v-brakes just because they're still fun.
    Round and round we go

  3. #3
    Titanium junkie
    Reputation: Loudviking's Avatar
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    47 yrs and counting, ride hardtail and V's,
    and I am perfectly happy, so ride what ya got and don't
    sweat the small stuff.
    Climb into the sky, never wonder why - Tailgunner
    You're a Tailgunner

  4. #4
    Afric Pepperbird
    Reputation: dirt farmer's Avatar
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    I'm two months older than you, about the same height, and about 10 pounds heavier. I'll most likely be a lifelong bachelor (I'm waaaaay too independent). Do I have a slight beer gut? Of course! Am I in very good biking shape? Of course! I'll never win a race, but that's not what I ride for.

    Welcome back, you'll love everything about it.

  5. #5
    Keep pedaling
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    Hello brianosaur,

    I'm only 48, and still feel young. I have a friend who is 30 years older than me and still does long hard rides.

    Remember it takes a while to get back in shape. Start out gradually and don't overdo it on the first few rides. Then keep riding a few times a week.

  6. #6
    Suckin wind like a boss
    Reputation: big terry's Avatar
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    ill be 45 in november. 6-4, (down to) 250 now (from a lifetime high of 266), and getting better and in better shape every day.

    welcome back!

  7. #7
    Hermit
    Reputation: swampboy62's Avatar
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    Another "old" guy here - 49 this year. You'll find there are a lot of guys in their 40's and 50's riding. Some of them are astoundingly good and give the 20 somethings a run for their money.

    And a lot of them are like me - slow as heck, but having fun and more fit than they've ever been.

    Welcome (back) to the show - we're so glad you could attend.

    Steve Z

    "I LOVE DOING THIS!!!!"
    Pedaling when it's dry
    And paddling when it's wet

    My insignificant blog:
    http://swampboy62.blogspot.com/

  8. #8
    mtbr member
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    Another old guy here - mid 50's and I ride a 26" hard tail with V brakes. I'm totally happy with my ride.

    Don't worry about your 'old' bike. Big picture, very little has changed on bikes in the last 30 yrs. The important thing is to get out there, not what you are on.

    Push on and enjoy....

  9. #9
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    I turned 45 (damn that's old!) this year. Wife, kids, job, house. Man, my 5'8" got up to 200lbs! Considered obese by BMI standards. I needed a serious life style change.

    My old MTB is 27yrs old. It sat in a barn until the tires rotted. Pretty sad that I let it get that bad.

    Quit drinking, bought an elliptical, and started eating healthy. I put $200 into my bike and it's way better than what you'd get new for that money. Not to mention, I feel better about it not going to waste.

    I work out 30min a night and ride every chance I get. I lost 45lbs! What's weird is I'm so into biking now that I keep in shape mainly for my next ride. It's true motivation.

  10. #10
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    Hey, thanks for the encouragement guys.
    If I keep checking back to mtbr forums I'm sure it will help motivate & encourage me.

  11. #11
    govt kontrakt projkt mgr
    Reputation: ArmySlowRdr's Avatar
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    50 later this year and 5 11 and 230. I agree 175ish is an ideal riding weight.

    Recovering from a broken ankle---to the stage most of the swelling's left and I'm starting flexibility exercsies. Cant wait to hop back on bike. I was around your mileage for MTB---1000 a year---no where near enough to stay trim at our age AND enjoy copious food.

    Welcome back to the MTB fold. Now go kick some ass.

  12. #12
    Damn that hurt
    Reputation: Tango59's Avatar
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    52.... Was hard core about 12 or 13 years ago. Bought a new Cannondale 29r to replace my F400 then had a heart attack. I'm getting there just takes time. Feels really good getting that burn again.
    It was fun while it lasted.

  13. #13
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
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    48, overweight, enjoy my burly rigid singlespeed with disc brakes.

    I'm a bit out of shape now: yesterday's 2 hour ride was good but I decided to skip the big group ride event where the short rides were 5 hours.

    A snapshot from yesterday, taking a breather at one of my favorite spots:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Old & Out of Shape.-26052012799_p.jpg  


    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  14. #14
    mtbr member
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    Brian, I just turned 41 on May 25th. I have 4 boys, a wife and work 6 days a week. Last August I weighed 215 and I'm 5'11. I was looking for something to get me motivated to loose weight. My brother got me out on a mountain bike. Since then my weight has dropped to 181 and I took 3rd last weekend at a MTB race. And on top of that, I'm having a blast doing it.

  15. #15
    Clyde on a mission!
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianosaur View Post
    Anyway, don’t laugh too loud when you see me going slow on my old bike with 26's & V’s.
    I am to biking what Tai Chi is to martial arts, it looks like the real deal, only immensely slower, hehe.. People are said to be impressed by my skill to stay upright at those speeds..

    Joking aside, I'm 43 and getting stronger and lighter every week. Picked up a bike last year after doing nothing even remotely sporty for 20+ years, started out with 2 slow miles and gradually added a tiny bit of extra distance each time out. A couple of months later I was doing 15-20 mile trips and started working on increasing speed rather than the distance.

    Whatever you do, don't be a hero and push too hard too soon. If you do, you'll end up sore as hell and probably won't get back on the bike again for a couple of weeks. It's much better to start easy and add a tiny bit extra each time, that way your body has time to adjust and you know that if you did 3 miles yesterday, a 3.2 mile trip is well within your reach today and before you know it you'll be perfectly fine with doing 20 miles.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandrenseren View Post
    Whatever you do, don't be a hero and push too hard too soon. If you do, you'll end up sore as hell and probably won't get back on the bike again for a couple of weeks.
    hehe!

    Went 4 times in ten days and Im hurtin'.
    Rode Saturday and then again Sunday bc I'm jonesing for it.

    Funny it isnt my legs but my neck, traps & lats that are aching.

    I guess hunching over on a very low stem on my old bike [similar to this one] I'm sore.



    Also my butt has been telling me to buy a new old people saddle.

  17. #17
    local trails rider
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    You need pretty good "core muscles" for cycling but cycling does little to develop them. A bit of home workout using your own body weight may help.

    If you've been away from riding, your backside is not used to being on a bike seat. That is very common, and takes a little time to get over. Padded shorts are usually helpful. I seem to be one of the few who do OK without the padding.

    I don't like soft seats because I just sink into them which increases chafing. I will stay away from wide seats too: they get in the way when I'm out of the saddle and shifting my weight to cope with the trail.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  18. #18
    Is not amused
    Reputation: Hutch3637's Avatar
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    OP doing any better? I will keep subscribed to this to await your response.
    Yip yip yip nope nope nope

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