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  1. #1
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    Off Camber Home Improvement

    Well, we have a thread for "wrenching on cars", might as well have a building/fixing houses and general construction/fixing of various buildings and structures, and the materials and tools of the trades thread.

    I've been painting for around 25 years now, and over the last 3-4 years have been taking on more and more carpentry jobs (mostly finish). I love working with wood and I will hopefully continue to do more of it.

    My knees getting old and I'm not wanting to work the chop saw on the ground anymore, and I can't justify buying a stand, so I'm looking for ideas on a simple, cheap, and easy shop-made one. I have plenty of wood to use up, and this would be a good project for some of it.

    This one looks alright, but the saw sits on a 2x4, and I'm sure it can't be that stable. I have sawhorses and was thinking I could build a platform to sit on top of those, but would need supports that extend out to support the lumber.

    Last edited by Klurejr; 05-28-2019 at 11:20 AM. Reason: OP requested title change
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  2. #2
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    Is that you in the video, Bob?
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    I have sawhorses and was thinking I could build a platform to sit on top of those, but would need supports that extend out to support the lumber.
    Get 1 or 2 of these:

    https://www.harborfreight.com/132-lb...and-68898.html
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    I've got one already, and I see them at estate sales often (&@HF), so maybe I could get another one. I could use the 'hoses for the saw with two rollers and be done with it. Not a bad idea.

    Or maybe something like this if I ever do a big trim carpentry job.

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  5. #5
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    This thing is actually really cool!

    https://familywoodworking.org/forums...iter-saw-stand

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  6. #6
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    You'll have to make your own, and step up the cool by a few points.
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  7. #7
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    I trimmed out my whole house (2500 ft2) with just 1 roller and the saw on a Craftsman Workmate. I could see if you're doing this for money, you'd want something more robust.

    Edit: And yes, DIY is way cooler.
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  8. #8
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    I made this bike stand out of a 2'x4' sheet of 3/4 ply. I just did it for fun and practice, it's not very stable.

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  9. #9
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    Very kewl. That reminds me of a wood wheel building stand I've seen on the interwebs, but I could never find plans for it.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    I trimmed out my whole house (2500 ft2) with just 1 roller and the saw on a Craftsman Workmate. I could see if you're doing this for money, you'd want something more robust.

    Edit: And yes, DIY is way cooler.
    I like the idea of bringing things like sawhorses to the job site because they have multiple uses, a dedicated stand has one use, well besides being a thing to hang stuff on.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker View Post
    You'll have to make your own, and step up the cool by a few points.
    The moar I look at that thing, the kooler it gets. It's hinged in the middle so it can fold in half.

    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    Very kewl. That reminds me of a wood wheel building stand I've seen on the interwebs, but I could never find plans for it.
    Thanks! Roger Musson's got good plans in his book. I based mine off of his, but made it overly complicated, lol! Still works just fine.
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  12. #12
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    I use a Craftsman Workmate. It's from the 70s and built solid.
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  13. #13
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    I took the easy way out and paid around $200 for one about 15 years ago, never have regretted it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vader View Post
    I use a Craftsman Workmate. It's from the 70s and built solid.
    They never die.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    Very kewl. That reminds me of a wood wheel building stand I've seen on the interwebs, but I could never find plans for it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Thanks! Roger Musson's got good plans in his book. I based mine off of his, but made it overly complicated, lol! Still works just fine.
    Yep, I bought Roger Musson's book and plan to make the stand in the back based on his plans. Getting the metal bits made, I think, is going to be the more challenging part for me.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Yep, I bought Roger Musson's book and plan to make the stand in the back based on his plans. Getting the metal bits made, I think, is going to be the more challenging part for me.
    I just used some oak. I'll probably build another one eventually, and maybe I'll use some aluminum flat bar, and maybe some carriage bolts with square holes in the aluminum. I like the sliding supports I made, easy to go from 26" - 29" wheels.

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  17. #17
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    I should put this in the score thread but to lazy to dig for it.

    I do a lot of back country camping and mountain biking. As a full size van owner again I plan to build a dedicated bed. One thing with sleeping in a van and back country camping is always the chore of finding the perfect(est) flat spot to park. Some choice spots with a view might not resemble anything near level and with multiple people there's always a fight over who gets to park where.

    So I had the idea of buying or making 4 telescoping legs for the bed. I'll mount a bubble level in three rails of the bed and that way I can park any which way and quickly level the bed it'self. After spending a bunch of time on Google and Amazon nothing really caught my fancy. Well, yesterday the perfect and I mean perfect set of adjustable legs found me at the dumpster.
    Off Camber Home Improvement-img_20190412_110016348.jpg

    Now on to the construction of my new camp bed, I think I've got it pretty well planned out with the exception of exactly how I might mount the legs. I plan to use Velcro to adhere the fourth bed rail to the van framing. That way it will stay put when driving but I can unattach it to adjust it. I'd like to attached the legs in a manner where they are either quickly foldable (ideally) or removable. That way I can quickly pack up the bed for more van space if need be.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Yep, I bought Roger Musson's book and plan to make the stand in the back based on his plans. Getting the metal bits made, I think, is going to be the more challenging part for me.
    The steel jaws? I have v5 of the book and that's the only metal part I see, other than the fixing HW.

    Is there a school metal shop nearby you could ask to cut & drill what you need for a box of donuts?
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    The steel jaws? I have v5 of the book and that's the only metal part I see, other than the fixing HW.

    Is there a school metal shop nearby you could ask to cut & drill what you need for a box of donuts?
    Yes, those are the metal bits. Though I was also considering making the alignment guide from metal, too.

    I do not know of any school metal shops nearby.

    I think I have tools I can use to work with something like aluminum, but I dunno how well I will be able to do the job.

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I think I have tools I can use to work with something like aluminum, but I dunno how well I will be able to do the job.
    Metal is just like wood, only harder. You can get a cheap metal hacksaw blade at HF, and just make sure to use oil when you drill into it.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Metal is just like wood, only harder. You can get a cheap metal hacksaw blade at HF, and just make sure to use oil when you drill into it.
    2 things I sometimes wish I had, but can hardly justify paying for (and storing) since I'd have such infrequent use: a metal chop saw and a drill press.
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Well, yesterday the perfect and I mean perfect set of adjustable legs found me at the dumpster.
    Score! It's amazing how that happens sometimes, init? I was doing a job the other day and I told the customer about my bedroom carpet removal and how I was looking for a rug, turns out she had the perfect fitting rug for me, a 9'x11' that was like $400 new, she just gave it to me!

    That's a brilliant idea with the adjustable legs. How do those things extend?
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    2 things I sometimes wish I had, but can hardly justify paying for (and storing) since I'd have such infrequent use: a metal chop saw and a drill press.
    I borrowed (took) one of my dad's old chop saws and put a metal blade on it, it did cut into the plastic a but when the blade was all the way down, but it works.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    I'd like to attached the legs in a manner where they are either quickly foldable (ideally)
    Something something piano hinge.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    I borrowed (took) one of my dad's old chop saws and put a metal blade on it, it did cut into the plastic a but when the blade was all the way down, but it works.
    I could do that with my miter saw, possibly. Are you supposed to cut steel at low rpm [edit] for dry-sawing?
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    I could do that with my miter saw, possibly. Are you supposed to cut steel at low rpm [edit] for dry-sawing?
    I dunno. I was cutting aluminum Schluter edging to go around a diamond plate backsplash. I think I've also used it to cut closet rod. I guess some metals could heat up and discolor, or maybe the blade would burn up?
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Metal is just like wood, only harder. You can get a cheap metal hacksaw blade at HF, and just make sure to use oil when you drill into it.
    I know that much. It's more of a matter of whether I can get the cuts clean and even enough for the precision needed in a truing stand

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I know that much. It's more of a matter of whether I can get the cuts clean and even enough for the precision needed in a truing stand
    Nah, you'd be fine with a piece of steel or aluminum flat bar from Home Depot. Just take your time and file the cuts clean in a vice if you have one. Sounds like you may be overthinking it like I did, a truing stand can be anything that holds a wheel so it can spin freely, the only precision needed is where the gauges meet the rim.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Score! It's amazing how that happens sometimes, init? I was doing a job the other day and I told the customer about my bedroom carpet removal and how I was looking for a rug, turns out she had the perfect fitting rug for me, a 9'x11' that was like $400 new, she just gave it to me!

    That's a brilliant idea with the adjustable legs. How do those things extend?
    It is, always makes me feel I'm on the right path when things line up like that. Sarindipitous, synchronicity and all that, sometimes I'm a believer. The legs are one of those deals where you spin one way to loosen and the other to lock. They're really well made, a nice gauge steel for the purpose, and they adjust very smoothly. Even the feet pads are nice quality and the legs are the perfect hight so I'm pretty stoked on $free.99

    *You've got some strong router skills, dig the trueing stand.
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    It is, always makes me feel I'm on the right path when things line up like that. Sarindipitous, synchronicity and all that, sometimes I'm a believer. The legs are one of those deals where you spin one way to loosen and the other to lock. They're really well made, a nice gauge steel for the purpose, and they adjust very smoothly. Even the feet pads are nice quality and the legs are the perfect hight so I'm pretty stoked on $free.99

    *You've got some strong router skills, dig the trueing stand.
    "$free.99" lol! Nice legs!

    You'll notice the dado on the bottom side of my truing stand, that would be a mistake, I think I made it too wide and just flipped the board over.

    I guess I should post up the thing that inspired the OP and the reason I might need a chop saw stand. I'm going to be doing some stair skirts for the first time. The stairs are currently carpeted up to the drywall with no skirt boards, and the homeowner want's hardwood, so I said I'd do it.

    My friend did the ones that go down to the basement in this house, and I saw him cutting the sides of the treads and risers off about an inch so he could slide a board back behind there. At the time I thought that was a good idea, cutting out the notches to fit around the steps seemed like a real challenge. Now that I've watched a few videos, I think what a PITA to cut the sides of the steps like he did, you just need to cut the bull nose off and scribe them in, or is it not as easy as it looks?

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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Yes, those are the metal bits. Though I was also considering making the alignment guide from metal, too.

    I do not know of any school metal shops nearby.

    I think I have tools I can use to work with something like aluminum, but I dunno how well I will be able to do the job.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
    AB Tech has a metal shop at the main campus. The dude that runs the shop (I assume heís still there) is a good dude. Heís helpful. Stop by and talk to him.


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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbmb65 View Post
    AB Tech has a metal shop at the main campus. The dude that runs the shop (I assume heís still there) is a good dude. Heís helpful. Stop by and talk to him.


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    Not sure I need a metal shop for this project.

    But I have another project that I most certainly don't have the tools for (and have been sitting on for years because of it), where I might call on him.

  34. #34
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    I've got an old grill I plan to convert to a chop saw stand. Well, I'll ditch the actual grill part and use the stand. It has a side table on both sides and wheels so if I can get the table for the saw mounted where the grill is and align and level the side tables, should be good to go and I can wheel it outside to cut. Only problem is finding a spot to park it inside. Probably wouldn't be so great for transporting to a worksite.

    Currently, I mostly chop on the floor. If I'm doing a lot, I've got a couple of those HF folding work stand/sawhorses and an old cedar narrow door I use as the top. And I have a roller my dad gave me.

    I was checking out metal chop saws the other day as I'm installing a drop ceiling. They are slower rpm. So I've just been using shears and a hacksaw as I don't have a lot to install.
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  35. #35
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    Iíve been a carpenter for most of my adult life. Most of that time as a trim carpenter. I started as a framing helper. We used saw horses and a circular saw. I moved into trim as soon as I could. Iíve had all manner of cut tables for my chop saws. I made a custom ďboxĒ table that placed the saw low enough that the cut table of the saw flushed out with the table that I made. It was super cool, and always got attention on the job site. And it worked like a charm. It was also heavy as fock, and a general pain in the ass. Now I use saw horses with 2x4ís, or whatever else I can scavenge, and clamp the saw to it, with roller stands as outfeed. Lately Iíve been using a 3íx5í piece of butcher block. My advice is donít complicate it, and never, ever just set your saw on the ground. Ever.


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  36. #36
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    Adjustable Saw Horses

    I bought my first pair of these in 1992 when I was doing kitchen remodels and have been using them since. They are now set up semi-permanently in my shop for my chop saw.

    Off Camber Home Improvement-saw-horses.jpg

    Adjustable leg height and they fold up to the size of a 2x4. I still have my original pair and recently found a pair at a thrift shop for $20.

    Another cheap work table: My folk's church was throwing out an old 30"x 96'' folding frame, collapsible table. The table had gotten wet and the particle board had swelled and delaminated the surface. I reused the frame and legs and cut a piece of 3/4" plywood for a newtop. Been using it as my main worktable in my shop for 9 years now. It's about due for a new top, but it works great for building my furniture.
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  37. #37
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    Anybody have experience with garage door thresholds that are glued to the garage floor?

    I've been thinking about getting one since I moved into my house (driveway slopes TOWARDS the garage door and while drainage is good enough during light rain, during some rain events, I do have issues), and recent rainfall events now have water flowing into my garage.

    I think part of the problem is that the bottom seal on the garage door is worn (and will be replacing that, too), but I want a little extra insurance. Was doing a little research and have found a variety of products ranging from fairly inexpensive stuff on amazon to more expensive options from Garadry and Tsunami Seal. I'm not thrilled by the fact that Tsunami Seal pretty much only sells kits that include the damn caulking gun. I don't need another damn caulking gun.

    I've also thinking about the storage shed thing a bit. I'd like to get that taken care of this summer if I can. Another option occurred to me this winter that would allow me to avoid building a shed on my sloping yard. My crawlspace is tall enough that underneath the master bedroom, I could have a door installed. There's already a full-sized exterior door on the back side of the wall I'd want to put a new door in. I could potentially have a concrete floor poured, but all I'd really need would be a floating wood floor, I think.

    Anyone have any thoughts on how much something like that might cost? If it prices out similarly to a shed, it might be worth pursuing further.

  38. #38
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    Do you have any type of trench gutter across your driveway before your garage door? Even if you were successful in sealing the door threshold I would think water would still be intruding the plate etc.
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Do you have any type of trench gutter across your driveway before your garage door? Even if you were successful in sealing the door threshold I would think water would still be intruding the plate etc.
    Yeah you'd be way better off with a channel drain, but it would be quite a big cost to install one on an existing driveway. It would probably be overkill if it is only an occasional problem. https://www.ndspro.com/products/drai...el-drains.html

    I have not used the threshold seal, but I have used liquid nails a lot. It should work reasonably well for that application. Just make sure the concrete is dry and clean when applying it. If the concrete has a smooth trowel finish, the liquid nails would adhere better if you roughed up the concrete a little bit first.

    They look like Cush Core
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Do you have any type of trench gutter across your driveway before your garage door? Even if you were successful in sealing the door threshold I would think water would still be intruding the plate etc.
    No. I agree, one of those would be awful nice. But what I have is a subtle side slope to my driveway that sheds water off that sheets down the driveway. The spot where that water drains to the side is a spot I need to periodically clear, as grass grows quite vigorously there. I've been thinking about doing some landscaping work in the area and planting a rain garden, as the runoff has created a pretty soggy spot where very little grows, because it stays moist for too long.

    The main issue seems to come from windblown rain that sheets down the front of the garage door, and is probably being drawn under the existing seal via capillary action.

    There is a piece of drain pipe running under the driveway from the yard on the other side, so that section of yard doesn't fill up with water and overtop the driveway.

    Quote Originally Posted by the_joe View Post
    Yeah you'd be way better off with a channel drain, but it would be quite a big cost to install one on an existing driveway. It would probably be overkill if it is only an occasional problem. https://www.ndspro.com/products/drai...el-drains.html

    I have not used the threshold seal, but I have used liquid nails a lot. It should work reasonably well for that application. Just make sure the concrete is dry and clean when applying it. If the concrete has a smooth trowel finish, the liquid nails would adhere better if you roughed up the concrete a little bit first.

    They look like Cush Core
    Oh, the garage floor definitely has a smooth finish. I'm not concerned about the adhesive at all. More specifically with the different threshold products themselves. If any are notably terrible or anything like that. I was particularly looking at the Garadry one, in part because the strip has bright yellow signaling the trip hazard (I'll still trip over the damn thing, I bet) built into the product, and it looks like the profile of it might be a little easier for me to drag my camper over using the trailer dolley without needing to hitch it up (some of them look abrupt enough that I'd have to hitch up my trailer just to pull it out of the garage).

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    I've got an old grill I plan to convert to a chop saw stand.
    That's gonna be so hot when it's finished!

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckha62 View Post
    I bought my first pair of these in 1992 when I was doing kitchen remodels and have been using them since. They are now set up semi-permanently in my shop for my chop saw.
    I have a pair of those, and a couple of those cheap black plastic ones. My work table in the garage is a solid core door from an office, so it's a little oversized. I can get sloppy with my work sometimes, so I just sand the whole top down when it starts to get chunky.
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbmb65 View Post
    Iíve been a carpenter for most of my adult life. Most of that time as a trim carpenter. I started as a framing helper. We used saw horses and a circular saw. I moved into trim as soon as I could. Iíve had all manner of cut tables for my chop saws. I made a custom ďboxĒ table that placed the saw low enough that the cut table of the saw flushed out with the table that I made. It was super cool, and always got attention on the job site. And it worked like a charm. It was also heavy as fock, and a general pain in the ass. Now I use saw horses with 2x4ís, or whatever else I can scavenge, and clamp the saw to it, with roller stands as outfeed. Lately Iíve been using a 3íx5í piece of butcher block. My advice is donít complicate it, and never, ever just set your saw on the ground. Ever.
    Another vote for sawhorses and roller stands, I think that's what I'm gonna do! I'm looking forward to not chopping on the ground!

    So I went and did the carpet tear out today, and hauled away the 4x8' sheet of MDF my friend left there for this stairway. I've got to decide how tall to make the skirts and rip them at home on the table saw. First pics are of the woodwork down into the basement that my friend did and I painted, second are the stairs going up to the 2nd floor. I'm just going to be doing the skirt with a piece of panel molding on top. Good thing these stairs aren't a straight run all the way to the top so I don't have to do a really long skirt board.





    After thinking about it all day today I'm not too worried, I think it's gonna be pretty easy (famous last words), like in the video I posted above. I need to leave a ~3/8" gap since they're going back with carpet, so I got a little room for error.
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    Yep, sawhorses and roller stands. As stated donít over think it or complicate it. Make your life easier not harder.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
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    I put very little thought into this setup, burned minimal calories, thinking would be required later. I couldn't cut one of the angles on my chopper, so I had to use the circular saw. I grabbed a chunk of ply from the garage and that became the table, nice to be able to clamp stuff down on it, worked out great!

    I don't know what I did wrong, need to sleep on it and watch moar U-toob. Might have to try the scribe method. Wondering if I should make it taller, I have plenty of material left, it's at 7.5" now. I'll just top it off with that molding, think it's just basic panel molding.







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    So I still can't figure out what I did wrong on the first try, and I did something wrong on the second try, so I'll have to try again. I did do the upper flight and that one came out ok. One thing I think is throwing me off is that the top step on the lower run is taller than the others, and the bottom step on the upper run is shorter than the others. I think I may be getting closer to the aha moment when I completely understand what's going on, but I don't think I'll get there before the project is done, and that's ok.
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    Iím no carpenter Korn, but this may help you figure it out.

    https://www.mycarpentry.com/stair-calculator.html
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
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  47. #47
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    Thanks DJ, but I'm pretty sure (after a quick glance) that is a guide for calculating the angles, dimensions, and such to build a staircase, not fit a skirt to an existing one.
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  48. #48
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    What kinda saw do y'all recommend for cutting circular holes in tile? I'm gonna need one to cut 1/2" and 1-1/4" holes in porcelain tile. I need to run some water lines up through newly placed tile floor in my bathroom when the time comes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    What kinda saw do y'all recommend for cutting circular holes in tile? I'm gonna need one to cut 1/2" and 1-1/4" holes in porcelain tile. I need to run some water lines up through newly placed tile floor in my bathroom when the time comes.

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    Either a diamond or carbide hole saw that attaches to a drill. They are typically used wet for cooling and to keep the dust down.

    Or you can cut a square hole with a regular tile saw and put a piece of trim or a flange around it to hide the square hole.
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  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_joe View Post
    Either a diamond or carbide hole saw that attaches to a drill. They are typically used wet for cooling and to keep the dust down.

    Or you can cut a square hole with a regular tile saw and put a piece of trim or a flange around it to hide the square hole.
    Hmm. That's what I was thinking was to get a hole saw, but there are so many types. Also figured I'd put flange around it just so everything looked more tidy. We are replacing the sink that had an oversized corner cabinet with a wall mounted sink and an alcove tub with a clawfoot tub, so the water lobes and drains aren't hidden in walls or cabinets anymore. This will be my first work tiling floors, so wish me luck. I'm glad it's only 35 square feet. Unfortunately I didn't take a picture of the bathroom with the old tub and sink, but it was a situation where you had to sit at an angle or scrunch up if you wanted to shit.

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    You could also layout the tiles so that the pipe falls on a joint in the tiles. That way you can just cut a half circle in each tile without the hole saw. Youíd just mark out the half circle shape with a marker and cut slices in from the edge of the tile. Then break off the slivers with ďend nippersĒ.

    This is an example of a hole saw... https://www.homedepot.com/p/QEP-1-3-...569Q/202205611
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  52. #52
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    Are you putting down new tile or are you wanting to cut holes through existing?

    If you're putting down new, you can get creative, might be able to get by without an expensive hole saw.

    https://www.todayshomeowner.com/vide...-hole-in-tile/
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  53. #53
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    I was actually looking at that saw. It'd do what I needed. May be a stupid question, but does the tile have to be cut before being set? Can I not make a hole in the sub floor when we lay that and use the hole saw for the tile based on where that is?

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  54. #54
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    Tile up to where the hole in the sub floor is, then cut the hole in the tile right before you set it in place.

    https://youtu.be/0FIuanAAV4Q
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Thanks DJ, but I'm pretty sure (after a quick glance) that is a guide for calculating the angles, dimensions, and such to build a staircase, not fit a skirt to an existing one.
    Oh sorry, I didnít look at it close enough. I Googled stair stringers and that popped up.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    ^ That link Corn posted is how I used to do it before having an expense account. I'd just use one of those cheapo triangle tile bits. If you're going to use a flange to cover the ugliness it'll work fine. Doing it after the tile is set does present some challenges. If you crack a tile or make a mistake you now have a can worms to deal with. After the fact I'd use a tile hole saw for sure and practice on some scrap before hand.
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    Yeah... what corn said. It is possible to cut through an installed tile but there is always a chance the tile will crack and that would be a huge bummer.

    You can use some butcher paper or something similar to make a pattern for the tile you need to cut so you get a pretty precise fit.
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  58. #58
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    Cool, thanks for the tips, guys! Very helpful video, there.
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  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Oh sorry, I didnít look at it close enough. I Googled stair stringers and that popped up.
    No one else has offered up any advice for cutting stair skirts, at least you tried.

    A friend did send me a link: https://www.thisiscarpentry.com/2013...rds-revisited/

    I tried scribing with a scribe stick, and that did help a little, but I'm still having some trouble figuring some things out. I was going to say "I'll figure it out tomorrow", but I'm learning that just jinxes me.
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  60. #60
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    This fuggin wallpaper that was hidden in my bathroom...

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    Iím always trying, Korn. Not always hitting the mark but at least Iím willing to give it a go.

    NDD, score on the wallpaper. At least you donít have to do any other wall treatment or paint.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
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    Carved out some time to get the adjustable legs I found ready for the party van. Ended up cutting about 4" off the top and 8" off the bottom to gain maximum adjustability.

    Off Camber Home Improvement-img_20190420_155557836.jpg

    Not a fan of these composite blades but they get the job done.

    Off Camber Home Improvement-img_20190420_153249054.jpg

    Prying the feet off was a real mother'effer. I made several cuts to determine hights on the first one but on the remaining 3 I knew I had enough clearance to cut well past it then just knock it out from the top of the cut off pipe.

    Off Camber Home Improvement-img_20190420_155811569.jpg

    Went back in the cut end very nicely.

    Off Camber Home Improvement-img_20190420_155842114.jpg

    Two pieces cut and ready to go.

    Off Camber Home Improvement-img_20190420_160019550.jpg
    Off Camber Home Improvement-img_20190420_160055783.jpg

    Legs done give me 10" of adjustment. Not sure on the van weelbase but I reckon I can park pretty damn crooked and still get a level nights rest.

    Off Camber Home Improvement-img_20190420_161122530.jpg

    Robbed these old line levels to mount in the bed rails. I'll use the pitch one lengthwise as I like a little elevation to my head.

    Off Camber Home Improvement-img_20190420_162336895.jpg

    Aslo, check out this dog. Trippin balls.
    Off Camber Home Improvement-fb_img_1555770594815.jpg
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    Haha, nice!

    Those will probably be pretty helpful down by the river.
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    Got the skirt hung and it came out pretty nice, if I don't say. It was a bit challenging until I stopped thinking about it and just did it. I understand the process now. I used Kreg pocket holes to joint the base to the stringer.

    That block is a makeshift clamping device, I wedged it under the top detail and shot 2 nails through it at the bottom to keep pressure on the top while the glue dried. I've got it all prepped and primed twice.

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    Nice man, looks like you got it pretty tight. Lining up a series of precise cuts like that is more difficult than most people would realize. I always feel pretty self taught when trying to tackle stuff like that and learn stuff along the way for next time. Of course there's always the guy out there that has a million and one tricks to learn from too. I'm the proverbial jack of trades, master of none though.
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    Looks good, Corn! I might end up doing that on my basements stairs. The walls are out of square a good bit so the treads hit the wall at the back and then have a gap toward the front. I guess it's the opposite on the other side, though I mostly tore that wall out so it only hits the stairs the first 4 or 5 steps from the top and then it is open. Or maybe I'll just use lots of caulk.
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  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Nice man, looks like you got it pretty tight. Lining up a series of precise cuts like that is more difficult than most people would realize. I always feel pretty self taught when trying to tackle stuff like that and learn stuff along the way for next time. Of course there's always the guy out there that has a million and one tricks to learn from too. I'm the proverbial jack of trades, master of none though.
    Thanks! Originally I was trying to leave a 3/8" gap around the treads and risers, but the carpet guy said I didn't have to so I just got it close as I could. I think the thing that helped me the most was all the accumulated knowledge from previous projects more than any one particular method, I used the best of two I guess.

    What are you mounting the legs to, some kind of steel frame?
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  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Looks good, Corn! I might end up doing that on my basements stairs. The walls are out of square a good bit so the treads hit the wall at the back and then have a gap toward the front. I guess it's the opposite on the other side, though I mostly tore that wall out so it only hits the stairs the first 4 or 5 steps from the top and then it is open. Or maybe I'll just use lots of caulk.
    Thanks! I just had an idea: You could cut a bunch of cardboard rectangles and hot glue them together, it would take all the guess work out of it, almost no measuring. Just put one against the wall at the bottom, then put another on the next step and glue it the first one and so on. Then just transfer that onto the skirt and cut.
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    Most likely just some 2x3. I'd like to keep it as light as possible and I've used it for my van beds previously. I've noodled the idea of angle aluminum but have no idea if it's strong enough.

    The next unknown is mounting the legs. I've looked into some folding hinges but they don't look very stable. I think I'll either just use two bolts per with wing nuts or maybe steel fence post brackets from HD. I tend to gravitate towards the simpler the better for my own stuff that'll see a lot of use. In a perfect world sturdy folding hinges that were designed for round legs would be ideal.
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    If you have access to standard metal bed frames for cheap or free, they are a good source of angle iron, maybe you could cut and bolt something together. Don't know if that'd be better than lumber though.
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  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Thanks! I just had an idea: You could cut a bunch of cardboard rectangles and hot glue them together, it would take all the guess work out of it, almost no measuring. Just put one against the wall at the bottom, then put another on the next step and glue it the first one and so on. Then just transfer that onto the skirt and cut.
    Hmm, interesting idea.
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    Replacing the old clapped-out bird feeder.

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    Cool, am I to assume you will once again become part of the bird thread with cool shots and videos?
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  74. #74
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    Well Korn, youíve mastered one of the trickiest endeavors in carpentry. Iíve heard many of them bitch and moan about building stairways. Congrats! Looks nice.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Cool, am I to assume you will once again become part of the bird thread with cool shots and videos?
    Sure.

    Done...

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    Korn, there's no way in hell I could ever pull off a carpentry feat like that....great job!
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  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker View Post
    Korn, there's no way in hell I could ever pull off a carpentry feat like that....great job!
    So youíre making fun of me using the word ďcarpentryĒ, smooth. Thatís what it is in old terminology.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  78. #78
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    Huh?

    I was stating that Korn's carpentry skills blow mine away.
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    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker View Post
    Sure.

    Done...

    Beautiful yard you got there & dig the 4 station feeder. I like to hang a feeder just out the window from where I eat breakfast. Watching birds at the feeder while eating my breakfast was a long time morning ritual & peaceful way to start the day. Haven't had one in quite a few years now as an apartment dweller and I sure miss it.
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    Thanks. And yeah, we get a nice view of it from the kitchen window.
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    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker View Post
    Korn, there's no way in hell I could ever pull off a carpentry feat like that....great job!
    Thanks! Really liking that bird feeder tree, did you come up with that design?

    Dogies!!!
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    Youíre welcome.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Hmm, interesting idea.
    After some thought, I think you'd need to find a way to make sure the template doesn't move or bend when you transfer it, maybe glue or tape some long thin strips of wood to keep it rigid. Or maybe you could draw a line from top to bottom with a straight edge while it's on the stairs, then make sure that line is straight when laid out on the piece of wood.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    ...did you come up with that design?
    Yes. Susie's idea to put that thingy on the top.
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    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker View Post
    Yes. Susie's idea to put that thingy on the top.
    Nice, I like the finial.

    I was looking at the old ladders on the side of the house yesterday, was thinking about taking them to recycling but remembered I was possibly going to use them to build some features in the yard. I should probably just take them in, I've got too many projects as it is. You still ride yours?
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    Naw, my stuff kinda rotted away. I didn't use pressure treated when I built it.

    The stump that is/was the base for the teeter-totter is still okay....maybe I'll rebuild that.
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    That tape measure is exactly what I need.

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    dang

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    That tape measure is exactly what I need.

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    Ingenious simple invention.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Anyone ever do any concrete overlay on countertops?

    I've got a countertop at a chiropractor's office that needs to be concrete, and I'm going to figure out how to do it one way or another!



    I was thinking of using Hardiebacker and screwing that down over the laminate, then taping the seams, then wet down and use a concrete resurfacer over top.
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    Iíve never done it but it sounds like youíre on the right track. One thing to keep in mind is the extra weight. Is the old countertop built strong enough to support it?
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
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    Yeah, it's good and solid. I'm planning on capping off that woodwork on the end there too, make it look like a solid piece of concrete.

    I was talking with a guy at Lowe's and he initially thought it wouldn't work, but after I told him I was going to wet down the backer really well before applying the overlay, he seemed to think it might be ok.

    There's a couple Quickcrete products, a specific countertop blend and a polymer concrete overlay blend, I think the polymer would be best to just trowel on. Rhino Linings also makes a polymer concrete resurfacer which is about the same price as the Quickcrete.
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    Iíd go with the Quickcrete product myself. Concrete products is what theyíve specialized in forever. Might be worth it in the long run.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Iíd go with the Quickcrete product myself. Concrete products is what theyíve specialized in forever. Might be worth it in the long run.
    I did a project kind of like that once. We tacked down steel mesh instead of backer board. I've had good luck with the Levelastic.
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    I just binged on YouTube, it seems there's several ways that'll work fine for my application. I'm going to go to some places today and see if I can find something that'll stick to the laminate, if I'm not satisfied with my findings I may use expanded steel mesh or Hardiebacker. DIY'ers report that Henry's or Ardex floor levelers do work directly over Formica and tile.
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  98. #98
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    You could probably just score the laminate with an angle grinder/ diamond blade or Skil saw set real shallow to get the adhesion you need, right?
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    Quote Originally Posted by MOJO K View Post
    You could probably just score the laminate with an angle grinder/ diamond blade or Skil saw set real shallow to get the adhesion you need, right?
    I suppose, or maybe just use my orbital with some 40 grit. I'm thinking with all the angles and sections of that top, putting mesh on it could be a PITA. I'm gonna go measure it and see if all the laminate is solid.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MOJO K View Post
    You could probably just score the laminate with an angle grinder/ diamond blade or Skil saw set real shallow to get the adhesion you need, right?
    That's a great idea though I would be reluctant to expose the laminate substrate (especially if it's particle board) to high levels of moisture. Wet the substrate too much and the laminate is no longer bonded reliably.

    I'd scuff the laminate and use a wire mesh.
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  101. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    I just binged on YouTube, it seems there's several ways that'll work fine for my application. I'm going to go to some places today and see if I can find something that'll stick to the laminate, if I'm not satisfied with my findings I may use expanded steel mesh or Hardiebacker. DIY'ers report that Henry's or Ardex floor levelers do work directly over Formica and tile.
    Why not just template it, and form and pour thin concrete slaps off site? Then attach the cured panels to the the laminate. Or do it all proper and remove the laminate and put the prefab slabs on the framing.


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    Quote Originally Posted by mbmb65 View Post
    Why not just template it, and form and pour thin concrete slaps off site? Then attach the cured panels to the the laminate. Or do it all proper and remove the laminate and put the prefab slabs on the framing.


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    I like the idea, but that may be too much work for their budget. I made a form and poured a concrete top for my small kitchen, complete with under-mount sink which I love!

    Their top is basically a U shape, I think it's probably about 8' long with the two ends that angle in at about 30į, so there would be some weird angles to deal with on the face.

    I just went by to measure and they're closed for lunch...
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  103. #103
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    Are they keeping the laminate on the face of the counter? If you're only doing the top, I'd trim it out with a quarter-round border, silicone it in so it won't leak out, and pour a leveling product over the top. If it's not going anyplace or getting anything built on top of it, it probably doesn't really need to bond to the surface it's sitting on. Whatever you decide, run a test/ sample on the process a day before to avoid any suprises on site.
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    Ugh, this is going to be harder to figure out than I thought, just like everything else in my life, lol! That stupid ear hanging down and the way they finished off the end is not pleasing.



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    I'm confident that you'll find a way.
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    Thanks for the support, Net!

    And I do appreciate everyone else's suggestions also! It seems like I've been getting all kinds of odd jobs lately that take a lot of figurin out. I guess that's a good way to learn new skills, but it can get a little frustrating at times. I helps to be able to bounce ideas around!

    After looking at it again and sleeping on it (I took a nap), I think I'm going to go with the Hardiebacker. I can go right over that molding detail on the back of the top and cap off the end. There are a few spots where the laminate is a bit loose, mainly where the top pieces join together at the miters, I can place the seams of the backer so they land just to the side of the loose areas and screw/glue them down solid. Using the backer will let me choose whatever product I want, anything should stick to that stuff, so I won't need a special bonding cement.
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  107. #107
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    One more dilemma, have you figured out how to work the Hardiebacker Board around all of this stuff?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  108. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    around all of this stuff?
    You mean all that chicken scratch?

    lol, I'm just going over the blue top and front, and hopefully that ugly end somehow.
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  109. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    You mean all that chicken scratch?

    lol, I'm just going over the blue top and front, and hopefully that ugly end somehow.
    Looking forward to seeing the final product. Anything will be better than the way it is now.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    1/4" backer with tape and thinset at the seams will work well, cap that end with backer and form in place for the faces and top. Wire mesh on the vertical face may help with long term adhesion and allow a thinner surface. I would try to pour it all at once for a seamless finish.

    My biggest concern is weight, if that front is only supported by a cantilevered countertop I'd want to make sure it could support the concrete without too much flex.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    You mean all that chicken scratch?

    lol, I'm just going over the blue top and front, and hopefully that ugly end somehow.
    It's got to be part of a full remodel job, right? How are they treating the rest of the space?
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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    My biggest concern is weight, if that front is only supported by a cantilevered countertop I'd want to make sure it could support the concrete without too much flex.
    Weight was my concern as well which I mentioned above. I personally wouldnít even do that project because of that concern.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    1/4" backer with tape and thinset at the seams will work well, cap that end with backer and form in place for the faces and top. Wire mesh on the vertical face may help with long term adhesion and allow a thinner surface. I would try to pour it all at once for a seamless finish.

    My biggest concern is weight, if that front is only supported by a cantilevered countertop I'd want to make sure it could support the concrete without too much flex.
    I'm doing a trowel on finish, just an overlay maybe 1/8-3/16" thick. I worked most of it out in my head last night, I will need three sheets of 1/2" backer, it'll have two seams on top, still thinking on the front. I want 1/2" board so there's a better chance of sinking the screws, and it'll be more rigid.

    I want to give the edges a slight rounded over profile, maybe with a file or just sandpaper before taping.
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  116. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by MOJO K View Post
    It's got to be part of a full remodel job, right? How are they treating the rest of the space?
    No, just the reception area, the place had recently been painted. We're going for a spa-like feel.

    Now I just need to figure out if there's any type of glue I can use to help stick the backer to the laminate. I will use plenty of screws so it probably isn't totally necessary, but if I can I will. I'm thinking vinyl floor adhesive! I don't think thinset will stick to laminate, but maybe it will if I rough it up enough. That stuff sticks to buckets!
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  117. #117
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    Are you going to get some scrap laminate and make a small form at home to test the application & adhesion?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    No, just the reception area, the place had recently been painted. We're going for a spa-like feel.

    Now I just need to figure out if there's any type of glue I can use to help stick the backer to the laminate. I will use plenty of screws so it probably isn't totally necessary, but if I can I will. I'm thinking vinyl floor adhesive! I don't think thinset will stick to laminate, but maybe it will if I rough it up enough. That stuff sticks to buckets!
    Rough up the surface and use liquid nails adhesive with a caulking gun. Not too expensive and works great
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    Are you going to get some scrap laminate and make a small form at home to test the application & adhesion?
    I was thinking of that last night. I need to test the whole system beforehand so there's no surprises on the job. Also; people are going to see my work, it has to be nice, can't be some half-arse polished turd!

    Quote Originally Posted by the_joe View Post
    Rough up the surface and use liquid nails adhesive with a caulking gun. Not too expensive and works great
    I was thinking of that also, but I saw one video that had like 45 likes and 50 dislikes, didn't read the comments lol! I'll have the nail guns there, so I could tack everything in place with glue/nails and then screw everything down.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    I was thinking of that last night. I need to test the whole system beforehand so there's no surprises on the job. Also; people are going to see my work, it has to be nice, can't be some half-arse polished turd!
    Yeah I thought after I posted that you can show them what the finished product would look like, once it's to your liking.
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    Yeah I thought after I posted that you can show them what the finished product would look like, once it's to your liking.
    There's some pretty gals working there, so it has to look good!

    Found some pics of my concrete countertop:



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  122. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    No, just the reception area, the place had recently been painted. We're going for a spa-like feel.
    I'm no designer, but the wood and brick with the black "specials board" hanging up, it all kind of looks like the hostess station at an 80's steakhouse...you know, the kind that had a giant salad bar.

    That said, I've never been to a spa. Do some of them look like walking into an old steakhouse?
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    All the golden oak that you see, plus the walls and ceiling in that area are going SW 7069 Iron Ore, so it will be a big change. And there's custom shelves going in to replace that bookcase.
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    Still concerned about weight. Have you addressed that problem?
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    All the golden oak that you see, plus the walls and ceiling in that area are going SW 7069 Iron Ore, so it will be a big change. And there's custom shelves going in to replace that bookcase.
    So a spa looks like a cool martini bar?
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    I'm not always helpful, I know.
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    lol!
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  128. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Still concerned about weight. Have you addressed that problem?
    Yes, in post #115.
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  129. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Yes, in post #115.
    Alright, Iím not always helpful, I know.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    All the golden oak that you see, plus the walls and ceiling in that area are going SW 7069 Iron Ore, so it will be a big change. And there's custom shelves going in to replace that bookcase.
    The ceiling and the cabinetry are going to be the same dark grey as the walls? Gonna feel like a cave.
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    The ceiling and the cabinetry are going to be the same dark grey as the walls? Gonna feel like a cave.
    I'm not the designer. It's just the ceiling right above the front desk, not the whole place.

    I've always liked dark ceilings, in fact I'm the one who first suggested a dark ceiling to the designer years ago, and know she takes credit for them!

    Dark colors recede, look up next time you're at a Starbucks with DJ.
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  132. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Gonna feel like a cave.
    ...or a martini bar.
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    Hopefully thereís some windows with natural light coming in to brighten up the otherwise dark perception. And yes, all colors are ďinĒ now with ceiling and walls. In the past ceilings were usually white, not now.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Good luck Corn. I can see the vertical face especially being a challenge to get a material that will finish smooth enough to look like a hard troweled finish yet thick enough to stick to the face without slumping.

    Staining could be a challenge too as it is very susceptible to differential curing. The thicker areas at seams and screws could telegraph through.

  135. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Hopefully thereís some windows with natural light coming in to brighten up the otherwise dark perception. And yes, all colors are ďinĒ now with ceiling and walls. In the past ceilings were usually white, not now.
    The whole east side is windows, so a cave like/martini bar could be the look she's going for.

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    Good luck Corn. I can see the vertical face especially being a challenge to get a material that will finish smooth enough to look like a hard troweled finish yet thick enough to stick to the face without slumping.

    Staining could be a challenge too as it is very susceptible to differential curing. The thicker areas at seams and screws could telegraph through.
    Thanks BC! I've been doing plaster (Venetian/lime/etc) for over 20 years now, so whatever I use there shouldn't be a problem. Hadn't thought about telegraphing tho, will check for that on the mock-up.


    Now I'm off to buy a floor squeegee. I have a slick concrete breezeway that I need to acid etch.
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    ^^^ Wow, plaster is a dying art, especially interior plaster.

    My experience with stain is more so on floors where doing something like leaving a bucket sit on a curing floor will result in a circle once stain is applied due to differential curing.

    A mock up is wise not only for your own edification, but it can also can help temper client expectations. Many people like the idea of stained concrete until they see the non-uniformity that naturally occurs.

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    We're going for raw concrete, no stain. The only variation will hopefully be from the concrete itself and the burnishing of the trowel. Go in about 5mins on this video to see what I mean. I was even thinking about using that Surecrete product, but will probaly find something locally like Quickcrete.

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    Yes, burnishing, friction from the trowel over and over which burns the concrete. Itís a good look and pretty easy to accomplish while finishing. Are you done yet? Iím ready for the finished product photos.
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  139. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Are you done yet? Iím ready for the finished product photos.
    It occurred to me that I'm giving away my "trade secrets" by posting this project here, so be patient while I assume the role of the guinea pig.

    Today I made the template for the top, and next is to lay out the backer board for the most efficient usage, which will require sleeping on it, kinda late to take a nap.



    I'm still not sure which product I'm going to use to skim over the cement board. I would think anything should stick like thinset to this stuff, but the TDS on one overlay product states that smooth surfaces need to be mechanically roughened between CSP 4 and CSP 6, others don't say anything about tooth. One side of Hardiebacker is fairly rough and will probably be adequate. I think I just need to pick one and test it out.
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    Still unsure about what I'm gonna use to skim this thing. I bought some Quickcrete Resurfacer, I think it might too sandy and doesn't trowel out smooth enough.

    Got the backer on today, but need to mess with the end cap.

    Super crappy cell pic!
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    That resurfacer product is quite sandy and doesn't have the adhesion that other products have. Didn't you mention thinset earlier? I'd use the stuff made for marble/granite, that stuff STICKS! And I'd use fiber tape to tape the seams with the first coat.

    This stuff,

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/FibaTape...46-U/100236369

    What is the plan for the top coat?

    Semco is a pretty cool product I'm told by guys that have worked with it, but I have no first hand experience with it.


  142. #142
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    Any of y'all who've done tile, I've got a question. I've seen quite a few instructional articles and videos on installing the cement backing board, but have seen conflicting instructions on whether or not the backer board should be adhered to the subfloor with some kind of thinset mortar and then have the special screws put in or if the adhesive between the subfloor and the backerboard is even necessary because it'll be nearly impossible to replace the backer board without also replacing the subfloor. Thoughts?

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  143. #143
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    Bought tape at HD when I got the backer and backer screws, don't know if it's that brand. I'd like to do three coats of whatever and tape on the first coat like you say.
    I have some lime plaster that's been approved, I just don't think it's hard enough.

    I've seen a bunch of crafty blog types posting about Henry's Feather Finish, directly over laminate and sh!t! I kinda thought it was a buncha crap, but maybe it works?

    https://youtu.be/9lRaNI2AOEQ
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  144. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Any of y'all who've done tile, I've got a question. I've seen quite a few instructional articles and videos on installing the cement backing board, but have seen conflicting instructions on whether or not the backer board should be adhered to the subfloor with some kind of thinset mortar and then have the special screws put in or if the adhesive between the subfloor and the backerboard is even necessary because it'll be nearly impossible to replace the backer board without also replacing the subfloor. Thoughts?

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    Scroll about halfway down to backer FAQs. https://www.jameshardie.com/product-...sked-questions

    I wouldn't use that fiber taped cement board unless you have to, I like Hardiebacker or "cement board" so far.
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  145. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Scroll about halfway down to backer FAQs. https://www.jameshardie.com/product-...sked-questions

    I wouldn't use that fiber taped cement board unless you have to, I like Hardiebacker or "cement board" so far.
    Cool thanks. Any particular reason for that? I've purchased Durock cement board already. If I don't like it, at least I've only done about 35 square feet of tile. That's how I figure it anywho.

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  146. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Cool thanks. Any particular reason for that? I've purchased Durock cement board already. If I don't like it, at least I've only done about 35 square feet of tile. That's how I figure it anywho.

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    I've always thought it wasn't as strong as the other type, but I really don't have much experience with it. If you've used it and it works that's all that matters!

    I would guess that it would be a good idea to use thinset between both types of backers and subfloor, any voids underneath could cause cracking tiles.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    I've always thought it wasn't as strong as the other type, but I really don't have much experience with it. If you've used it and it works that's all that matters!

    I would guess that it would be a good idea to use thinset between both types of backers and subfloor, any voids underneath could cause cracking tiles.
    Word, I can get behind that.

    I'll use what materials I've amassed so far and see how it goes. Maybe in a year or two I'll have an idea of whether or not I want to change up when I do the kitchen.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Any of y'all who've done tile, I've got a question. I've seen quite a few instructional articles and videos on installing the cement backing board, but have seen conflicting instructions on whether or not the backer board should be adhered to the subfloor with some kind of thinset mortar and then have the special screws put in or if the adhesive between the subfloor and the backerboard is even necessary because it'll be nearly impossible to replace the backer board without also replacing the subfloor. Thoughts?

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    The Durock installation instructions say to adhere the Durock to the subfloor with thinset. It also requires a minimum of 5/8" subfloor. Stiffness and stability are key. If you feel your subfloor flex at all you risk cracking tile or grout.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    The Durock installation instructions say to adhere the Durock to the subfloor with thinset. It also requires a minimum of 5/8" subfloor. Stiffness and stability are key. If you feel your subfloor flex at all you risk cracking tile or grout.
    Yep, many make the mistake of having 1/2Ē subfloor which will flex.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
    Semco is a pretty cool product I'm told by guys that have worked with it, but I have no first hand experience with it.

    Had to watch that again, looks like really cool stuff!

    I need something now tho, prolly have to order that Semco. I'm gonna go get some Henry's and give it a shot, Home Depot is right around the corner. If I can get something that looks as good as this I'll be in good shape.

    Not my pic.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    The Durock installation instructions say to adhere the Durock to the subfloor with thinset. It also requires a minimum of 5/8" subfloor. Stiffness and stability are key. If you feel your subfloor flex at all you risk cracking tile or grout.
    Cool, I used 23/32". Subfloor is screwed in now, and feels very sturdy, doesn't flex or squeak, which is miles ahead of where it was before demo.
    dang

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Bought tape at HD when I got the backer and backer screws, don't know if it's that brand. I'd like to do three coats of whatever and tape on the first coat like you say.
    I have some lime plaster that's been approved, I just don't think it's hard enough.

    I've seen a bunch of crafty blog types posting about Henry's Feather Finish, directly over laminate and sh!t! I kinda thought it was a buncha crap, but maybe it works?

    https://youtu.be/9lRaNI2AOEQ
    Cool, I don't think the brand of tape matters much.

    That feather finish looks like a pretty cool product!

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    So, my water trap to my sink is 1-1/4" inside diameter and the drain pipe it attaches to is 1-1/2". Just bought a water trap adapter for 1-1/2" x 1-1/4" and it's too small to accommodate the water trap pipe. Are the dimensions for water traps given in outside diameter and the dimensions for standard pipes given in inside diameter? Worst $1 I ever spent.
    dang

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Yep, many make the mistake of having 1/2Ē subfloor which will flex.
    My house was built with 1/2" subfloor. Errr. Since I did not want to raise the finish floor elevation I scratched my head for a solution. I pulled up the 1/2" in my bathroom, screwed and glued some 2x4s as ledgers on each side of each floor joist and left them 3/4" down from being flush with the top of the joists. I then infilled between the joists with 3/4" ply, glued and screwed down to the edge of the 2x4s. Top of 3/4" ply resulted flush with top of joists. It in effect created solid blocking. 1/2" ply then went back down on top, glued and screwed. Durock adhered and screwed on top of that. Any movement is now negligible.

    Off Camber Home Improvement-subfloor.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Bought tape at HD when I got the backer and backer screws, don't know if it's that brand. I'd like to do three coats of whatever and tape on the first coat like you say.
    I have some lime plaster that's been approved, I just don't think it's hard enough.

    I've seen a bunch of crafty blog types posting about Henry's Feather Finish, directly over laminate and sh!t! I kinda thought it was a buncha crap, but maybe it works?

    https://youtu.be/9lRaNI2AOEQ
    You could also look into Ardex Forti Finish as an option. At 7,800 psi, it is hard and feathers.

    https://www.ardexamericas.com/produc...-forti-finish/

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    So, my water trap to my sink is 1-1/4" inside diameter and the drain pipe it attaches to is 1-1/2". Just bought a water trap adapter for 1-1/2" x 1-1/4" and it's too small to accommodate the water trap pipe. Are the dimensions for water traps given in outside diameter and the dimensions for standard pipes given in inside diameter? Worst $1 I ever spent.
    Are all three pieces the same material? Pretty sure it all should be inside Ý.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
    Cool, I don't think the brand of tape matters much.

    That feather finish looks like a pretty cool product!
    It is actually, now that I've used it! It was exactly what I needed, super workable and dries fast. I had a trowel in my hand applying it for 5 hours straight, It was dry at the starting point by the time I made it to the end, so I just kept building it up where it needed it until I got it where I wanted it.

    I still need to do two more coats because I was putting it on thin, you can still see the tape a little. The designer needs to see it and approve the color before I do that. You can kinda see a little variation in the 3rd pic, and I wasn't even trying. I'm going to play with it this week and see how cool I can make it, I only used 2/3 of a bag, so I've got plenty for samples.

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    You could also look into Ardex Forti Finish as an option. At 7,800 psi, it is hard and feathers.

    https://www.ardexamericas.com/produc...-forti-finish/
    Too late! I went ahead and just went for it, mock-ups are for sissies!







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  158. #158
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    Nice work corn, that looks pimp!

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    First off, Korn, that does look really dang good.

    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Are all three pieces the same material? Pretty sure it all should be inside Ý.
    I mean it should all be schedule 40 PVC, but I don't think Ikea actually specified the material for the trap that comes with the sink? Doesn't matter, a trip to the hardware store confirmed that, yes, contrary to your standard pipe used for drains or supplies, a water trap measurement is the outside diameter. As measured for the water trap - 1-1/2 OD and 1-1/4 ID. The fitting that works is a 1-1/2" to 1-1/2" water trap adapter, which is made to fit over 1-1/2" pipe and NOT into the flange of a fitting for a 1-1/2" pipe (because I'm dumb, this took three [3] trips to the hardware store). But life is good. I properly measured the drywall, got the sink remounted and then installed all of the water fixtures. NO LEAKS. I'll take it. Actually I said yesterday that plumbing isn't fun. That's kinda BS, it's fun, and I'm not too bad at it. I can at least make basic things functional.

    Still a long way from finished but the rest of the drywall does not need to accommodate fixtures, so I think it'll be somewhat easier for here on my big bathroom reno. Woot. Now to clean before the old lady gets home.
    dang

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    Thanks guys! I'm really stoked/relieved it worked out, and at the last minute too! After the owner got done saying she loved it, she asked if I could do it over her granite at home!

    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    I said yesterday that plumbing isn't fun. That's kinda BS, it's fun
    It's fun when it goes right, not so much when it doesn't.

    Sounds like you made some good progress there, NDD!
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  161. #161
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    Great success! I knew you'd find a way.

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    Looks great, Corn!

    Oh and I like your new sig. Thinking I may talk with Phillip about making that an automatic sig for all users.

    Next time I need some plumbing work, I'm calling you, NDD.
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  163. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Next time I need some plumbing work, I'm calling you, NDD.
    Will work for either bike parts or beer but it'll take me 5 times as long as a licensed plumber. Don't sue me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    (because I'm dumb, this took three [3] trips to the hardware store)
    NEVER do any plumbing work when the hardware store is not open, EVER.


    I have done plenty of plumbing in my life, but its still rare that it only takes one trip to the hardware store, its actually NOTABLE if it only takes one trip....

    Good to hear you're making progress!

  165. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
    NEVER do any plumbing work when the hardware store is not open, EVER.


    I have done plenty of plumbing in my life, but its still rare that it only takes one trip to the hardware store, its actually NOTABLE if it only takes one trip....

    Good to hear you're making progress!
    This is my general philosophy for all projects. I am an exceptionally forgetful person.

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    Carpentry and electrical have so many fewer variables, I'm fine doing that ish on a sunday, but NOT plumbing!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
    Carpentry and electrical have so many fewer variables, I'm fine doing that ish on a sunday, but NOT plumbing!
    That's true but I'll be damned if I don't forget or run out of something anyway. Missing one 2x4? Sure. 1' short on wire? Check. Fortunately the hardware store is open Sunday here, too or I'd be ruined.

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    dang

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    Wow! Looks way better than I pictured it. Good work, already paying off with another job it sounds like.

    Once the wood gets pained the Iron Ore color itís going to really set it off.

    https://www.sherwin-williams.com/hom...ngColors&p=PS0
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Too late! I went ahead and just went for it, mock-ups are for sissies!
    I wouldn't have the courage to try that in an office setting! You do nice work.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Wow! Looks way better than I pictured it. Good work, already paying off with another job it sounds like.

    Once the wood gets pained the Iron Ore color itís going to really set it off.
    Thanks, I hope it's not too painful! I wouldn't use this process to go over granite tho, I'd have to start from scratch and replace them with poured concrete.

    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I wouldn't have the courage to try that in an office setting! You do nice work.
    Why thank you! There were some oh sh!t moments where I wasn't sure if I was going to pull it off, I think there was some luck involved on this one.

    Sure beats the more labor intensive painting that I had done for so many years.
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    Wow, that looks great! You are the Danny Macaskill with a trowel...mad skills.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    Wow, that looks great! You are the Danny Macaskill with a trowel...mad skills.
    Thank you! There is something very satisfying about applying paste to surfaces with a steel blade.

    This is at the house where I was acid etching the other day, finally got some "after" pics. I had to bury the raisin bread cultured stone and soften the feel of the details. I used a piping bag with drywall mud and a paint brush to fill in some of the crevasses on the mantel. Had to use a plastic Bondo blade to get the Marmorino plaster on the details.





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    Quote Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
    NEVER do any plumbing work when the hardware store is not open, EVER.


    I have done plenty of plumbing in my life, but its still rare that it only takes one trip to the hardware store, its actually NOTABLE if it only takes one trip....

    Good to hear you're making progress!
    No matter what the job I plan on making two trips to the hardware store. I just always buy way more stuff than I need and bring back whatever I donít use when itís done.
    MERCY! MERCY! MERCY!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MOJO K View Post
    No matter what the job I plan on making two trips to the hardware store. I just always buy way more stuff than I need and bring back whatever I donít use when itís done.
    Thatís my usual go to plan as well. Itís always better to have too much than not enough. Iím going back there eventually anyway so I can return whatís not used at that time.

    Cool stuff, Kornage. Good idea with the plastic almost rubber like Bondo spatula. They work great for being able to form around details rather than a rigid plastic or metal one.

    These are the ones Iím picturing you using.

    Off Camber Home Improvement-9dcfe03a-4038-45db-ba39-695fa3dc5f53.jpeg
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  175. #175
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    This is at my local Habitat For Humanity Restore for $150. I wish I had room!!!

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    Nice work up there ^ Korn.

    And, a sliding miter saw?
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    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker View Post
    Nice work up there ^ Korn.

    And, a sliding miter saw?
    Thanks!

    It's a radial arm saw, it can do compound miters like the sliding chop saws of today, and SO much moar!

    I bet that one is from the 60s or 70s.
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  178. #178
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    I noticed the blade on it is huge!
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  179. #179
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    That whole thing is almost 5' tall, the blade is 10" I believe. My chop saw has a 12" blade.

    The more I look at that thing the more I want to go get it, must, resist, lol!
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  180. #180
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    I run my own business and I am always in a search for the best and the most effective ways of promotion. I am interested in increasing sellings. I used to use FB commercial but it turned to be expensive and not as effective as I hoped it to be. I turned to bulk e-mail sender, Atompark. I can say that I am planning to use it next year for sure. Why Atompark? It is effective, it brings me new clients, it is not as expensive as FB or Google. I believe it is one of the best tools for promotion.

  181. #181
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    There you go Korn, you need to make your business into an e-mail spammer.

    People will love you for that and flock to you for all their building/painting/Kustom needs....based on you sending them 25 emails a week.

    And based on nothing, I thought that blade was like 15 inches.
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    Also: looks like yer gonna win a free pot fender.
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    lol! I would have given that to Jcd, but Train Wreck was on it, so he's gonna get it.
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  184. #184
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    Corn, I think you should go buy that radial arm saw then lie SellAway across it and see how many pieces you can cut him up into.
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    [email protected] SellAway, seems my reporting hasn't reached the moderation staff yet.

    Oh well, more important things to do. I'm not happy with the Henry's as a finish coat, it's not intended as a wear coat. I've tried a few sealers (DuPont and 511) with wax over top, which is ok, but not ideal. Still a little soft, you can make marks on it with your fingernail. Maybe I should have tested it first, lol!

    I think I'm going to have to look around for something else. Thinking about veneer plaster, but that's hard to find.
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    When I bought tile yesterday, I was really into this porcelain tile and that's what I bought. I really like it, but I cannot cut through it for the life of me. I've tried my manual tile cutter, a tile hole saws, and masonry bits. The problem with the tile hole saws is that this tile just eats up the carbide bits. I imagine at first I may have let the bits get too hot but can just a little bit of overworking the bit really cause it to go kaput like that?

    HALP
    dang

  187. #187
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    An angle grinder with a diamond blade, or a wet saw.


    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  188. #188
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    Thanks, DJ, that will work for my 4.5" hole for the toilet drain, but not for the 1" holes for the water supplies and 2" holes for the sink drain and radiator supply pipe.
    dang

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Thanks, DJ, that will work for my 4.5" hole for the toilet drain, but not for the 1" holes for the water supplies and 2" holes for the sink drain and radiator supply pipe.
    You need a ďdiamond tipĒ drill bit or hole saw.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Oh well, more important things to do. I'm not happy with the Henry's as a finish coat, it's not intended as a wear coat. I've tried a few sealers (DuPont and 511) with wax over top, which is ok, but not ideal. Still a little soft, you can make marks on it with your fingernail. Maybe I should have tested it first, lol!

    I think I'm going to have to look around for something else. Thinking about veneer plaster, but that's hard to find.
    Your project led me to do a little looking around......I will definitely consider the concrete when I redo my kitchen floor, especially with the hydronic heat floors.
    I stumbled across some vids on using epoxy for counter tops, could you use that for a top coat?
    Bicycles don't have motors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    When I bought tile yesterday, I was really into this porcelain tile and that's what I bought. I really like it, but I cannot cut through it for the life of me. I've tried my manual tile cutter, a tile hole saws, and masonry bits. The problem with the tile hole saws is that this tile just eats up the carbide bits. I imagine at first I may have let the bits get too hot but can just a little bit of overworking the bit really cause it to go kaput like that?

    HALP
    Low speed, high torque, keep saw blade cool/wet, go slow. Use a corded drill NOT in hammer mode if you have one.

    This guy uses a scrap plywood template to keep the blade from walking across the tile surface before it gets through the glaze:



    Not super hard tile in his vid but you get the point.
    The only thing we have to fear is, nasty questions from terrible reporters.

    Real eyes realize real lies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Thanks, DJ, that will work for my 4.5" hole for the toilet drain, but not for the 1" holes for the water supplies and 2" holes for the sink drain and radiator supply pipe.
    Have you tried a diamond jig saw blade? I've had good luck with Bosch t-shanks.
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  193. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    You need a ďdiamond tipĒ drill bit or hole saw.
    For whatever reason, the hole saws I got would work fine but they came with carbide tip pilot bit...so I'm thinking about buying a 1/4" diamond tip hole saw so I can then slip the carbide tip in and use the bigger hole saws.
    dang

  194. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    Have you tried a diamond jig saw blade? I've had good luck with Bosch t-shanks.
    Considering it... but I actually don't own a jigsaw.
    dang

  195. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    For whatever reason, the hole saws I got would work fine but they came with carbide tip pilot bit...so I'm thinking about buying a 1/4" diamond tip hole saw so I can then slip the carbide tip in and use the bigger hole saws.
    Are you asking if you could buy a 1/4" diamond tip bit to use with your existing bigger hole saw cutters?

    Don't forget about that trick where you use a small bit, like a 1/8" diamond tip bit, for drilling a circle of smaller holes and knocking the center out. I think it's in one of the videos on the last page.
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  196. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Are you asking if you could buy a 1/4" diamond tip bit to use with your existing bigger hole saw cutters?

    Don't forget about that trick where you use a small bit, like a 1/8" diamond tip bit, for drilling a circle of smaller holes and knocking the center out. I think it's in one of the videos on the last page.
    Kind of. I would basically drill the pilot hole with the 1/4" diamond, then insert the larger saw, chuck and all. Maybe I'll try to get three of the smallest diamond bits I can and do the big hole made of little holes thing. I'm just feeling very dismayed right now.
    dang

  197. #197
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    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    Your project led me to do a little looking around......I will definitely consider the concrete when I redo my kitchen floor, especially with the hydronic heat floors.
    I stumbled across some vids on using epoxy for counter tops, could you use that for a top coat?
    I probably could. When I think of epoxy coatings I think of thick glossy pour on coatings like in the penny floor video on the last page. I don't have much experience with epoxy.

    I'm kinda determined to make this "fauxcrete" resemble true concrete as much as possible, and I think any kind of thick clear coat would ruin it. I've been to just about every hardware and concrete store in town the last two days looking for a solution, just been trying to sleep off a cold I musta picked up along the way from all the dang holiday weekend warriors. I tried what I thought was a product similar to that Ardex stuff BlueCheeshead posted, but made by Henry, which is about the same as their Feather Finish (scratches easily). So far I've had the best durability with Quickcrete Concrete Resurfacer, but I had to strain out the sand to make it more suited to troweling, and I'm not wanting to strain an entire bag!

    I even tried to learn a bit about what goes into concrete and what makes the finished product so durable. I tried some of the Portland Cement by itself and it just powders up when you scratch it, but somehow adding sand and gravel and floating it on top creates a really strong surface.

    I'm getting ready to go do some more testing, hopefully I can figure something out by tomorrow and finish it. Part of me is wanting to just complete it with the Henry's since they like it, and see how it wears over time. I would just finish it as they do in blogland with 511 sealer and some water based clear coat.
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  198. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Kind of. I would basically drill the pilot hole with the 1/4" diamond, then insert the larger saw, chuck and all. Maybe I'll try to get three of the smallest diamond bits I can and do the big hole made of little holes thing. I'm just feeling very dismayed right now.
    That would work too, assuming the hole cutters can make it through the tile.

    I get dismayed all the time, it's something you have to figure out how to deal with in this business, especially when you're doing something 'outside of the box'!

    Hang in there!
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  199. #199
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    The milwaukee brand hole saws I just bought are killing both my wallet and the tile cutting game.

    Sent from my LM-X212(G) using Tapatalk
    dang

  200. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    The milwaukee brand hole saws I just bought are killing both my wallet and the tile cutting game.
    Is "killing the tile game" is a good thing? I sometimes have a hard time with the lingo.

    Meanwhile at my house...

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