Off Camber Home Improvement - Page 5- Mtbr.com
Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 801 to 1,000 of 1086
  1. #801
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    I think the OSB movement with rigid tiles would be an issue. There are trowelable underlayments designed to go over wood which you could tile over with thinset and grout.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  2. #802
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    I think the OSB movement with rigid tiles would be an issue. There are trowelable underlayments designed to go over wood which you could tile over with thinset and grout.
    Talking about un- coupler?

    Name:  DDC3E04F-D4D5-4EF8-A333-EFA14DE9ED61.jpeg
Views: 109
Size:  22.0 KB
    Round and round we go

  3. #803
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Liquid backer board. Not sure about exterior application.

    https://www.wwhenry.com/product/henry-542/
    Berms and transitions may apply

  4. #804
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    For a dry indoor vertical install you could get away with it. Otherwise...
    Round and round we go

  5. #805
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    I think the OSB movement with rigid tiles would be an issue. There are trowelable underlayments designed to go over wood which you could tile over with thinset and grout.
    I would never use OSB in an exterior environment. Pressure treated plywood, 5/8" or thicker with substructure at 16" oc, then cement board thin set on top, joints taped and filled, then that roll on tile waterproofing like one uses in showers. Tile should be exterior rated, especially if in a freeze/thaw area.

  6. #806
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    I think it all depends on how long he want's it to last, and maybe it will. I've done stuff like that not caring if it failed in the future, sometimes those rig jobs last.

    I would use this and tile over top, it's for interior but maybe it'll work. https://www.tecspecialty.com/product...-underlayment/
    Berms and transitions may apply

  7. #807
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    True Corn
    And sometimes itís just as easy to do it the right way, while thereís more than one way to skin a cat.
    Thinset, modified, fortified or not, wonít bond to pressure treated. Exterior plywood of a grade acceptable to the thinset you use. Could prime or red guard it first if you really want to be thorough
    Round and round we go

  8. #808
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SoDakSooner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    674
    I've found that in the case of tile work, doing it right isn't really that much more expensive or time consuming. I've used the Schleuter Kerdi stuff and it works well, but honestly a little concrete board over the underlayment is cheaper and just as effective IMO.

  9. #809
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Especially when edges are involved
    Round and round we go

  10. #810
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,525
    If thinset is incompatible with PT ply, then there are plenty of construction adhesives that would work. The point is try and make the ply and cement board act as one and be more rigid. With thick enough plywood on a counter, that is probably not necessary. An alternative to PT ply would be an MDO sign board. My utility trailer sides are made of that and they have lasted 20 years outside in Wisconsin with zero finish on them.

    OSB is made to be exposed to weather only long enough to be enclosed. Leave it in a wet/high moisture area and it will fall apart in a year or two.

  11. #811
    mtbr member
    Reputation: azimiut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    676
    Even in a 1/16 or tighter grout lines?

  12. #812
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    Even in a 1/16 or tighter grout lines?
    For purposes of an exterior countertop it seems caulk would have the advantages of being more: stain resistant, waterproof and forgiving for expansion/contraction.

  13. #813
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Nah
    Round and round we go

  14. #814
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    444
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    For purposes of an exterior countertop it seems caulk would have the advantages of being more: stain resistant, waterproof and forgiving for expansion/contraction.
    The problem is that most caulks can not expand and contract at the same rate as the tile. Once the initial bond between the two is compromised because one moved and the other didn't, it's adios osb.
    Bicycles don't have motors.

  15. #815
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    The problem is that most caulks can not expand and contract at the same rate as the tile. Once the initial bond between the two is compromised because one moved and the other didn't, it's adios osb.
    The point of the caulk is that it has elastomeric properties, meaning that it will stretch and compress as the tile expands and contracts. Grout is great in compression with near zero tensile strength. Grout is far more likely to crack allowing water in. Caulk is used in masonry expansion/contraction joints precisely for that reason.

    Anyone that uses OSB for an exterior application (sheltered or not) should not expect long term performance.

  16. #816
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    OSB is a no go, and so is caulk in grout lines, unless itís an inside corner
    Round and round we go

  17. #817
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    OSB is a no go, and so is caulk in grout lines, unless itís an inside corner
    Plus caulk in grout lines just looks cheesy in my opinion.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  18. #818
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SoDakSooner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    674
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    OSB is a no go, and so is caulk in grout lines, unless itís an inside corner
    Agreed. not in an oudoor application but all the tubs and showers I have done(all 3) have color matched caulk in the base of the tile and inside corners. It actually was pretty hard to tell what was caulk and what was grout. The caulk was sanded just like the grout.

  19. #819
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    I'll have moar time to help figure out how to rig an outdoor kitchen on OSB once I'm done rigging my countertops!

    The Rapid Setģ rep has been in town for a few days and has been helping me try to dial in my concrete countertops. Just when I think I'm almost there I find another rabbit hole to go down, and now I'm looking into paintable membranes such as RedGard for a first coat over the OSB. Since these are meant to go under thinset they should be fine under any cementicious product, and the Custom & Rapid Set reps confirmed that. What is still a bit of a gray area is how a thin layer of concrete will hold on something like a bullnose edge.

    I coated these tops with one product and it didn't set up right (not shown), so I'm going to have to sand it off, luckily it won't be that difficult. Once I got it back down I was thinking of using a concrete primer to saturate it so it wouldn't suck to much moisture out of the 1st coat (partially why I think that one product failed), and that's when I thought of RedGard.

    Can anyone comment on how hard RedGard gets? If it's rubbery at all then I'd think a thin layer of concrete would crack and/or indent with some pressure.

    Berms and transitions may apply

  20. #820
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    2 thinner coats instead of one thick and it will get hard faster. One big thick coat and it will take much longer.
    Red guard is not cheap

    Looking good
    Round and round we go

  21. #821
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Off Camber Home Improvement-14c9b93c-e377-41a7-9fb0-ea2e9745110e.jpg
    Hardie backer over plywood, thinset and screwed down.
    Next day, once dry enough, slate tiles with thinset.

    Off Camber Home Improvement-370f0100-38dd-478c-9411-d8035b3071b8.jpg
    Round and round we go

  22. #822
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    2 thinner coats instead of one thick and it will get hard faster. One big thick coat and it will take much longer.
    Red guard is not cheap

    Looking good
    Thanks! I stopped by this new Floor & Decor store to see what they had, and I think I may have found the product I'm going to use, Mapei ECO Prim Grip. They have a primer to go over plywood and porous surfaces before you ECO Prim, so it's a two part process and the cost is similar to RedGard, but I don't think $50 is a lot if it works! And, since I may need to go cement over tile in the future I'm good there too! I also think the aggregate will help on the bullnose giving a place for my skim coats to build up in.



    All this to avoid using Hardibacker , I hate installing that stuff on my projects! I can see using it under tile on a single plane, tho.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  23. #823
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Thanx for sharing. Interesting for tile over tile. If the tile is sound.

    sandwich some thinset between 3/4 ply and cement board and have a solid, sound, flat surface that wonít flex. Will also be perfect thickness to receive bullnose.
    Round and round we go

  24. #824
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Off Camber Home Improvement-4f90459b-b451-4112-937e-649229190a27.jpg

    Walls that get tile get cement board

    Tiles go up tomorrow
    Round and round we go

  25. #825
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Nope, I'm done with cement board, unless it's on the floor, and even then I'd probably try the liquid backerboard products. It makes my fingers dry, lol! I also hate using those Backer-on screws, I haven't found an easy way to set them in straight, also hard on the fingers!

    Well, here's the coating I'll be removing, unless it has gotten hard by tomorrow. I think with the temps, me mixing it too thin, and the OSB and dry air sucking the moisture out of it, it didn't cure properly.

    Berms and transitions may apply

  26. #826
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Doesnít sound like fun
    Round and round we go

  27. #827
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    It's just the price you sometimes have to pay for pushing the limits...

    Or because you were in too much of a rush to do a test.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  28. #828
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    We have a complex with tile over tile. Fireplace boarder & hearth, walk in stall showers, and backsplashes. Can't speak to what they used but eventually it all let loose. Imo, regardless of product used the difference in expansion/contraction eventually pops the tile and your left with a colossal clusterf$$ck. No way would I put name on such a project.

    I find that thinner checkerboard backer really easy to work with. All self countersinking screws kinda suck. I think the trick is apply a lot of force and not let the screw drive itself. I wish spax would make a cement screw, their products are awesome.

    A guy I've known since kindergarten is a partner in this company.

    http://geomatrixinc.com/

    Check out some of their stuff Corn, you might find it interesting. They use fly ash instead of Portland. They currently have the contract for a bunch of stuff in Yellowstone which is super cool.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  29. #829
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    That's a cool deal there Whale! I wish they had something for my project(s).

    The thing I don't like with Backer-on screws is the head doesn't fit into the sleeve of a bit driver, so you cant slide it down over the screw and keep it straight while spinning it in.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  30. #830
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Practice makes perfect. The screws make a lil dimple when put just below surface as they should be. A touch of sandpaper takes it right down.

    Magnetic tip, no sleeve
    Round and round we go

  31. #831
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,525
    Red Guard is rubbery but I think it could go on thin enough that you would be okay.

  32. #832
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Practice makes perfect. The screws make a lil dimple when put just below surface as they should be. A touch of sandpaper takes it right down.

    Magnetic tip, no sleeve
    Ah yes. My bit is probably worn too.

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    Red Guard is rubbery but I think it could go on thin enough that you would be okay.
    My friends have RedGard under their marmorino plaster finish in Axl Rose's shower.

    I may have to buy a couple different products and build a mock up to do some testing today. Maybe some silica sand in the RedGard...
    Berms and transitions may apply

  33. #833
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    What Meat said. Also when you start the screw, any screw, come down with a lot of force like your trying to make the screw stick on it's own. This will negate the initial wobble until the threads catch. Try it.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  34. #834
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    What Meat said. Also when you start the screw, any screw, come down with a lot of force like your trying to make the screw stick on it's own. This will negate the initial wobble until the threads catch. Try it.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    Thatís the ticket
    Round and round we go

  35. #835
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    444
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    What Meat said. Also when you start the screw, any screw, come down with a lot of force like your trying to make the screw stick on it's own. This will negate the initial wobble until the threads catch. Try it
    Force should be reserved for hand nails. If you're having difficulty with screws you should pre-drill. And if you're not using an impact driver you're doing it wrong to start with.
    Bicycles don't have motors.

  36. #836
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Impact driver for sure. I can say unequivocally setting the screw with a little force works. There's certainly a time and place for pre-drilling but I typically reserve that for finish work, products that may crack, carriage bolts,etc. Lots of nice screws on the market today that self drill (not speaking to self tapping).

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  37. #837
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SoDakSooner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    674
    I didn't realize how much difference the impact driver made over a drill. It is night and day, and doesn't bugger up the screw head. I always force set screws like you guys are talking about. Most of my projects arent that nice that I need to predrill, unless I am in a spot where it may crack as mentioned.

  38. #838
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OzarkFathom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Posts
    388
    The impact driver is the bomb.
    Used it on the 1x4 furring strips on the ceiling joists in Missouri. Real shoulder saver.

  39. #839
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    I used about half a box of 145 1 5/8" deck screws on those tops, and a lot of them had to spin for a while before penetrating the OSB, and with the tops being as high as they are I was doing fine with the sleeve, or whatever that bit driver is called.

    I love my Makita impact driver, I got it on Black Friday of 2018. I almost bought a $129 "tool only" Makita router for this job, it's compatible with my 18v LXT batteries and charger.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  40. #840
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Berms and transitions may apply

  41. #841
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,173
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Don't pretend you wouldn't be taking those to the skate park.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  42. #842
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Don't pretend you wouldn't be taking those to the skate park.
    Ha! Didn't even think of that, I was too busy watching the way the one guy was driving screws into cement board.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  43. #843
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Durock & rolling
    Round and round we go

  44. #844
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Coming along

    Off Camber Home Improvement-6377def7-c0f1-4972-b0d9-c48b432229c3.jpg
    Round and round we go

  45. #845
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Coming along
    Looks great, I really dig that tile!

    Had to do a CR for ya, had to see it right side up, hope you don't mind.

    Berms and transitions may apply

  46. #846
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Thanx Man
    Round and round we go

  47. #847
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Meat are you a man show?
    You hang the wainscoting, rough in the plumbing, set the tub etc?
    That tile is cool, looking good man.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  48. #848
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Guess I should post my progress. Don't have the energy to say too much about it tho, lol!

    Berms and transitions may apply

  49. #849
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Looking great!

    A man show?

    Yeah, do plumbing,electric, etc.
    My love is the creativity. Tile, woodwork, kitchens and the likes
    Round and round we go

  50. #850
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Looking great!

    A man show?

    Yeah, do plumbing,electric, etc.
    My love is the creativity. Tile, woodwork, kitchens and the likes
    Whoops lol.
    A one man show?

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  51. #851
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Whoops lol.
    A one man show?

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    Hard to do somethings alone. Like that tub, is cast iron and weights about 350, installed on second floor.
    Usually have 2 guys plus me on site
    Round and round we go

  52. #852
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Good looking tile Meat. And that knee roller would certainly speed up the process.

    And Korn, looks good so far, keep us updated.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  53. #853
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Sir kayakalot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    209
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Think Iíll get a pair of these for my wife
    DAAAANG...that was janky

  54. #854
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Quote Originally Posted by Sir kayakalot View Post
    Think Iíll get a pair of these for my wife
    Hmmm..the possibilities are endless.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  55. #855
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Hard to do somethings alone. Like that tub, is cast iron and weights about 350, installed on second floor.
    Usually have 2 guys plus me on site
    Gotcha. I was curious how many man crew you run based on the scope and frequency of the projects you post. I plan to go back to being a privateer within a year. Most of my previous privateer work I sub'd...maybe 60%, and always had a network of labourer's and contractors we could all pull from. It's a much different story today, at least where I currently live. Anyway, I appreciate the input on your work.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  56. #856
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Hard to do somethings alone. Like that tub, is cast iron and weights about 350, installed on second floor.
    Usually have 2 guys plus me on site
    I delivered plumbing parts to various job sites for a time. I once delivered an oversized special order cast iron tub. I was on the delivery by myself. Delivered to an existing large home with a bathroom remodel. The only other person on site was a female drywall worker. Luckily she was a beast. I couldnít get the flatbed truck very close to the front entrance due to muddy conditions. Had to carry it about 40í to the front door, then down a hallway and into the master bathroom. Most would have just dropped it as close as they could outside. I about broke my back and got a hernia, she seemed fine.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  57. #857
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Hmmm..the possibilities are endless.
    Can only think of one
    Round and round we go

  58. #858
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Sir kayakalot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    209
    Oh, I can think of a few!
    DAAAANG...that was janky

  59. #859
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by Sir kayakalot View Post
    Oh, I can think of a few!
    Alright, two
    Round and round we go

  60. #860
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    No imagination. Endless angles happening at lighting fast speed.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  61. #861
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Getting close to done

    Off Camber Home Improvement-5254890b-d0f6-4ee5-9ac8-1c3f83bbbfcd.jpg

    Off Camber Home Improvement-1869efee-7622-46bf-aa58-2d53c4ec38bc.jpg
    Round and round we go

  62. #862
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Getting close to done
    Looks good! I'll just turn my head this time.

    Wish I was getting close to done, I kinda am, but still a ways to go. Last couple weeks have been "everything you didn't care to know about concrete, and didn't care to ask". I've probably spent more time researching on the computer web than doing the actual job, and I'm not done yet!

    I'm going to recoat all my countertops tomorrow, and it kinda makes me ill thinking about it. I'm using CSA cement, which sets up really fast and is really finicky about water content, a little too much and it gets weak, which is why I'm doing it again.

    Now I'm looking into CSA densifiers and preferably a finishing aid. A finishing aid is something you spray on the cement after it's placed to make it easier to finish, keeps moisture in, and hardens the surface.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  63. #863
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    If anyone knows how to get an even coating of 1/8" thick cementicious product on a surface please speak up!

    I have a 1/4"x3/16" V-notch, but after troweling it only leaves about 1/16th when compressed. Maybe I pulled it too tight and scraped away too much material.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  64. #864
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    If anyone knows how to get an even coating of 1/8" thick cementicious product on a surface please speak up!

    I have a 1/4"x3/16" V-notch, but after troweling it only leaves about 1/16th when compressed. Maybe I pulled it too tight and scraped away too much material.
    I think you answered your own question. Taking away too much material, maybe try a 1/4Ē x 1/8Ē for less depth and easier to compress with less pressure. Not sure if you can find a V notch in that size but I think that U notch comes in that size.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  65. #865
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    444
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    If anyone knows how to get an even coating of 1/8" thick cementicious product on a surface please speak up!

    I have a 1/4"x3/16" V-notch, but after troweling it only leaves about 1/16th when compressed. Maybe I pulled it too tight and scraped away too much material.
    Any way to clamp strips around the perimeter and use a screed board?
    Bicycles don't have motors.

  66. #866
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Not familiar with this product or process but maybe apply with v trowel and let dry as is with groves intact. Then apply another coat with flat trowel over
    Round and round we go

  67. #867
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    I think you answered your own question. Taking away too much material, maybe try a 1/4Ē x 1/8Ē for less depth and easier to compress with less pressure. Not sure if you can find a V notch in that size but I think that U notch comes in that size.
    I was looking for a bigger tooth V-notch, but I think the square would work. It would be just like putting down a layer of thinset.

    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    Any way to clamp strips around the perimeter and use a screed board?
    I've got bullnose that curves down to the 4" sides, so no. My friend suggested using a long straight board to lay on top and check progress.

    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Not familiar with this product or process but maybe apply with v trowel and let dry as is with groves intact. Then apply another coat with flat trowel over
    Good idea, but I think that'd be too much work, and would be hard to keep a straight line next to the bullnose. I think I'm going to try the V-notch and see how it goes, sorta like the first part of this vid:

    Berms and transitions may apply

  68. #868
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Since you have bullnose, is bullnose wood?
    Round and round we go

  69. #869
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Since you have bullnose, is bullnose wood?
    It's where the top transitions to the side, I used a round over bit on the router, can't remember what size.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  70. #870
    NDD
    NDD is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,446
    Hmm...I wanted to update all of the wiring before replacing the ceiling throughout the house, but I was told today the city would allow me to take a test to be able to apply for permits, but would never allow me to replace all of the wiring throughout the house. They would sign off on permits to do things like add or move an outlet, or wire a small room. Is this normal? Do you just bite the bullet and pay someone to do it? Do you do one room at a time over 5 years?

    Sucks trying to improve anything.
    dang

  71. #871
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Would do it to code without permits if doable
    Round and round we go

  72. #872
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    444
    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Hmm...I wanted to update all of the wiring before replacing the ceiling throughout the house, but I was told today the city would allow me to take a test to be able to apply for permits, but would never allow me to replace all of the wiring throughout the house. They would sign off on permits to do things like add or move an outlet, or wire a small room. Is this normal? Do you just bite the bullet and pay someone to do it? Do you do one room at a time over 5 years?

    Sucks trying to improve anything.
    Why would you tell the city anything if you are capable of doing the work and/or have some professional guidance so that the work is safely performed and meets current codes?
    Bicycles don't have motors.

  73. #873
    NDD
    NDD is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,446
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Would do it to code without permits if doable
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    Why would you tell the city anything if you are capable of doing the work and/or have some professional guidance so that the work is safely performed and meets current codes?
    Hey they don't know my name or address. Didn't call from a house phone, just asked questions and said thank you and goodbye. I was just trying to be proper. Some of the shit I've seen in my walls (had a light switch blow because they left the ground wire loose and it somehow touched the hot wire, we fixed that) I'd really rather the previous owner had shelled out the dough. They had to have used a couple extra hundred feet of wire when they did it, too. The wires from one breaker traverse the house twice. Also not sure that I'd have used 14 gauge NM wire in metal conduit or in other cases left it totally exposed running along a brick wall from the floor to the outlet and back to the basement.

    FWIW the inspection process when buying a house is a joke here. Pretty sure the inspector was drunk.
    dang

  74. #874
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    149
    Trying to do the right thing just doesn't work some times, I would wire to code and forget the permits.

    I am in the process of building a house and have an owner builder permit, I'm allowed to do any work on the house as long as it is for me and not for sale. I just finished the electrical trim out. I've had owner builder permits in two states and never had an issue, but I know not all jurisdictions are that way.

  75. #875
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,173
    I just built to code. I had an electrical engineer check my work (ok, he's also my dad). For things like fire blocking, I took photos so I can show it was done if it ever comes up.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  76. #876
    NDD
    NDD is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,446
    Thanks for the insight, y'all. Nice idea about taking pictures, Chaz. I'll have to do that. I'll mostly likely just do it and deal with it if I have to. Mostly concerned about my family's safety. I'll verify all relevant codes as I'm planning my work. I'm not doing things like replacing the panel or wiring AC, but I do need to prevent switches from burning up in my wall.

    What I don't get about the rules is this: if you allow homeowners to do it, you're allowing more people in a city that has house fires every day the potential to avoid yet another fire from old, faulty wiring. By law it would be illegal for me to completely removed all knob and tube wiring and replace it with modern materials, and that's the kinda thing that causes house fires if you can't afford to pay somebody. If homeowners can do it and then have an inspector come out without the prospect of fines or jail time to verify work, then at least it's double checked. If they get there and it's not up to snuff, them make them hire somebody to fix what needs to be fixed.
    dang

  77. #877
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,525
    Unless it is a major remodel that could get questioned when we sell, I just do it per code and move on.

    I took a video (circa 2003) of our basement rough in prior to drywall even though I pulled a permit. I wanted to know where the miles of cat-5 cable and speaker wires were buried...then came wireless. Never once have I needed to find a wire.

  78. #878
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    As long as it doesnít change the c of o it shouldnít flag any future permit issues. You can say you bought it that way.
    If inspectors walk in while work is going on, not good. Until you get permits. Which you can do, and 9 times out of 10 any fines received get waived.
    If youíre changing c of o then get em now or get em when you sell but youíll likely need to get permits to get a c of o.
    Round and round we go

  79. #879
    NDD
    NDD is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,446
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    As long as it doesnít change the c of o it shouldnít flag any future permit issues. You can say you bought it that way.
    If inspectors walk in while work is going on, not good. Until you get permits. Which you can do, and 9 times out of 10 any fines received get waived
    Sorry not sure what you mean by c of o? Also if an inspector walked in that'd mean my neighbors told on me.
    dang

  80. #880
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Certificate of occupancy
    Round and round we go

  81. #881
    NDD
    NDD is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,446
    Oh yeah duh
    dang

  82. #882
    NDD
    NDD is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,446
    Alright, a couple quick electrical questions for y'all. By current NEC codes, pretty much all branch circuits need to have AFCI and at least a few need to have GFCI protection, too (though I can't see how having GFCI would on all of them would be a bad thing besides extra cost). So:

    If you use a dual-function GFCI/AFCI circuit breaker for the origin of the BC, you obviously don't need to make sure the first receptacle in line is AFCI (which is an alternate way to do it that is to code), but do you still need individual receptacles in kitchen or bathroom to be GFCI? For some reason that part was clear to me for AFCI but not GFCI. Also, a way I've seen to do it was to use AFCI circuit breaker and GFCI receptacle, but maybe that's equivalent (if not unnecessarily costly?).

    Also, I see a lot of reviews for dual function circuit breakers that say that they "trip too easily". Doesn't that really just mean there's a fundamental problem with the circuit? Too much load or a damaged sheath on a wire? I mean, if you're gonna spend $50 on a circuit breaker it should trip if there's a problem.

    Feeling much more confident about planning after reading codes, though. Also feeling much more surprised the inspectors didn't raise a stink at some of these things. I have unprotected NM cable (not in conduit) in pretty much every room, most of it is grounded (white), but some is actually ungrounded (black). I read current codes as outlets need to be 6" above the floor minimum, and they put many outlets right on the baseboard only 2" off the ground.
    dang

  83. #883
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Off Camber Home Improvement-7830940b-c41d-4ef4-a795-4bf31614c607.jpeg
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  84. #884
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    NDD
    Codes can be/are very local. Round me, in most places, afci is required on main brkrs and thatís it as far as afci in residential.
    Far as gfci, again, round me, gfci must be in, or within 6í of any wet location. Sink, tub, washing machine etc. gfci must also be on 12 gauge wire.
    You can run gfci outlet first in a series, then connect onto that gfci load side and the rest of the outlets after that outlet, in that series are gfci protected.
    Havenít heard afci/gfci brkrs always trip, but theyíre def more sensitive. Also donít see the need. Unless you are running dedicated runs to a pool or hot tub would use gfci outlets, which you can run in series as described.
    Sorry I couldnít be more informative, hope this helps. If I were in your shoes would try to network/find a friend of a friend who is licensed in your area to steer you in the right direction.
    And yeah, some inspectors are very overlooking, and some very thorough.
    Round and round we go

  85. #885
    NDD
    NDD is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,446
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    NDD
    Codes can be/are very local. Round me, in most places, afci is required on main brkrs and thatís it as far as afci in residential.
    Far as gfci, again, round me, gfci must be in, or within 6í of any wet location. Sink, tub, washing machine etc. gfci must also be on 12 gauge wire.
    You can run gfci outlet first in a series, then connect onto that gfci load side and the rest of the outlets after that outlet, in that series are gfci protected.
    Havenít heard afci/gfci brkrs always trip, but theyíre def more sensitive. Also donít see the need. Unless you are running dedicated runs to a pool or hot tub would use gfci outlets, which you can run in series as described.
    Sorry I couldnít be more informative, hope this helps. If I were in your shoes would try to network/find a friend of a friend who is licensed in your area to steer you in the right direction.
    And yeah, some inspectors are very overlooking, and some very thorough.
    Thanks, it helps a lot. The plan I had decided on was to use AFCI on all main breakers and GFCI at outlets as needed. Local code isn't as well written as the national code, here. Frankly, just about anything is closer to code than what's going on now, the more I look at it.

    Edit: FWIW, the city's website only lists NEC 2017 as the adopted electrical code, so as these things only seem to get more strict, I should be gold by using 2020.
    dang

  86. #886
    One ring to mash them all
    Reputation: the one ring's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,455
    Also make sure your receptacles are rated properly for the circuits they're on (e.g. 20A).
    COVID-19 - Calm Before the Storm

    Real eyes realize real lies.

  87. #887
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    15a receptacles can be used on 20a brkrs. But not the other way round. Always a good idea to use 15a receptacles throughout, unless your have a greater need for tools in garage or whatnot
    More important to make sure if you use/need a 20a outlet, to use adequate gauge wire throughout that circuit. For most runs that would be 12 gauge.
    Round and round we go

  88. #888
    NDD
    NDD is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,446
    Yes you can use 15 A outlet in a 20 A breaker but you need to use wire to match the higher of the two, which is where people tend to go wrong, no?
    dang

  89. #889
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Yup. Plus itís easy to access/fix/remedy the outlet. Not as easy to change the wire all the way to breaker

    15a with 14gauge ok.
    20a with 14gauge not ok. Needs 12 gauge, at least

    Oh, and regardless if 15 or 20a, gfci needs to be 12gauge, at least round these parts.

    Maybe a lil more work and cost, but running 12 gauge throughout never a bad idea
    Round and round we go

  90. #890
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Berms and transitions may apply

  91. #891
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Looks good Corn
    Round and round we go

  92. #892
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    .nroC doog skooL
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  93. #893
    One ring to mash them all
    Reputation: the one ring's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,455
    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Yes you can use 15 A outlet in a 20 A breaker
    As long as it isn't a single (non-duplex) 15A receptacle that's the only receptacle on a 20A circuit [/pedantics]

    I agree with everything you and Meat have said.
    COVID-19 - Calm Before the Storm

    Real eyes realize real lies.

  94. #894
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Thanks guys.

    Hopefully I can recover from all the stress from everyone saying stuff like; It's gonna crack, It's going to fall off, One good hit, etc...
    Berms and transitions may apply

  95. #895
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    As long as it isn't a single (non-duplex) 15A receptacle that's the only receptacle on a 20A circuit [/pedantics]

    I agree with everything you and Meat have said.
    True. This is code. Except youíd be hard pressed to find an appliance that gets plugged into that outlet that would need 20a these days, and pretty sure 15a is max you can put on a plug in cord these days, according to code. Not to mention the added load would be put on the wire, not the outlet itself
    Round and round we go

  96. #896
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Here arc fault breakers are only required for dedicated appliance receptacles, stoves, fridges, washer & dryer etc. We have a very high end property where this has proven problematic. When the refrigerators go from their defrost cycle back to pumping the condenser it can trip the breaker. Seems efficiency and redundant safety don't always play nice.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  97. #897
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Here arc fault breakers are only required for dedicated appliance receptacles, stoves, fridges, washer & dryer etc. We have a very high end property where this has proven problematic. When the refrigerators go from their defrost cycle back to pumping the condenser it can trip the breaker. Seems efficiency and redundant safety don't always play nice.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    How do you remedy this? Do you just reset breaker and wait for it to happen again?
    Round and round we go

  98. #898
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    How do you remedy this? Do you just reset breaker and wait for it to happen again?
    Temporarily we replaced the breakers with non-arc fault. I'm not sure what their long term solution is or if they've sought one. Things like that tend to fall between the cracks with large companies, out of sight out of mind.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  99. #899
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Temporarily we replaced the breakers with non-arc fault. I'm not sure what their long term solution is or if they've sought one. Things like that tend to fall between the cracks with large companies, out of sight out of mind.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    Yeah. The problem with that is if you have a fire that your insurance company might not pay.
    Would think a single outlet could help. As well maybe try a dif brand breaker since they are made and respond slightly dif.
    Round and round we go

  100. #900
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    13,141
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Temporarily we replaced the breakers with non-arc fault. I'm not sure what their long term solution is or if they've sought one. Things like that tend to fall between the cracks with large companies, out of sight out of mind.


    Have you tried installing a new arc fault breaker? The first few generation ones were really problematic but newer ones have been pretty much trouble free ime. Also there's a chance the arc fault breaker is detecting a problem in that circuit that a normal circuit breaker wouldn't.

    That said, using a standard breaker is a good solution.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  101. #901
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Have you tried installing a new arc fault breaker? The first few generation ones were really problematic but newer ones have been pretty much trouble free ime. Also there's a chance the arc fault breaker is detecting a problem in that circuit that a normal circuit breaker wouldn't.

    That said, using a standard breaker is a good solution.
    Have heard that new gen is better also but not so sure. Can see getting worn being an issue but itís not like the arc brkr is smart. Meaning it canít tell the dif between a good arc and a bad arc.
    Round and round we go

  102. #902
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    We tried new ones on property but I couldn't speak to a different brand definitively. They all have a dedicated circuit. My role was to work with the building engineer to try and figure out what specifically was happening, rule out anything obvious, and report my findings. Then it's on to the next shit show. If we eliminated the timer & relay so the condenser stayed on it didn't happen & that was basically enough for me to report " yeah it's definitely something with these [email protected]#cking refrigerators".

    These are high end longer term "suits" for Nike, Intel, Tektronix etc., with the top 2 floors residential penthouses, It's become a very competitive market. Typically people I deal with making decisions on this stuff are concerned with the very short term and that's it.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  103. #903
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    13,141
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Have heard that new gen is better also but not so sure. Can see getting worn being an issue but itís not like the arc brkr is smart. Meaning it canít tell the dif between a good arc and a bad arc.


    I think the newer ones are definitely better, I've rarely seen any troubles with them. I'm not sure what the exact definition of "smart" is but I'd say arc fault breakers are smart for sure and they can detect the difference between a good arc and a bad arc, good being a motor startup or switch and bad being a series or parallel arc in a cable or cord by monitoring voltage and current waveforms and detecting any abnormalities in them.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  104. #904
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I think the newer ones are definitely better, I've rarely seen any troubles with them. I'm not sure what the exact definition of "smart" is but I'd say arc fault breakers are smart for sure and they can detect the difference between a good arc and a bad arc, good being a motor startup or switch and bad being a series or parallel arc in a cable or cord by monitoring voltage and current waveforms and detecting any abnormalities in them.
    Yeah, idk. Have heard they can tell the dif between good and bad arc. Many things have arc as normal operation. Like a motor with brushes. Itís not like the arc breaker has a way of knowing/smart what is good or bad. Only a tolerance and a threshold. Could be wrong, but the way I see it
    Round and round we go

  105. #905
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    13,141
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Yeah, idk. Have heard they can tell the dif between good and bad arc. Many things have arc as normal operation. Like a motor with brushes. Itís not like the arc breaker has a way of knowing/smart what is good or bad. Only a tolerance and a threshold. Could be wrong, but the way I see it

    They do know the difference, as mentioned they constantly monitor voltage and current waveforms. A parallel or series arc creates different waveforms than a motor or switch arc.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  106. #906
    NDD
    NDD is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,446
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Is it as smooth as it looks? Could I slide a beer can across it?
    dang

  107. #907
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Is it as smooth as it looks? Could I slide a beer can across it?
    I don't see why not, it's pretty smooth, mostly. It's in a boat warehouse/retail place, so there will be beers on it at times.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  108. #908
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Went by a client's house today to drop something off, was looking at this fireplace I did maybe two years ago. It was hideous man-made stone that looked like salmon colored raisin bread, and the back wall was covered in 7"x11" bricks of the same material in a dry stacked running bond pattern with irregular gaps. I coated it all with 20min drywall mud and primer, then coated it with Marmorino plaster. I thought for sure it would've had cracks in it by now, but it's still perfect!

    Berms and transitions may apply

  109. #909
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Thatís special
    Round and round we go

  110. #910
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Thanks Meat. The leaves on the legs were the most fun parts to do. Had to brush in the plaster into the scrollwork on the mantel, which wasn't so fun.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  111. #911
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Gotta be happy with that Corn. That's the second pic (in memory) that you really built some character into an existing structure. I'm looking to get back to smaller hands on start to finish projects for a living. I'm realizing that I'm burned out on the corporate shit. Time for a change

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  112. #912
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Thanks Whale. I'm not trying to show off or anything, just trying to get out of this self questioning mind funk. I'm not a hack!

    Went out to another client's today and did some wall patch and paints, was so great to not think about that other job for a bit.

    It's really fulfilling to good work for decent people, their appreciation is like an added bonus!
    Berms and transitions may apply

  113. #913
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    For sure. Always nice to be appreciated for your efforts. Especially when you put your heart into it
    Round and round we go

  114. #914
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Okay, it's time to move on to other projects, got a room in a house that has two entrances, a regular swing door that leads into the hallway, and a pocket door that opens up to the front entry area. The owner wants the pocket door walled in to make more wall space in the bedroom and make it more private. I was just thinking of leaving the door in there and framing in the opening, but now I think I should probably cut the drywall back and remove the whole pocket door framework. He'll most likely be hanging a flat screen where the door was, so I think having a door with no studs inside the wall would be no bueno.

    Seems like this should be fairly straightforward: Cut back drywall on inside of room, remove pocket door and frame, install base plate and header, install vertical studs, drywall, tape&mud, trim, and paint.

    I'm tired of Googling shit, I type in "drywall over pocket door" etc, and all I get is "how to install a pocket door" or "how to remove a pocket door" so any tips or links would be welcome.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  115. #915
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,173
    Is it a bi-part or just a single? If it's a wide bi-part and looks good, it would make a cool backdrop for the TV, maybe with a faux wood paint? But I guess they want a wall.

    If you take it out, you just mean install a top plate rather than a header, right? I would think the tough part will be all the non-tapered seams. If you have to take the whole frame out, it'll be twice the work compared to if you can cut the door itself out and just patch the opening.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  116. #916
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Ask where they want a tv, put a 2x6 or 2 on edge there and rock in the rest leaving the door alone if possible.

    We recently had a big box store drill through the wall and into the main bus of an 11 story high-rise to hang a TV. Wait untill that tenant gets the bill...holy shit!

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  117. #917
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    It's pretty basic, just a standard single sliding pocket door that goes into a 2x4 wall. I just need to open it up, remove the door and all it's interior framework (being careful not to pull the screws/nails thru the outer side of drywall), then frame it in and rock it.

    I think I'm being overly analytical about it. I'll just start tearing into it and fix it back up.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  118. #918
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,173
    My house has bi-parting pocket doors. I just looked at it and you could do like whalenard suggested and just rotate the studs ninety degrees on both sides. But probably better to take it out. Are you going to wire in a new outlet for the TV, or even run it up the wall to the mount?
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  119. #919
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    My house has bi-parting pocket doors. I just looked at it and you could do like whalenard suggested and just rotate the studs ninety degrees on both sides. But probably better to take it out. Are you going to wire in a new outlet for the TV, or even run it up the wall to the mount?
    Hadn't even thought about an outlet, good thinking! It's a door, so there's no power running along the wall down low, but there may be an outlet close to one side (like in the pic below) that I could tie into. I'll check it out tomorrow or Wednesday.

    This is probably similar to what it looks like behind the sheetrock. I suppose I could find out where the TV might be mounted and put some blocking on edge between the studs as Whalenut suggested.

    Berms and transitions may apply

  120. #920
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Next question: I have a can light in a soffit above a bathroom vanity and want to remove the soffit and put in a box for a wall mounted light. This should also be pretty straightforward, right?
    Berms and transitions may apply

  121. #921
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Provided there's no plumbing in it for an upstairs bath and the existing wire reaches the new box height about as easy as it gets.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  122. #922
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    It's about 3' wide, 1' deep, and 10" tall right above the vanity. I'm fairly certain there's no plumbing in there, it's just there to house the can light in this 70s-80s house. I'll pull the can and see how much wire is there before I start tearing into it.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  123. #923
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Yeah, unlikely it houses any plumbing or venting but ya just never know. Even if the existing wire doesn't reach if you have the ceiling rock open to the wall the switch is on pulling new wire should be super easy. Also a good time to add recep's to the vanity area if they would like any.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  124. #924
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    They were also talking about replacing the fans, but they're the old circular ones. Just found this video of the ones I think they have, might see if I can just clean and oil them instead of turning a round hole into a square for a new modern fan light.

    Berms and transitions may apply

  125. #925
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    If your cutting out rock now's the time to tackle the fan. Put in a nice quiet one with a light. Add one of those programmable light switches where you can easily program the fan to stay on for a given duration after use. They'll love you man. Once you open up the rock around the fan those things are really simple to replace. Bonus if it vents out an exterior wall right there but if not there are all manner of HVAC adapters to tie into the existing vent.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  126. #926
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,173
    Check that the fans are properly vented, sometimes they just dump them into the attic which can cause condensation problems.

    I have a bunch of can lights I would like to replace with LED canless lights but not sure how easy it would be to pull the cans. I'm not sure if they were original and probably tied into joists or of they were added and probably pretty easy to remove.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  127. #927
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Next question: I have a can light in a soffit above a bathroom vanity and want to remove the soffit and put in a box for a wall mounted light. This should also be pretty straightforward, right?
    It sounds like you may have to extend the wire. One thing to remember is that per code wire splices need to be protected, like in an electrical box. Also, you cannot make an electrical box inaccessible, like burying it behind drywall. If you can get to the box in the attic, that is fine. The other solution is one of these: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Tyco-Ele...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

  128. #928
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    The guy want's to spend some money, but he doesn't want to go all out, so right now I'm kinda feeling him out (no, not that way!). He did put a call in to an electrician about the fans, so he is willing to replace, but I bet he'd be all over new or oiled motors. He was questioning me wanting to remove the old pocket door instead of leaving it in the wall and patching in just the opening because he is not planning on hanging a TV. He's all about doing stuff for resale vs his taste, but I can't see leaving the door in there even if you would never be able to tell.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  129. #929
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post

    I have a bunch of can lights I would like to replace with LED canless lights but not sure how easy it would be to pull the cans. I'm not sure if they were original and probably tied into joists or of they were added and probably pretty easy to remove.
    They make led lights you can screw into the existing can socket and push into the existing can. They have their own sconce built into the light such that you can't tell it was retrofitted. HD sells them.

    With that whether the the can is a remodel style or anchored to a joist I find them equally easy to pull. The low voltage one's with a central power source will be much more involved to replace with a new system

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  130. #930
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    It sounds like you may have to extend the wire. One thing to remember is that per code wire splices need to be protected, like in an electrical box. Also, you cannot make an electrical box inaccessible, like burying it behind drywall. If you can get to the box in the attic, that is fine. The other solution is one of these: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Tyco-Ele...E&gclsrc=aw.ds
    I've not used or come across those romex splices before, I need to check one out. It's funny I see electricians burying splices all the time. Epecially for long runs like exterior lighting for apartments or commercial buildings. God forbid the layperson get caught doing it though.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  131. #931
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BlueCheesehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    I've not used or come across those romex splices before, I need to check one out. It's funny I see electricians burying splices all the time. Epecially for long runs like exterior lighting for apartments or commercial buildings. God forbid the layperson get caught doing it though.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    I used one on my bathroom renovation. They snap together and feel a bit hokey. I wrapped mine with electrical tape just to make sure the little tabs did not pop loose. It seems to me one would be better off burying a box as long as wires are properly nutted together.

    BTW, Tyco also makes one to tap a wire on to an existing run.

  132. #932
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post

    BTW, Tyco also makes one to tap a wire on to an existing run.
    I believe I have seen those used before for branch taps but they were accessible. I think Ideal makes a similar product as well. Big fan of those push style wire ties Ideal makes. So much cleaner and easier to deal with than traditional wire nuts.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  133. #933
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    So I pulled one of the fart fans and it's ~11.5" in diameter, then there's three more upstairs that are 12.25" across. Are there any round replacements out there that would fit in the round holes?



    And I was able to move the can light over and take a pic inside the soffit. There's a few wires running thru it but nothing else, and it looks like there's plenty of it. I believe the wire coming out of the can box is the one hat goes up and over to the fart fan, and maybe the one on the right returns to the switch. He's got the electrician scheduled for monday, so I think it's safe for me to demo the soffit at the very least.

    Berms and transitions may apply

  134. #934
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Those fans aren't that old. You can pull the model# off that sticker and special order them through HD or possibly easier through a good appliance store. Word to the wise order the complete fan- motor/bracket/squirrel cage as a single unit Also I'd double make sure they don't work first by plugging them into an outlet or extension cord. Hate to go through all that trouble for a thermal fuse.

    *Oh wait I think I misunderstood your question. Doubtful you'll find a fan that won't require cutting out rock. Typically any new one is going to mount to 2 adjacent joists with straps.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  135. #935
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Lots of different products there.
    >scratches head<
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  136. #936
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Those fans aren't that old. You can pull the model# off that sticker and special order them through HD or possibly easier through a good appliance store. Word to the wise order the complete fan- motor/bracket/squirrel cage as a single unit Also I'd double make sure they don't work first by plugging them into an outlet or extension cord. Hate to go through all that trouble for a thermal fuse.

    *Oh wait I think I misunderstood your question. Doubtful you'll find a fan that won't require cutting out rock. Typically any new one is going to mount to 2 adjacent joists with straps.
    That's what I was thinking, going back in with something different will require access to joists, so it wouldn't matter what shape/size the new ones are. I could try oiling them and see if they quiet down, but there's no way they'll ever be as quiet as some of the new ones.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  137. #937
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Yeah Korn, that was a question without a question mark. Care to explain all those products? Never mind, you deleted that post.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  138. #938
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    A lot of times what makes them loud is not the motor but the fan. The fan gets gunked up with oil, dust, dead skin cells etc. and throws it way out of balance. Remove motor, saturate everything with a powerful degreaser, run under highish pressure water. Get all the gunk off the fan cage. Plug back in wall to dry it out. Lube bushings at either side of motor. Make sure everything is good and tight and 95% of the time they're good as new. You could also replace the motor/fan/bracket.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  139. #939
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Yeah Korn, that was a question without a question mark. Care to explain all those products? Never mind, you deleted that post.
    What are you talking about? I'm not a moderator, I can't delete posts!

    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    A lot of times what makes them loud is not the motor but the fan. The fan gets gunked up with oil, dust, dead skin cells etc. and throws it way out of balance. Remove motor, saturate everything with a powerful degreaser, run under highish pressure water. Get all the gunk off the fan cage. Plug back in wall to dry it out. Lube bushings at either side of motor. Make sure everything is good and tight and 95% of the time they're good as new. You could also replace the motor/fan/bracket.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    That makes sense, I'll try that tomorrow, thanks!
    Berms and transitions may apply

  140. #940
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Not necessarily true. Most fans the innards/fan comes out of the housing, and you can screw right through housing into wood structure. Then put innards back. If your new fan is bigger just cut and install. If new fan is smaller youíll have to patch.
    Youíd be surprised, with many fans you can get new innards. Try to spot the model number
    Most fans within the last few decades are oil-less. Oiling them will quiet it diwn for a short time but is pretty much a death sentence.
    If you are to frame away pocket door take out the header and stud all the way up to the double plate. With the floor sole plate you gotta cut finished floor and attach sole to subfloor to allow floors to expand and contract. Do not skip this step.
    Round and round we go

  141. #941
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    What are you talking about? I'm not a moderator, I can't delete posts!
    You tell me. You responded to NDD on the fan thing and then said ďthis is where Iím at at homeĒ
    You posted a photo of 6 or 7 different concrete products. Am I really losing it? Could be, Iím on my ďjankyĒ cell phone.

    I got that southern ďjankyĒ slang from Net and NDD. like it.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  142. #942
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Not necessarily true. Most fans the innards/fan comes out of the housing, and you can screw right through housing into wood structure. Then put innards back. If your new fan is bigger just cut and install. If new fan is smaller youíll have to patch.
    Youíd be surprised, with many fans you can get new innards. Try to spot the model number
    Most fans within the last few decades are oil-less. Oiling them will quiet it diwn for a short time but is pretty much a death sentence.
    If you are to frame away pocket door take out the header and stud all the way up to the double plate. With the floor sole plate you gotta cut finished floor and attach sole to subfloor to allow floors to expand and contract. Do not skip this step.
    The fans are much smaller than the space between joists, and that's why the straps are there, to hold the fan somewhere between joists, you know that. The motors are held in with a bracket and can be removed/unplugged, and replaced if a new one of that model can be found. The video I posted above, the guy shows the oil ports, if these fans don't have them, I might oil them just a touch, and clean them as Whale suggested, I would have done that anyway, but I'll pay closer attention.

    And thanks for the flooring tip! I was going to shim up to the hardwood level where the carpet half way into the jamb. Now I will cut back the floor and put the base right on the subfloor.

    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    You tell me. You responded to NDD on the fan thing and then said ďthis is where Iím at at homeĒ
    You posted a photo of 6 or 7 different concrete products. Am I really losing it? Could be, Iím on my ďjankyĒ cell phone.

    I got that southern ďjankyĒ slang from Net and NDD. like it.
    Okay...
    Berms and transitions may apply

  143. #943
    NDD
    NDD is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,446
    You're really losing it DJ, I haven't posted in this thread in a minute.
    dang

  144. #944
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Hello! Korn, where did you post photos of several different bags of concrete product? Possibly earlier in the thread? Seems it was right here on this page this morning.

    If you say you didnít itís obvious you deleted it.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  145. #945
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Bottom of first page , DJ
    Round and round we go

  146. #946
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    I think the point of the fan strapping is to help isolate vibration for say a bedroom above. Meat's suggestion will absolutely work though. Most modern fan motors spin on "oil impregnated bushings" . Oiling them can help but if they're super worn/sloppy they're done. To reiterate the main culprit of a noisy fan is the squirrel cage it's self being out of balance, pay extra care to fully cleaning every single tine. Also make sure the motor bracket and fan box are all tight as that can make a racket as well.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  147. #947
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,173
    And remember that usually people don't want a powder room fan too quiet. They really are fart fans and not moisture removing fans!
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  148. #948
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Is "killing the tile game" is a good thing? I sometimes have a hard time with the lingo.

    Meanwhile at my house...

    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Bottom of first page , DJ
    Thanks Meat, that's it.

    Sorry Korn and NDD, posting off a ďjankyĒ cell phone during a dinner break. I seriously thought you deleted a post. I thought that photo looked familiar.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  149. #949
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    If you are to frame away pocket door take out the header and stud all the way up to the double plate.
    I'm having a hard enough time convincing him to cut back the sheetrock and remove the door, no way he'll let me go all the way up.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  150. #950
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Coupla bathrooms going on
    Off Camber Home Improvement-e967a978-4217-41d7-9755-9ec3dd8374bd.jpg
    Off Camber Home Improvement-b3574c66-eb81-4761-bfe2-6eccc9418de0.jpg
    Off Camber Home Improvement-6bae6ced-8207-4969-8669-e438252238ba.jpg
    Round and round we go

  151. #951
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    ^^Looking good as usual, Meat!

    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Sorry Korn and NDD, posting off a ďjankyĒ cell phone during a dinner break. I seriously thought you deleted a post. I thought that photo looked familiar.
    No need to apologize, we know you have your moments. It may be too early for you to have senior moments, but you'll have had plenty of practice by the time you get there.

    *And I've heard "janky" used in NorCal some 15-20yrs ago, it's not just a southern thing.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  152. #952
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    ^^Looking good as usual, Meat!



    No need to apologize, we know you have your moments. It may be too early for you to have senior moments, but you'll have had plenty of practice by the time you get there. ;
    Well that was rather janky of you.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  153. #953
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Did some tear out and started framing in the door opening. Everything came out pretty easily, just gonna wait till the electrician comes on Monday and let him deal with the wiring. The wires in the right corner go to the switch in the laundry room, and there looks to be enough wire to make it to the new light location. Don't know what the one going under the duct is, it's a bit thicker than the romex.



    Need one more stud and will rock it up tomorrow.

    Berms and transitions may apply

  154. #954
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    So removing the door paid off, especially in the long run. Peace of mind knowing it was done correctly.

    Speaking of which: I donít know how some contractors [handy man] sleep at night.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  155. #955
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,173
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Did some tear out and started framing in the door opening. Everything came out pretty easily, just gonna wait till the electrician comes on Monday and let him deal with the wiring. The wires in the right corner go to the switch in the laundry room, and there looks to be enough wire to make it to the new light location. Don't know what the one going under the duct is, it's a bit thicker than the romex.


    Isn't that going to be an issue (though I guess for the electrician) in that the wire runs under the joists and in front of the studs? If you're going to sheetrock flush the wire will have to be rerun, right?
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  156. #956
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    So removing the door paid off, especially in the long run. Peace of mind knowing it was done correctly.
    It had to come out, there would have been no way to put a stud under the header with the track in the way. The "header", was two 2x4s on edge with a piece of ply sandwiched in between. Actually it could have been 2x6-10s up there, could only see the bottoms of the boards.

    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Isn't that going to be an issue (though I guess for the electrician) in that the wire runs under the joists and in front of the studs? If you're going to sheetrock flush the wire will have to be rerun, right?
    I'm sure they'll figure it out, haha!
    Berms and transitions may apply

  157. #957
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Did some tear out and started framing in the door opening. Everything came out pretty easily, just gonna wait till the electrician comes on Monday and let him deal with the wiring. The wires in the right corner go to the switch in the laundry room, and there looks to be enough wire to make it to the new light location. Don't know what the one going under the duct is, it's a bit thicker than the romex.




    Need one more stud and will rock it up tomorrow.

    Looks good
    Did you put sole plate on sub floor?
    Round and round we go

  158. #958
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Dig this floor

    Off Camber Home Improvement-0b17521b-9008-4747-a708-25f22b5dcee5.jpg
    Round and round we go

  159. #959
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    ^^I like that a lot!

    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Looks good
    Did you put sole plate on sub floor?
    Yes. There was a piece kinda like a breadboard end in the threshold, I just removed that and put the sole down onto sub with a 1/8" gap between it and the hardwood floor.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  160. #960
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Dig this floor

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	0B17521B-9008-4747-A708-25F22B5DCEE5.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	283.6 KB 
ID:	1314033
    Nice work but the design makes me dizzy, in turn Iíd fall over in the shower and hit my head. Probably be late for work most days.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  161. #961
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,173
    I like that floor tile!
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  162. #962
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Problem solving 101


    Wasn't there a thread just for this?
    Couldn't find it

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  163. #963
    NDD
    NDD is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,446
    Thanks I hate it
    dang

  164. #964
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Thanks I hate it
    ďItĒ?
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  165. #965
    NDD
    NDD is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,446
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    ďItĒ?
    Yeah that door with all the holes cut out.
    dang

  166. #966
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Berms and transitions may apply

  167. #967
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Cool trick, except it will make the door closer on the hinge side.
    Round and round we go

  168. #968
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Yes, another trick to add to your repertoir.

    I'm re-hinging and re-knobing an entire house this week, might come in handy.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  169. #969
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Since the electricians were on the job anyway, I let them move the wires. My AV friend was there and said I could just notch out the studs and put those metal plates over where the wires were, and that's exactly what they did. I didn't think it would come out as good as it did since those plates were sticking out like 3/16" on the studs. Like it was never there.

    Berms and transitions may apply

  170. #970
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Looks good!
    Yeah that metal plates are a need in this day of pex tubing, csst pipe, and romex cable.
    Round and round we go

  171. #971
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Yes, another trick to add to your repertoir.

    I'm re-hinging and re-knobing an entire house this week, might come in handy.
    Lol
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  172. #972
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Cool trick, except it will make the door closer on the hinge side.
    That is a pretty cool trick. It wouldnít play earlier on my cell phone. I recently took a door off that way to fit a couch through it. Re-hanging it was a challenge. And I think youíre right that depending on how far off it is that trick would hinder the hinge side and may make it rub.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  173. #973
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Lol
    Knob jobs can be pricey!

    I have stuck shims, like a coffee stir stick from Starbucks, under the hinge to move the pin side over. This trick accomplishes pretty much the same thing by bending the knuckles over. If that makes any sense, lol.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  174. #974
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Knob jobs can be pricey!

    I have stuck shims, like a coffee stir stick from Starbucks, under the hinge to move the pin side over. This trick accomplishes pretty much the same thing by bending the knuckles over. If that makes any sense, lol.
    Makes sense but its immoral to take free stir sticks just for your gain. Unless of course you used them to stir your coffee prior.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  175. #975
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,173
    I did that on one of my doors several months ago and ended up with it binding. I had some matching hinges laying around and ended up swapping it out to get it back where it was before I messed with it. You can buy a special tool made for bending those hinges. My door wasn't hitting the frame, the catch wasn't catching because it wasn't lining up due to some sagging (and probably a bad install job by the previous owner).
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  176. #976
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Well I did the re-knobing job yesterday, and wouldn'tcha know it, I couldn't figure out how to get off the last knob in the house, now I gotta go back!

    I've seen a lot of knob types, and maybe I was in too much of a rush, but I was considering using a hammer to beat it off! There's that little U shaped wire tab under the handle that keeps the shroud on, under the shroud are the bolts that hold the two halves together, but I can't figure out how to take the inside handle off to get to the bolts! There aren't any set screws, just a couple dimples. I didn't see any tabs under the handle to depress and release. Halp!

    Berms and transitions may apply

  177. #977
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    The knob on one side of door should have set screw or release mechanism , slot/dimple
    Round and round we go

  178. #978
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    None that I saw, speaking of saw...

    I'll bring the Sawzall with me.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  179. #979
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    The knob on one side of door should have set screw or release mechanism , slot/dimple
    Yep, I just replaced one identical to it. Very frustrating design, I get it Korn.

    Thereís a hole you slip the screwdriver in and at the same time rotate the handle until the screw on the other side is in view.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  180. #980
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Yep, I just replaced one identical to it. Very frustrating design, I get it Korn.

    Thereís a hole you slip the screwdriver in and at the same time rotate the handle until the screw on the other side is in view.
    Yeah, hollow spindle design, sometimes you have to release knob from spindle, rotate, to line up access to set screw

    A saw could work, too a grinder. If you donít have a grinder in tool box def get one
    Round and round we go

  181. #981
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    I have a grinder in my toolbox!

    After bending the shroud to get to the screws, fighting with them and stripping one out, I took a drywall screw and poked at one of the dimples (see arrow) and voila!, the handle popped right off, lol!

    Berms and transitions may apply

  182. #982
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NorCal_In_AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    138

    Off Camber Home Improvement

    Started a project that has been on my mind for a while. Last year, I installed a TV on my back patio for music and TV while outside. Well the TV is just loud enough to hear on the patio, but get in the pool and you canít hear it. So Iíll be adding outdoor speakers. I also want to install a fan and can lights in the ceiling.

    Helped my buddy and his in laws with some painting and floor coatings. Since his father in law is a electrician, heís going to help me with running wire through the wall, adding some outlets, and just cleaning up my install.

    Since I needed to gain access to the ceiling anyways, I decided to tare out all the Sheetrock, and Iíll replace it with tongue and groove.




  183. #983
    mtbr member
    Reputation: azimiut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    676
    When we bought our house we replaced all our door knobs for all the outside doors. that was a PIA. some were really old and all different styles. had to paint/stain the doors where we changed the different designs and shapes. We have eight exterior doors between the house, guest house, and garage.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  184. #984
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NorCal_In_AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    138

    Off Camber Home Improvement









    Got my wiring done today. Got everything ran without having to cut any new holes. The small round hole was where the old porch light was. So that will get plugged and patched.

    Speakers and amp will be installed tomorrow. Then I gotta decide what wood Iím going to use for the ceiling.

  185. #985
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Looking good!

    Can't believe there was drywall on the exterior!

    Have you heard of Eco-wood treatment?
    Berms and transitions may apply

  186. #986
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4,426
    Sheetrock as sheathing is ubiquitous in Oregon. When I first moved out here I was blown away seeing and still shake my head. Not only is ALWAYS rotten around windows, eves, corners, and 4 feet off the ground but provides zero shear factor in an abduction zone.

    Sent from my moto g(6) forge using Tapatalk
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  187. #987
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NorCal_In_AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    138
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Looking good!

    Can't believe there was drywall on the exterior!

    Have you heard of Eco-wood treatment?
    Never seen that before. But itís mostly because I sell coatings and being in the Southwest, stain isnít super popular here.

    When I bought the house 4 years ago, I sealed the flat paint on the sheet rock, then put elastomeric on it. That stuff was 100% waterproof. I sprayed it down with water a few times.

  188. #988
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by NorCal_In_AZ View Post
    Never seen that before. But itís mostly because I sell coatings and being in the Southwest, stain isnít super popular here.

    When I bought the house 4 years ago, I sealed the flat paint on the sheet rock, then put elastomeric on it. That stuff was 100% waterproof. I sprayed it down with water a few times.
    It's not really a stain, it's a penetrating sealer that changes the color of wood. I've been applying coatings for 25yrs, and my friend just turned me on to it. I haven't seen how it performs over time exposed to the elements, but I bet it'd be fine on a ceiling like yours. Depending on what wood you use it could look really cool, and it's super easy to apply, just have to experiment. I think the best thing about it is that it isn't something that can peel off in the future.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  189. #989
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    Berms and transitions may apply

  190. #990
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SoDakSooner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    674
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Looking good!

    Can't believe there was drywall on the exterior!

    Have you heard of Eco-wood treatment?
    My old house in OK was that way. Even used as backer for the sandstone veneer. Crappy stuff for sure.

  191. #991
    mtbr member
    Reputation: upstateSC-rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,556
    Hi all. I'm really bummed at myself for letting it get this bad but in case I get some Corona-time from work (doubtful) can anyone give me some advice to restore the finish on both my front door and dining room table? Front door area is badly faded from mostly sun damage but does have a small split in the trim I 'assume' I can fill with wood putty. Not sure on the next steps, though... Hand sand then some type of tinted polyurethane or stain? As far as the table, is it best to start with some fine sandpaper then go straight to some poly or do I need to stain first? Thank you for any advice for a wood-finishing rookie.

    Off Camber Home Improvement-frt_dr.jpg
    Off Camber Home Improvement-front_dr.jpg
    Off Camber Home Improvement-img_20200302_163046.jpg
    Off Camber Home Improvement-img_20200302_163038.jpg
    Last edited by upstateSC-rider; 3 Weeks Ago at 07:09 PM.
    Niner Jet 9 RDO, Scalpel 29, XTC 650b, 04 Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Trek Rigid SS - No suspension, no gears....no problem

  192. #992
    mtbr member
    Reputation: NorCal_In_AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    138
    On the door, sand the entire door down to acceptable wood. Work your way down in steps. 100, 150, 220. Sand with the grain of the wood to avoid cross sanding scratches. Stain, then apply spar urethane.

    Not sure what your trying to do to the table.

  193. #993
    Upcyclist
    Reputation: Cornfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    5,310
    It's so hard to see what's going on in the door pics, but I agree with NorCal. If the finish is intact in spots and completely gone in others, I'd probably use a stripper and take it all the way down to raw wood. Unless you're really skilled at blending stains it's best to start fresh. I've had to strip a few doors where someone tried to treat raw areas with tinted polyurethane to match good areas, which almost never works.

    Too hard to see what's going on with the table also.
    Berms and transitions may apply

  194. #994
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OzarkFathom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Posts
    388
    Concerning the table.

    4/0 steel wool on the spots lightly, clean, followed with a little wipe on Zar with a clean cotton cloth if what I can make of the pictures is correct, bit of spot damage to the finish.

    If that doesnít correct the issue and the discoloration is beyond the finish layer, it will be tricky to get what you might want.

    But Iíd try the steel wool before the sand paper.
    Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes.

  195. #995
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,173
    Be careful with wood filler, a lot of it doesn't stain well. And it will fill the pores around the area if you smear it on trying to get it in a crack. Trying to wipe it off just keeps the area you smear it into from staining. You can buy colored filler that you apply after staining. And yes, ask me how I know.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  196. #996
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    For table could just be wax separating. Happens on tops, and sunny locations and under moist or hot plates and such. Hard to tel from pic but for sure try clean cloth with mineral spirits. Wipe dry with clean dry cloth. If you got something off do it a couple, maybe a few, times using clean clothes till all waxes and polishes/whatever is on comes off. Might try very fine steel wool if itís real goopy. Certainly try this before digging into finish in ways suggested above. Let us know.

    For door, personally, if itís real wood would sand smooth to get off anything loose, prime, paint using hi quality or front door specific paint. Or get a new fiberglass door.
    If you want it wood strip/sand it all the way down. Clean it with a mild mex solution, let dry and lightly sand again. On aged or previously finished woods, or on opposing grains as a door has, wood conditioner before you stain and/or seal is a good idea
    Round and round we go

  197. #997
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Quote Originally Posted by NorCal_In_AZ View Post
    On the door, sand the entire door down to acceptable wood. Work your way down in steps. 100, 150, 220. Sand with the grain of the wood to avoid cross sanding scratches. Stain, then apply spar urethane.

    Not sure what your trying to do to the table.
    Spot on, and be sure to use ďSpar UrethaneĒ as suggested for protection against yellowing from the sun, Itís an exterior product. So many make the mistake on using a polyurethane which is an interior product with zero UV Ray protection, which will crack and yellow from weather / sunlight.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  198. #998
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,595
    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Be careful with wood filler, a lot of it doesn't stain well. And it will fill the pores around the area if you smear it on trying to get it in a crack. Trying to wipe it off just keeps the area you smear it into from staining. You can buy colored filler that you apply after staining. And yes, ask me how I know.
    Wood conditioner really helps in this regard
    Round and round we go

  199. #999
    Self Appointed Judge&Jury
    Reputation: DIRTJUNKIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    34,799
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post

    For door if itís real wood would sand smooth to get off anything loose, prime, paint using hi quality or front door specific paint. Or get a new fiberglass door.
    I agree with this, also if it is fiberglass another option is using a gel stain. Goes right on fiberglass and in conjunction a graining tool can be used to give it a ďrealĒ wood look. Just another option.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  200. #1000
    mtbr member
    Reputation: upstateSC-rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,556
    Quote Originally Posted by NorCal_In_AZ View Post
    On the door, sand the entire door down to acceptable wood. Work your way down in steps. 100, 150, 220. Sand with the grain of the wood to avoid cross sanding scratches. Stain, then apply spar urethane.

    Not sure what your trying to do to the table.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    It's so hard to see what's going on in the door pics, but I agree with NorCal. If the finish is intact in spots and completely gone in others, I'd probably use a stripper and take it all the way down to raw wood. Unless you're really skilled at blending stains it's best to start fresh. I've had to strip a few doors where someone tried to treat raw areas with tinted polyurethane to match good areas, which almost never works.

    Too hard to see what's going on with the table also.
    Quote Originally Posted by OzarkFathom View Post
    Concerning the table.

    4/0 steel wool on the spots lightly, clean, followed with a little wipe on Zar with a clean cotton cloth if what I can make of the pictures is correct, bit of spot damage to the finish.

    If that doesnít correct the issue and the discoloration is beyond the finish layer, it will be tricky to get what you might want.

    But Iíd try the steel wool before the sand paper.
    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Be careful with wood filler, a lot of it doesn't stain well. And it will fill the pores around the area if you smear it on trying to get it in a crack. Trying to wipe it off just keeps the area you smear it into from staining. You can buy colored filler that you apply after staining. And yes, ask me how I know.
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Spot on, and be sure to use ďSpar UrethaneĒ as suggested for protection against yellowing from the sun, Itís an exterior product. So many make the mistake on using a polyurethane which is an interior product with zero UV Ray protection, which will crack and yellow from weather / sunlight.
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    For table could just be wax separating. Happens on tops, and sunny locations and under moist or hot plates and such. Hard to tel from pic but for sure try clean cloth with mineral spirits. Wipe dry with clean dry cloth. If you got something off do it a couple, maybe a few, times using clean clothes till all waxes and polishes/whatever is on comes off. Might try very fine steel wool if itís real goopy. Certainly try this before digging into finish in ways suggested above. Let us know.

    For door, personally, if itís real wood would sand smooth to get off anything loose, prime, paint using hi quality or front door specific paint. Or get a new fiberglass door.
    If you want it wood strip/sand it all the way down. Clean it with a mild mex solution, let dry and lightly sand again. On aged or previously finished woods, or on opposing grains as a door has, wood conditioner before you stain and/or seal is a good idea
    Thanks all, appreciate the help.
    The door is definitely wood and the table just 'feels' like it has a paper-thin top-layer with a lot of fine scratches.
    Will try sanding the door first to get an even finish/feel on the door before using that SPAR and try 0000 steel wool on the table.
    I've uploaded better pics too.
    Niner Jet 9 RDO, Scalpel 29, XTC 650b, 04 Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Trek Rigid SS - No suspension, no gears....no problem

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Off Camber (off topic) (718 Viewing)
    By AZ in forum Off Camber (off topic)
    Replies: 52
    Last Post: 01-24-2013, 01:20 AM
  2. Advice needed. 12 Camber Comp vs 12 Camber Carbon
    By moto67e in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 07-10-2012, 10:43 AM
  3. 2011 Camber/Epic vs 2012 Camber/Epic
    By covrc in forum Specialized
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-20-2012, 12:40 PM
  4. Homemade/Off-season Skills Improvement
    By jnbqm9 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 12-28-2011, 07:34 PM
  5. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-09-2006, 12:44 PM

Members who have read this thread: 138

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.