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  1. #1
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    How do you secure your home?

    Coming off HighDell's burglar thread (that sucks, man)... just wondering how y'all do it. I understand if you don't want to reveal all, but here's what I have:

    1. Three dogs (two big, one yappy)
    2. Alarm system
    3. Motion sensor lights and lights that stay on during the night and shut off during the day.
    4. Difficult entry points (try hopping my fence without making a ton of noise)
    5. Locks
    6. Something loaded and tactical (flashlight, calibrated laser sight).

    I also sleep with the windows open so I can hear activity outside, if any.

    In the event somebody actually did breach the fortress, I have conceal/cover areas if I have to "rid" myself of a zombie. I would hope that my first line of defense would be enough to send them off running.

    #4 is an interesting thing the people overlook. At those entry points (like a fence) place PITA objects there that somebody would land on if they hopped the fence. Some people put garbage cans, buckets, planters, thorn bushes, etc.

    I also don't display all my stuff for the world to see. I keep my garage door closed and we don't answer the door for anybody who wasn't invited.

    Can't really stop a break in, but deterring one is very possible.

  2. #2
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    By living in Canada.

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  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    For the last few years, ive avoided crime by moving to extremely low crime areas. I havent locked my door in years, and havent so much as seen something suspicious in as long.

    Im moving back to a high crime area, and I need to replan security, mostly for my car.

  5. #5
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    99% of the time, I leave my door unlocked when I leave because I usually can't remember where I left my house keys. Otherwise, when I'm home, I lock up at night and have several firearms and a soon to be large dog (still a growing pup). The way I see it, locks are made to keep out honest people. If someone wants in your place bad enough, they're getting in.
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  6. #6
    Clyde on a mission!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    4. Difficult entry points (try hopping my fence without making a ton of noise)
    Actually difficult exit points is more important. A thief will always be able to make it into your house, but while he might be okay with sliding through a small basement window or stepping through some broken glass to get in, he will hate having to carry your stereo and big-screen tv through those entry points. A thief will look for nice, clean exit points, it makes it easy to carry your stuff out and easy to make a run for it if you are suddenly at the front door.

    A thief will be okay climbing through a window if he knows he can just unlock your front door from the inside or slide your big garden door open from inside and comfortably walk out of there with your stuff. Now if he can see from the outside that both your front door and garden door requires a key to unlock, even from the inside, he will be much less attracted to robbing you.

    Put an extra lock on any outside door, visible from the outside. When I'm home I only use the regular lock with the twister unlock option from the inside. In case of a fire, I like being able to get out in a hurry without having to look for my keys. When I leave the house I lock both locks. A thief will know the extra keyhole as a tell-tale sign that he won't be able to easily unlock my doors from the inside. A keyhole on your sliding patio door will say the same.

  7. #7
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    My house is unlocked whether I'm home or not, except while I'm sleeping. The dog keeps an eye on things for me.

  8. #8
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    Ever since my house was robbed in 2010 I did a few things...

    1. 1 big dog, 1 yappy one. Niether one has a mean bone in their bodies but they make alot of noise when someone they dont recognize is around. And the big one will attempt to remove a limb if you come over the fence. (an electrician jumped our fence once and hit her a few times with a wrench).
    2. Keyed Schlage deadbolts on both sides of the door. You have to have a key to get in and out.
    3. Solid core metal skinned doors w/ reinforced door frames. Youre going to have to be chuck norris or have a master key to kick my doors in.
    4. ADT Security system, locally monitored.
    5. Sig P229 .40 cal with a tac light
    6. Easton aluminum ballbat.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperSlow35th View Post
    2. Keyed Schlage deadbolts on both sides of the door. You have to have a key to get in and out.
    That's actually a building code violation, and extremely unsafe if there were a fire, or other emergency event...but suit yourself.

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    A big effin German Shepard, a pit bull, and LOTS of ammo......

  11. #11
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    A couple of woofers and a few well placed shots.

  12. #12
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    Until a week ago I thought I was fine with locked doors and windows 5' from the ground. While the didn't get into the rest of the house they did get onto the 3-season porch and make off with 3 bikes.

    Now I'm making sure the windows are locked or have the limit stops set (the window opens 5cm then) and the interior door is locked.

    I may install some motion sensor lights too. I'm an electrician so it won't be that hard, it's a matter of picking ones that don't look like ass and work well enough that a chipmunk doesn't set them off.
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  13. #13
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    Alarm, dogs, guns.
    It's such a fine line between idiocy and genius.

  14. #14
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    Four Labs with the oldest male being 120+ pounds of muscle, a few ammunition dispensing devices, and my take home patrol car in the drive way. With the car outside... if someone decides to make a move, they know what's coming! The neighbors love it as well.

  15. #15
    I dd what you see there.
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    Many years ago, and being a Canadian I lived in one of the safest areas anywhere. At one end of my street, we had a "main" road where our street just happened to pop out in between a police station and a Tim Hortons.

    Now, we're lucky (both the cops and donuts and have moved on) but we have a U-Haul at the opposite side of the "main" street (to our street) and they have several lights, and cameras including ones pointed down our street for some reason. It also helps being totally random. My neighbours and I have a natural cohesion that works pretty well. I work afternoons and if I decide to work OT, which comes up pretty often, I can be home any time between 10pm and 2am. My neighbour kitty corner to me is a baker, and he'll leave for work any time between 3am and 5am. I don't know what the woman a few doors down does, but several times I've worked OT and come home after midnight, I've seen her out on her porch smoking too, and then there's lots of barky dogs - all over the place.
    So there's really no routine in our neighbourhood, which makes it hard to plan something like a break-in when you're never sure of when you could run into someone....
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  16. #16
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    It's so alien to me that people still live in places where you can leave your house unlocked. I live in a very nice area of the Bay Area, Ca.

    The riff raff comes wandering into the neighborhood and breaks into cars. We have a neighborhood watch.

    Every time somebody has stolen something from a car, we feel it is from somebody who has been casing the area. Somebody would break into a car, but leave the others alone. Our previous next door neighbor left her purse in her car. Guys across the street left tools in the back of their truck... people displaying their stuff for all to see.

    Our neighbors across the street reviewed their security camera footage, and they saw a woman wandering about at 2:00am in the morning.

    I think this is the biggest security measure - don't make your house a shopping display. As my grandpa told me once, "If you're ever going to the Philippines, don't wear a nice ring. You may lose a finger..."

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by wbmason55 View Post
    That's actually a building code violation, and extremely unsafe if there were a fire, or other emergency event...but suit yourself.
    I think the idea is to lock it when gone to deter thieves because their egress will be limited, however I don't think that most burglars have enough thought process to figure that out. They will just kick the door open or smash windows if it suits them. Otherwise, the lock would be unlocked when home, I'd assume.
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  18. #18
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    It's so alien to me that people still live in places where you can leave your house unlocked. I live in a very nice area of the Bay Area, Ca....
    Thiefs are more likely in very nice areas. IMO Much better pickings than poorer areas. Same with remote homes. A thief would want to go where there are multiple possibilities for scores, not drive for an hour for one.
    Everyone is entitled to my opinion.

  20. #20
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    a super aggressive crazy blue eyed chihuahua that hates people

  21. #21
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    my dog would treat a burglar like a long lost best friend. she loves everybody and everything. she doesnt bark....but on very rare occasions will growl, so i'm hoping that would be enough to at least alert. i live in a pretty safe area. its a row of townhouses, so i dont think its a good target for thieves. too easy to be seen. pretty sure one of us has broken into the house before when locking ourselves out. the windows are pretty large and stupid. but if they DO crawl thru the front window, they'd land on cacti

    the lock broke on my back sliding door, so temporarily, we put a wooden beam in the slider slot, so it cannot be opened. now i realize thats even stronger than any lock would ever be.
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  22. #22
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    I have gotten away several times with leaving my garage door open all night without anything going missing...so I know my neighborhood is more safe than not. but I still try to make it a habit to lock up and enable the security system at night.

    1. security system
    2. motion-activated exterior lights
    3. dogs
    4. firearms

    there is more I could do, certainly. but in most cases, I think it's your habits that make a bigger difference. my parents have been burglarized twice...because they never locked the house up. well, no kidding!

  23. #23
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    I live in a low crime area.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    It's so alien to me that people still live in places where you can leave your house unlocked. I live in a very nice area of the Bay Area, Ca.

    The riff raff comes wandering into the neighborhood and breaks into cars. We have a neighborhood watch.

    Every time somebody has stolen something from a car, we feel it is from somebody who has been casing the area. Somebody would break into a car, but leave the others alone. Our previous next door neighbor left her purse in her car. Guys across the street left tools in the back of their truck... people displaying their stuff for all to see.

    Our neighbors across the street reviewed their security camera footage, and they saw a woman wandering about at 2:00am in the morning.

    I think this is the biggest security measure - don't make your house a shopping display. As my grandpa told me once, "If you're ever going to the Philippines, don't wear a nice ring. You may lose a finger..."
    I don't where you live, but much of the Bay Area is super safe. There are even people that don't lock up in New York.

    They're all around you: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/14/ga...pagewanted=all

  25. #25
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    I live in a low crime area.
    me too, but low crime does not mean no crime. a house in la jolla, ca just got burglarized in the middle of the afternoon while the freaking owners were home...

    also, it is a matter of past experience with crime imo. i have had my car stolen, 3 car stereos stolen, 2 bikes stolen etc.

    theft is pretty "real" for me. just bad luck really. it has made me more cautious and aware of theft and as a result, i make a point to lock my house door.. will it stop a burglar? maybe..maybe not. why test it?

    my only hope would be that it is sorta like the club on your car. it is less convenient for the burglar, so often they move along to the similar car lacking the club device...

    if i had never had these items stolen, theft would not be on my mind as much i wish it were the case.
    Last edited by rydbyk; 06-28-2012 at 11:18 AM.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    I think the idea is to lock it when gone to deter thieves because their egress will be limited, however I don't think that most burglars have enough thought process to figure that out. They will just kick the door open or smash windows if it suits them. Otherwise, the lock would be unlocked when home, I'd assume.
    I think you give thieves too little credit, they usually know quite a bit about locks, which ones break easy and which are hard.

    My cousin is a lock smith. He gets to clean up after a lot of break in's and says that it's very rare that he has to fix a broken door that had two locks to start with. He works with the police quite often, they also talk about clear patterns, some lock types are definitely targeted more than others, so it seems the bad guys know which locks to go for and which to leave alone.

  27. #27
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk View Post
    me too, but low crime does not mean no crime. a house in la jolla, ca just got burglarized in the middle of the afternoon while the freaking owners were home...

    also, it is a matter of past experience with crime imo. i have had my car stolen, 3 car stereos stolen, 2 bikes stolen etc.

    theft is pretty "real" for me. just bad luck really. it has made me more cautious and aware of theft and as a result, i make a point to lock my house door.. will it stop a burglar? maybe..maybe not. why test it?

    my only hope would be that it is sorta like the club on your car. it is less convenient for the burglar, so often they move along to the similar car lacking the club device...

    if i had never had these items stolen, theft would not be on my mind as much i wish it were the case.
    Is it a fancy neighborhood? The key is it needs to be modest and low crime. Than you're golden

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by wbmason55 View Post
    That's actually a building code violation, and extremely unsafe if there were a fire, or other emergency event...but suit yourself.
    If theres a fire, theres a chair by the front window I can throw through it. Not to mention we hang our keys at night on a hook directly next to the back door, and our door into the garage unlocks by hand.

    And it may be a violation where you live, but my parents have done this to the last three houses they have owned and sold them that way. My grandparents are the same way. This mainly keeps somebody from kicking a window out and then opening the front door to leave.
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  30. #30
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    My sister has a sign with a dog, saying:
    "I can make it to the gate in three seconds. Can you?"

    She does have two large dogs. I don't have a sign.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperSlow35th View Post
    And it may be a violation where you live, but my parents have done this to the last three houses they have owned and sold them that way. My grandparents are the same way. This mainly keeps somebody from kicking a window out and then opening the front door to leave.
    It's a violation in all jurisdictions that have adopted the International Building Code, or the equivalent state code, which would include all 50 states, D.C, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

    You're free to do as you wish, I'm just pointing this out to whomever else may be considering this as a potential security measure.

  32. #32
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    just remember most home grade locks take very little skill to bypass. basic operation of a file and a few different key blanks is all you need to open most of the locks in your neighborhood. i wont tell you which locks to buy, but an easy way to find out which ones to ignore is go to the hardware store and ask them for their most popular door locks, dont buy any of them.

    going from 5pin to 7 pin or 7 to 9 doesnt do much, adding side pins is much more effective.

    a dog or alarm system is a better deterrent. or at least a dog sign and an alarm sign. will deflect thieves of opportunity.

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  34. #34
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    @ YoungCon...Yeh...you better protect those fancy cars of yours

  35. #35
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    guard cat. and locked doors. but where i live crime isnt an issue.

  36. #36
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    An alarm system with motion sensors and glass break sensors that notifies the authories, a couple loud mean looking dogs, a 7 ft privacy fence with a locked gate and as a last resort a highpoint 9mm carbine and a sig p250 .40cal.

  37. #37
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    Locked door and windows
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  38. #38
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    Skynet keeps my home safe. Bad guys get terminated and disposed of.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by wbmason55 View Post
    It's a violation in all jurisdictions that have adopted the International Building Code, or the equivalent state code, which would include all 50 states, D.C, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

    You're free to do as you wish, I'm just pointing this out to whomever else may be considering this as a potential security measure.

    Just out of curiousity, if its against code, why do they still sell them?


    HOME SECURITY HARDWARE: Article 5.33A, Section 6(a)(1), Texas Insurance Code states: Exterior doors must be solid core doors that are 1 3/8 inches thick and must be secured by deadbolt locks. The deadbolt must lock with a minimum throw of one (1) inch and must penetrate a metal strike plate firmly secured to the doorframe. If a door secured with a deadbolt has breakable glass within forty (40) inches of the lock, the deadbolt lock must be a double cylinder (double keyed) deadbolt.


    I realize it personal preference, but in the event of a fire im alot closer to any window than i am the front door. Plus, break ins happen alot more frequently then house fires.
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  40. #40
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    If I felt that my family's security was contingent on so many devices, I'd get the hell outta Dodge. We lock our doors at night, but beyond that Ive got noting else, nor do I worry...

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    I try to remember to shut the front door before I leave for work in the morning, but that's about it.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperSlow35th View Post
    Just out of curiousity, if its against code, why do they still sell them?


    HOME SECURITY HARDWARE: Article 5.33A, Section 6(a)(1), Texas Insurance Code states: Exterior doors must be solid core doors that are 1 3/8 inches thick and must be secured by deadbolt locks. The deadbolt must lock with a minimum throw of one (1) inch and must penetrate a metal strike plate firmly secured to the doorframe. If a door secured with a deadbolt has breakable glass within forty (40) inches of the lock, the deadbolt lock must be a double cylinder (double keyed) deadbolt.


    I realize it personal preference, but in the event of a fire im alot closer to any window than i am the front door. Plus, break ins happen alot more frequently then house fires.
    There are circumstances where a door keyed on both sides would be permitted. An egress door from a home is not one of those. In order to sufficiently beat this horse to death:

    International Residential Code 2009:

    SECTION R311 MEANS OF EGRESS

    R311.1 Means of egress. All dwellings shall be provided with a means of egress as provided in this section. The means of egress shall provide a continuous and unobstructed path of vertical and horizontal egress travel from all portions of the dwelling to the exterior of the dwelling at the required egress door without requiring travel through a garage.
    R311.2 Egress door. At least one egress door shall be provided for each dwelling unit. The egress door shall be side-hinged, and shall provide a minimum clear width of 32 inches (813 mm) when measured between the face of the door and the stop, with the door open 90 degrees (1.57 rad). The minimum clear height of the door opening shall not be less than 78 inches (1981 mm) in height measured from the top of the threshold to the bottom of the stop. Other doors shall not be required to comply with these minimum dimensions. Egress doors shall be readily openable from inside the dwelling without the use of a key or special knowledge or effort.

    Or you could cut through all that BS and summarize by saying sorta 'It's common sense.'
    Last edited by wbmason55; 06-29-2012 at 06:43 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loudviking View Post
    Shar-pei
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    And a really piss pore attitude when it comes to uninvited quests.
    I'm right there with you on that last sentence.
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  48. #48
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    I forgot the family Honey Badger sleeps with one eye open... Honey Badger don't care!

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    So, the guys with loaded 45s, are you in Detroit? I'm all for guns, but never feel the need to load one.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caffeine Powered View Post
    Until a week ago I thought I was fine with locked doors and windows 5' from the ground. While the didn't get into the rest of the house they did get onto the 3-season porch and make off with 3 bikes.

    Now I'm making sure the windows are locked or have the limit stops set (the window opens 5cm then) and the interior door is locked.

    I may install some motion sensor lights too. I'm an electrician so it won't be that hard, it's a matter of picking ones that don't look like ass and work well enough that a chipmunk doesn't set them off.
    If you're an electrician, installing motion sensor lights should be super simple. And most have adjustable sensitivity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Caffeine Powered View Post
    I may install some motion sensor lights too. I'm an electrician so it won't be that hard, it's a matter of picking ones that don't look like ass and work well enough that a chipmunk doesn't set them off.
    dumb$hit builder who built my place installed motion-sensing lights, which is nice, except only the timer is adjustable, not the sensitivity. the porch light goes off if a moth flies in front of it. terrible. I'd change the stupid things, except I've spent enough money replacing indoor fixtures (the kitchen fixture's cover, a plastic POS, broke off and fell on my head a few days ago while I was cooking dinner).

  52. #52
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    1. Dogs that will attack - trained
    2. Guns

    Some of our neighbors have been robbed but our house never touched.

  53. #53
    No Stranger to danger....
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    when i lived in a tent i would secure it down with big tent pegs, but now im in a house the weight of the bricks usually holds it down ok, but i still use big mother f**king chains cemented into the ground to secure it, this seems to do the trick, it hasnt gone anywhere.....

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    So, the guys with loaded 45s, are you in Detroit? I'm all for guns, but never feel the need to load one.
    What's the point of having a gun for home/self defense if its not loaded?

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    dumb$hit builder who built my place installed motion-sensing lights, which is nice, except only the timer is adjustable, not the sensitivity. the porch light goes off if a moth flies in front of it. terrible.
    If the sensor is infrared, you may be able to mask or diffuse it with tape.

  56. #56
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    I have a loaded .40 cal in my nightstand. Wife has a loaded 9mm in hers. We have a 12 gauge with a tac light hidden in a closet. Provided the security system goes off someones leaving in a body bag. Dead men file no lawsuits.
    2010 Giant Yukon FX
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  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbnoobadam View Post
    What's the point of having a gun for home/self defense if its not loaded?
    I don't own them for defense, that's just a happy extra I get from owning them. I just never feel the need in my neighborhood I guess.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by FujNoob View Post
    Alarm, dogs, guns.
    x2.
    2013 Specialized P 26 AM green/purple. Nuff said

    Giant Faith

  59. #59
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    I have a single shot shotgun for home defense (I have a crap load of other guns, but I like the shotgun for this purpose). People would ask me, "Why single shot?" Because if you get good with it, and the gun ejects the shell, you have unlimited rounds to shoot. If anybody is entertaining a home defense gun on a budget, check out the single shot. They're cheap and are totally reliable.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    I have a single shot shotgun for home defense (I have a crap load of other guns, but I like the shotgun for this purpose). People would ask me, "Why single shot?" Because if you get good with it, and the gun ejects the shell, you have unlimited rounds to shoot. If anybody is entertaining a home defense gun on a budget, check out the single shot. They're cheap and are totally reliable.

    if i need more than a 10 round drum. i should probably rethink my defensive tactics. and even if i do i can still stuff 1 at a time directly into the chamber.

    my 15 year old remington 870 hasnt ever failed me yet and i treat it like crap.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    I have a single shot shotgun for home defense (I have a crap load of other guns, but I like the shotgun for this purpose). People would ask me, "Why single shot?" Because if you get good with it, and the gun ejects the shell, you have unlimited rounds to shoot. If anybody is entertaining a home defense gun on a budget, check out the single shot. They're cheap and are totally reliable.

    I like your style ... safe and easy too.

  62. #62
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    nice vid, Dion. I like that guy.

    I have a semiauto Remington 11-87 hand-me-down and have two different barrels for it. Smooth bore with a selection of choke tubes for most stuff, and also a rifled barrel. It's a hunting gun, which is why it's at the bottom of my home security list. I have to recognize which barrel is on it and choose the correct ammo if I'm going to use it for that.

    The simple single barrel shotgun option is actually a really good one.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperSlow35th View Post
    5. Sig P229 .40 cal
    Same here!

  64. #64
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    I live in an apartment complex so they usually just break into cars. They haven't broken in lately since I came home from work at 3am (I work in EMS) and whipped out a 44mag. Told them to leave and never come back and they haven't. Apparently my friend who lives in an apartment next to me had a major increase in breakins since then.

  65. #65
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    You guys in apartments might want to go to shoot guns or go to different ammo that won't go through the walls and hit your neighbors. Just a thought.

  66. #66
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    I also have a hunting bow for when im out of ammo, and Id probably die before a run out because I have a sh!tload of ammo.
    2013 Specialized P 26 AM green/purple. Nuff said

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  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by dihymon View Post
    They haven't broken in lately since I came home from work at 3am (I work in EMS) and whipped out a 44mag. Told them to leave and never come back and they haven't.
    "Get off my lawn." Or was that "Do ya feel lucky, punk? Well, do ya?"

    BTW Dion, thanks for the detailed security measures. Now I know exactly how to exploit you,
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slozomby View Post
    if i need more than a 10 round drum. i should probably rethink my defensive tactics.
    FPS Russian disagrees.





    Gotta love that Dragon's Breath round!

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    You guys in apartments might want to go to shoot guns or go to different ammo that won't go through the walls and hit your neighbors. Just a thought.
    My 44mag is my truck gun and I keep mags instead of specials in there incase I need a bullet to fly through another person's car. I know a guy who had a 9mm he used while driving. The first bullet ricocheted into his dash before busting out his window. He got rid of it and now uses a 40. Best part is it was a brand new truck with 300miles.

    I have various weapons at home but my main home defense is a 20ga shotgun. At close range in an apartment most of the shot will go into the intruder and the few that remain will have trouble making it past the wall.
    Negative Reps Please.

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  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    FPS Russian disagrees.





    Gotta love that Dragon's Breath round!
    That dude is just awesome! I love his vids but especially the one with the dual m16s going fishing, russian style!
    2013 Specialized P 26 AM green/purple. Nuff said

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  71. #71
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    I’m surrounded by cranky old retired folks who are alert 24 hours a day. The slightest noise will have them turning on their lights and checking things out. In the middle of the day they’re always snooping around, making sure no punk ass kids are on their lawn. One time, however, I almost threw a large boulder into the windshield of a car doing burnouts in our parking area, but the punk kids saw me just in time and took off… and never came back.
    Uh oh! Someone just stole your KOM!

  72. #72
    M8 M12 M15 deez nuts
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's L'axeman View Post
    when i lived in a tent i would secure it down with big tent pegs, but now im in a house the weight of the bricks usually holds it down ok, but i still use big mother f**king chains cemented into the ground to secure it, this seems to do the trick, it hasnt gone anywhere.....
    Uh oh! Someone just stole your KOM!

  73. #73
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    Lock the doors.
    How do you secure your home?-imageuploadedbytapatalk1341165503.260742.jpg
    How do you secure your home?-imageuploadedbytapatalk1341165544.021570.jpg
    If all else fail...smother them with the bunny blanket.
    How do you secure your home?-imageuploadedbytapatalk1341165644.939911.jpg

  74. #74
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    looks like that guy needed to do some fire control after those dragon's breath rounds. he set that bale of hay on fire.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    looks like that guy needed to do some fire control after those dragon's breath rounds. he set that bale of hay on fire.
    Bale of hay is nothing compared to what this guy does. In the gun world HE IS AWESOME!!!

    Check out his latest vid.

    Professional Russian - YouTube

  76. #76
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    Bale of hay is nothing compared to what this guy does. In the gun world HE IS AWESOME!!!

    Check out his latest vid.

    Professional Russian - YouTube
    Wow. I would be concerned that I would accidentally shoot myself with that thing..haha. Crazy!!

  77. #77
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    WOW, that thing is like the stuff in metal gear solid 2.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by GiantMountainTroll View Post
    That dude is just awesome! I love his vids but especially the one with the dual m16s going fishing, russian style!
    The auto-shotgun plus firebreather would be just epic.
    Negative Reps Please.

    Soy Loco

  79. #79
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    One dog
    Shotgun
    Two cats 1- big 1- grumpy

  80. #80
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    1. Living in a very very low crime area, the front door only gets locked at night, keys left in car ignitions in driveway ect.
    2. A watchdog, as in she will wag her tail and watch a robber walk out with the goods lol. In all seriousness she was great in her younger years but at 12 she isnt much of a watchdog anymore.
    3. 12 or 20 gauge, assorted flavors...

  81. #81
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    For you gun nerds, I couldn't believe my eyes, but Big 5 Sporting Goods had an ATI M4 Carbine for $1,200! Wow, have they expanded their line-up. Not really a HD gun (more like zombie apocalypse gun) but still...

    Their home defense shotguns are still at really great prices (under $275). I need another gun like I need a bat to the head.

  82. #82
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
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    Extremely nosy neighbors, a quiet and fairly low crime neighborhood that isn't on through streets. We're quiet, and we don't show off a flashy/wealthy lifestyle. Not that we have one anyhow. My house with the Mazda/Kia driveway combo will get bypassed for the one with the BMW/Audi most of the time.

    Front and rear doors with keyed deadbolts, added when we bought the house. Steel doors, solid frames. Storm windows add another "layer" someone would have to go through if choosing the non-door route.

    ADT mid-level system, local monitoring.

    Motion sensor lights, front, rear, and sides, solar powered. Nothing annoyingly bright, but enough to have the areas well lighted.

    Medium size dog, medium aggressive, medium on the bark.

    Hefty Mag-light and Glock-21. Doesn't really do ya' much good when someone is attempting to break in when no one is home though.

    I think the nosy neighbors seriously are the best. They've actually prevented/stopped a couple suspected break-ins in the area by calling the cops or just making sure the possible perps know that they've been seen doing something a bit shady looking.

    When going away for more than a day or two, we have a half dozen random timers for lights/music/tv. Have the mail held. It's rare that we have both our cars gone at the same time - helps the illusion the place isn't empty.

    Good USAA homeowners policy. Seriously. If someone wants in to get your stuff badly enough, they'll figure out a way. If they do, and don't get busted, and least we've got decent coverage.
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  83. #83
    Beer Me!
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    Move to a small college town in canada, where steeling a bag of BBQ chips makes local news!

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/A4AHuy8eybY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    "Any wheel size is better than sitting at a computer all day." -Myself

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guerdonian View Post
    Move to a small college town in canada, where steeling a bag of BBQ chips makes local news!

    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/A4AHuy8eybY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    So, no need for the AR15? Not that you could own one there anyway ... it's worse than California.

  85. #85
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    with my two good friends, Smith and Wesson

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    So, no need for the AR15? Not that you could own one there anyway ... it's worse than California.
    Can't you buy pot in Canada? If so then I can see chip theft being a serious crime.
    Negative Reps Please.

    Soy Loco

  87. #87
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    My home is protected by Kim, Barry, and Walther...

    We are on first name basis, but their full names are Kimber (.45), Beretta (.22, yeah, I know ), and Walther .380
    Better 2 ask 4 pardon than 2 ask for permission. Recall that nxt time U feel you have 2 ask ur wife if U can buy something

  88. #88
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    Paranoid much

  89. #89
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    I just recorded my wife screaming "We are broke, we have nothing, I can't afford any jewelry, all our credit cards are cancelled!!!!" and play the tape loudly every now and then.

  90. #90
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    Chum and xenon win so far. Locked doors, working class furnishings, and a Ruger P95 loaded with 'defensive' rounds.

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