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  1. #1
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    Design Professionals, any here? (Architects, Automotive, Bicycle, Graphic, etc)

    Architect here. Currently working on a new headquarters for Habitat for Humanity in Tucson. An adaptive reuse of an existing building that was an adaptive reuse of an old grocery store. We are trying provide a cool interior space in the old grocery store and trying to renovate and tie in a late 90's addition that is completely eclectic and unrelated to the grocery store building all the while creating a feeling that this is a Habitat for Humanity facility.

    My first comprehensive use of my design software with it photoreal rendering capabilities.

    Post up what you are and currently doing.
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  2. #2
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    I am an architectural engineering graduate with a bachelors degree and I have been having a hard time finding work in my field. I am located in Rhode Island and would appreciate any networking opportunities I may come across through this forum especially of they have the same interests as mountainbiking. Boone in the AE world seems to be hiring unfortunately.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by AE Beej View Post
    I am an architectural engineering graduate with a bachelors degree and I have been having a hard time finding work in my field. I am located in Rhode Island and would appreciate any networking opportunities I may come across through this forum especially of they have the same interests as mountainbiking. Boone in the AE world seems to be hiring unfortunately.
    AE = Structural Engineering?

    Same can be said about the Architectural side of things, and I live in the most architectural depressed state right now. We have a surplus of completed housing and retail buildings that lasts years at our current growth rate. Not a lot of new construction work but there is some tenant improvement work to be done in the existing facilities. However that almost always is a break even proposition for this architect.
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  4. #4
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
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    I have a BFA in Illustration and Communication Design from Otis/Parsons.

    Been a web Dev/Designer for 18 years.

    Primary focus now is on global branding, associated collateral (E and print) and technical communications (secure data transfer/communications between depts, employees and customers)

    yes, i wear a goddamn tie and am surrounded by grey cubes/carpet....blah...
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  5. #5
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    Yes AE is my degree. Half of our course work was learning autocad extensively and the other half was all civil/structural engineering and site planning classes.

  6. #6
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    I'm a decorative outdoor lighting designer/cube farmer. Think antique looking street lights. Everyone want led lights because our Uncle is subsidizing purchases.
    Everyone is entitled to my opinion.

  7. #7
    REALLY?
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    I was an artist at a very early age (started at 3 years old), I was offerd apprentice jobs at architect and advertising firms when I was 15 years old. Although I was the best at what I did, somehow my heart just wasnt into drawing buildings and advertisments for a living, by age 18 I burnt out on drawing and moved onto other things.

    Have I actually designed anything - sure, I've played around with bike designs on paper (its easy), but, thats about it.

    I'm also a texture/graphic artist (or was) over at a site called IMVU, made money at it for a little bit, very fun and challenging.
    DJ, "Because I'm sure the world need's more dudes stalking the woods stoned out of their mind carrying a deadly weapon."

  8. #8
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I did theatrical lighting design for several years after college.

    I'm now working on a MS in Engineering. Mostly a Systems, Dynamics and Controls focus. If I can talk my way into it, I'd like to work for Kona this summer. Not really sure what I'll do when I finish my degree in a year, but hopefully stay in western Washington and do something interesting.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #9
    since 4/10/2009
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    It's not my primary focus, but I do a lot of GIS. geographic information systems.

    One of the chapters in my master's thesis is dedicated to GIS work entirely, and another uses some GIS for analysis purposes.

    While a good portion of it is more statistical analysis oriented, I have to make dozens of actual maps to put into my thesis. And that is all very heavy into the design.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghoti View Post
    I'm a decorative outdoor lighting designer/cube farmer. Think antique looking street lights. Everyone want led lights because our Uncle is subsidizing purchases.
    I did a really high end Visitor Center for the BLM in Las Vegas and they really wanted LED fixtures for everything but when they saw the cost of $50-100 per fixture it didn't take them long to decide that maybe they would step back from LED until a later date. Things are damn expensive and the light quality is so variable. Supposedly they are getting better but most examples I see are still to far down the spectrum in the 6000k and less area than I prefer.
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  11. #11
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    I'm a senior in graphic arts who is currently awaiting the end of the scholar strike to get his diploma. I'd rather ride then work, but I prefer the computer work and web design to the artistic hand drawing part. I'm pretty good with graphics and code, but my manual skills are showing up better with a wrench than with a paintbrush.

    I was looking to get some kind of certification or technical course for the mechanical/engineering industry, but I think the graphic arts brought a lot to me. Mastering Ps, Illustrator, InDesign, DreamWeaver and software coding really helps when you're trying to enter a new work market like the bike industry.

    Hey, I just took my learnings from my 3 years graphic arts classes and some field experience to make technical drawing for a part (hub spacer) to send to a machinist. It was fun and quick to do. Next I want to make an angleset to slack my HA down a few degrees. Let me know what you think

    Got my website, always upgrading and moving things around as I go, it is not finished yet, will probably never be since I keep on adding new stuff. check out chavecadesign.com
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Design Professionals, any here? (Architects, Automotive, Bicycle, Graphic, etc)-spacer_hub_web.jpg  

    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    I'm a senior in graphic arts who is currently awaiting the end of the scholar strike to get his diploma. I'd rather ride then work, but I prefer the computer work and web design to the artistic hand drawing part. I'm pretty good with graphics and code, but my manual skills are showing up better with a wrench than with a paintbrush.

    I was looking to get some kind of certification or technical course for the mechanical/engineering industry, but I think the graphic arts brought a lot to me. Mastering Ps, Illustrator, InDesign, DreamWeaver and software coding really helps when you're trying to enter a new work market like the bike industry.

    Hey, I just took my learnings from my 3 years graphic arts classes and some field experience to make technical drawing for a part (hub spacer) to send to a machinist. It was fun and quick to do. Next I want to make an angleset to slack my HA down a few degrees. Let me know what you think

    Got my website, always upgrading and moving things around as I go, it is not finished yet, will probably never be since I keep on adding new stuff. check out chavecadesign.com
    Nice javascript you have going. I like the menu button.

    I have done a couple of website including my own but I did this one for my previous employer before I left them. Unfortunately they never gave me enough time to size down the images so it is a slow website and they aren't smart enough to figure it out themselves so slow connections be wary.

    Line and Space, LLC

    I converted an antiquated flash based website to this script driven one. I did a lot of the coding myself but based on a lot of mootools (I think) scripts. It was fun an a nice diversion from designing buildings and their documents (which is what I really enjoy doing).

    Edit: I just went there for the first time since I left and man what a slow website, they should have kept me on longer so I could have knocked down those images. Probably not that helpful for their marketing if the images load so slowly you click away. Haha.
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  13. #13
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    I have two US design patents.

    Did this back in the day (the industrial design). We were such a small company, I even designed the packaging and logos.



    I created a children's cartoon back in 2002 and had the pilot completed - we had a team of storyboard artists, animators, a music producer, etc. Never took off (I tried to sell it to everybody), but a pretty cool project all the same.

    Every once in awhile, I'll get a wild hair and paint or draw... but that was all in a past life. This is my last painting... but I'm a little rusty. Now I'm an insurance agent - awesome life.


  14. #14
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    Yeah, most of the Java I use is not from me, but open-source Jquery data base modules I take and customize to my liking. Most of them get completely transformed, and then I go on to optimize the loading and user experience. In my website I'm trying to keep the user from having a side menu, and find ways to display the content with a permanent central menu. A lot of experimentations, slow work and tuning to my liking.

    I know how bad it is to have a boss who always know better behind you for every single steps when you are working on a website... I have to deal with mine who is running a polish pastry shop and is always running everywhere, changing his minds every time I see him, wants me to do wonders, but never satisfied with what I bring up because it's not how he was seeing it... Because he's not the one who know what can be done and what can be done and be terrible looking... He's the one who decide if HE likes it or not... and you know that the client is always right... like your employer with that website

    And he wants me to do the job in half the time it takes. Even if he pays me less than half a web designer would gets for the same quality work... He doesn't understand that 30 hours to redo a 9 years old website in both french and english language and write most of the texts and take the pictures is very NOT a lot of time for someone who is working part time and has to provide all the equipment and tools (software/hardware) for the job... I mean, I was busting weekends working like 9-10 hours straight with him always running around and watching me, taking 15 minutes lunch time, have to bring my computer, my DSLR, tri-pod, etc and work in a small office space where I had not much place to even lay down my mouse pad... And even tho I was making sure to validate the HTML, CSS, JS and do website optimization, search engines references, text corrections, etc...

    But at least I was working and making money... not a lot, but some at least. He's not a bad guy, it's just he thinks that web and design work can be done in a snap and work as expected... And dare I try to explain how it's not possible to him... He said he paid $500 back in 2003 to get his website from a local web agency. And now he's not happy because 9 years later I charge him $300 to redo it from scratch and up to date with the web's standards, better navigation, multi languages, fast browsing and all the **** ? Geez, you should have seen his "$500" website... td, tr, tbody, table, etc all over the place... Like a single div, then 36 different tbody and hundreds of td/tr... like it was taking me 5 minutes only to find the line where I wanted to edit a word of text, than again check everything coz the CSS where all over the place and shared throughout random HTML's and all different layouts... Like a fawking nightmare... And he don't understands. He don't have time and he don't want to. And I'm the one who have to deal with this... www.wawelpatisserie.com

    Anyways, sorry for the rant, back on topic.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  15. #15
    see me rollin, they hatin
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    i do a a mix of marketing, word processing and graphic arts. lately putting together flashy proposals. Sometimes drawing figures in Adobe

  16. #16
    Beer Me!
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    Mechanical Design Engineer:

    At Boeing I worked on this:
    Laser Gunship Fires; 'Deniable' Strikes Ahead? | Danger Room | Wired.com
    Advanced Tactical Laser - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    And this:
    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/crVkYnzQJrg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    Boeing Laser Avenger - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Also worked here: WELCOME | Subsea ROVs, Manipulators and Controls | Schilling Robotics

    on this:
    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/cAkqbJRkt54" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    and this: SchillingHDpromo.flv - YouTube (goofy promo)

    Now i work here: ADN-Flow Systems

    I also had a bike industry job for a year, but that parts a secret.

  17. #17
    Beer Me!
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    I also paint (watercolor) and sketch:
    PM me i have plenty of pieces available for sale hehe
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  18. #18
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    Architect here in PA. Presently working on custom homes in MI, Canada, and a cultural museum in NY.

  19. #19
    the catalan connection
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    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    Hey, I just took my learnings from my 3 years graphic arts classes and some field experience to make technical drawing for a part (hub spacer) to send to a machinist. It was fun and quick to do. Next I want to make an angleset to slack my HA down a few degrees. Let me know what you think
    This drawing might look nice, but is confusing from a machining point of view.....specially for such a simple part.
    There are rules for machining drawings...The section area fill pattern cannot be used in a such arbitrary way.... ...Put section patterns where the part is actually cut by the section plane and leave alone the rest, and the other way around. Tolerances?? Use as little views and info as necessary. Redundancy is bad...etc.
    A machining drawing of such small and simple part wouldn´t look much more complicated than this one...there´s still missing everything (measures, material spec, tolerances, finishing...etc) but I hope you get an idea of the layout: thumbsup:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Design Professionals, any here? (Architects, Automotive, Bicycle, Graphic, etc)-section.jpg  

    "Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving us wordly evidence of the fact." George Elliot

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by What&son View Post
    This drawing might look nice, but is confusing from a machining point of view.....specially for such a simple part.
    There are rules for machining drawings...The section area fill pattern cannot be used in a such arbitrary way.... ...Put section patterns where the part is actually cut by the section plane and leave alone the rest, and the other way around. Tolerances?? Use as little views and info as necessary. Redundancy is bad...etc.
    A machining drawing of such small and simple part wouldn´t look much more complicated than this one...there´s still missing everything (measures, material spec, tolerances, finishing...etc) but I hope you get an idea of the layout: thumbsup:
    Thanks, that's good info. I guess my artistic side and precision details took over once again
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  21. #21
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Quote Originally Posted by What&son View Post
    A machining drawing of such small and simple part wouldn´t look much more complicated than this one...there´s still missing everything (measures, material spec, tolerances, finishing...etc) but I hope you get an idea of the layout: thumbsup:
    I was starting to think, "But that's actually a really nice drawing!" And then I figured out it was your example of a good drawing of a part. So, good example.

    David C - how is yours supposed to slacken the head angle? It looks like it has axial symmetry... Does it just increase the stack height?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    David C - how is yours supposed to slacken the head angle? It looks like it has axial symmetry... Does it just increase the stack height?
    Nope, this one was for my rear axle hub spacer. To convert from a 135x10 to 142x10.

    The angleset will be next, but I have to dig more info before. I remember a thread in the AM forum where a guy explained all the maths to make your own. I'll search for it later. But any infos on sources would be welcomes

    Edit : Got to rework the drawing a bit with your advices. It now look easier to read thanks to you What&son.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Design Professionals, any here? (Architects, Automotive, Bicycle, Graphic, etc)-spacer_hub_final.jpg  

    Last edited by David C; 04-10-2012 at 12:11 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  23. #23
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    Graphic designer and photographer here. I've worked on a wide array of marketing campaigns and PR efforts.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher View Post
    I did a really high end Visitor Center for the BLM in Las Vegas and they really wanted LED fixtures for everything but when they saw the cost of $50-100 per fixture it didn't take them long to decide that maybe they would step back from LED until a later date. Things are damn expensive and the light quality is so variable. Supposedly they are getting better but most examples I see are still to far down the spectrum in the 6000k and less area than I prefer.
    I think ours start at aorund $1000
    Are you saying 6000k is too high a color temp?? That's pretty darn white!
    Everyone is entitled to my opinion.

  25. #25
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    Arts administrator turned planner here. I work for a non-profit affordable housing developer. I am not the principal designer, but work with architects, landscape architects and others on homes, apartment complexes and, currently, a 1 acre community garden space. I coordinate and manage these projects from conception through build out. Getting set to build 4 infill homes on some skinny 25' downtown lots which will be an interesting project. Going for LEED Silver or Gold.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghoti View Post
    I think ours start at aorund $1000
    Are you saying 6000k is too high a color temp?? That's pretty darn white!
    No we prefer warmer lights in the 7000+k range. Yeah they ain't cheap, especially for exterior lighting applications. Task lighting is definitely coming into good dollar ranges.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher View Post
    No we prefer warmer lights in the 7000+k range. Yeah they ain't cheap, especially for exterior lighting applications. Task lighting is definitely coming into good dollar ranges.
    Wouldn't the 7000k lights be super cold? Regular old light bulbs are very warm at 3,200 more or less. Anything over 5,500k is colder then daylight.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by wahday View Post
    Arts administrator turned planner here. I work for a non-profit affordable housing developer. I am not the principal designer, but work with architects, landscape architects and others on homes, apartment complexes and, currently, a 1 acre community garden space. I coordinate and manage these projects from conception through build out. Getting set to build 4 infill homes on some skinny 25' downtown lots which will be an interesting project. Going for LEED Silver or Gold.
    Is this in ABQ? I'd thought there was plenty of land left for KB Homes to put pressboard houses on still?

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Wouldn't the 7000k lights be super cold? Regular old light bulbs are very warm at 3,200 more or less. Anything over 5,500k is colder then daylight.
    yeah for some reason I always get that backwards. So yeah LEDs in the 3500k range was what we wanted but they were only available in the 5-6500k range at the time. I can only suspect that they were predominantly used for medical theaters/clean rooms and such where bright white light is desired.
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  30. #30
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    Guilty of graphic prostitution.

    Who had a Mac IIci? Probably everyone over 40 I unearthed the receipt for my first system...over six grand! 25 MHz and 13 inches of vibrant CRT RGB, woohoo!

    Remember mechanical boards and type galleys? You're a designosaur

    Mike

  31. #31
    Hermit
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    Got my Masters of Architecture at Kent State. Currently working in a firm in Youngstown OH, mostly doing schools. Business is not good here.

    Steve Z
    Pedaling when it's dry
    And paddling when it's wet

    My insignificant blog:
    http://swampboy62.blogspot.com/

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by She&I View Post
    Guilty of graphic prostitution.

    Who had a Mac IIci? Probably everyone over 40 I unearthed the receipt for my first system...over six grand! 25 MHz and 13 inches of vibrant CRT RGB, woohoo!

    Remember mechanical boards and type galleys? You're a designosaur

    Mike
    Oh, you're talking about those ?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Design Professionals, any here? (Architects, Automotive, Bicycle, Graphic, etc)-img_0089_web.jpg  

    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  33. #33
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by She&I View Post
    Guilty of graphic prostitution.

    Who had a Mac IIci? Probably everyone over 40 I unearthed the receipt for my first system...over six grand! 25 MHz and 13 inches of vibrant CRT RGB, woohoo!

    Remember mechanical boards and type galleys? You're a designosaur

    Mike
    pfft...i remember cutting rubylith...mechanicals...

    that and photostats..and waxing type...

    much easier now though...
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  34. #34
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    Amberlith all the way, Chum

    Then came the Mac. (Those poor type houses.) We had a sign-up sheet for the "studio Mac." Multi-finder wasn't far off. OMG, running multiple apps? Wow!

    Pretty stoked I can do it all on a lappy now, sans mouse. I took a trad rendering class a couple years ago and did it all in Illustrator. No eraser shavings, hehe.

    Mike


    PS: David C, who stole the CPUs?
    Last edited by She&I; 04-12-2012 at 12:12 PM.

  35. #35
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
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    i gotta say...designers get beat up pretty good.

    today I am working on:
    - direct mail piece
    - email blast piece
    - concept branding for 2 products
    - 3D animation direction for a technology only about 12 people on the planet understand...i am not one...and neither is the animator (we both think it's cool as hell though)
    - site updates
    - tech direction on implementing collaborative work tool for non-tech peeps...
    - new design templates for presentation (powerpoint crap)
    - and updating existing style guides.


    and I'm at home with viral conjunctivitis (pinkeye) because I am the proud parent of 2 plague distribution machines...miniCHUM and CHUMmette...

    gargh!!! I NEED A BEER ALREADY....
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHUM View Post
    i gotta say...designers get beat up pretty good.

    today I am working on:
    - direct mail piece
    - email blast piece
    - concept branding for 2 products
    - 3D animation direction for a technology only about 12 people on the planet understand...i am not one...and neither is the animator (we both think it's cool as hell though)
    - site updates
    - tech direction on implementing collaborative work tool for non-tech peeps...
    - new design templates for presentation (powerpoint crap)
    - and updating existing style guides.
    - managing MTBR kindergarden

    and I'm at home with viral conjunctivitis (pinkeye) because I am the proud parent of 2 plague distribution machines...miniCHUM and CHUMmette...

    gargh!!! I NEED A BEER ALREADY....
    Edited for ya
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  37. #37
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    I'm working on this. It is my fourth pass on this area maybe. Each time I think i have it we make some changes and then it seems wrong. I think i now have it tied to all the rest of the entry spaces a little better.

    At least it is all just bytes and not buff paper and pen and ink and hours and hours of my time.

    Well it is hours and hours of my time but at least the 3D environment I work in allows me to have live updating support drawings based on my changes each time.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Design Professionals, any here? (Architects, Automotive, Bicycle, Graphic, etc)-.jpg  

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  38. #38
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher View Post
    I'm working on this. It is my fourth pass on this area maybe. Each time I think i have it we make some changes and then it seems wrong. I think i now have it tied to all the rest of the entry spaces a little better.

    At least it is all just bytes and not buff paper and pen and ink and hours and hours of my time.

    Well it is hours and hours of my time but at least the 3D environment I work in allows me to have live updating support drawings based on my changes each time.
    architecture would make my head *pop*....too much informashun to process...

    cool design though
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    powerpoint crap = redundancy


  40. #40
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    I am a security consultant. We design and engineer high end security systems for corp campuses, universities, healthcare, financial, etc.

    Our biggest struggle recently has been the migration from AutoCAD to Revit.

    Most of our design is done in 2D because there are not models of the devices we design and the clients / architects don't want to pay the cost for us to 3D model.

    I don't do that side of the work, but it is a struggle to find qualified Revit guys.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by kerryp View Post
    I am a security consultant. We design and engineer high end security systems for corp campuses, universities, healthcare, financial, etc.

    Our biggest struggle recently has been the migration from AutoCAD to Revit.

    Most of our design is done in 2D because there are not models of the devices we design and the clients / architects don't want to pay the cost for us to 3D model.

    I don't do that side of the work, but it is a struggle to find qualified Revit guys.
    Yeah REVIT is my savior when it comes to design. However I don't charge clients for library development costs. I make a lot of my own library to fit my particular design needs. It is a cost I absorb because it makes each successive job that much quicker and hopefully i can make up the loss of my time developing the library on the next job.

    Although i can see how it would be problem for companies with a library that consists of up to the moment devices. For me wide flange beams, masonry walls, furnishings, millwork, etc don't change technology between jobs.
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by She&I View Post
    PS: David C, who stole the CPUs?
    The same guy who stole the video cards.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  43. #43
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    I am still not convinced on the usefulness of revit at this point but only because it is relatively new and very few people know how to use it.

    It is being used to coordinate the exact locations of conduit, HVAC, etc which is great during the design process, but what happens in construction?

    Most contractors have never heard of revit, much less used it and how well does that information translate to the field.

    Then there is the whole asbuilt documentation issue of requiring contractors to build the asbuilts in revit; hell, i have a hard time getting good asbuilts in CAD.

    I think it will get there, but its going to take some time since its so new to contractors, etc.

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  44. #44
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    About 90% of our work is in Revit, with the transition taking about 4 years. Most of our work is for universities, with sophisticated enough CMs that they're all used to building their own BIMt models by now, or know who to farm it out to. And most of the larger universities are requiring BIM in our contracts.

    We have only Arch in house, but pretty much all of our consultants are using BIM as well. It's ability to coordinate Arch, Struct, MEP and detect clashes is tremendous, particularity if you're providing minimal plenum space or everything's architecturally exposed.

    It's when the industry moves from the CM rebuilding the model to the Architect handling over their model, which is probably inevitable, that things are going to get interesting from a liability standpoint. We are thus far resisting that type of project delivery.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by kerryp View Post
    I am still not convinced on the usefulness of revit at this point but only because it is relatively new and very few people know how to use it.

    It is being used to coordinate the exact locations of conduit, HVAC, etc which is great during the design process, but what happens in construction?

    Most contractors have never heard of revit, much less used it and how well does that information translate to the field.

    Then there is the whole asbuilt documentation issue of requiring contractors to build the asbuilts in revit; hell, i have a hard time getting good asbuilts in CAD.

    I think it will get there, but its going to take some time since its so new to contractors, etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonz View Post
    About 90% of our work is in Revit, with the transition taking about 4 years. Most of our work is for universities, with sophisticated enough CMs that they're all used to building their own BIMt models by now, or know who to farm it out to. And most of the larger universities are requiring BIM in our contracts.

    We have only Arch in house, but pretty much all of our consultants are using BIM as well. It's ability to coordinate Arch, Struct, MEP and detect clashes is tremendous, particularity if you're providing minimal plenum space or everything's architecturally exposed.

    It's when the industry moves from the CM rebuilding the model to the Architect handling over their model, which is probably inevitable, that things are going to get interesting from a liability standpoint. We are thus far resisting that type of project delivery.
    I am on my fourth project with revit now and this is the first that the engineering consultants are on board. The firm I was previously with was interested in REVIT because they did a lot of government work and the word at the Government Level was that they would be requiring BIM for all projects within this decade. They feel it greatly reduces the amount of expensive changeorders based on coordination issues between all the disciplines which greatly reduces the amount of legal proceedings they have to do.

    That said I prefer it because of the same as Jonz. Better coordination between disciplines and less egregious errors that are only caught during construction. The REVIT model of my last project, even though we were the only discipline using it, allowed us to catch a beam sizing that didn't work at one part of the structure. Had it not been detected until it was being framed for the ceiling soffit it would have effect the entire profile of the building to accommodate and would most certainly have involved substantial legal proceedings and monies to remedy and assess blame. I caught it when I installed the Structure plans in 3D in our REVIT model. Right there I consider all the back costs worth it.

    What I am waiting for is some enterprising programmer to come up with an app for tablets that allows you to export your drawing set to the tablet but allows the contractor to click anywhere on the documents to bring up an orbital 3D snap shot of the area, allowing clarification or detail enhancement, without the contractor having the REVIT model in hand.

    I suspect the Autodesk probably understands that this will be the future of CM and maybe they will bring something out, but since their main goal is to release year after year of outrageously expensive versions that don't work with the previous version and still miss what could be said to be a useful interface and advance usability, I am not holding my breath.

    I hope the future of CM is based on 3D models, with a Minority Report style CM interface, and a locked proprietary file type for them to use.

    I guess we will see.
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  46. #46
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    Yes. Autodesk def needs to have some means of viewing revit in the field similar to their design review and trueview programs. We have revit guys that do all of the revit work and as the designer it would be helpful to be able to easily open and view files.

    About 90% of our work has gone to revit as well and i def agree that it is useful, it is just that i don't see alot of the subs using or even knowing what the program is. I said contractors in my last post and i agree that alot of the CM's are using it but electricians, plumbers, are what i am referring to.

    Do you guys use Bluebeam yet? If not you should really check it out. It is a PDF program on steroids and is one of the most useful tools i use in the office and out in the field. We use it for coordination, submittal review, etc and it has alot of tools that are very useful.



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  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by kerryp View Post
    Do you guys use Bluebeam yet? If not you should really check it out. It is a PDF program on steroids and is one of the most useful tools i use in the office and out in the field. We use it for coordination, submittal review, etc and it has alot of tools that are very useful.
    We're using Bluebeam and from what everyone tells me it kicks ass. I personally haven't gotten into it yet. I did just get upgraded to Acrobat X pro a few weeks ago and I hate it so far. Not sure why Adobe thought they needed to completely change the interface.

  48. #48
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    I will never go back to adobe after using bluebeam. BB also finally released the ipad app which i havent used because i dont have an ipad, but if it works even half ass it will be cool.

    Keep your drawings on your ipad when out in the field and do all your markups, do final inspections, etc. all from an ipad, plus a whole lot more.

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  49. #49
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    I went to school for that back in the early early 1990s before Microsoft unfolded their evil plan to unseat properly schooled designers by unleashing an unfortunately successful ad campaign, wherein the scope was to lure the sheep into believing that, Armed with your Microsoft Office and clipard CDROMS, say ‘good-bye’ to those pesky smug black-turtleneck-sweater-wearing Mac-using designers and say ‘hello’ to your $20,000/year-making secretary, who is now your design department.”

    Fast-forward to today, I am doing non-clipart-oriented “design” for some blowhard project manager who only knows clipart and Microsoft retardation. Fortunately I taught myself important Javascript (big into the Dojo Toolkit) and CSS stuff, so I can do development work.

    I miss those days, when people understood that you don’t just use Powerpoint as a “design” tool.
    goodbye cruel world. I am leaving you today.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonz View Post
    Not sure why Adobe thought they needed to completely change the interface.
    They didn’t have enough money, so the only logical thing to do was force people to upgrade. Come on now, it’s just like Microsoft, only in San Jose, CA rather than Redmond, WA. Adobe lost my respect years ago. Clearly Adobe Photoshop 5.5 was the best version ever… didn’t need all these useless “essential upgrades”, like cutting off support for older versions. Fortunately I still have connections in the software side of things, so I don’t need to spend my hard-earned money on them… just bug my friends who still work for Adobe for the Masters Collection, trade it for some beer, good to go.
    goodbye cruel world. I am leaving you today.

  51. #51
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    Just graduated last spring with my BSArch, currently i'm a little over half way through my MArch with a concentration in digital fabrication. Like most other places, the architecture field isn't exactly booming in Michigan, but it is getting better which is good for students like myself looking to get their foot in the door. Until then, school projects are my occupation.

    This was a gift shop myself and another student designed and fabricated for the Virgil H. Carr Cultural Arts Center in Detroit. Best experience i've ever had as a student. Budgets and schedules had to be met, designs had to be approved by the client, and unlike most student projects...it had to work.

    Initial concept rendering (after many other iterations).

    Finished Installation.


    The unbeveled perforations were evenly spaced so that shelving could be added/removed/changed based on the needs of the gift shop at any given time.


  52. #52
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    <-Structural Engineer (buildings only)
    We work as consultants manly to Architects, with few specialty contracts/clients.

    Work is progressing to probably 75% Revit company wide. Bluebeam is great for the electronic submittal process. Under 10% of my shop drawings have been on paper in the last 2 years. Multiple monitors is key to workflow.

    Right now I've got going: 3 and 5 story medical office buildings, a building renovation to a 1920 structure, four condo buildings (w/ 97 units between 2,300-400sqft each), an addition to an elementary school, two office building renovations and expansions, two retail store renovations and the addition of a 2nd floor to an old gas station.

    We are registered in 31 states. The Metro DC area has seen a noticeable increase in construction in the past 6-9 months.

    I believe one of the Architects I'm working with bikes too but I have yet to have that discussion.

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