Changing Careers in your 40's or later- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Changing Careers in your 40's or later

    "What if",..you had to change your career. You're in your late 30's 40's or later, and with or w/o a family to take care of. What would you do?
    And is your change a realistic one?
    Last edited by dadstoy; 08-01-2012 at 07:18 PM.

  2. #2
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    I work in research and love it, but it is long hours and stress. If I had to make a change, I would go to culinary school and open a restaurant. Simple ingredients, lots of flavor and family friendly would be the model.
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  3. #3
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    I recently turned 42. I live uber frugal, except for gear and have saved 10-25% of my income for well over 10 years. I'm also debt free. In a year, the last kid will be an adult, I'll sell my business and disappear. Riding my bike, the slopes and tropical waves around the globe. I haven't had more than four days off in a row in over ten years and I'm due. When I get back, I'll probably milk the system I've overpaid into all these years.
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vader View Post
    I recently turned 42. I live uber frugal, except for gear and have saved 10-25% of my income for well over 10 years. I'm also debt free. In a year, the last kid will be an adult, I'll sell my business and disappear. Riding my bike, the slopes and tropical waves around the globe. I haven't had more than four days off in a row in over ten years and I'm due. When I get back, I'll probably milk the system I've overpaid into all these years.
    You're my hero.

  5. #5
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    Without a family, I think I'd be the captain of a snorkeling boat in the Caribbean.

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    Do it. I went to a trade school for automotives and worked as a mechanic for 10 years doing automatic transmissions. I got burned out on the industry and never knowing how much my paycheck would be from one pay period to another and went into IT. I couldn't be happier, and I make better money.

  7. #7
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    I'd have to SERIOUSLY screw up for this to be possible....

    Fools will continue to buy $100 bikes; my employer has pretty liberal opportunities for other positions, and I have LOADS of managerial respect. I can pretty much be there was long as I need to be.

    Sadly, though -- the "What if..." is a little unnerving, as I'm 53 with extended family.
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  8. #8
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    Possibly upgrading to Cat1 in 2013… if I keep getting faster, I could be pro. Just need to keep enough time available for the training for it. Some of my teammates (who are considerably faster than me and in Cat1) are pushing me to upgrade to Cat1 even though I haven’t made any 1st place finishes in Cat2 (OK, so two 2nds, one 3rd, and one 4th this season—one of the 2nd places was on a pretty technical race in 100°F heat). If my weak-ass 24-hour-per-week part-time web development gig fell through tomorrow, I’d concentrate heavily on training for this supposed Cat1 upgrade.
    Don’t frail and blow if you’re going to Braille and Flow.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker View Post
    Possibly upgrading to Cat1 in 2013… if I keep getting faster, I could be pro. Just need to keep enough time available for the training for it. Some of my teammates (who are considerably faster than me and in Cat1) are pushing me to upgrade to Cat1 even though I haven’t made any 1st place finishes in Cat2 (OK, so two 2nds, one 3rd, and one 4th this season—one of the 2nd places was on a pretty technical race in 100°F heat). If my weak-ass 24-hour-per-week part-time web development gig fell through tomorrow, I’d concentrate heavily on training for this supposed Cat1 upgrade.
    So are you saying you'd be a pro rider for a career change??
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  10. #10
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    I have had 4 different jobs in the last year and I am 42. The one I am at now I plan on staying there for sometime.

    If you need a change, do it. You only live once and it would suck to end up in your 70's with some crappy job your whole life.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by heyyall View Post
    I work in research and love it, but it is long hours and stress. If I had to make a change, I would go to culinary school and open a restaurant. Simple ingredients, lots of flavor and family friendly would be the model.
    And lots of long hours and stress :-)

  12. #12
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    You see,..Im in healthcare and this Obama plan could very well devastate my yearly income. So before it really takes affect, I want a plan.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vader View Post
    I recently turned 42. I live uber frugal, except for gear and have saved 10-25% of my income for well over 10 years. I'm also debt free. In a year, the last kid will be an adult, I'll sell my business and disappear. Riding my bike, the slopes and tropical waves around the globe. I haven't had more than four days off in a row in over ten years and I'm due. When I get back, I'll probably milk the system I've overpaid into all these years.
    That is awesome. I'm a few years older and have been fortunate to be gainfully employed my entire career and managed to make some correct/dumb luck moves with housing, jobs, etc. Once my kids are in college I am moving from East to West US. The kind of work I do can be from anywhere there is limited Internet connectivity so I can probably do better than scrape by working part time down the road.

    As for the original poster's query, I know quite a number of folks who were forced to start a second career in their 40's. One took a job out of desperation at Home Depot, got treated like crap and went to Lowe's. He moved to FL and is doing very well (probably making less than his last career but happy being less stressed and working less hours). Another was in sales and started an entry level IT career. In ~8 years he's done well. Never too late to try something different- just have to talk to people and find someone who's willing to give you an opportunity based less on paper credentials and more on real stuff

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    The government will decide for you.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vader View Post
    I recently turned 42. I live uber frugal, except for gear and have saved 10-25% of my income for well over 10 years. I'm also debt free. In a year, the last kid will be an adult, I'll sell my business and disappear. Riding my bike, the slopes and tropical waves around the globe. I haven't had more than four days off in a row in over ten years and I'm due. When I get back, I'll probably milk the system I've overpaid into all these years.
    You're my hero too!

  16. #16
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    I was in the automotive repair industry for over twenty years, and honestly burnt out, hard. Quit my GOOD paying job, lost my benefits, and did nothing for about 9 months.

    Woke up one day, drove down to a local vocational college and applied for an open instructor position. I was hired, taught for two years and was "promoted" and brought over to the administrative side, and found out that I love it. Less hours, no stress, better pay and amazing benefits.

    Sometimes you just have to do what's right for you, and hope for the best.

    Oh, and I'm married with three teenage boys, so things got a little tight money wise there for a while, but we made it.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by dadstoy View Post
    You see,..Im in healthcare and this Obama plan could very well devastate my yearly income. So before it really takes affect, I want a plan.
    I'm curious to how exactly it will affect your income? What type of work do you do?

  18. #18
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    I have been an insurance agent for nearly a decade (I'm 37) and recently have had feeling of being trapped, even though this is a very flexible job. I do well for myself and I am highly decorated with a ton of dusty sales award plaques - but I started to feel like I'm herding cats on meth with my clients, and the economy, although in the news it is "getting better" has affected a lot of my clients.

    My territory is broke, and it's frustrating when the agents in other territories are doing incredibly well in surrounding affluent cities. This year has been the worst year I've ever had with the exception of my first year.

    I was listening to the Joe Rogan podcast and he said something that struck a chord with me: "Something changes in a fighter when he realizes he's not going to be the best..."

    I think this is what happened to me. I've always *almost* got there, but have never attained where I want to be due to broke territories, wishy-washy prospect, etc. The Bay Area, Ca. is insanely expensive to live in and I don't have the luxury to quit to go to school.

    All that said, I was looking at a career change, but I've given up. Unfortunately, being a fraternal insurance agent, nobody wants to hire you. I've managed, trained, taught seminars, etc. but they're looking for that magical paper that says you sat in some classes about marketing. With my career I have pinned myself into a rut, and that sucks. I've given up looking and decided this will be the job I will retire with. Unless I do awful or break the law, I can't be fired. My career is a blessing and a curse.

    To call this "burn out" would be an understatement - but I am stuck. Unless I win the lottery or inherit a ton of cash, I'm am here for the long run. I've accepted my fate and just deal.

  19. #19
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    If I didn't have to worry too much about $$, the guys running shuttles out in colorado & moab seemed to enjoy their jobs. Take out-of-towner's out the the trail, dogs ride along in the van..lol good times. Prob not the best paying, but sure seemed stress free.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412 View Post
    So are you saying you'd be a pro rider for a career change??
    If the opportunity was possible, I’d go for it. Problem is I am married and have two young kids, so obviously there are serious roadblocks involved. Racing as a career is really demanding, without a lot of reward except for lots of pain and the occasional podium. I’m sick of sitting at a desk all freakin’ day long in front of a computer for work.
    Don’t frail and blow if you’re going to Braille and Flow.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    I have been an insurance agent for nearly a decade (I'm 37) and recently have had feeling of being trapped, even though this is a very flexible job. I do well for myself and I am highly decorated with a ton of dusty sales award plaques - but I started to feel like I'm herding cats on meth with my clients, and the economy, although in the news it is "getting better" has affected a lot of my clients.

    My territory is broke, and it's frustrating when the agents in other territories are doing incredibly well in surrounding affluent cities. This year has been the worst year I've ever had with the exception of my first year.

    I was listening to the Joe Rogan podcast and he said something that struck a chord with me: "Something changes in a fighter when he realizes he's not going to be the best..."

    I think this is what happened to me. I've always *almost* got there, but have never attained where I want to be due to broke territories, wishy-washy prospect, etc. The Bay Area, Ca. is insanely expensive to live in and I don't have the luxury to quit to go to school.

    All that said, I was looking at a career change, but I've given up. Unfortunately, being a fraternal insurance agent, nobody wants to hire you. I've managed, trained, taught seminars, etc. but they're looking for that magical paper that says you sat in some classes about marketing. With my career I have pinned myself into a rut, and that sucks. I've given up looking and decided this will be the job I will retire with. Unless I do awful or break the law, I can't be fired. My career is a blessing and a curse.

    To call this "burn out" would be an understatement - but I am stuck. Unless I win the lottery or inherit a ton of cash, I'm am here for the long run. I've accepted my fate and just deal.
    I don't see why you have to quit your job for more school. I have gotten my b.s and am halfway done with masters while still working, riding, being a dad and husband over the last 4 years. granted I'm not going to harvard but my school is decent and the education from there will continue to help me prosper.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adim_X View Post
    I don't see why you have to quit your job for more school. I have gotten my b.s and am halfway done with masters while still working, riding, being a dad and husband over the last 4 years. granted I'm not going to harvard but my school is decent and the education from there will continue to help me prosper.
    The fact that I have a commission-based job and work 70 hours a week, nights/weekends. Day starts at 6:30am and ends at 10:00pm. No paid time off, no sick days, no bonuses, no 401(k) - none of that. It's truly being a business owner. Feast or famine, and recently it's been famine.

    I try to throw in a couple of hours riding in between there everyday just to keep my sanity. My life is a hustle with little luxury. School is is something I can hope for when I'm old and retired. I already have two college degrees, but would like to get a degree in marketing... don't know how much that would pay off in terms of pay, though.

    I make great money - I'm just burned out. Big time.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    I'm curious to how exactly it will affect your income? What type of work do you do?
    I'm curious too because I'm finishing up my schooling in respiratory therapy and RT's are already paid too little, I'd hate to see them (us) get incomes cut even more.
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    My dad had 3 careers. He started out as a research engineer for Dupont and got laid off when their patents expired. While getting laid off was tramatic, in hindsight, he said it was the best thing that ever happened to him. He dabbled as a short-order cook and a career planner before he landed in his second career of owning a stereo store. He sold the store and spent a year teaching himself computer skills and started his third career as a database computer programmer.

    For me, I don't know what I'd do. I have fantasies of going back to school just to learn a new area, but I can't imagine a job that I'd enjoy more than the one I have now. If I had to change careers, the area of physical therapy is intriguing.

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    I'm 41 and in the same boat and have run a successful small business for the past 15 years. The downturn in the economy really hit hard this summer and after 25 years in the business I'm feeling a bit burnt. I just want to do something completely different and not have the stress that comes with being self employed. I just feel things have run their course and I'm ready to start the second act of my life.

  26. #26
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    I'd seriously go back to managing animal shelters.

    I worked them throughout college (bachelors and masters) and while the pay low, was emotionally draining, thankless, gross, involved physical labor, and getting bit and scratched occasionally, thinking back on it now in the end

    I got payed to play with dogs and cats all day.

  27. #27
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    Dion, you seem like a nice dude. I hope you figure something out, because wages aren't worth misery. There is a book I am going to download tonight call '48 Days to the work you love'. I am sure it might have some christian undertones since I heard about it through Dave Ramsey, but I can tune that sh1t out. I don't love or hate my job, it provides for my family fairly well, but I would really like to find a passion and follow it.

  28. #28
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    I quit a job in electronics engineering to take a government job. Went from a HIGH stress environment to an extremely low one. I am only 27 but I can tell you that my health is considerably better now and I contribute that wholly to my job change.... well maybe a little to my discovery of this amazing world of MTB!

    Good luck to all of you and keep your chin up... keep looking... and take some chances. You only live once, enjoy it.

  29. #29
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    At 40 I got out of the computer business and became a fireman.


    They actually pay me to drive a fire truck.
    It's such a fine line between idiocy and genius.

  30. #30
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    6 years ago (40) I left a career designing trucks for use on high power lines. I now work in Subsea Robotics. I get to play with the coolest equipment. Best move I ever made.
    With my goldfish shorts swimming around my toes.

  31. #31
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    think i would study to be a pâtisserie and open up a work live store spot...

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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    I'm curious to how exactly it will affect your income? What type of work do you do?
    Im a surgical assistant in the operating room. When we assist a surgeon, afterwards we send a bill to the patients insurance company. The ins co then cuts us a check for services performed. It pays very well,..by the surgery, not by the hour. But rumors say that the ins co's will cut back the amount paid out to us,..including doctors. This is across the board all insurance companies. So instead of doing about on average 10-15 surgeries in a 5day week,..we would have to do at least triple that amount in a week, to maybe make what we make now.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcmark View Post
    Do it. I went to a trade school for automotives and worked as a mechanic for 10 years doing automatic transmissions. I got burned out on the industry and never knowing how much my paycheck would be from one pay period to another and went into IT. I couldn't be happier, and I make better money.
    This is what Im thinging of,..something in computers.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by heyyall View Post
    I work in research and love it, but it is long hours and stress. If I had to make a change, I would go to culinary school and open a restaurant. Simple ingredients, lots of flavor and family friendly would be the model.
    Lol. Restaurant business is one of the longest hours with lowest pay. Plus %80 failure rate on new restaurants.

    sent from one of my 4 gold leafed iphone4s's

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by dadstoy View Post
    Im a surgical assistant in the operating room. When we assist a surgeon, afterwards we send a bill to the patients insurance company. The ins co then cuts us a check for services performed. It pays very well,..by the surgery, not by the hour. But rumors say that the ins co's will cut back the amount paid out to us,..including doctors. This is across the board all insurance companies. So instead of doing about on average 10-15 surgeries in a 5day week,..we would have to do at least triple that amount in a week, to maybe make what we make now.
    Interesting, we have some of highest medical costs in the industrialized world now.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Interesting, we have some of highest medical costs in the industrialized world now.
    Not because of Doctors. We need tort reform - this new health care bill is going to kill this country.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinning Lizard View Post
    Not because of Doctors. We need tort reform - this new health care bill is going to kill this country.
    I don't buy that. The rest of the world provides care for everyone and is doing just fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    I don't buy that. The rest of the world provides care for everyone and is doing just fine.
    LMAO, Seriously? We are the ONLY country where Doc's have to pay up to 5 million a year for mal practice insurance.

    And the rest of the world? Have you lived in these other great countries with their health care. I have and guess what, it absolutely sucks. My grandfather just went blind last year waiting on a damn list for eye surgery, he was on the list for 18 months because he was over 80. You libs make me freakin puke, do your self a favor and move to these other countries and STFU.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinning Lizard View Post
    LMAO, Seriously? We are the ONLY country where Doc's have to pay up to 5 million a year for mal practice insurance.

    And the rest of the world? Have you lived in these other great countries with their health care. I have and guess what, it absolutely sucks. My grandfather just went blind last year waiting on a damn list for eye surgery, he was on the list for 18 months because he was over 80. You libs make me freakin puke, do your self a favor and move to these other countries and STFU.
    Sorry to insight so much anger ... Docs do pay way too much. Where is your grandpa living? I don't know what the solution is and don't even claim to and perhaps we'll all go down the tubs like you said; but we spend a lot on healthcare and often times have worse outcomes than some other "advanced" countries. As far as moving, my family came in the 1600s and helped make the country; so I don't think that's an option at this point.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adim_X View Post
    I don't love or hate my job, it provides for my family fairly well, but I would really like to find a passion and follow it.
    Thanks for the kind words! Yes, this is exactly how I feel...

    I guess, since I work for a charitable, fraternal benefit society, I get a good feeling that my organization is helping others all around the world. Also, handing widows and widowers a large, tax-free check for a life insurance policy I advised is rewarding, as is servicing others with their retirement and insurance cash values in times of need. So, it's not all bad... but for the amount of work I do, I should be making twice what I'm making. I don't get paid for all that service work that is rewarding.

    Sounds weird, but my dream job is to teach art. I was Creative Director with an art background before I got stuck in this insurance thing, with a couple of US design patents under my belt. Back in my day, I had a few art exhibitions as a student. I loved it - it's what I was really good at. But... as you probably know, it doesn't pay the bills.

    One of my instructors was Dave Fleming, a former industrial designer that was extremely influential in the 1969 Ford Mustang (he designed the entire rear end). After a great career as a commercial artist, he "retired" and taught industrial design at San Jose State University and is now a fine artist. THAT is my dream. Move back to Santa Cruz, Ca. (my home town), ride, chill... seems only attainable with time, though.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Sorry to insight so much anger ... Docs do pay way too much. Where is your grandpa living? I don't know what the solution is and don't even claim to and perhaps we'll all go down the tubs like you said; but we spend a lot on healthcare and often times have worse outcomes than some other "advanced" countries. As far as moving, my family came in the 1600s and helped make the country; so I don't think that's an option at this point.
    Sorry, but it does me angry when I see my family get zero healthcare in the same system we are not trying to use. My family is from the UK and I am the only American in it. My Mother's Uncle died last year in his 60's waiting for heart surgery. He was on the wait list for 2 years. Not a transplant just surgery.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinning Lizard View Post
    Sorry, but it does me angry when I see my family get zero healthcare in the same system we are not trying to use. My family is from the UK and I am the only American in it. My Mother's Uncle died last year in his 60's waiting for heart surgery. He was on the wait list for 2 years. Not a transplant just surgery.
    Ok, so that system bites too. Of course all this happens everyday in the US for people without health insurance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Ok, so that system bites too. Of course all this happens everyday in the US for people without health insurance.
    That is not true. If you cannot afford insurance EVERY state has state aid. My friends kid had a serious illness and the state picked up the entire bill. The problem is the people that do not want insurance then buy a BMW or a house that is way over budget then cry when they have no money. All comes back to personal responsibility, which seems to be very lacking in the US.

    I make $13.00 and hr and have 2 kids and pay out of pocket my own healthcare plan. No problem.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinning Lizard View Post
    That is not true. If you cannot afford insurance EVERY state has state aid. My friends kid had a serious illness and the state picked up the entire bill. The problem is the people that do not want insurance then buy a BMW or a house that is way over budget then cry when they have no money. All comes back to personal responsibility, which seems to be very lacking in the US.

    I make $13.00 and hr and have 2 kids and pay out of pocket my own healthcare plan. No problem.
    So somebody picks up the tab after all I guess and why should it be the government? This is the problem with doing nothing, somebody still has to pay. If we like our system as is and want to go with an every person for themselves winner take all approach, then we need to make people suffer the consequences of not planning ahead. The state and all states are tapped out.

    You must live somewhere super cheap, you couldn't do that on $13 an hour in California.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    So somebody picks up the tab after all I guess and why should it be the government? This is the problem with doing nothing, somebody still has to pay. If we like our system as is and want to go with an every person for themselves winner take all approach, then we need to make people suffer the consequences of not planning ahead. The state and all states are tapped out.

    You must live somewhere super cheap, you couldn't do that on $13 an hour in California.
    Actually our state just posted a 129 million dollar surplus. There is a reason CA is so expensive that is because of the government. Government never helps a situation they only ever make it worse. Private enterprise is the only solution to the countries problems. Me and you need to find solutions, not the government who only cares about money and power, they definitely do not care about us.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinning Lizard View Post
    Actually our state just posted a 129 million dollar surplus. There is a reason CA is so expensive that is because of the government. Government never helps a situation they only ever make it worse. Private enterprise is the only solution to the countries problems. Me and you need to find solutions, not the government who only cares about money and power, they definitely do not care about us.
    After having worked with and around government I agree they sometimes cause more problems than they fix. But, my state is expensive because of other reasons too. $13 an hour only goes so far when when a crappy house costs $500k.

  47. #47
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    I recently [last year] worked with a career counselor to try and figure out what I could do for work that might make me happier than what I'm doing now. After several sessions of surveys, testing, interviews with people in the fields I wanted to get into, introspection and whatnot, I found that career change was not in the cards.

    The fields I wanted to get into pay poorly, and have long development paths. 50hr weeks, no vacation and $20/hr AFTER I do a 4 year degree? Meh. I can mow lawns and shovel snow full-time and earn that now if I want. Hell, night shift at 7-11 pays $15, and I could walk to work. Instead of changing jobs, I changed my attitude. I started caring less about getting satisfaction out of my job.

    I'm a contractor, and only bill when I'm working, so when I'm done for the day I leave. 6 hours in, 9 hours in, whatever. I get up and walk away. If it's a really nice day out, and whatever I am working on can wait until tomorrow, it does. After I leave work, I don't think about my job. When I finish a contract [every 6-12 months], I look around and see what's available in my current field or in other fields. If there's nothing available immediately, I don't stress - what good would it do? I go to the mountains and build trail or bike or snowboard. I help friends with their projects. Eventually, something decent comes up.

    My wife doesn't support my choice to not work. She works full-time [and likes what she does], and expects me to, which is understandable. I make sure I save money for the days/months when I'm not working. There is no negative effect on our standard of living. As a bonus, I'm a lot more fun to be around, which she does support, so it's not too bad. Long term, I plan to stay in this field about 2-3 years beyond when the house is paid off. At that point I will go back to building trail for $20/hr and be more fun to be around all the time instead of for a month or two here and there.

  48. #48
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    I've spent a substantial portion of my life in school and subsequent training to do what I'm currently doing. I'm very well trained and am very good at what I do . . . . I already know that I will not being doing this for the rest of my life. I see at LEAST one more career in the cards for me, and that will likely be as a professor at a college or small university.

    12 months salary for 9 months of work? Check.
    Make your own schedule? Check.
    Tenure? CHECK.
    Alcohol may lead nowhere, but it sure is the scenic route!

  49. #49
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    I'm 45 and have been in sales for over 20 yrs and am sick of it. Worked in retail sales and the last 16 yrs in business to business. Sales I'm in now is Industrial and is pretty tuff right now.

    I assistant coach my sons soccer team and found I love working with and being around the kids. Maybe i should have been a teacher like my wife? Seems too late for that now, especially with all the districts cutting teaching jobs.

    I'm lucky in that my wife tells me if I hate sales then make a change, sadly I don't know what to do though. I don't want to manage people and I am frankly sick of dealing with "clients".

    If there was a job where I could work M-F with dogs, kids, and bikes I'd sign up in a minute. I'd love to open a small bike shop- I can do repairs but I don't think it would succeed. A few local ones have gone out of business just recently.

    I scroll the job boards and sometimes see job postings that sound like something I'd like to do but then I see the pay rate, and I just can't bring myself to pursue it. They are usually much less than I make now.

    oh well

  50. #50
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    This is a very timely thread for me. I am about to turn 42, work in retail sales/management and absolutely HATE it. I am looking to make a change soon, but just don't know where to turn after doing the same thing for 20+ years.

  51. #51
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    I currently own my own fitness business, but I'm burnt out. I am almost 40 and I just started my master's program in counseling psychology. I enjoy helping people discover things about themselves and I know I have to work for myself.

    A friend of mine is an MFT who makes six figures, sets his own schedule, and takes 4 vacations a year. I may be able to intern for him when I get through my program in two years. I have learned to find the people who do what you want to do and learn from them.

    While there is or used to be a stigma about starting a new career over 40, I find that doors open when you show passion and enthusiasm for something. People want to help you succeed if they can tell you're going to be a good investment of their time/money/effort. Finding mentors is huge during career changes.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by daves4mtb View Post
    I want to get away, live somewhere scenic, commute to work by bike or bus, live frugally, drink at a neighborhood bar, know people in my neighborhood, and settle down with a late cougar stage woman who still is reasonably horny, has some education, and can tolerate my bike riding habit. The live happily ever after. What I do for a living would be almost secondary, if I can pull that off!
    You can get in line right behind me! I am all for that lifestyle but my wife is not at all for it.... so here I am doin the daily grind.

  53. #53
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    I have worked in health care 20+ years as a clinician and administrator/manager, (burn out and stress levels are high ) What helped me wasn't changing careers per se..my education foundation is nursing and my field specialty is valued. So I've managed to switch up roles and places of employment over the years which kept me mentally stimulated and led to greater job satisfaction.

    My clinical skills are transferable in practically every setting (management/leadership, research, clinical practice). Having a graduate degree helped open doors for leadership positions. I never thought of switching careers but when I do see an opportunity for personal or professional growth its within heath care I do explore the possibility of change.

    When I mentor students or do performance reviews with staff, I encourage and support methods to build capacity so they don;t end up being pigeon holed and frustrated.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dion View Post
    I have been an insurance agent for nearly a decade (I'm 37) and recently have had feeling of being trapped, even though this is a very flexible job. I do well for myself and I am highly decorated with a ton of dusty sales award plaques - but I started to feel like I'm herding cats on meth with my clients, and the economy, although in the news it is "getting better" has affected a lot of my clients.

    My territory is broke, and it's frustrating when the agents in other territories are doing incredibly well in surrounding affluent cities. This year has been the worst year I've ever had with the exception of my first year.

    I was listening to the Joe Rogan podcast and he said something that struck a chord with me: "Something changes in a fighter when he realizes he's not going to be the best..."

    I think this is what happened to me. I've always *almost* got there, but have never attained where I want to be due to broke territories, wishy-washy prospect, etc. The Bay Area, Ca. is insanely expensive to live in and I don't have the luxury to quit to go to school.

    All that said, I was looking at a career change, but I've given up. Unfortunately, being a fraternal insurance agent, nobody wants to hire you. I've managed, trained, taught seminars, etc. but they're looking for that magical paper that says you sat in some classes about marketing. With my career I have pinned myself into a rut, and that sucks. I've given up looking and decided this will be the job I will retire with. Unless I do awful or break the law, I can't be fired. My career is a blessing and a curse.

    To call this "burn out" would be an understatement - but I am stuck. Unless I win the lottery or inherit a ton of cash, I'm am here for the long run. I've accepted my fate and just deal.
    This, almost word for word, is my story too. Insurance agent, 38 and almost 39, trapped, doing well, but a curse. The only difference, I have not settled with the fact that I will be in it for life. I'm in the mode of seeing what options are there, and while I haven't found one yet, I am determined to. Hey Dion, want to start our own agency? I am P&C and L&H licensed myself. Only open from 10am-Noon, and the rest of the day we go riding!
    *2016 Transition Patrol Carbon (aka: Sweet Pea)

  55. #55
    Good, green, Oregon.
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    You guys will love this negative rep I received for the above post! Too funny!

    Trapped? Nope, you're a 1% in the world. Be glad you weren't born in India, a whiner like you would starve.
    Totally man, you're dead on!
    *2016 Transition Patrol Carbon (aka: Sweet Pea)

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giant Chachi View Post
    You guys will love this negative rep I received for the above post! Too funny!



    Totally man, you're dead on!
    Too funny. Guess what, this is America. We expect more, dare to dream.

  57. #57
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    I didn't post that rep. That said, I traveled to India once and after that, when I start to get down about being a burnt-out over 40 "successful" person I think back to some things I saw on that trip and it does give me perspective. I also like the line from Drew Carey:

    "Oh, you hate your job? Why didn't you say so? There's a support group for that. It's called EVERYBODY, and they meet at the bar."

    Still, once the kids are grown I may just pack up and start a charter boat business in the Caribbean.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeginnerCycling View Post

    "Oh, you hate your job? Why didn't you say so? There's a support group for that. It's called EVERYBODY, and they meet at the bar."
    .
    Awesome. I have worked for the same company for 13 years and have done quite well. Only recently things have started to change. Lots of layoffs and those of us still there have to take up the slack. Recently when we went through some regional changes my job title changed. They were supposed to re-access my job duties and pay with the assurance that I would not lose money. They changed me from hourly to salary without bothering to tell me. One day I came in and I couldn't clock in anymore. When I looked over my pay they did not take overtime or on call pay into consideration so they basically cut my pay by $11,000 dollars which was a clear breach of contract for me. Needless to say I was not pleased. I left work immediately and had my lawyer call them. 2 days later I had an offer on the table for an additional $18,000 yearly and a 2 year contract. Sometimes lawyers are good.

  59. #59
    toscano
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    "Changing Careers in your 40's or later"

    For me, 45 yo, will be a thing to do in 2013 because media tell us that the crisis can be overcome at the end of the year but the reality of international finance is light years away from the reality of the people.
    My shop is destroyed by the fall in consumer spending and a tax increase that has no logic in the real world.
    Rich people do not spend their money because they are afraid of being persecuted by taxes, poor people are not spending because they have no money, the middle class is long dead. So no more businesses in shops etc.
    Fortunately houses around florence maintain a good price, so the only solution will be to sell and buy a bigger house elsewhere and rent some rooms to tourists.
    Surely I can not have for my daughter to the standards that my parents have done for me.
    Last edited by toscano; 01-16-2013 at 06:25 AM.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by toscano View Post
    For me, 45 yo, will be a thing to do in 2013 because media tell us that the crisis can be overcome at the end of the year but the reality of international finance is light years away from the reality of the people.
    My shop is destroyed by the fall in consumer spending and a tax increase that has no logic in the real world.
    Rich people do not spend their money because they are afraid of being persecuted by taxes, poor people are not spending because they have no money, the middle class is long dead. So no more businesses in shops etc.
    Fortunately houses around florence maintain a good price, so the only solution will be to sell and buy a bigger house elsewhere and rent some rooms to tourists.
    Surely I can not have for my daughter to the standards that my parents have done for me.
    Just when we thought it was bad for us someone comes along from Italia to tell us how it really is. All we now is a grecian to show up and show the italiano how bad it can really be. Bummer about the business but I think you have a good idea, all italy really needs to do is spend some governmental dollars on promoting itself to the rest of the world as a world class vacation resort and you guys will be set. Can't walk a few steps in italy without bumping into something that predates our entire country here.
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  61. #61
    toscano
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher View Post
    Just when we thought it was bad for us someone comes along from Italia to tell us how it really is. All we now is a grecian to show up and show the italiano how bad it can really be. Bummer about the business but I think you have a good idea, all italy really needs to do is spend some governmental dollars on promoting itself to the rest of the world as a world class vacation resort and you guys will be set. Can't walk a few steps in italy without bumping into something that predates our entire country here.
    I am just trying to figure out what is going on.
    Greece and Italy have different histories and different problems, I had the pleasure of visiting Greece several times, but my memories are memories of a tourist, they are not memories of an economist.
    Italy is a country of stark contrasts, traveling from north to south is like visiting three different countries. This is difficult to understand for foreigners.
    The word tourism comes from the "grand tour" immortalized by Goethe in his book "trip to Italy", but the real problem of modern economies is that we all fear of becoming poor.
    My idea is a small way to unhook a bit from a system that I do not like, even if I lived in another country.
    The future is uncertain

  62. #62
    toscano
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    Quote Originally Posted by daves4mtb View Post
    Greece and Italy's economic problems differ in the details. They both are suffering from the same thing, excess debt.
    The way these countries came to public debt is different because they are different countries with different economies, these are not details.

  63. #63
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    At 43, I shut down my real estate brokerage and went to work in the oil field. I went from pestering my friends and neighbors for business to driving a big rig for an oil servicing company. Hours are long, pay and benefits ar great, and the work is very interesting. I'm on duty for 2 weeks then I get a week off. My only regret....I wish i had made the change years ago.

  64. #64
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    Re: Changing Careers in your 40's or later

    Quote Originally Posted by ShaleBreaker View Post
    At 43, I shut down my real estate brokerage and went to work in the oil field. I went from pestering my friends and neighbors for business to driving a big rig for an oil servicing company. Hours are long, pay and benefits ar great, and the work is very interesting. I'm on duty for 2 weeks then I get a week off. My only regret....I wish i had made the change years ago.
    I love this kind of story.

  65. #65
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    I did this although I didn't have to change jobs. I was an mechanic and electrician in the yacht repair business. Over the years, I played three roles: Employee, manager, and business owner.

    When I left, I was at the top of my game and could stand toe-to-toe with anybody when it came to ability. The only thing I lacked was the massive capital required to buy my own marina. This required me to work (twice) with or for young heirs who had no business or work experience but who could afford to purchase such facilities. It went about as well as expected...

    At 42, my wife and I moved out of the state for me to pursue additional schooling in the renewable energy field. Thankfully, I graduate this May and plan to move into controlled environment agriculture for my next career. It's not widespread, but I feel it is the future of food production.

    Things I have learned: College is ridiculously expensive; I hope it was worth it. There are some serious issues with education in our country, both at the high-school level and the university system. I'm sit in classes in shear astonishment at the low intellectual level exhibited by both professors and students. Quite disappointing in that regard.

    If there are any parents here who would like to know how to maximize their education dollar and how to also help ensure their child succeeds in college, feel free to PM me.

    -Lule

  66. #66
    sof
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    In the software company I work for, we take on undergraduates (that's people doing a degree for anyone who doesn't know - though you probably all do, but now I can't be bothered deleting, which is weird, because I've spent longer on this over the top excessive parenthesis) each year. One of them last year was in his late 40's and he'd given up his business to start a new career. Wife, kids, mortgage. He had a bit of cash saved up, closed the business and worked part time here and there to make ends meet while doing a degree.

    At the end of this year, he'll start a new job in the software industry, again make enough money to support his family and will be far happier than he has been in his previous professions. Plus, as it turns out, he's really quite good at programming. Bonus.

  67. #67
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    I work in Healthcare IT sales and it is booming! There is such a lack of qualified people with knowledge of the healthcare industry, that I'm confident you could find something to do that would pay at least as much or double what you're making now. All the docs and staff are getting hit hard, but the vendors and healthcare companies are cashing in on Obamacare. Go work for an EMR company or something. They'd love to have you, I'm sure.

    But don't chase the money - do what you love:

    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

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