Camping....- Mtbr.com

View Poll Results: How do you camp?

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  • On the ground. Tents are for sissies

    6 5.66%
  • In a tent

    74 69.81%
  • I've got an RV or trailer

    25 23.58%
  • Ew camping is dirty

    10 9.43%
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Thread: Camping....

  1. #1
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    Camping....

    Figured we could do a camping thread. We love to camp. Not just my wife and I but our whole family. I was just learning to crawl the first time I went camping. Most of the time we go "dispersed" camping. Without a campground. In the winter we camp at campgrounds because the mountains are pretty much closed because of snow.

    I have camped in the desert which can get very cold in the winter btw to Alpine tundra at 11k feet in Colorado. However I have never bike camped. Maybe a plan for this summer.

    Who else loves to camp and how?
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  2. #2
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    Saw this coming.

    My childhood growing up in the 1960’s and 1970’s. Tent camping with a 5 kid family. Three tents in the campsite. My parents had a large dome tent for them. The kind that you put the poles in then get inside and pull down and the tent pops open. You have to pull down hard enough to get the mechanism at the top of the dome to lock. Made by Coleman and not too many were made. I’m pretty sure my dad still has the tent up in the garage rafters. Probably hasn’t been used since the 1970’s. Then there was a large 8 person pole tent which my 3 sisters used and my brother and I shared a pup tent. Mostly state park camping in Upstate NY and Canada. Some in Colorado. We always had a Red Chevy station wagon. That was my dads go to vehicle every time he’d get a new vehicle it had to be a Red Chevy station wagon. We’d pull a snowmobile trailer that my dad converted for camping by making a plywood box that mounted to the top to carry all our gear. A custom made canvas tarp with snaps that covered it. After a few years doing that we ended up buying 14’ ski / power boat which took the place of the box trailer. We just packed everything in the boat and hauled it that way. Many trips to the Adirondack Mountains and always a campsite on a lake. Nothing like fishing, swimming, rafting, water skiing right in front of your campsite.

    Oh, and also we had a canvas tarp that covered the picnic table area.

    Thanks for the memories.
    Last edited by DIRTJUNKIE; 03-16-2018 at 08:38 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  3. #3
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    I was afraid you were going to beat me to it

  4. #4
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    Camping sucks. Stay at a hotel in a resort town for your riding needs. But seriously, camping keeps me sane. While we have a pretty plush little travel trailer, we also backpack , river trip and tent camp. A 7 day riding trip supported by the trailer is pure heaven. I think that camping is so important for kids and their development, that I now use it as a question to screen people during job interviews. RE: "Do you go camping, and if so, describe a recent camping trip". A really good way to judge someone's character. That question, plus "did you play with Lego's as a kid:, and "Please show me how to set up this ratchet strap." typically weed out the rest of the useless people out there.

    Bike camping is my favorite thing - so much so that every other time I'm camping without my bike, I constantly thinking that I wish I had my bike.
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  5. #5
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    My camping is pretty much relegated to our 24 Hr races, which consists of setting up the site for the purpose of the event (i.e. tents, pop-ups for the pits and food, campfire pit, etc). The experience of camping tends to be secondary to the racing. When the weather is nice, I prefer to sleep under the stars on a cot.
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  6. #6
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    Most of the time I take my bike camping. Unless it's a 4x4 trip. Not really recommended. I have several camping trips lined up this year already. Next weekend is a 4x4 trip with my dad, father in law, cousin and a friend. April bike buddies are going on a trip, June my wife and I might go to NM and check out the enchanted Forest event.

    AZ is tricky about camping it can be too cold or too hot. Nothing like camping in 90°+. The hardest part is fire danger. This year may not be so bad since we didn't get a lot of rain. If we get heavy rain we get plant growth. Come summer the underbrush dies and is prime for fires. Then they either close the forests or have extreme fire Bans. Camping without a fire isn't camping. And if you are in the mountains in August thru October you get severe monsoon thunderstorms. And that all makes camping awesome. Nothing like watching a tree 20ft away get hit by lightning.

  7. #7
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    I've camped all my life. We had a 12x12 canvas Coleman tent growing up, and for a few years we had a 21' travel trailer. We used those all over the western US and Canada.

    For present-day family "car" camping we have a 10x10 Eureka nylon tent and combination of cots & air pads or mattresses.

    I've been backpacking since I was 8. Most of the time we'd share a 2-person tent w/ rain fly because you never know what you'll wake up to in the middle of the night in the Sierra. Now I have a cool "modular" system with a bivy sack and a floorless hexagonal tarp. No bugs or rain? Sleep on top of the bivy. Bugs and no rain? Sleep inside the bivy. Light rain and a little wind? Sleep under the tarp pitched high for ventilation. Wind & rain? Pitch the tarp low and use the bivy for splash protection. All told with stakes & cords this weighs about 1 lb.

    I have never, and probably never will, snow camped. Not my cup o' tea (and I understand you spend a lot of time making those).
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  8. #8
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    ^^ I agree no snow camping. brrrrr!

    Desert camping, now that's fun. Joshua Tree is a great place, a buddy of mine owns 36acres in the middle of JT. We had some great times there, I've also backpacked the Sierras, Palm Springs, and Los Padres National Forest, where my buddy and I almost didn't make it out.

    I'm always in the bike packing forum, just checking stuff that looks like so much fun! That would be something I really like to do, not sure if alone though for the first time.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    And if you are in the mountains in August thru October you get severe monsoon thunderstorms. And that all makes camping awesome. Nothing like watching a tree 20ft away get hit by lightning.
    I have a favorite spot right on the edge of the rim off the Young Road that is awesome for watching monsoon storms role in.....

  10. #10
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    I camp, a lot. I like to get out and away from people and find that gem of a camp spot. Sometimes I'll spend hours driving the logging roads, enjoy a road soda or two to explore and find potential good camping. I have found some really nice spots that now serve as a hub for me and my buddies on wknd trips. There are endless miles of dirt road in WA and OR, endless.

    I've been around and as far as I'm concerned there is not a better environment than the Cascades. Big fires, cold swimming holes, vistas, freinds, big days on the mtn, beers, cooking on an open fire, and star filled nights, what else is there?
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  11. #11
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    Depends on what I'm doing.

    I'll tent/hammock camp, but I also have a small camping trailer that's basically a hard-sided tent with storage and a memory foam mattress. I find the nicer bed certainly helps me get a really good night's sleep to be fresh to ride the next morning.


    IMG_20170422_191004_796 by Nate, on Flickr

    Tents or hammocks for canoe camping.


    Angelina River Canoe Trip by Nate, on Flickr

    or backpacking


    DSCF0001 by Nate, on Flickr

    Same thing for bikepacking, though I haven't done one of those trips yet.

  12. #12
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    Camping on the weekends when I was in high school with no adult supervision was the best!
    This space intentionally left blank. We apologise for any inconvenience.

  13. #13
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    I just posted some of my backpacking adventure in the eggs thread, oops.

    I've promised my son we'd go camping this spring. My folks have a cabin up in the Blue Ridge Mountains in North Georgia so maybe we'll drive up there after work some Friday and then head out Saturday morning, though one night of camping is really too short. He's gotten into fly finishing and I'm getting back into it.

    I also have a big kayak and would love to paddle somewhere and camp and also try bike packing but I'm not sure where you can really do either of those around me.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    ^^ I agree no snow camping. brrrrr!
    As I mentioned above I did a lot of tent camping with family growing up. As an adult my camping has been on and off. I did however do several winter tent camping trips. Brrrrrrr..is right. Those trips were in the High Country of Colorado on Elk hunts in my late teens early 20’s. I don’t care how bundled up you are you still freeze.

    One of those winter Elk hunts was quite memorable. Went to 8,500’ elevation to Red Feathers Lakes, Colorado. A buddy and I, 4x4’ed in, then hiked 2 miles into the back country. Arrived right before dark and set up camp. No snow on the ground upon arrival. Got up later than planned after sunrise. Unzipped the tent to 2’ of fresh power dead still sunny blue skies and gorgeous. As we headed out we came upon some fresh Mountain Lion tracks just 100’ from camp. The tracks circled our campsite and then left. The cat never came in to our camp and we never saw it. Talk about a bone chilling feeling. Great camping experience though.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    As I mentioned above I did a lot of tent camping with family growing up. As an adult my camping has been on and off. I did however do several winter tent camping trips. Brrrrrrr..is right. Those trips were in the High Country of Colorado on Elk hunts in my late teens early 20’s. I don’t care how bundled up you are you still freeze.

    One of those winter Elk hunts was quite memorable. Went to 8,500’ elevation to Red Feathers Lakes, Colorado. A buddy and a I, 4x4’ed in, then hiked 2 miles into the back country. Arrived right before dark and set up camp. No snow on the ground upon arrival. Got up later than planned after sunrise. Unzipped the tent to 2’ of fresh power dead still sunny blue skies and gorgeous. As we headed out we came upon some fresh Mountain Lion tracks just 100’ from camp. The tracks circled our campsite and then left. The cat never came in to our camp and we never saw it. Talk about a bone chilling feeling. Great camping experience though.
    Wow - that is bone chilling! We had fresh bear tracks up in Los Padres. We decided to have breakfast @ Carl's Jr. in Gorman and we got food poison out that! I must have gotten sick at least 20x my buddy wasn't as bad but it was a struggle to set camp, we managed to get some sleep, the next day coming back down with almost no water towards the end.. trying to find his truck, and Mr. Bear had just come by.

    This was right after 9/11 - We had already planned it way in advance, and given the situation, we said f-k it! and went.. there wasn't a soul around. We still remember this as we were very lucky to make it out. Found the truck and bolted, arrived at some gas station, the guy looked at us and said: "what happened to you guys" in my best Hindu accent.
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  16. #16
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    inspired by the egg thread I see

    camping was a big part of me growing up. We did all tent, or on the ground of the conditions were right. Everything from hike/ski in with all the gear on us, set up; repeat the next day; to State Park type camping....back the truck up, then unload the tents and gear. we never RV'd. Never had electricity, or other "modern" assistance other than batteries in flashlights. Really also never used white gas or kerosene except in extreme cold

    Dad was an old school Scoutmaster/outdoorsman - taught us all outdoors skills at an early age.

    Hiked the part of the AT that goes from Gatlinburg TN to Harrisburg PA back in the 90's when my sister was thru-hiking. That was awesome, and the whole time I was thinking: "this would be sooo much better on a bike!"

    Now, camping mostly revolves around getting to biking spots, but is still also motivated by getting to the outdoors, which to me is the closest thing to a church I can think of. We still mostly go to the central and northern part of Michigan, as well as the UP, and around Lake Placid in New York. I prefer to camp in cooler weather, and northern terrain. Would much rather be out in 20*-70*F...begrudgingly will camp in the summer

    It has been cool getting my step-kids into camping...before I came around, "being outdoors" meant going from the car to the mall, or the friends house etc...taught them how to canoe this summer. That was fun
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  17. #17
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    These quotes are brought over from the egg thread:


    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Sounds similar to my childhood. Tent camping with a 5 kid family. A 3 tent campsite. My parents had a large dome tent for them. The kind that you put the poles in then get inside and pull down and the tent pops open. You have to pull down hard enough to get the mechanism at the top of the dome to lock. Made by Coleman and not too many were made. I’m pretty sure my dad still has the tent up in the garage rafters. Probably hasn’t been used since the 1970’s. Then there was a large 8 person pole tent which my 3 sisters used and my brother and I shared a pup tent. Mostly state park camping in Upstate NY and Canada. Some in Colorado. We always had a Red Chevy station wagon. That was my dads go to vehicle every time he’d get a new vehicle it had to be a Red Chevy station wagon. We’d pull a snowmobile trailer that my dad converted for camping by making a plywood box that mounted to the top to carry all our gear. A custom made canvas tarp with snaps that covered it. After a few years doing that we ended up buying 14’ ski / power boat which took the place of the box trailer. We just packed everything in the boat and hauled it that way. Many trips to the Adirondack Mountains and always a campsite on a lake. Nothing like fishing, swimming, rafting, water skiing right in front of your campsite. There were some eggs in there as well.

    Oh, and also we had a canvas tarp that covered the picnic table area.

    Thanks for the memories.
    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    we did rough camping as well...would either hike in, drive in and park, but sleep in tents, or in the winter, cross country ski in sometimes, gear on our backs. Usually it was a week long event either in Michigan, Canada, or somewhere in upstate New York. The only time we would retreat to the back of the (1972 Ford F-150) truck was when the bugs were too much, or in dangerous weather.

    We had old cast iron pans, and old military mess kits usually. 2 North Face dome tents - 1 for me and my sister, one . for mom and dad....always built the fire from scratch with wood from the area...we sometimes did State Park camping, but it was usually rougher than that
    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    No problem!!! My dads "go to" truck was the green F-150....had a '72, then a '92, then a 2013. Always standard shift. No air conditioning....He can't drive anymore due to Alzheimers coming on, so we sold the last one, but it was always that truck...with a Hop-Cap top on the back.

    And the canvas tarp...I ABSOLUTELY remember that smell...we had the same thing. Big military issue olive drab green, like 20'x20' or something. It was from our Boy Scout camping stuff. We used the pup tents as well sometimes

    Our sites were always on or near a lake, in a pine forest, and remote. We built furniture out of lashing fallen branches and stuff together with twine. Dug the poop pit/latrine out, or used an outhouse...used water from the rivers or lakes...back when you could do that with out much fear of getting sick, though we also always had the old iodine pills that would fizz like Alka Seltzer just in case.

    We also had an aluminum canoe tied to the top of the truck, and my BMX and old Schwinn bikes in the back of the truck...lots of early "mountain biking" going on there

    'twas good times!!! I still mostly camp like that now with the fam, but my fiance will not accept outhouses...we always have to be near a regular bath facility. I have weened her into most other aspects of "roughing it" though....she had never camped before we met. Ever. That is so weird to me
    Funny, our tarp was the same olive green canvas 20’x20’ and had that same musty smell. Folded up into a square after each trip. Then when we got back home my dad would have to spread it out on the back lawn to let it dry out. It didn’t matter how long we let it dry out. It always retained that same musty smell.

    Almost every one of those numerous year after year mid summer trips into the Adirondacks always produced some serious down pours. Which brings another camping experience to mind. After we’d set up camp before we could go off to play my dad always made us dig about 4-6” deep trench around each tent with a trench on the downside that took the water away from the tent. If you didn’t do this it would be highly likely you’d wake up floating inside your tent.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Wow - that is bone chilling! We had fresh bear tracks up in Los Padres. We decided to have breakfast @ Carl's Jr. in Gorman and we got food poison out that! I must have gotten sick at least 20x my buddy wasn't as bad but it was a struggle to set camp, we managed to get some sleep, the next day coming back down with almost no water towards the end.. trying to find his truck, and Mr. Bear had just come by.

    This was right after 9/11 - We had already planned it way in advance, and given the situation, we said f-k it! and went.. there wasn't a soul around. We still remember this as we were very lucky to make it out. Found the truck and bolted, arrived at some gas station, the guy looked at us and said: "what happened to you guys" in my best Hindu accent.
    Not a fun experience. Nothing worse than food poisoning in the outback. Cool to see bear tracks though.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  19. #19
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    Going winter/snow camping this weekend in the mountains with my two boys and some friends. We build a "luge" track down the hill for our toboggans/sleds with banked turns around trees, etc. We sleep in either tents or build a quinzee. The quinzee is much warmer than a tent, but a lot of work if there are a lot of people sleeping it. Grew up camping with a tent trailer, have been tenting since then (backpacking and car camping), but my wife finally wanted a trailer so picked up a used one last year. Used it for a few trips and also a few tent trips and still prefer the tent.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparkman999 View Post
    Going winter/snow camping this weekend in the mountains with my two boys and some friends. We build a "luge" track down the hill for our toboggans/sleds with banked turns around trees, etc. We sleep in either tents or build a quinzee. The quinzee is much warmer than a tent, but a lot of work if there are a lot of people sleeping it. Grew up camping with a tent trailer, have been tenting since then (backpacking and car camping), but my wife finally wanted a trailer so picked up a used one last year. Used it for a few trips and also a few tent trips and still prefer the tent.

    Sounds like a blast. I’m assuming the “Luge” track build was inspired by the Winter Olympics.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    These quotes are brought over from the egg thread:








    Funny, our tarp was the same olive green canvas 20’x20’ and had that same musty smell. Folded up into a square after each trip. Then when we got back home my dad would have to spread it out on the back lawn to let it dry out. It didn’t matter how long we let it dry out. It always retained that same musty smell.

    Almost every one of those numerous year after year mid summer trips into the Adirondacks always produced some serious down pours. Which brings another camping experience to mind. After we’d set up camp before we could go off to play my dad always made us dig about 4-6” deep trench around each tent with a trench on the downside that took the water away from the tent. If you didn’t do this it would be highly likely you’d wake up floating inside your tent.
    yep. I remember digging those trenches...I still do that even to this day, just to be sure. When we were young in Scouts and using the army pup tents with no floor, you HAD to do this, no matter what, or you were drenched. You still got wet from where you would accidentally touch the canvas sides causing water to drip through...or when you did this on purpose over your buddies sleeping area as a "joke", which was always returned back to you

    I am hoping to get a Tarptent Double Rainbow this summer with the bathtub type floor, but will still probably do the trenches because it is habit.

    Also, always remembered to make sure the tent is on a slight incline with your head at the top, so that blood does not rush to your head while you sleep. I did not do that on one camping trip, and was probably the sickest I have ever been the following day with a migraine like headache and lots of vomiting.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    yep. I remember digging those trenches...I still do that even to this day, just to be sure. When we were young in Scouts and using the army pup tents with no floor, you HAD to do this, no matter what, or you were drenched. You still got wet from where you would accidentally touch the canvas sides causing water to drip through...or when you did this on purpose over your buddies sleeping area as a "joke", which was always returned back to you

    I am hoping to get a Tarptent Double Rainbow this summer with the bathtub type floor, but will still probably do the trenches because it is habit.

    Also, always remembered to make sure the tent is on a slight incline with your head at the top, so that blood does not rush to your head while you sleep. I did not do that on one camping trip, and was probably the sickest I have ever been the following day with a migraine like headache and lots of vomiting.
    LOL - to all of the above. Been there done that. Also, we used plastic sheeting between the tent and the ground for the extra win!
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    LOL - to all of the above. Been there done that. Also, we used plastic sheeting between the tent and the ground for the extra win!
    yep...I remember my dad calling it "visquene"..it also had a distinct smell...like mildew and that vinyl smell...and never dried even if you left it out in the sun...and whe you went to the store to replace it and asked for visquene, no one knew what you were talking about...
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Sounds like a blast. I’m assuming the “Luge” track build was inspired by the Winter Olympics.
    Yup, is a lot of fun (except when you fly out of a corner and land in a tree well)!

    Here's part of the luge track from a few years ago:
    Camping....-luge-small.jpg

    And the boys standing/kneeling on top of the quinzee to show the strength of it. We've had 5+ adults standing on one without it collapsing. Typically the roof is about a foot thick.

    Camping....-top-quinzee.jpg

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    yep...I remember my dad calling it "visquene"..it also had a distinct smell...like mildew and that vinyl smell...and never dried even if you left it out in the sun...and whe you went to the store to replace it and asked for visquene, no one knew what you were talking about...
    Yep, visquene being the actual name for it. Commonly referred to it this way in the construction trades. Homeowner civilians call it “plastic sheeting”. I work in the Home retail industry and coincidentally only a week ago a customer asked one of my co-workers and good friends where the visquene was. She looked at him dumbfounded then turned and looked at me. I said right this way Sir. As I’m laughing with both of them following me I commented that it’s reffered to as plastic sheeting to most people but actually named visquene by most in construction trades. We all had a great laugh about it. She learned something that day.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  26. #26
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    Grew up camping, it WAS the summer family vacay. And an old canvas tent. Up graded to a pop trailer for a while. Still camp every year. Bikepacking is AWESOME, the best of both biking and camping( 'cept for that 60lb bike part). Hammock some too. Stealth camping as well. All good.

  27. #27
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    Unfortunately, there isn't an option for both RV and tent camping.

    We go camping in our small RV trailer for our family vacations since my wife's bad back won't allow her to sleep on the ground anymore. We'll haul the bikes in the back of the truck and pull the trailer to a state park or RV resort and spend the days riding the area trails. We don't have a TV in the trailer and will spend the evenings playing games in the campsite.

    I take my son out backpacking in the Cascades in addition to our RV trips. I should take him canoe camping again. Canoe camping is awesome because it's like backpacking, but you can bring a cooler of beer too.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo View Post
    I have a favorite spot right on the edge of the rim off the Young Road that is awesome for watching monsoon storms role in.....
    we like to camp near milk ranch point. its less busy than the woods canyon lake side. It is also less abused than the east sideCamping....-milk-ranch.jpg

    this is where we camped at in Colorado. thats our campsite down by the lake. elevation was 11490ft at the camp site. we were there for a week. that was a hell of a trip.
    Camping....-denver-lake.jpg
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    I still have my Northface three season tent I bought in Berkley back in the late 80's. We camped in Baja when it was really hot and I could remove the rainfly and the main tent was mostly mesh that allowed a breeze to cool you down.

    After ten years, We purchased a Jayco pop-up camper. It was deluxe. Even had a solar panel on the roof. Took it all across North America. I kept it at The Grand Canyon for four years while I worked as a crew supervisor for an international conservation corps. I remember one morning waking up and opening to door and seeing 11 tents outside, even though there were only ten tents when I went to bed. During the night, some hippie could who wanted to camp for free, just set up their tent in the middle of my crews tents. Another time, all of us were trapped in tents and my camper for over 8 hours, as a very large elk was in the middle of our camp, actively calling out to other rutting Elks. They get mean when they are interrupted.

    Then there was the time several crew member forgot their tents, and I had to squeeze them into my pop-up camper. I had one king size slide out and a double size slide out and a dining table that converted into a twin bed. I think there were six or seven of us that night. I slept on the king bed with a male Russian and male Brit, and tried to put all the attractive females at the other end of the camper, so when I told my wife about it, she didn't get too worked up. They were all in their early 20's, healthy and attractive, especially the Swedish women.

    I miss that camper. We sold it and got a fifth wheel camper I tricked out with solar power and an impressive entertainment center with surround sound and a sub-woofer and an auto-seeking satellite dish.

    Camping....-dan30.jpg

    Camping....-lakepleasant00830.jpg


    A few old campers I saw at the camping museum.

    Camping....-p1010050-2.jpg

    Camping....-p1010044.jpg

    Camping....-p1010041.jpg

    Camping....-p1010039.jpg

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    btw if you ever go on a long camping trip and you pack the tent double check that the poles for the tent are in the bag with said tent.

    if you dont you end up on the back side of a mountain miles from nowhere with a tent that has no poles. then you have to get creative.

    Camping....-no-poles.jpg

    same trip in Colorado.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    LOL ^
    Sorry I went there.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    it was a good thing I had rope. unfortunately there were no trees at that altitude.

    Me: hey honey, when you put the tent away did you put the poles in the bag?
    Her: No, they didn't fit. Why? do you need them?
    Me: uh yea.....
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    Just signed up to run a checkpoint for the PMBAR race, which will require some bikepacking in Pisgah during the first week of May. Good excuse to get out into the woods.

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    I don't "go camping", but make camp when backpacking.
    To me, there's a big difference. I actually like tiny shelters that are just for sleeping in. Would still be using my hooped bivy if it weren't such a PITA to change clothes in, or get in and out of when it's raining or snowing without getting my bag/quilt wet. Adding a tarp would be an obvious step, but my Integral Designs bivy weighs more than my Tarptent Notch, already.
    It's easy to find a spot for, though, and high winds don't phase it.
    If I were camping, I'd get a big tent I could walk into, and that a cot would fit in!

    I do have an old TNF Slickrock 2p tent. It was considered "ultralight" in its day, and is pretty small. Those 2p would have to be on good terms...

    The tent's more convenient...
    Camping....-fb_img_1467647494594.jpg

    But the bivy is like snuggling up in a cocoon. Love that part.
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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    it was a good thing I had rope. unfortunately there were no trees at that altitude.

    Me: hey honey, when you put the tent away did you put the poles in the bag?
    Her: No, they didn't fit. Why? do you need them?
    Me: uh yea.....
    LOL, LOL, LOL
    Oops, I went there again.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by OwenM View Post
    I don't "go camping", but make camp when backpacking.
    To me, there's a big difference. I actually like tiny shelters that are just for sleeping in. Would still be using my hooped bivy if it weren't such a PITA to change clothes in, or get in and out of when it's raining or snowing without getting my bag/quilt wet. Adding a tarp would be an obvious step, but my Integral Designs bivy weighs more than my Tarptent Notch, already.
    It's easy to find a spot for, though, and high winds don't phase it.
    If I were camping, I'd get a big tent I could walk into, and that a cot would fit in!

    I do have an old TNF Slickrock 2p tent. It was considered "ultralight" in its day, and is pretty small. Those 2p would have to be on good terms...

    The tent's more convenient...
    Click image for larger version. 

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    But the bivy is like snuggling up in a cocoon. Love that part.
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    Yeah, that’s real roughing it. It’s nice not having to deal with so much crap.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    I've done winter camping a couple times. Once I went showshoeing with an online group up across Garibaldi Lake. There is a hut on the other side. it is along steep hike up there so I was petty sweat soaked and my boots were soaked too from all the snow that got on them which melted from the heat of my feet. The cabin was jam packed and I can't sleep with snorers so I slept in my tent outside. I wasn't too smart and didn't sleep with my boots in the sleeping bag. It got down below minus 20 C and my boots froze like a brick. I was kind of screwed and eventually someone came out to check on me and took my boots in to melt on the wood stove. They got a bit burnt but at least I had footwear!!!
    All I am saying is give pizza chants

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    The other time I went winter camping was up at Callaghan Lake cross country area near Whistler. I went to buy the ticket and the girl didn't know what to do since I was the first fatbike she ever seen, this was when fatbikes were first coming out. She sold me the ticket but was a bit worried I might tear up the cross country skiing tracks. But I assured her it would be fine. So I went up there and camped overnight and that was another cold one. Every skier stopped to look at the bike. On the way back I passed by the manager who was very concerned I would wreck the trails but I assured him it is fine. I hope the girl didn't get into trouble.
    All I am saying is give pizza chants

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    ^^ I agree no snow camping. brrrrr!

    Desert camping, now that's fun. Joshua Tree is a great place, a buddy of mine owns 36acres in the middle of JT. We had some great times there, I've also backpacked the Sierras, Palm Springs, and Los Padres National Forest, where my buddy and I almost didn't make it out.

    I'm always in the bike packing forum, just checking stuff that looks like so much fun! That would be something I really like to do, not sure if alone though for the first time.
    Hey @jcd46, you should check out my write-ups for my desert bikepacking trips in Baja. I tried to get in to the Asamblea drainages again this year from the north end and found a way in but scraped my knees so didn't want to risk it by going down beyond the pass. I haven't written that one up yet.

    So now I know there is a route entirely through the Asamblea mountains. Start in the north and end in the south.

    Next time I want to go with someone and organise water caches and emergency local boat pickups if required. But I want to go with someone else so if you're interested I am hoping to try for another trip this autumn.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/sal...ke-891993.html

    Here are some photos from January:

    Camping....-img_8557_tn.jpg

    Camping....-img_8533_tn.jpg

    Camping....-dsc_4092_tn.jpg

    Camping....-dsc_4117_tn.jpg
    All I am saying is give pizza chants

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_BC View Post
    Hey @jcd46, you should check out my write-ups for my desert bikepacking trips in Baja. I tried to get in to the Asamblea drainages again this year from the north end and found a way in but scraped my knees so didn't want to risk it by going down beyond the pass. I haven't written that one up yet.

    So now I know there is a route entirely through the Asamblea mountains. Start in the north and end in the south.

    Next time I want to go with someone and organise water caches and emergency local boat pickups if required. But I want to go with someone else so if you're interested I am hoping to try for another trip this autumn.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/sal...ke-891993.html

    Here are some photos from January:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Mark that looks amazing! I will take a look at the write up you posted. How long is this trip? I would have some logistics to work out but plenty of time for that.

    Thanks, sounds awesome!
    Surly Krampus
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  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Mark that looks amazing! I will take a look at the write up you posted. How long is this trip? I would have some logistics to work out but plenty of time for that.

    Thanks, sounds awesome!
    Prolly 1.5 to 2 weeks to get through. Set up caches on the beaches at the base of the washes beforehand so we don't have to desalinate seawater which is a pain. Then you cross over to the next wash and do that a few times. If we're lucky there will be water at the palm oases.

    Also a writeup here:

    BajaNomad - Salsipuedes Canyon by Fatbike - Powered by XMB
    All I am saying is give pizza chants

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_BC View Post
    Prolly 1.5 to 2 weeks to get through. Set up caches on the beaches at the base of the washes beforehand so we don't have to desalinate seawater which is a pain. Then you cross over to the next wash and do that a few times. If we're lucky there will be water at the palm oases.

    Also a writeup here:

    BajaNomad - Salsipuedes Canyon by Fatbike - Powered by XMB
    I will touch base, if I can pull it off.
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    Go ahead, you can do it, pitch a tent!

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    Camping....-fb_img_1441610877492.jpg

    I have a truck camper

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    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I have a truck camper
    Nice setup. Four wheel drive and enough ground clearance to get back in where nobody else is.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Nice setup. Four wheel drive and enough ground clearance to get back in where nobody else is.
    Don't want to migrate this into a truck thread but I'm trying to get one of these Land Cruiser Troopies. They never sold them in N America. You can get right hand drives from Australia but the left hand drives come from Central America or Europe. There is a guy scoping me one out from Nicaragua in a few weeks. In the US they have a stupid rule where you can't import a car until it is 25 years old. In Canada it is 15 years old so that means I can try to find one from the late 90's to the early 2000's and I won't have any American competition!!!

    You can put a popup tent on the roof and set up camp in only a few minutes. He is the David Attenborough of 4x4ing.

    All I am saying is give pizza chants

  47. #47
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    Mark, Looks like a fun rig. I bet you could get a Land Cruiser that’s already in the states and have a camper conversion done to it.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Mark, Looks like a fun rig. I bet you could get a Land Cruiser that’s already in the states and have a camper conversion done to it.
    Maybe an 80 series but they're all auto's and not as large.
    All I am saying is give pizza chants

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Nice setup. Four wheel drive and enough ground clearance to get back in where nobody else is.
    Yes, it's basically a 4wd motorhome, just small and can't access the crapper when doing down the road. Which is good because if I left the wheel to access the crapper, it'd probably get ugly real fast anyway.

  50. #50
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    Mmmm camping breakfast

    Camping....-breakfast.jpg
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  51. #51
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    Yum! ^
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  52. #52
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    Not sure if I should ask in camping or pizza topic.

    so going camping next weekend 13-15. I am going to cook a pizza over the fire. My father did it back when he was in boy scouts but he wont tell me how he did it. says I have to figure it out for myself. So gonna give frozen pizza over a fire a shot. any thoughts on the subject? What brand pizza should I try? I will post pics of most likely fire that will happen.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    I like the pizza idea. I've considered it before but not sure how exactly either. Would the fire crack a pizza stone?

    I suppose you could build an igloo around a pizza stone with brick or rock and shovel in coals, but that's a lot of effort. Maybe a steel box you could place over a pizza stone but that would be a bitch to pack and care for.

    I have made calzone camping. Wrapped in tinfoil in coals worked ok at best, in a dutch oven worked pretty damn good. Suppose you could also do a deep dish in a dutch oven but where I come from deep dish aint pizza.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

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    Get some lavash flat bread and the sauce and topping you like. I cook them on the grill all the time.

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    This guy does it over the fire, but I'm not real impressed.
    Thinking unless I see a better idea I'll use a large cast iron pan.

    https://youtu.be/uINSHRPjc_w
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

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    Bivy. Most of my camping has been off-trail and above treeline...trying to stake out a shelter in rocky terrain, taught enough for windy conditions, can be a real pain in the ass.

    A snow cave is the warmest and most bomb proof shelter around if the conditions are right and you have the time/energy to make it.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    I like the pizza idea. I've considered it before but not sure how exactly either. Would the fire crack a pizza stone?

    I suppose you could build an igloo around a pizza stone with brick or rock and shovel in coals, but that's a lot of effort. Maybe a steel box you could place over a pizza stone but that would be a bitch to pack and care for.

    I have made calzone camping. Wrapped in tinfoil in coals worked ok at best, in a dutch oven worked pretty damn good. Suppose you could also do a deep dish in a dutch oven but where I come from deep dish aint pizza.
    Have it delivered.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  58. #58
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    I would bring my own dough, and my own ingredients. Maybe try it out in the backyard?
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  59. #59
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    Cheap to zero-cost campfire pizza oven:

    Making a Campfire Pizza Oven

    I'd substitute a disposable foil lasagna pan (or lid) for the Al foil; it would hold its shape better.

    The article mentions using pita as the crust but I prefer pre-made pizza dough. I like the kind that already have the herbs added.
    "…it has long been said: oft evil will shall evil mar."
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  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Have it delivered.
    By drone?
    I dread the day
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    By drone?
    I dread the day
    Domino's first did it in New Zealand back in 2016.
    "…it has long been said: oft evil will shall evil mar."
    — Tolkien

    Real eyes realize real lies.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    By drone?
    I dread the day
    Hmmm. . you may be on to the next hot, up and coming business. Count me in if you’re an investor. I’ll do the hands on ground work.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    I prefer not to camp from the standpoint of getting some quality sleep. I prefer a real shower as well but have learned that sun showers can be surprisingly good. I have a high quality tent but depending on where you're camping, when the wind starts blowing, there's no stopping that micro-find sand from getting inside. If conditions are optimal, camping can be a great but when conditions suck, camping sucks.
    Carpe Diem!!

  64. #64
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    Well where we are camping I can have pizza delivered unfortunately. Im going with some friends who don't do dispersed camping all that well. We will be at a lake in a campground. It has hot showers and the nearest store is 2 miles away by bike.

    I was thinking of a pita/naan bread pizza but I wanted to have some fun and try a pre made frozen pizza. I do the pita/naan bread pizza often on the grill and have that down. I even make my own naan bread. Maybe I'll get those really bad totinos pizzas. 10 for $10 and give them a shot. I was also thinking of getting a pizza, cut it into squares and use my pie irons to make it a calzone.


    I was thinking of bringing my big dutch oven and use it as a pizza oven but I am trying to be a minimalist on this trip. but it is big enough I can store stuff in it when I pack. I always end up supporting everybody with my camping gear and I dont want to take my truck. I'm taking my little 2dr hatchback.

    I have no shortage of cast iron. I might just use one of them. these are my camping cast iron. almost everything I cook is done in cast iron and my whole kitchen pots and pans are iron. only way to cook.

    the big one is a 16qt dutch oven
    Camping....-iron.jpg

    some of these guys will be in campers. Im not even bringing my tent. cot plus sleeping bag done. the weather could not be better. 71H/45L clear skies.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  65. #65
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    Nice post. 📫
    “The further a society drifts from truth, the more it will hate those who speak it.”

    George Orwell

  66. #66
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    Prescott?

  67. #67
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    We are going to Fool's hollow, show low. I suggested dead horse in campe Verde. Sleeping in my backyard is closer to camping than fool's hollow.

  68. #68
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    Cast iron pan works well for pizza. I do that at home from time to time.

    If your grill grate is fine enough, you can toss it on, but it will take longer for the toppings to cook that way, unless you can cover it. Quick and dirty for that would be to invert one of those alu baking pans over the pizza. I would not hesitate to use a pizza stone over the fire. Just make sure you pre heat the pizza stone.

    Sleep quality is why I got a teardrop camper. Real bed, hard sides, more secure in iffy weather. Still cook outside and all those parts of camping.

    In recent years, I have become less and less comfortable on sleeping pads. Most cots are too narrow, too. Hammocks work well for me, but the wife is not so impressed by them. She doesn't get much choice when backpacking, but for base camping, we love the little trailer.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  69. #69
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    I have a pizza stone but don't wanna bring it. Don't want to break it. My 16qt Dutch oven is plenty big enough for a pizza. I think I'll bring that.

    I think I have realized that you can't be super comfy while sleeping camping. Our first time using the cots was at 24hop. Both my wife and I were riders in the event and we slept really well. Last camp out the other weekend my father and I slept on the cots with a cushion under the stars and we're quite comfortable.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    I have a pizza stone but don't wanna bring it. Don't want to break it. My 16qt Dutch oven is plenty big enough for a pizza. I think I'll bring that.

    I think I have realized that you can't be super comfy while sleeping camping. Our first time using the cots was at 24hop. Both my wife and I were riders in the event and we slept really well. Last camp out the other weekend my father and I slept on the cots with a cushion under the stars and we're quite comfortable.
    I'm not asking for super comfy. I just ask to sleep at all. As I've aged, my ability to get any sleep whatsoever when on the ground has dropped substantially. When I'm out doing any kind of bike trip, that's critical for being rested for the next day of riding.

    I'll be doing a short bikepacking trip in May. I'll be working one of the the Pisgah MTB Adventure Race checkpoints in a remote spot on a technical trail and it requires camping at the checkpoint for at least one night. I'll probably make it two. I'll be sleeping in my hammock so I can actually get some sleep. Trying to decide how I'm going to make the checkpoint fun for the racers. I'll have some tunes, but I want a fun handup for the racers that's small/light enough to pack out there.

  71. #71
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    That would be a lot of fun to run a check point

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I'm not asking for super comfy. I just ask to sleep at all. As I've aged, my ability to get any sleep whatsoever when on the ground has dropped substantially. When I'm out doing any kind of bike trip, that's critical for being rested for the next day of riding.

    I'll be doing a short bikepacking trip in May. I'll be working one of the the Pisgah MTB Adventure Race checkpoints in a remote spot on a technical trail and it requires camping at the checkpoint for at least one night. I'll probably make it two. I'll be sleeping in my hammock so I can actually get some sleep. Trying to decide how I'm going to make the checkpoint fun for the racers. I'll have some tunes, but I want a fun handup for the racers that's small/light enough to pack out there.
    Get a 2-3" thick air mattress? That and some quality bourbon. Add in full day of loaded bikepacking. No issues for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Get a 2-3" thick air mattress? That and some quality bourbon. Add in full day of loaded bikepacking. No issues for me.
    Yeah, I have one. It's too narrow. I'll use it in a pinch, but I barely sleep on it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Get a 2-3" thick air mattress? That and some quality bourbon. Add in full day of loaded bikepacking. No issues for me.
    and sleep next to a running stream, need that sweet background music.
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    Melatonin works wonders for me and thank god I discovered it. By the time you're 50 you're producing about 1/3 less than when you were in your 20's. 7-9 hours a night no problem and no latent hangover or grogginess either.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

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    ^Yep, I take a little sleep aid with melatonin when I turn in for the night on backpack trips. For some reason walking 20 miles doesn't produce the knockout punch like it did 25 years ago.
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    Damn. Wish I could get 7-9 hours of sleep any night. Long good night rest for me is 6 hours. Camping might be 4 hours a night. Gotta stay up till the fire dies out and up before Dawn to make coffee. It's really hard to sleep in when you don't have a tent. Dawn comes early camping. Right around sunrise.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Melatonin works wonders for me and thank god I discovered it. By the time you're 50 you're producing about 1/3 less than when you were in your 20's. 7-9 hours a night no problem and no latent hangover or grogginess either.
    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    ^Yep, I take a little sleep aid with melatonin when I turn in for the night on backpack trips. For some reason walking 20 miles doesn't produce the knockout punch like it did 25 years ago.
    No trouble sleeping at home. I have avoided melatonin because the packaging of the ones I've looked at warns against taking it when you have a history of leukemia. No explanation of why, but since I do, I prefer to take the cautious route on that one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    Dawn comes early camping. Right around sunrise.
    Man, that is early
    Yeah, there are nights I'll stay up all night for various reasons. I'm fairly excitable and on peak summer nights in a beautiful spot I can't get enough of natures bounty. Other times I might not get up untill 10-10:30.
    I only use it when I need it, but when I do it works very well.
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    Posted a little while ago in another thread (Is wifi going to kill us?):

    "I am camping on Gooseberry Mesa. I am listening to the radio via 4g, surfing here, and my son is watching a movie."

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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Posted a little while ago in another thread (Is wifi going to kill us?):

    "I am camping on Gooseberry Mesa. I am listening to the radio via 4g, surfing here, and my son is watching a movie."

    Booo. This is why I like camping in places without cell reception.

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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    That would be a lot of fun to run a check point
    It sounds like it will be fun. Bring a book, chill on the woods for a weekend, mark racers's sheets, have fun. My kinda weekend.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Posted a little while ago in another thread (Is wifi going to kill us?):

    "I am camping on Gooseberry Mesa. I am listening to the radio via 4g, surfing here, and my son is watching a movie."
    And we even (gasp!) went out to eat in town!
    I grew up thru hiking in Vt, Europe, adirondacks, co...I prefer now to set up 'camp' and ride bikes during the day.
    To each their own.
    This trip we have been camping in Moab, Fruit! Moab, Bears ERs, Page Az, and not St. George...
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    Quote Originally Posted by rideit View Post
    And we even (gasp!) went out to eat in town!
    I grew up thru hiking in Vt, Europe, adirondacks, co...I prefer now to set up 'camp' and ride bikes during the day.
    To each their own.
    This trip we have been camping in Moab, Fruit! Moab, Bears ERs, Page Az, and not St. George...
    lol, I didn't post who you were but you found it anyway! Oh well, have fun.
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  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    No trouble sleeping at home. I have avoided melatonin because the packaging of the ones I've looked at warns against taking it when you have a history of leukemia. No explanation of why, but since I do, I prefer to take the cautious route on that one.
    Whoa... I use it on occasions and also have a history. I may have to rethink my use of melatonin and discuss with my doc. Thanks for the heads up.

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    I go full on natural and don’t take anything to fall asleep. The side effect is I don’t sleep much.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo View Post
    Whoa... I use it on occasions and also have a history. I may have to rethink my use of melatonin and discuss with my doc. Thanks for the heads up.
    Yeah I dunno. In some quick google searches, it seems that melatonin is actually used as part of some cancer treatments and can be useful for cancer-associated side effects like thrombocytopenia (honestly the only long term side effect I deal with from my leukemia history). But when the package says stuff like "Do not use if you have a history of leukemia", you think twice when you're in my boat. Being 9yrs out may be different than being in active treatment, but I haven't pushed the issue.

    I talked to my oncologist when I was in active treatment and he prescribed me Ambien when I had sleep issues during and after treatment. Minimum dosage on that stuff did the trick back then. Got me on normal circadian rhythms again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    Damn. Wish I could get 7-9 hours of sleep any night. Long good night rest for me is 6 hours. Camping might be 4 hours a night. Gotta stay up till the fire dies out and up before Dawn to make coffee. It's really hard to sleep in when you don't have a tent. Dawn comes early camping. Right around sunrise.
    No tent? Helps with bugs, rain and that pesky sunlight stuff. Tarp? Nest of pine boughs?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Yeah, I have one. It's too narrow. I'll use it in a pinch, but I barely sleep on it.
    Ever use a hammock? I find it quite comfortable, but not everyone does. It runs cooler than sleeping on the ground, needs a pad for bugs from below, and a tarp/bugnet from the top.

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    only tent it when its rainy or going to be dewy in the morning. or camping with the wife
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rideit View Post
    And we even (gasp!) went out to eat in town!
    I grew up thru hiking in Vt, Europe, adirondacks, co...I prefer now to set up 'camp' and ride bikes during the day.
    To each their own.
    This trip we have been camping in Moab, Fruit! Moab, Bears ERs, Page Az, and not St. George...
    I'll definitely cut you some slack since your main goal is mountain biking rather than the camping aspect.

    And I'm jealous!
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Ever use a hammock? I find it quite comfortable, but not everyone does. It runs cooler than sleeping on the ground, needs a pad for bugs from below, and a tarp/bugnet from the top.
    http://forums.mtbr.com/off-camber-of...l#post13611759

    Here's a pic of my hammock setup with the big tarp (can be buttoned down to block wind really well):


    DSCN1904 by Nate, on Flickr

    My setup is entirely modular, so my bugnet encloses the whole thing. Don't need a pad to protect against bugs. Only need under-insulation for warmth. Have gone down to low 30's (snowing) with a basic foam pad. I find the hammock very comfortable, and it's my preferred setup for backpacking/bikepacking when there are trees to hang it. It's what I'll be sleeping in when I bikepack out to run the PMBAR race checkpoint in a month. I'll have to make sure I have PLENTY of extra storage when I set out, though, because I'm also going to have to haul back a tent and other supplies the race organizer will be setting up at the checkpoint site (mostly to to help out any racers who might get in trouble on the course).

    But my wife is not so impressed with the hammock. She sleeps about as well in a hammock as she does on the ground, which is pretty much not at all. She has less interest in backpacking/bikepacking these days as a result. She has sleep issues in general, though, and probably ought to make an effort to deal with that. I only pull out the tent if there's nowhere to hang the hammock (or it's prohibited). I have a tarptent Cloudburst 2 for that.


    DSCF0001 by Nate, on Flickr

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    Harold, nice hammock setup.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    I grew up camping, continued with the wife and kids. The 2 of us went last fall, she brings an aero bed. I never saw it inflated. Filled it up with the power outlet at the showers. It's 2.5 FEET high. Wouldn't fit in the back of the forester, had to tie it to the roof. The other couple we were with busted a gut laughing. Nice sleep though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Harold, nice hammock setup.
    Ditto, all his set ups are top notch! That tear drop trailer is just awesome!
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  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    I grew up camping, continued with the wife and kids. The 2 of us went last fall, she brings an aero bed. I never saw it inflated. Filled it up with the power outlet at the showers. It's 2.5 FEET high. Wouldn't fit in the back of the forester, had to tie it to the roof. The other couple we were with busted a gut laughing. Nice sleep though.
    Funny, I grew up camping as well. We always used tents and sleeping bags on the floor. My parents had their own tent with two cots. I remember watching neighboring campsites setting up and blowing up air mattresses and laughing thinking it was ridiculous. As an adult I now see the benefit.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Ditto, all his set ups are top notch! That tear drop trailer is just awesome!
    Probably ought to wheel it out of the garage and wash off all the winter's dust accumulation.

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    I was camping before I could walk. growing up camping we never used air mattresses, cots, or cushions. Got married and camping with the wife is when I went with air mattresses. then we went camping for new years and our new coleman air mattress failed so we went and got cots. I will never go back to an air mattress. I would rather sleep on the ground which is what usually happens with an air mattress anyhow.

    I have never slept overnight anywhere with a hammock but I do enjoy an afternoon nap camping or on the boat with one. nothing beats a hammock on the bow of a boat with a cold beer and some good tunes playing.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    I was camping before I could walk. growing up camping we never used air mattresses, cots, or cushions. Got married and camping with the wife is when I went with air mattresses. then we went camping for new years and our new coleman air mattress failed so we went and got cots. I will never go back to an air mattress. I would rather sleep on the ground which is what usually happens with an air mattress anyhow.

    I have never slept overnight anywhere with a hammock but I do enjoy an afternoon nap camping or on the boat with one. nothing beats a hammock on the bow of a boat with a cold beer and some good tunes playing.
    Speaking of...I have a really big porch hammock that I should hang.

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    I've been getting into hammocks for the last 5 years or so. I typically can't make it through the night in one though. Wake up around 4AM and retreat to my van. They're great to have around camp. Lay in to enjoy the forest canopy or sit in like a hanging chair with my morning coffee.

    I like to sleep out by the fire on the ground too. My favorite is to sleep on a 3°-5° pitch facing a vista with the fire behind me. Wake up to the sunrise behind me but forelighting the mountain in front of me.

    I have a place perfect for this overlooking the Lewis River. In spring when the volcanos are still in all their snow capped glory. I wake up and it's still twilight but in the distance the very top of Mt Adams is glowing yellow orange as if on fire. I watch the rising sun rush down it's snowfilled flanks from the comfort of my sleeping bag. Soon enough the rising sun beams are lighting up the valley below and I merely need to turn my head slightly to watch Mt St Helens as the rising sun climbs it's snow filled walls. Then I turn my head to the left and it's Mt Rainer's turn. Only the back side of it is already lit so I watch the sun beams crest it's summit than down the other side in one fell swoop, it's awesome. By this time it's time to get up. I turn around and bam there's Mt Hood all lit up like a beacon. Casting so much light you have to squint to look at it. Man I can't wait to get up there.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post

    DSCF0001 by Nate, on Flickr

    I have that same tarptent, packs up amazingly tiny!
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    my favorite hammock story was one of the times we sailed out to Catalina and stayed in Avalon Harbor. My uncle decided he wanted to sleep out on the bow in my hammock. well the swells were coming in and the boat started pitching just right. He was swinging back and forth to the point it threw him overboard.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    Several years ago, I took a vacation to Costa Rica and the balcony outside my room had this view, and hammock hooks on the patio support beams. I couldn't turn down the opportunity to sleep in my hammock with this view.


    Scenery around the resort by Nate, on Flickr

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    Funny ^

    My hammock nightmare started with buying a hammock in Mexico. Note to self, next time buy a hammock with cross beams at both ends. Nothing worse than being stuffed into a cocoon like bundle and flipping over and being dumped with the slightest move.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Funny ^

    My hammock nightmare started with buying a hammock in Mexico. Note to self, next time buy a hammock with cross beams at both ends. Nothing worse than being stuffed into a cocoon like bundle and flipping over and being dumped with the slightest move.
    You're supposed to lay on gathered-end hammocks on the diagonal. Super stable that way. I hate hammocks with spreader bars.

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  106. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    You're supposed to lay on gathered-end hammocks on the diagonal. Super stable that way. I hate hammocks with spreader bars.

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    Tried it, nothing worked with this hammock. Did I mention I bought it in Mexico? There was no way to lay diagonal in this one. It was strung so tight at the ends it cocooned as soon as you got in.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Tried it, nothing worked with this hammock. Did I mention I bought it in Mexico? There was no way to lay diagonal in this one. It was strung so tight at the ends it cocooned as soon as you got in.
    Supposed to have a nice, relaxed hang to the hammock. I like a structural ridgeline on mine (I added it) to make sure my hammock hangs the same way every time regardless of how far apart the trees or hooks are (at least as long as the ridgeline is pulled tight).

    here's a close shot. The rings are basically just a hub for the attachment of the hammock (which you see), the ridgeline (the horizontal line), the adjustable lines that go to the tree, and the little drip line.


    ENO hammock test hang by Nate, on Flickr

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    Great idea, I’ll keep that in mind when I get another hammock. How come you don’t like spreader bar hammocks? I could see them being harder to pack for a camping trip but for a back yard application I would think they’d be better.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Great idea, I’ll keep that in mind when I get another hammock. How come you don’t like spreader bar hammocks? I could see them being harder to pack for a camping trip but for a back yard application I would think they’d be better.
    They force a specific lay position, and I find them less stable and more flippy. The models made for backpacking are fine to pack up, but that is not really my issue.

    I just prefer gathered end types. As I said earlier, I have one made just for backyard use, too. Haven't used it for years since I haven't had a good space for it. But I do now, so I plan to hang it up this year.

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    Another benefit of the ridgeline is that when I slip the bugnet over everything, it keeps the bugnet out of my face.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_BC View Post
    Don't want to migrate this into a truck thread but I'm trying to get one of these Land Cruiser Troopies. They never sold them in N America. You can get right hand drives from Australia but the left hand drives come from Central America or Europe. There is a guy scoping me one out from Nicaragua in a few weeks. In the US they have a stupid rule where you can't import a car until it is 25 years old. In Canada it is 15 years old so that means I can try to find one from the late 90's to the early 2000's and I won't have any American competition!!!

    You can put a popup tent on the roof and set up camp in only a few minutes. He is the David Attenborough of 4x4ing.

    That rig is way too cool! It seems that we can't really get the good 4x4s like that in the US.
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    sure you can get cool stuff like that here. You just gotta build or pay through the ass and have one built.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    So went camping over the weekend with some buddies. It was campground camping. Not my first choice but depends on where. Fools Hollow Camp ground is nice. Hot showers, flushing toilets, good fishing, and close to places. Its right in the heart of Show Low, AZ.

    The weather Friday and Saturday was not the best. Friday was windy 30mph with 50mph gusts and a Red flag fire warning so no fires. It was 43 degrees when I got there at 2:30. Woke up Friday to 22 degrees. kinda chilly. At least it was sunny. We tried fishing but with the wind that just wasn't going to happen.

    Camping....-fools-hollow.jpg

    I knew ahead of time that we would not be able to have a fire so I changed my meal planning accordingly. But I did do my frozen pizza on the griddle. It came out excellent. Thin crust Digiorno pizza. The crust was just right crispy and the cheese melty. I took two just in case one didn't work out. I folded it over and made a calzone. Again it was excellent. I took the lid to my dutch oven and heated it up, put the pizza under it and turned off the griddle and 25 minutes later done.

    Camping....-camp-pizza.jpg

    Saturday the winds calmed down and they lifted the fire ban. My friend made "hobo dinner" for everybody. chicken, shrimp, potatoes, corn, and green beans. Wrap it up in foil and throw it on the grill over the fire. That was pretty good.

    Then the best part of camping before the worst part, Last day breakfast. take everybody's left overs and throw them on the griddle with eggs and eat it on a tortilla. after breakfast is always the worst part, packing up followed by the 3 hour drive home.

    Camping....-breakfast.jpg
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    Looks like you weren't hurting for camp chairs.
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    I miss camping!
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  116. #116
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    Those temps combined with a fireban are foreign to me, though I guess those winds warrant it. Still rain rain rain here in the PNW. Can't wait for camping season to start up here!
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  117. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    Looks like you weren't hurting for camp chairs.
    Somehow some body was always in my chair. I posted before about musical chairs camping. you brought a chair. sit in your chair. I dont care that the smoke is in your face. thats why I put my chair where it is and I was here first.

    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Those temps combined with a fireban are foreign to me, though I guess those winds warrant it. Still rain rain rain here in the PNW. Can't wait for camping season to start up here!
    the problem was the wind, humidity, and lack of rain. It is so dry up there its like a match wrapped in paper covered in gasoline waiting to light.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  118. #118
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    I have my first outing of the year coming up next week...sorta. mix of camping and visiting family. we're taking the trailer...just because.

    father-in-law is turning 60, so we're headed up for that. Our anniversary is right after, so we're going to spend some time camping in the trailer and hopefully some mtb if the weather works out. forecast is so far out for that, it's hard to say. so far, the trend is looking just about ideal, so keeping the fingers crossed.

    I get to get the trailer ready this week. Today was not so useful for some of the stuff I need to do. Too damn cold and windy. But, I finally have all the stuff I need and I'm going to install a brake controller on the subie, because our trailer has brakes even though it's under the capacity for the car, anyway. I've been in a couple situations where the extra braking control would have been nice.

  119. #119
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    2 friends and I are prepping for a 180 mile PCT hike from the Mojave desert to just south of Mt. Whitney in the Sierra, in "anything-can-happen" late May.

    Need to be ready for a couple of 40-mile waterless stretches, 100+ temps in the day, freezing or below at night, late snow storms, 50+ mph sustained winds, rattlesnakes, armed robbers on the trail (that happened last year), uranium-tainted water sources, and -- omg -- no cell service for most of the trek.
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  120. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    Somehow some body was always in my chair. I posted before about musical chairs camping. you brought a chair. sit in your chair. I dont care that the smoke is in your face. thats why I put my chair where it is and I was here first.
    I know we talked about this before, but I .

    It’s so true, it never fails. You get up and walk away only to return someone claiming your seat as their own.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  121. #121
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    I think my problem is I have a really nice chair. I'm bringing my tripod chair for our next trip in 2 weeks. That will be my 5th campout so far this year. And we have another planned for may.

  122. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    2 friends and I are prepping for a 180 mile PCT hike from the Mojave desert to just south of Mt. Whitney in the Sierra, in "anything-can-happen" late May.

    Need to be ready for a couple of 40-mile waterless stretches, 100+ temps in the day, freezing or below at night, late snow storms, 50+ mph sustained winds, rattlesnakes, armed robbers on the trail (that happened last year), uranium-tainted water sources, and -- omg -- no cell service for most of the trek.
    That sounds like an awesome trip.
    I'd like to give the PCT a go when my mtbing falls off. Where I ride in OR & WA we come across a lot of through hikers. Without exeption they are on cloud 9...also they smell.
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  123. #123
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    For those of you familiar with the ADK's.

    November hunting/packing trip.

    Ended up with almost 2 feet of unexpected snow which made our four to five day stay more interesting.


    Camping....-img_0679.jpg

  124. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    For those of you familiar with the ADK's.

    November hunting/packing trip.

    Ended up with almost 2 feet of unexpected snow which made our four to five day stay more interesting.


    Click image for larger version. 

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    Nice. Growing up and well into my 20's the Keene Valley was my playground. Love those rugged mountains. You guys have gotten some real winters these past couple seasons.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  125. #125
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    You are lucky to have grown up here. I moved to the area just over 10 years ago. Fortunately, my work gives me a lot of free time and it is all spent outside - so I'm making up for moving here later in life. The High Peaks area gets a bit busy, but otherwise this area is a well kept secret. My last xc/bc ski of the year a few weeks ago was 6 hours and I didn't see another person the entire day. You'd never believe you were in the NE, or NY State no less. Snow, yep, probably my best winter ever. We still have snow on the ground.

  126. #126
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    I know the ADK’s. Many a trip up there in the summer camping and in the winter in various lodges for snowmobiling and skiing. In the summer our go to camping was done on Raquette Lake. And in the winter we were in Old Forge. Love the ADK’s.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  127. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    I know the ADK’s. Many a trip up there in the summer camping and in the winter in various lodges for snowmobiling and skiing. In the summer our go to camping was done on Raquette Lake. And in the winter we were in Old Forge. Love the ADK’s.
    That pic is not too far from Raquette Lake. A few miles north in the Five Ponds Wilderness area off Cranberry Lake.

  128. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    That pic is not too far from Raquette Lake. A few miles north in the Five Ponds Wilderness area off Cranberry Lake.
    Very cool, I remember the area. Lakes everywhere, I haven’t been there since I was a young teen but every summer and winter growing up we made trips up there as a family. As we camped at Raquette Lake in the evening we would drive by Cranberry Lake just before sunset looking for bears. Back then in the 1970’s they had dump sites for all the camp grounds. Every evening people would drive to these dumps that were set into the amazing wilderness. Like clockwork just as it was getting dark the Black Bears would meander out of the woods to feed on human trash. Years later they put a stop to these dump sights. All trash is now put in enclosed trash containers and hauled out of the Adirondacks. Many great memories for me as a kid though.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  129. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    For those of you familiar with the ADK's.

    November hunting/packing trip.

    Ended up with almost 2 feet of unexpected snow which made our four to five day stay more interesting.


    Click image for larger version. 

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    Looks like 4 inches to me :-P

  130. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
    Looks like 4 inches to me :-P
    That’s just too easy....

  131. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowpoker View Post
    That’s just too easy....
    I look at 3 inches all the time...





    We are talking about diameter, right?

  132. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
    I look at 3 inches all the time...





    We are talking about diameter, right?

  133. #133
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    I camped often in PA/MD and for longer road trips, around Dolly Sods, WV when I was younger. Definitely had a few "unintentional" snow adventures... woke up to 8" on one trip and 4-5" on another. Thankfully, we were prepared for 3+ season weather.

    In the 80's I carried a 6-person canvas tent (never did THAT again lol).

    I'm starting to get stuff together to begin bike packing with some of the experienced locals. It is insane how lightweight the gear is these days. Sub 3-lb two person tent is what I'm angling for now.
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  134. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowpoker View Post
    That’s just too easy....

    But, but...

    It was really cold.

  135. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    But, but...

    It was really cold.
    And in the AD’s it could have easily been 2’, so screw them.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  136. #136
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    [QUOTE=edubfromktown;13628056]I camped often in PA/MD and for longer road trips, around Dolly Sods, WV when I was younger.
    ...
    Dolly Sods is beautiful country. The wife and I get to Canaan/Davis whenever we can.
    If you haven't been there recently, you should check out Davis. It's really becoming a worthwhile mountain-biking destination.
    A couple good breweries. A great bike shop. And the best burrito I ever had East of the Mississippi.
    Oh yeah. Real good trails too.


    Below is our current camping setup with the bike rack solution I was able to come up with this weekend.Camping....-fb_img_1523150490514.jpg

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  137. #137
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    CC, sweet setup.
    I like how the trailer is high enough to clear some off roading trails.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  138. #138
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    Nice rig. I've been thinking of building a camp trailer of some kind that uses the same tires as my truck. I spend too much time on over landing sites.

    this is what I really want for my truck. well the camper and a SAS.

    Camping....-1996_ford_bronco_camper-1.jpg

  139. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Supposed to have a nice, relaxed hang to the hammock. I like a structural ridgeline on mine (I added it) to make sure my hammock hangs the same way every time regardless of how far apart the trees or hooks are (at least as long as the ridgeline is pulled tight).

    here's a close shot. The rings are basically just a hub for the attachment of the hammock (which you see), the ridgeline (the horizontal line), the adjustable lines that go to the tree, and the little drip line.
    I too keep a ridgeline on my eno double nest. Using Dyneema lines? I use some lighter weight 1/2" straps with one loop on the end. Loop it around the tree or such, then at the hammock end is a small carabiner. The carabiner has 2 descending rings which to secure the straps. Works well, easy to set up. Using some wider straps for the tree?

  140. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    I too keep a ridgeline on my eno double nest. Using Dyneema lines? I use some lighter weight 1/2" straps with one loop on the end. Loop it around the tree or such, then at the hammock end is a small carabiner. The carabiner has 2 descending rings which to secure the straps. Works well, easy to set up. Using some wider straps for the tree?
    Similar setup here. I think my straps are 1/2" also. whoopie slings made from amsteel blue, which I think is dyneema line. I connect the straps to the whoopie slings with wooden toggles and marlinspike hitches.

    I can dig up a post I wrote about how all that comes together on my website when I am back at my computer.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  141. #141
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    Current setup. Still working on the bike rack. Hitch mount on the jeep when not pulling the trailer, but have two old yakima rooftop racks(currently called the frontloader I think) I will mount once I get my permanent telescoping rack built. I also have all the parts to replace the old military 8 lug axles with a 3500 lb axle and hubs that match the 5 x 5 jeep pattern. Just need to find time to install

    Can also mount the tent on the jeep.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Camping....-trailer22.jpg  


  142. #142
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    After reading about it I set up a ridgeline on my hammock. I tried it on the trees behind my house. works great! Im going to take it camping next weekend. unless we go this weekend also. and then again in a few weeks.

    I love the truck mounted tents but many of the times we go camping we drive somewhere either 4x4 or to the lake to fish. I dont want to have to pack the tent up everytime we want to go somewhere. I was thinking of building a trailer that the tent goes on that I can unhitch and leave. But I also hate off roading with a trailer no matter how nice the trailer is. We were in Sedona and 4 wheeled back to oak creek. on our way home there was a hummer tour coming up the trail and they refused to let us pass. One of the guys we were with brought a trailer and had to back it up the hill almost a 1/4 mile to let the hummer A holes by.

    Camping....-hummer.jpg
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  143. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoDakSooner View Post
    Current setup. Still working on the bike rack. Hitch mount on the jeep when not pulling the trailer, but have two old yakima rooftop racks(currently called the frontloader I think) I will mount once I get my permanent telescoping rack built. I also have all the parts to replace the old military 8 lug axles with a 3500 lb axle and hubs that match the 5 x 5 jeep pattern. Just need to find time to install

    Can also mount the tent on the jeep.
    that's a great idea for the tent...was thinking of getting a Tepui for the top of the Rav4, but the trailer thing might be a better way to go
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  144. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    After reading about it I set up a ridgeline on my hammock. I tried it on the trees behind my house. works great! Im going to take it camping next weekend. unless we go this weekend also. and then again in a few weeks.
    Make sure no one takes it like your chair..
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  145. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Make sure no one takes it like your chair..
    I think Im going to bring a rigged chair next time. get a cheapo chair and if someone sits in it, it's just gonna break and they fall on their ass.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  146. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    that's a great idea for the tent...was thinking of getting a Tepui for the top of the Rav4, but the trailer thing might be a better way to go
    The trailer is nice when you are set up in the same spot for several days. Don't have to put the tent away all the time. Also allows room for all the other gear when you have 3 or 4 folks plus a dog or two in the Jeep. We run it on the jeep too but with a 3.5" lift and 35" tires, it is at the max of the ladder. mileage wise it is about a wash between the two options. We have the CVT McKinley and it is the second largest tent they make. It is pretty big on the jeep....lol. Like a big sail!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Camping....-colorado-jeep.jpg  


  147. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoDakSooner View Post
    The trailer is nice when you are set up in the same spot for several days. Don't have to put the tent away all the time. Also allows room for all the other gear when you have 3 or 4 folks plus a dog or two in the Jeep. We run it on the jeep too but with a 3.5" lift and 35" tires, it is at the max of the ladder. mileage wise it is about a wash between the two options. We have the CVT McKinley and it is the second largest tent they make. It is pretty big on the jeep....lol. Like a big sail!
    yeah. I like the idea of keeping gear below it in the trailer. I might also look at the CVT tents as well...had not heard of them. The whole sail thing is my only apprehension about putting it on top.

    Also, what type of Jeep is that? I am entertaining the thought of getting a Jeep, but most of the new models don't look like they could really handle any off roading...maybe for frat parties in DAytona, but IDK. Just looking for a rugged simple model to get me to some trail/camping sites...
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  148. #148
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    2014 Wrangler unlimited. It is not stock! 3.5" lift, 35" tires, lockers front and rear, plus a bunch of other stuff. It'll hold its own off road. Oh and the top and doors come off too!

    CVT and Tepui are direct competitors. CVT were a bit cheaper and they included the annex(lower tent) when I bought mine. At the time it was extra with the Tepui. I believe they are now included with the tent. Also, CVT offers a couple of larger tents that at the time i bought mine Tepui did not. Both are good "Chinese" tents but the CVT was a better deal financially when I picked mine up.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Camping....-little-blue.jpg  


  149. #149
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    You hammock guys and your endless supply of trees…
    "…it has long been said: oft evil will shall evil mar."
    — Tolkien

    Real eyes realize real lies.

  150. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    ...

    Also, what type of Jeep is that? I am entertaining the thought of getting a Jeep, but most of the new models don't look like they could really handle any off roading...maybe for frat parties in DAytona, but IDK. Just looking for a rugged simple model to get me to some trail/camping sites...
    I've owned Wranglers for decades and the JK and JKU models are the most capable Wranglers made to date. No joke.

    If you get a Rubicon model, you also get front and rear lockers, (electronic) sway bar disconnects, Dana 44 front and rear, 4.10 gears, 4:1 crawl ratio, etc., - all from the factory with a warranty.
    Or you can get a stock "Sport" and build it up yourself with the endless aftermarket.



    I wanted to try a rooftop tent, but the wife vetoed that idea pretty quick.


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  151. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    You hammock guys and your endless supply of trees…
    I have trees on my property, but they are desert trees. they can barely hold themselves up. I have a few big trees and some poles to tie a hammock. but the stars at night are amazing. I love living outside the city. I have camped closer to town than I live.

    Camping....-trees.jpg
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  152. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    I too keep a ridgeline on my eno double nest. Using Dyneema lines? I use some lighter weight 1/2" straps with one loop on the end. Loop it around the tree or such, then at the hammock end is a small carabiner. The carabiner has 2 descending rings which to secure the straps. Works well, easy to set up. Using some wider straps for the tree?
    Here are some links that cover my hammock hang.

    Hammock Suspension: Whoopie Slings with a Fixed Eye Loop | The GPS Geek

    ENO Hammock Test Hang | The GPS Geek

    I replaced the bits of fiberglass pole for the toggles with wooden ones. Damn things splintered when I cut them, even when I coated the ends in silicone glue.

  153. #153
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    I mostly really like small trailers for camping. Love mine. I've entertained the idea of putting a RTT on the roof of mine eventually if I need the extra capacity for one or two kids. I have a shelf inside that could be converted into a small kids' bunk to cover one until they're old enough to climb into the RTT.

    Gotta say, though, there would have to be a REALLY convincing reason for me to back up at all on narrow 2-track for opposing traffic. It would depend on what's behind me, and what's behind the traffic coming at me. For one, if the other guy had a bigger trailer. Courtesy would rule. Conditions of the trail/road are the biggest factor. If the other guy(s) wants to be a d!ck, I'll just sit there and take up space. Mine isn't for off-roading, though. If it was, I'd have an articulating hitch no question.

    I know some people who have off-road versions of my camper, and they've gone so far as to install air bags on the trailer (and their TV, usually Jeeps), and they have an inflation system on the Jeep that they can hook to the trailer to adjust tire pressure and the suspension. Serious setups. I don't want to know how much they have invested.

  154. #154
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    It's not uncommon for me to set up my hammock on trees that are 8'+ in diameter. This presents it's own set of challenges. Sometimes 2 lengths of 30' static webbing is not nearly enough. I use to 2 rap-rings on either side and cinch for adjusting. It's the easiest way I've come across, though I'm sure there are even better ways.

    I occasionally (rarely these days) climb as well & enjoy the challenge of setting up my hammock with nuts & cams on rock. Sometimes my climbing buddy and I try to out ridiculous each other in where we've managed to set up our hammocks. City of Rocks in ID is perfect for this.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  155. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Sometimes my climbing buddy and I try to out ridiculous each other in where we've managed to set up our hammocks. City of Rocks in ID is perfect for this.
    Excellent!

  156. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoDakSooner View Post
    2014 Wrangler unlimited. It is not stock! 3.5" lift, 35" tires, lockers front and rear, plus a bunch of other stuff. It'll hold its own off road. Oh and the top and doors come off too!

    CVT and Tepui are direct competitors. CVT were a bit cheaper and they included the annex(lower tent) when I bought mine. At the time it was extra with the Tepui. I believe they are now included with the tent. Also, CVT offers a couple of larger tents that at the time i bought mine Tepui did not. Both are good "Chinese" tents but the CVT was a better deal financially when I picked mine up.

    Thanks! I figured it wasn't stock...and I will probably also do some aftermarket adjusting as well. Just wanting to see which base model to start with. A girl I dated back in the early 90's had a wrangler with the hard top. As soon as she got it, the HT came off, floor drain plugs came out and it pretty much lived without doors and top into November. We got a soft top for it for rain if it got bad. That thing was awesome. No frills. No leather interior...

    Quote Originally Posted by Coal-Cracker View Post
    I've owned Wranglers for decades and the JK and JKU models are the most capable Wranglers made to date. No joke.

    If you get a Rubicon model, you also get front and rear lockers, (electronic) sway bar disconnects, Dana 44 front and rear, 4.10 gears, 4:1 crawl ratio, etc., - all from the factory with a warranty.
    Or you can get a stock "Sport" and build it up yourself with the endless aftermarket.



    I wanted to try a rooftop tent, but the wife vetoed that idea pretty quick.


    Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk
    Ny original idea was to get a 70's era CJ5 or 7 cause those are my most fav, but I think there is a lot more "upkeep" with those that I don't want to get into. The Rubicons are most likely way out of my price range, but seem sweet

    Thanks for the info all!
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  157. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    Ny original idea was to get a 70's era CJ5 or 7 cause those are my most fav, but I think there is a lot more "upkeep" with those that I don't want to get into. The Rubicons are most likely way out of my price range, but seem sweet

    Thanks for the info all!
    Man, I'm torn!! I really want a Jeep but I think it might have to wait, as I still have to do medical visits with Mom, and a Jeep might not be the most practical car at this time.

    For now, I might just have get a Mazda CX-5 - and get a Jeep later when my midlife-crisis needs increase
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  158. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coal-Cracker View Post
    I've owned Wranglers for decades and the JK and JKU models are the most capable Wranglers made to date. No joke.

    If you get a Rubicon model, you also get front and rear lockers, (electronic) sway bar disconnects, Dana 44 front and rear, 4.10 gears, 4:1 crawl ratio, etc., - all from the factory with a warranty.
    Or you can get a stock "Sport" and build it up yourself with the endless aftermarket.



    I wanted to try a rooftop tent, but the wife vetoed that idea pretty quick.


    Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk
    We just picked up a new 2018 JL Rubicon Unlimited - totally bonkers for a stock rig, longer and wider wheelbase than the JK's, subtle but noticeable amount in increased interior space, stock with 33" tires. Really glad we waited for the new JL to come out.
    I would advise not taking my advice.

  159. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by watermonkey View Post
    We just picked up a new 2018 JL Rubicon Unlimited - totally bonkers for a stock rig, longer and wider wheelbase than the JK's, subtle but noticeable amount in increased interior space, stock with 33" tires. Really glad we waited for the new JL to come out.

    Sweet!
    You got me curious on what they’ve changed on the new ones. Still couldn’t find what “JL” stands for. I did however get a kick out of #10 in this artical.

    Ten Things You Need to Know About the JL 2018 Jeep Wrangler | Automobile Magazine

    Camping....-da49db51-85ea-402c-9fe3-918661c7a255.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  160. #160
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    OK, now I'm pissed. My new Jeep could have had "burrito holders" on the engine specifically designed to cook frozen burritos, but the safety lawyers put a nix on it.

    "10. Burrito holders on the JL’s exhaust manifold didn’t make the cut.

    “You know, you throw your frozen burrito on here,” Mark Allen explains, pointing to the top of the engine, where the burrito holders were to be. “And we don’t have them, but at some point we had them baked in, and there was this little icon of a burrito with steam coming off it, and the safety office called and said, ‘You can’t do that.’ One of the engineers came to me and said, ‘It sounds like they’re serious. We can’t do it. What do you want to do?’ I said, ‘Simple. We’ll draw a circle around the burrito and put a slash through it.’ We did that, and they sent it back. They’re on to us.” Perhaps next Easter."
    I would advise not taking my advice.

  161. #161
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    I’d be pissed off as well if I were you. I bet they didn’t offset the price by removing the burrito [cookers] holders. Just nixed the idea and went on with production.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  162. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by watermonkey View Post
    OK, now I'm pissed. My new Jeep could have had "burrito holders" on the engine specifically designed to cook frozen burritos, but the safety lawyers put a nix on it.

    "10. Burrito holders on the JL’s exhaust manifold didn’t make the cut.

    “You know, you throw your frozen burrito on here,” Mark Allen explains, pointing to the top of the engine, where the burrito holders were to be. “And we don’t have them, but at some point we had them baked in, and there was this little icon of a burrito with steam coming off it, and the safety office called and said, ‘You can’t do that.’ One of the engineers came to me and said, ‘It sounds like they’re serious. We can’t do it. What do you want to do?’ I said, ‘Simple. We’ll draw a circle around the burrito and put a slash through it.’ We did that, and they sent it back. They’re on to us.” Perhaps next Easter."
    My sprinter has a perfect hot spot on the heated intake manifold for heating food to ~110* F. The intake is heated with coolant to prevent the EGR gasses from "condensing" in the intake and blocking it... I have heated many a burrito on it.

  163. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    I’d be pissed off as well if I were you. I bet they didn’t offset the price by removing the burrito [cookers] holders. Just nixed the idea and went on with production.
    And I bet eliminating the burrito cookers allowed them to use littler weight fabrics on the seats as well.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  164. #164
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    Camping....-20151010_182319.jpg

    If the weather warrants I just sleep on the ground with my Moss heptawing to keep the wind and morning dew off me. This pic was taken at Buffalo Creek.
    Sweet Jesus don't let the judge release me, what if she's a Zombie or a Dracula and tries to f&*king eat me.

  165. #165
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    Camping....-20140614_152949.jpg
    And my trusty Garuda Big Joe tent when I need protection. This is up above Salida back towards the Rainbow Trail
    Sweet Jesus don't let the judge release me, what if she's a Zombie or a Dracula and tries to f&*king eat me.

  166. #166
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    that looks like the areas we generally camp in. mogollon rim area.

    to those cooking burritos on your engine perhaps a bit of reading you should look into

    Manifold Destiny
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  167. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
    My sprinter has a perfect hot spot on the heated intake manifold for heating food to ~110* F. The intake is heated with coolant to prevent the EGR gasses from "condensing" in the intake and blocking it... I have heated many a burrito on it.
    Manifold Destiny: The One! The Only! Guide to Cooking on Your Car Engine!
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  168. #168
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    guess great minds think alike.

    my father in law is a crane operator. diesel engine runs all day long. He actually cooked a whole chicken in the engine room just to see if it was possible. he said it came out excellent.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  169. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    guess great minds think alike
    Mine too!
    "…it has long been said: oft evil will shall evil mar."
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  170. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    that looks like the areas we generally camp in. mogollon rim area.

    to those cooking burritos on your engine perhaps a bit of reading you should look into

    Manifold Destiny
    Sweet!

    I actually want to modify the manifold a bit to make it work better for heating food while driving, but I haven't quite found the time yet...

  171. #171
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    the toyota guys have everything

    Camping....-4-yodateq-hot-fj80-manifold-warmer.jpg
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  172. #172
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    this thread is awesome...camping > hammocks > Jeep types> cooking on your manifold...love it!!
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  173. #173
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    Camping....-camping2.jpg

    my camping/4x4 trip last month. My bronco, my buddy willy's, and my father in law's M37.

    here is me in my stock bronco, damn open front diff. the oversize tires rub on the radius arms. then followed by my father in law in his truck.



    we are doing another one next weekend with a bunch of 4x4 guys. One is hopefully bringing one of his FC (Forward Control) Jeeps. that will be fun.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  174. #174
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    That Willy's is awesome!!
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  175. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by CUP-TON View Post
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    If the weather warrants I just sleep on the ground with my Moss heptawing to keep the wind and morning dew off me. This pic was taken at Buffalo Creek.
    Maybe slip some of those cooked on the Jeep manifold burritos in the sleeping bag.

    Here Bear, Here Bear.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  176. #176
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    I've never bikepacked but when backpacking, we always carried bear boxes (still have mine) if no bear box we hanged them from a tree. What do you guys do?

    Also, is bike security a concern? I'm sure this is all based on where you are camping.
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  177. #177
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    I went camping last weekend in a campground with my bike. I leaned it on a tree next to my tent. my friends told me to put it in the tent with me or in my car. I was not concerned and it was there in the morning. I have brought my bike and my wife's bike camping and went fishing for several hours. we left the bike in the campsite without a lock and never had an issue. Either I am really trusting of other people or just been lucky there hasnt been any dirt bags.

    Yea that willy's is insane. It was his grand fathers truck, now it has a 350tpi motor, 4L85 trans, dana 60 front, 14 bolt rear with detroit lockers on both ends. Hydro ram steering too, It can turn a tighter corner than my little hatchback. I dont know when the last time he has had to put it in 4x4. it has flex like you cannot believe. that's my next project for my truck. SAS leaf spring swap from a powerstroke.

    Camping....-dave.jpgCamping....-daves-jeep.jpg
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  178. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by watermonkey View Post
    We just picked up a new 2018 JL Rubicon Unlimited - totally bonkers for a stock rig, longer and wider wheelbase than the JK's, subtle but noticeable amount in increased interior space, stock with 33" tires. Really glad we waited for the new JL to come out.
    Nice!!

    Crazy as it sounds, I actually forgot completely about the JL. Haha...
    I think most "Jeep guys" look at the JL as a product improved JK, versus a whole new model. It's not near the departure/improvement the JK was from the TJ.
    Why mess significabtly with a good thing, right?

    I was worried insurance companies and safety regulations would pressure Jeep to go IFS and do away with the removable top. I was happy to see they didn't cave in.

    I've been waiting for years for the long-promised Jeep truck/Scrambler release.
    It's looking really good for the 2019 model release. Fingers crossed...

    Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk

  179. #179
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    The top on my bronco is not supposed to be removed. It's a 94 and that year they required shoulder belts that were attached to the top. Well I don't care and don't have a back seat. So the top comes off.

    When Jeep goes to ifs it's all over. I have technically ifs if you consider ttb ifs. But hopefully soon it will be a solid axle.

  180. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    I've never bikepacked but when backpacking, we always carried bear boxes (still have mine) if no bear box we hanged them from a tree. What do you guys do?
    It depends on where you go. In the Sierra there are zones where bear canisters are absolutely required, so if I'm spending at least one night there I'll take one. I just don't want the hassle of a ticket or being ordered out of the area if I do get questioned by a ranger (and I have). I think the Shasta NF started requiring them as well.

    Some places have large, steel bear-proof lockers at larger camping areas, but you may not be able to spend every night at one of those sites.

    For everywhere else, I have this: https://www.ursack.com/product/ursack-s29-allwhite/ I'll even take it where bears are scarce, more for protection against other varmints. I had a hanging bag get a hole chewed into it by a squirrel. You don't hang these Ursacks though, you tie them to a tree trunk and keep them low.
    "…it has long been said: oft evil will shall evil mar."
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  181. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    I went camping last weekend in a campground with my bike. I leaned it on a tree next to my tent. my friends told me to put it in the tent with me or in my car. I was not concerned and it was there in the morning. I have brought my bike and my wife's bike camping and went fishing for several hours. we left the bike in the campsite without a lock and never had an issue. Either I am really trusting of other people or just been lucky there hasnt been any dirt bags.

    Yea that willy's is insane. It was his grand fathers truck, now it has a 350tpi motor, 4L85 trans, dana 60 front, 14 bolt rear with detroit lockers on both ends. Hydro ram steering too, It can turn a tighter corner than my little hatchback. I dont know when the last time he has had to put it in 4x4. it has flex like you cannot believe. that's my next project for my truck. SAS leaf spring swap from a powerstroke.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    That Willy's is killer!
    I dream of doing something like that with a 50's split windo milk truck. Would make an awesome go anywhere camper.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  182. #182
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    Can't even count how many times I slept in the bed of that truck.

  183. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    That Willy's is awesome!!
    I agree...
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  184. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    Mine too!
    Lol,
    finally just got that.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  185. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by the one ring View Post
    It depends on where you go. In the Sierra there are zones where bear canisters are absolutely required, so if I'm spending at least one night there I'll take one. I just don't want the hassle of a ticket or being ordered out of the area if I do get questioned by a ranger (and I have). I think the Shasta NF started requiring them as well.

    Some places have large, steel bear-proof lockers at larger camping areas, but you may not be able to spend every night at one of those sites.

    For everywhere else, I have this: https://www.ursack.com/product/ursack-s29-allwhite/ I'll even take it where bears are scarce, more for protection against other varmints. I had a hanging bag get a hole chewed into it by a squirrel. You don't hang these Ursacks though, you tie them to a tree trunk and keep them low.
    Thanks, that's a pretty cool bag, my bear box is huge for the bike. Its pretty light, but I wouldn't know where to stuff it.
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  186. #186
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    This popped into my email inbox because of this thread.

    https://www.yeti.com/new-price-coole...IaAvQMEALw_wcB

    Camping....-0eedbf32-557e-4d25-b5ac-5bcc6225a50c.jpg
    Camping....-427a5390-347c-4533-88e4-60e181882454.jpg
    Camping....-6fb6c7c6-d742-4735-ba1a-be2054c2a3ac.jpg
    Camping....-ff77c702-224b-46d2-b561-05218ff8f75c.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  187. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    Thanks, that's a pretty cool bag, my bear box is huge for the bike. Its pretty light, but I wouldn't know where to stuff it.
    I have an ursack. Pair it with odorproof bags (opsak or similar) to cut the attraction factor from food odors. Love it when I am not required to have a bear canister.

    The cooler in my camper (forget the brand, but similar rotomolded design as a yeti), counts as bear resistant if I use long shackle padlocks on it.

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  188. #188
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    Camping....-fb_img_1487598132476.jpg

    I also go with hammocks. Last trip got down below 0. The underquilts underneath are amazing how they keep you warm.

  189. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradym77 View Post
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    I also go with hammocks. Last trip got down below 0. The underquilts underneath are amazing how they keep you warm.
    sweet...might look into this more. Was wondering about the draft from below...what is your set up?
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  190. #190
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bradym77 View Post
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    I also go with hammocks. Last trip got down below 0. The underquilts underneath are amazing how they keep you warm.
    0* f or 0* C?

  191. #191
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    for the hammock crowd:

    have any of you ever woken up wit ha creature sleeping beneath you using your cover as cover for them? Like in the rain? I could imagine animals being attracted to the shelter or even some warmth that is given off in the night
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  192. #192
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    I was camping in Eureka Colorado and when I packed up my tent there was a family of mice that made a nest under my bed. It was pretty cold out so they found their way under there. Luckily they stayed outside the tent and didn't chew their way in.

  193. #193
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    1st Camping trip of the year

    Fourteen hour drive then five days in Moab. This is my version of a hammock.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    for the hammock crowd:

    have any of you ever woken up wit ha creature sleeping beneath you using your cover as cover for them? Like in the rain? I could imagine animals being attracted to the shelter or even some warmth that is given off in the night
    Bugs under the tarp, sure. But no more than that.

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  195. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    I was camping in Eureka Colorado and when I packed up my tent there was a family of mice that made a nest under my bed. It was pretty cold out so they found their way under there. Luckily they stayed outside the tent and didn't chew their way in.
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Bugs under the tarp, sure. But no more than that.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
    As a kid camping in the Adirondacks my parents had their own tent. All the kids were snuggled up in other tents. I was about 12 years old and just about to fall asleep when I heard a blood curdling scream. I ran outside to find my mom on her back outside the door to her tent. She was the first to head to the tent between her and my dad. As she unzipped and bent down going in head first she was face to face with a HUGE raccoon on in her cot just a foot from her face. Startled and in shock she fell down backing back out of the tent. The raccoon was hissing and growling. By the time my dad got there the raccoon was under her cot. Nothing that a broomstick couldn’t coax back out. Before shooing him out my mom snapped a photo with a trusty Kodak disposable. I’ll have to dig through some old family albums and find the photo of the raccoon under the cot growling away. Lol
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  196. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coal-Cracker View Post
    I've owned Wranglers for decades and the JK and JKU models are the most capable Wranglers made to date. No joke.
    Coal everybody knows the TJ was the last REAL Jeep!

    I'd love to have one of the new ones but damn sooo expensive!

    Some awesome Willys up there ^^ I just sold my '78 Honcho truck, will miss it
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    some weird crazed desert dweller.

  197. #197
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    Some cool campin' pics on the bike. Will be going for a couple weeks soon with the old Coleman pop up camper, can't wait!

    Camping....-20170508_182014.jpg

    Camping....-20160806_190124.jpg

    Camping....-20160806_190212.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    some weird crazed desert dweller.

  198. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by EugeneTheJeep View Post
    Some cool campin' pics on the bike. Will be going for a couple weeks soon with the old Coleman pop up camper, can't wait!

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    man...those are sooo motivating! I cant' wait till school is out and I have the time to get out there!
    Go Practice. Figure it out - Fleas

    15 Surly Krampus - King Amongst Bikes
    LET IT SNOW!

  199. #199
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
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    Combining several things this past week. Spent some time visiting inlaws (not camping), but took a few days on the way home to ride and camp. Super quiet in the campground. Not much use for the awning. Not so hot that shade is necessary. It was raining the first day we were here (our anniversary), but the ground was absolute mush so still not worth deploying the awning. We just went into town to drink at the new distillery, then went out for pizza after.

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  200. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by sXeXBMXer View Post
    for the hammock crowd:

    have any of you ever woken up wit ha creature sleeping beneath you using your cover as cover for them? Like in the rain? I could imagine animals being attracted to the shelter or even some warmth that is given off in the night
    Not hammock but our backpacking/hunting tent is floorless and we have to shoo the mice out of there at times. You learn to keep your food packed away.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Camping....-tent.jpg  


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