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  1. #1801
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    We have an over-abundance of banana peppers this year, so trying something new to us...home made banana pepper rings. Also have a ton of tomatoes about to ripen, along with a ton of jalapenos. Gonna try home made salsa, too.

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  3. #1803
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    Wow, you got it going on there, Net!

    We've been getting the red yard long beans and a few green ones, cucumbers, okra, and a few jalapeños and grape tomatoes. I don't know what has happened but tomatoes just don't seem to perform for me like they use to. I probably need to fertilize more than I do. Also picked a good number of strawberries; finally got them all covered up where the chipmunks can't steal them anymore.

    And I may have an advantage on you on that day lily, unless that was likewise in your yard.

    Botany Thread-day_lilies.jpg
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  4. #1804
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    That day lily was from Huntsville Botanical Gardens. I don't have any of those in my yard.

    Your's is very nice!
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  5. #1805
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    Just spotted these off the trail...

    Botany Thread-20190714_112937.jpg Botany Thread-20190714_112904.jpg
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  6. #1806
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    Fun Guy! ^
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  7. #1807
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    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker View Post
    We have an over-abundance of banana peppers this year, so trying something new to us...home made banana pepper rings. Also have a ton of tomatoes about to ripen, along with a ton of jalapenos. Gonna try home made salsa, too.

    That's what my wife and I are doing. she does the normal pickle/canning I do the lacto-fermented pickling. It is getting close to prickly pear season. nothing beats real prickly pear syrup, jelly, and prickly pear cowboy candy. Unfortunately we did not get very many fruit on our saguaros this year so no saguaro jelly.

    I currently have several jars of ferment pickle beets, radish, turnips, corn, salsa, and hot sauce. I do quart mason jar ferments and If I like it, throw it in my 5L crock.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  8. #1808
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    That's what my wife and I are doing. she does the normal pickle/canning I do the lacto-fermented pickling. It is getting close to prickly pear season. nothing beats real prickly pear syrup, jelly, and prickly pear cowboy candy. Unfortunately we did not get very many fruit on our saguaros this year so no saguaro jelly.

    I currently have several jars of ferment pickle beets, radish, turnips, corn, salsa, and hot sauce. I do quart mason jar ferments and If I like it, throw it in my 5L crock.
    Nice.
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  9. #1809
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Which brings to mind this thread >> https://forums.mtbr.com/off-camber-o...cs-534432.html

    It needs to be bumped me thinks. *hint, *hint.

    Nice garden Net. Makes me hungry.

    Chaz, what was your strategy in keeping the chipmunks from eating your strawberries?
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
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  10. #1810
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    Some of the tomatoes ripened up...ready to try my first batch of homemade salsa.

    Plan is to puree all the tomatoes in a blender. Then dice all the banana peppers and 1 or 2 of the jalapenos and add them and just hand stir. The jalapenos were really mild last year, but this years are bringing the heat!!! I need to not overdue them or risk making it too hot to be good. Also, need to get a store bought onion. I never had any luck trying to grow onions so I gave up on them.

    Might add a little honey and brown sugar to try and add some balance.

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  11. #1811
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    What are good spices to add? Cilantro?
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  12. #1812
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    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker View Post
    What are good spices to add? Cilantro?
    Yes!

    Keep forgetting to grab jalapeños to take to work to add to my egg, tomato and cheese wraps.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  13. #1813
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    Yum! Are you shipping samples to your homies? 😂
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  14. #1814
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    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker View Post
    What are good spices to add? Cilantro?
    Hmm I dunno. How much garlic are you putting in it?

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    dang

  15. #1815
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Hmm I dunno. How much garlic are you putting in it?

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    One clove, finely chopped.
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  16. #1816
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Yum! Are you shipping samples to your homies? 😂
    Probably going to be consumed in-house.....sorry! Swing by Huntsville this weekend and you can try it out.
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  17. #1817
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    Chaz, don't forget jalapeños.
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  18. #1818
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    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker View Post
    Chaz, don't forget jalapeños.
    Wow, perfect timing, Net. I was about to forget them, thanks!

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  19. #1819
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    Quote Originally Posted by net wurker View Post
    One clove, finely chopped.
    Woof, I'd probably put 2 or 3, but you know, I'm probably one of those people that uses way too much garlic. Oh man, if it's roasted, too...yum.

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    dang

  20. #1820
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    agreed 2-3. don't forget a pinch of cumin. do we need a salsa thread?
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  21. #1821
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    agreed 2-3. don't forget a pinch of cumin. do we need a salsa thread?
    The mods will probably move it to the bike brand forum.

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    dang

  22. #1822
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    Because of cumin I'm sure

  23. #1823
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    Botanical Chicken

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  24. #1824
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    One of my hobbies is growing carnivorous plants. I have an outdoor bog garden with an in-ground float valve that keeps the reverse osmosis, deionized water at a constant level. They can be tricky to grow, but cool to watch them catching and digesting bugs.












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  25. #1825
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    One of my hobbies is growing carnivorous plants. I have an outdoor bog garden with an in-ground float valve that keeps the reverse osmosis, deionized water at a constant level. They can be tricky to grow, but cool to watch them catching and digesting bugs.












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    Woah just saw this, as I've been neglecting this thread. Absolutely beautiful garden!
    How many carnivorous plants do you think you have?

    I want to start a small decorative native woodland wildflower and grass planting in my font yard so I don't have to mow it anymore. Unfortunately it's low on the list of priorities, after tuckpointing on the house, repainting the brick, and putting anything in place of the shrubs I cut down in the back yard.

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    dang

  26. #1826
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    Sweet!
    Isleblue65, You must live in a very humid region to be able to keep a garden like that in good shape.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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  28. #1828
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Woah just saw this, as I've been neglecting this thread. Absolutely beautiful garden!
    How many carnivorous plants do you think you have?

    I want to start a small decorative native woodland wildflower and grass planting in my font yard so I don't have to mow it anymore. Unfortunately it's low on the list of priorities, after tuckpointing on the house, repainting the brick, and putting anything in place of the shrubs I cut down in the back yard.

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    We had a couple of wet winters, and I unfortunately lost all of my Venus Flytraps, sphagnum peat moss and some pitcher plants because I didn't have adequate drainage. Since then, I've moved my bog from the ground into a large galvanized trough above ground with drainage holes, and more control from squirrels and invasive plants such as ivy and blackberries rooting into the bog. I have three varieties of pitchers, a cobra plant, 2 varieties of flytraps, several sundews, several butterworts, and sphagnum moss. The plants aren't cheap, so I'm slowly replenishing what was lost last winter, and they are doing much better in the trough.

    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Sweet!
    Isleblue65, You must live in a very humid region to be able to keep a garden like that in good shape.
    You'd be surprised! I live in Northern California (Santa Rosa) where it is hot and dry in the summer. Contrary to what most think, many of the carnivorous plants people are familiar with grow in the wild in the US. Fly traps as well as pitchers, sundews, etc grow in South Carolina natively. There are peat bogs in Minnesota that I have visited with an amazing variety of cobra plants, pitchers, butterworts and some beautiful flowering plants that bloom every 10 years.
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  29. #1829
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    Quote Originally Posted by isleblue65 View Post
    We had a couple of wet winters, and I unfortunately lost all of my Venus Flytraps, sphagnum peat moss and some pitcher plants because I didn't have adequate drainage. Since then, I've moved my bog from the ground into a large galvanized trough above ground with drainage holes, and more control from squirrels and invasive plants such as ivy and blackberries rooting into the bog. I have three varieties of pitchers, a cobra plant, 2 varieties of flytraps, several sundews, several butterworts, and sphagnum moss. The plants aren't cheap, so I'm slowly replenishing what was lost last winter, and they are doing much better in the trough.



    You'd be surprised! I live in Northern California (Santa Rosa) where it is hot and dry in the summer. Contrary to what most think, many of the carnivorous plants people are familiar with grow in the wild in the US. Fly traps as well as pitchers, sundews, etc grow in South Carolina natively. There are peat bogs in Minnesota that I have visited with an amazing variety of cobra plants, pitchers, butterworts and some beautiful flowering plants that bloom every 10 years.
    Dude all that is so awesome. Sorry about your loss of plants but I'm glad you still have many. Really our southeastern counterparts should be visiting bogs and other wetlands and sending pictures of the flora. I'm going to Mississippi on a seed collection trip for work at the beginning of September, so maybe I'll take pictures for y'all. I usually forget because I've got the task I'm doing on the brain (mondo ADHD). Don't count on it.

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    Last edited by NDD; 08-23-2019 at 06:06 AM.
    dang

  30. #1830
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Dude all that is so awesome. Sorry about your loss of plants but I'm glad you still have many. Really our southeastern counterparts should be visiting bogs and other wetlands and sending pictures of the flora. I'm going to Mississippi on a seed collection trip for work at the beginning of September, so maybe I'll take pictures for y'all. I usually forget because I've got tee taski I'm doing on the brain (mondo ADHD). Don't count on it.

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    Every place we travel, I look online to see if they have bog areas. A few years ago, we found an amazing bog in Northern Minnesota (Lake Bemidji State Park Bog Walk) which was one of the highlights of my carnivorous plant experience. Who would think that these plants can survive -30f and feet of snow in the winter time, just to sprout up again in Spring?!

    I hope to see more bog/ CP photos posted!


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  31. #1831
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    your wish
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  32. #1832
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    your wish
    Lol. I mean, there are plants and no birds...

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  33. #1833
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    True, there’s also a caterpillar. I guess it could go in the creepy crawler insect thread.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  34. #1834
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    True, there’s also a caterpillar. I guess it could go in the creepy crawler insect thread.
    Too bad we don't have a resident entomologist.

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    dang

  35. #1835
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    Took a walk in the botanical garden the other day. One thing caught my eye. Choctaw Lily, Hymenocallis choctawensis. Native to the Gulf Coast states.
    dang

  36. #1836
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    The post fire SoCal Oaks are coming back, you can see obvious growth even tho it's not much. These 'growths' seem like they're doing quite well tho. At first I thought they were Oak blossoms, but maybe they're parasites? NDD?

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  37. #1837
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    Woah I'm going to have to wait until I get home to my larger computer monitor to check this one out. Especially the second one looks like something that just happens you be growing on top of a dead tree.
    dang

  38. #1838
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    Attachment 1276037

    Sunflowers are the Bees Knees.....

  39. #1839
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    Quote Originally Posted by OzarkFathom View Post
    Attachment 1276037

    Sunflowers are the Bees Knees.....
    Nice, somebody is ready for dove season...
    dang

  40. #1840
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    Perceptive Fellow.....

  41. #1841
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    Quote Originally Posted by OzarkFathom View Post
    Perceptive Fellow.....
    Hey I wished I'd had a field like that today! We had permission to walk some field roads and such, but most farmers haven't cut anything yet. Different thread though (can't imagine how a shotgun/trap shooting/hunting thread would go...).
    dang

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Hey I wished I'd had a field like that today! We had permission to walk some field roads and such, but most farmers haven't cut anything yet. Different thread though (can't imagine how a shotgun/trap shooting/hunting thread would go...).
    Should go fine. Most don’t mind bird hunters, its the big game that gets most riled up. Seems like that anyway, start one up and see.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
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  43. #1843
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Should go fine. Most don’t mind bird hunters, its the big game that gets most riled up. Seems like that anyway, start one up and see.
    Should I start it in the recycle bin?
    dang

  44. #1844
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    Avoid the middle man.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Woah I'm going to have to wait until I get home to my larger computer monitor to check this one out. Especially the second one looks like something that just happens you be growing on top of a dead tree.
    Kinda washed out and hard to see, but maybe it's enough to ID it. You can see the green oak leaves in there.



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  46. #1846
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Kinda washed out and hard to see, but maybe it's enough to ID it. You can see the green oak leaves in there.



    Ah, now from these photos looks like oak resprouts but the leaves are so young they're totally covered in white hairs. Pretty cool. You see this often in areas of the Eastern US that are managed with prescribed fire, though the hair level is usually not so extreme. The root structure survives the fire and uses remaining resources to send up sprouts, but I am surprised these are so high on the tree. Usually resprouts are close to the ground... It was actually hard for me to make out the points in the oak leaves from the first two pics.
    dang

  47. #1847
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Ah, now from these photos looks like oak resprouts but the leaves are so young they're totally covered in white hairs. Pretty cool. You see this often in areas of the Eastern US that are managed with prescribed fire, though the hair level is usually not so extreme. The root structure survives the fire and uses remaining resources to send up sprouts, but I am surprised these are so high on the tree. Usually resprouts are close to the ground... It was actually hard for me to make out the points in the oak leaves from the first two pics.
    That is pretty cool, thanks! It's like another form of oak!

    I'm petty sure they're all over the trees. Maybe they're just going off from all the rain.



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  48. #1848
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    All the trees, mainly the oaks but many other species are dying off in Southern California. 😢

    https://www.latimes.com/local/califo...403-story.html
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
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    from my camping trip over the weekend. I have more but Ill put these out
    its amazing where trees will grow
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    thistle
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    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    All the trees, mainly the oaks but many other species are dying off in Southern California. 

    https://www.latimes.com/local/califo...403-story.html
    read the article and came across:

    Liquidambar is one example. The species evolved in the Southeastern United States, then developers and property owners planted it in Southern California after World War II.

    and I'm thinking, "what is a Liquidambar tree?" Looked it up, oh, a Sweetgum! I've got some of them in my yard.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  51. #1851
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    from my camping trip over the weekend. I have more but Ill put these out
    its amazing where trees will grow
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    Nice!
    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    read the article and came across:

    Liquidambar is one example. The species evolved in the Southeastern United States, then developers and property owners planted it in Southern California after World War II.

    and I'm thinking, "what is a Liquidambar tree?" Looked it up, oh, a Sweetgum! I've got some of them in my yard.
    It's funny in a common language type article to throw in the botanical Latin, unless it's a genus that is also the common name (i.e. Hibiscus or Catalpa). It's easier for everyone to just use the common name followed by the formal species name in parentheses so everyone has an idea of what is gaining. I'm not a big fan of common names but y'all don't want me to call it Schoenoplectus tabernaemontani, you want me to call it Soft-stemmed Bulrush. I try to abide.
    dang

  52. #1852
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    plant ID?

    Botany Thread-img_20191001_114459587.jpg

    Botany Thread-img_20191001_114450441.jpg

    and a happy bell pepper

    Botany Thread-img_20190926_175445319.jpg
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  53. #1853
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    The first two pics show what is called a ground cherry (Physalis sp.), but I'm not sure which species from the pics. Could be Physalis longifolia, long-leaf ground cherry. Not familiar enough with these to know for sure.

    They are in the same genus as tomatillos. Fruits on these are often edible, but I don't know about all of them. If they taste anything like a tomatillo, then that'd be some good shit.
    dang

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    the fruit husk at this point is empty. It is a large weed on the back corner of one of our properties. I want to see what develops so I dont want to remove it. it has very small white flowers that are similar to tomato, it also smells like a tomato plant when the leaves are crushed. That would make sense that it would be in the genus of tomatillos. I love me some tomatillo salsa. just have to be careful with those nightshade plants.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  55. #1855
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    I thought it looked a bit like a Chinese Lantern and looking up Physalis, I see they are from the same genus.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  56. #1856
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    I thought it looked a bit like a Chinese Lantern and looking up Physalis, I see they are from the same genus.

    Those are quite pretty, also somewhat unusual. Most species in this genus are in the Americas, which is expected because of where its culinary use comes from. Some people think they're weeds worth using effort to manage if found but I've never seen them actually in natural areas, maybe parking lots or roadsides.

    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    the fruit husk at this point is empty. It is a large weed on the back corner of one of our properties. I want to see what develops so I dont want to remove it. it has very small white flowers that are similar to tomato, it also smells like a tomato plant when the leaves are crushed. That would make sense that it would be in the genus of tomatillos. I love me some tomatillo salsa. just have to be careful with those nightshade plants.
    Absolutely, fortunately plants in this genus have a very distinctive husk, and usually quite showy flowers for plants in the nightshade family (Solanaceae), which includes tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant among edible plants and deadly nightshade and Jimson weed among potentially deadly plants.
    dang

  57. #1857
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    Does tree = Botany?

    Botany Thread-lone-yellow.jpg

  58. #1858
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCTJ View Post
    Does tree = Botany?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    100% yes! Anything that's a plant is botany!
    dang

  59. #1859
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    Well I was just in middle Tennessee for a few days doing a plant reintroduction and took zero pictures. What the hell? I need to get my act together and stop working and start photographing!
    dang

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    my sage in my backyard exploded with blooms yesterdayBotany Thread-img_20191010_165535541_hdr.jpg
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  61. #1861
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    my sage in my backyard exploded with blooms yesterdayClick image for larger version. 

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    Gorgeous specimen!
    dang

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Gorgeous specimen!
    Yes


    8,500FT Colorado about 5 days ago. Before the snowstorm hit.

    Botany Thread-04d5b066-73fb-4dd0-a9eb-04fe92e49a7d.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  63. #1863
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Yes


    8,500FT Colorado about 5 days ago. Before the snowstorm hit.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Nice bluestem and bellflower. Do you know what the low shrubby stuff is?
    dang

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Nice bluestem and bellflower. Do you know what the low shrubby stuff is?
    No, but I only see it at high altitude.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    I hate trimming sage for work. If they are just left alone and not trimmed into a cube they would look like mine, but no, have to trim them.

    This one is a texas sage. Not only is it covered in blooms, its covered in bees. What's even better is it's all on natural water. Nothing in my yard has irrigation.

  66. #1866
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    I hate trimming sage for work. If they are just left alone and not trimmed into a cube they would look like mine, but no, have to trim them.

    This one is a texas sage. Not only is it covered in blooms, its covered in bees. What's even better is it's all on natural water. Nothing in my yard has irrigation.
    That's amazing and I wish that more people in arid lands would refrain from growing water intensive plants in their yard. I also agree that if you're not worried about being in a fence line or up against a building there's no reason to trim something like that.

    Some cool botanical news, 2600+ year old balls cypress in North Carolina.

    https://www.newsweek.com/2624-tree-n...-m5ZRD-Kc_Ry1Y
    dang

  67. #1867
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    When we plant for work we always plant low water low maintenance plants. Called xeriscaping. Cacti, yucca, agave, creosote, and my favorite euphorbias. That is such a huge family of plants. Doing commercial landscaping the issue is the designers are from other states and do not realize what does well and what does not and how much water grass needs.

  68. #1868
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post

    Some cool botanical news, 2600+ year old balls cypress in North Carolina.

    https://www.newsweek.com/2624-tree-n...-m5ZRD-Kc_Ry1Y
    Wow, that's some old balls!
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Wow, that's some old balls!
    Don’t beat around the bush about it.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    That's amazing and I wish that more people in arid lands would refrain from growing water intensive plants in their yard. I also agree that if you're not worried about being in a fence line or up against a building there's no reason to trim something like that.

    Some cool botanical news, 2600+ year old balls cypress in North Carolina.

    https://www.newsweek.com/2624-tree-n...-m5ZRD-Kc_Ry1Y
    That's really beautiful. Thanks for sharing.

  71. #1871
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Wow, that's some old balls!
    Frig, I'm dead. Never trust the swipe text feature on your phone keyboard. Not even once.
    dang

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    bougainvillea bracts and flowers

    Botany Thread-img_20191015_120322375.jpg

    I was sitting at the time clock today waiting for the laptop to upload the winter grass water in cycle and it is surrounded by bougainvillea. I always thought it was funny how people think the bright pink/purple bracts(specialized leaves) are the flowers, but the real flower is the tiny little one on the inside. was interesting that this one had a square flower
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    Its amazing what a difference in trees 400 miles of driving can make...compared to my Alpine tree above.

    Botany Thread-interesting-tree.jpg

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    How about a little Indian Pipe aka Ghost Plant...Botany Thread-img_3799.jpg

    Found on trail at Lake Wissota in August.

    Weird stuff.

  75. #1875
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    bougainvillea bracts and flowers

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I was sitting at the time clock today waiting for the laptop to upload the winter grass water in cycle and it is surrounded by bougainvillea. I always thought it was funny how people think the bright pink/purple bracts(specialized leaves) are the flowers, but the real flower is the tiny little one on the inside. was interesting that this one had a square flower
    Ah a great example of this phenomenon, the most popular probably being poinsettias. It's an easy mistake to make. For most people the colorful part is the flower, and they don't want to have to think about where the naughty bits actually are on the plant. Those are actually quite showy compared to the actual flowers on many species in the Euphorbiaceae!

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCheesehead View Post
    How about a little Indian Pipe aka Ghost Plant...Click image for larger version. 

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    Found on trail at Lake Wissota in August.

    Weird stuff.
    One of those plants I always get excited to see, no matter how many I've seen recently. There's just something about parasitic plants that kinda sexy. Funny thing is these are actually pretty closely related to blueberries and cranberries. Seems weird from this angle, but the floral parts are actually pretty similar.
    dang

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    There's just something about parasitic plants that kinda sexy.
    how about some pinesap?


    0831191122 by Nate, on Flickr

    Next are a few plants from a recent hiking trip up the highest mountain east of the Mississippi River (Mt. Mitchell).

    mountain spleenwort


    IMG_8465 by Nate, on Flickr

    cliff saxifrage


    IMG_8466 by Nate, on Flickr

    stairstep moss


    IMG_8469 by Nate, on Flickr

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Really our southeastern counterparts should be visiting bogs and other wetlands and sending pictures of the flora.
    None of us has ever done that. Not at all. (to be fair, these were planted, but no fancy water control systems needed)

    https://forums.mtbr.com/off-camber-o...l#post13696472

    Back in college, before I even owned a camera (inconceivable, right?), I visited a bunch of bogs in Ohio for some botany and ecology courses I took. One was a really weird one. Cranberry Bog in central Ohio. This link describes it and how it was formed.

    https://naturepreserves.ohiodnr.gov/cranberrybog

    The bog will eventually disappear, though, as the reservoir surrounding the bog is slowly changing the chemistry of everything at the periphery, so slowly the bog mat gets smaller and smaller.

    Even though venus flytraps are native here in NC, I've not gone out searching for them. The mountains I live in keep me busy enough.

  78. #1878
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    Thanks for the pics NateHarold. I'm just saying, that was like decades ago that you visited those wetlands. I don't blame you for enjoying your time in the mountains. But for Peat sake give us a little something from a bog or fen sometimes. We don't have bogs here and our fens are few and far between.
    dang

  79. #1879
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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Thanks for the pics NateHarold. I'm just saying, that was like decades ago that you visited those wetlands. I don't blame you for enjoying your time in the mountains. But for Peat sake give us a little something from a bog or fen sometimes. We don't have bogs here and our fens are few and far between.
    decades ago? lol, that was last summer.

  80. #1880
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    decades ago? lol, that was last summer.
    What's the difference? For some plants that was a whole generation.
    dang

  81. #1881
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    Fall from below.

    Botany Thread-fall-below.jpg

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    Sweet shot BC.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

  83. #1883
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Sweet shot BC.
    Thanks - do you like the caption? Fall from below. Its kind of a play on words. Like watching Fall colors from below the tree.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BCTJ View Post
    Thanks - do you like the caption? Fall from below. Its kind of a play on words. Like watching Fall colors from below the tree.
    Yep, I got that. Very witty and a perfect caption.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BCTJ View Post
    Fall from below.

    Love it! I have one client out here who has a healthy Liquidamber tree that is just starting to turn. I try to remember to snap a pick of it each week this time of year.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Radium View Post
    Love it! I have one client out here who has a healthy Liquidamber tree that is just starting to turn. I try to remember to snap a pick of it each week this time of year.
    Thanks! Glad you like it.

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    I just found out that figs are not actually botanically fruit; they are inverted flowers. I've never thought about that they don't flower like other fruit trees/bushes. And that, though most figs in the US are self-pollinating, other figs require wasps to pollinate them and the female dies within the "fruit".

    https://www.foxnews.com/food-drink/a...nswer-is-maybe
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  88. #1888
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    That's pretty neat. I'd never really thought about figs much. Only ever see them in cookie form so I'm not looking at fruit structures.

    Atypical fruits are pretty common in that family - Moraceae, the mulberry family. Mulberries are called multiple fruits, because the primary the fleshy material is not derived from the flowers ovaries, but some other flower part, in this case the stem the flowers sit on. A strawberry is a similar example, though it's an aggregate fruit, so the flower receptacle (place that female flower parts sit on top of) is most of the flesh, while the fruits are the small one-seeded fruits we always call seeds.
    dang

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    Earth to Chaz, how is spring looking down there? The grapevine says y'all are early this year.
    dang

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    Sorry, this didn't come up on my New Posts link for some reason, I just happened to be looking through Off Camber and saw a recent post.

    It's been a very wet winter, but only one snowfall that was largely melted by early afternoon. My daffodils are blooming and some of the trees are starting to also. Forgot to get a closer look but driving by them, it looks like my blueberries are budding. But, they are predicting temps down into the mid twenties the end of this week so they may get zapped. Similar to last year; used to not be until more like mid-March.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

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    Hmm... That could be disheartening for some work later in the year. If some of our study species put up flowers too early and then it frosts we will be out of luck.
    dang

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    Berms and transitions may apply

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    Lol, NDD has certainly come out of his shell.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    *confused hissing*
    dang

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    cool little plant out by the Salton Sea

    Botany Thread-img_20200228_065427096.jpg
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    NDD, I've got a good one for ya! This is the weirdest tree I have ever seen in So Cal.

    It has grooved deep red bark (like a redwood) that is twisted around the trunk and the leaves a typical flat, semi-broad.

    What the hell is it?!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Botany Thread-img_2543.jpg  

    life is... "All About Bikes"...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawgzilla View Post
    It has grooved deep red bark (like a redwood) that is twisted around the trunk and the leaves a typical flat, semi-broad.

    What the hell is it?!
    Looks like a Gum Tree, Eucalyptus.

    Cholla Buds
    Botany Thread-img_20200318_150129244_burst001.jpg
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  98. #1898
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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    cool little plant out by the Salton Sea

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Wow, how did I miss this beauty! Any ideas as to what it is?

    Hawg, I'm gonna defer to Azi on this one. No clue.
    dang

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    LOL! That was easy, a quick search for Liliaceae on Calflora website looks like it's an African Lily, genus Agapanthus. I'm guessing pretty innocuous.
    dang

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    Desert Lilly Hesperocallis undulata


    I was amazed anything grew out there. From the salt, sand, and wind it was rough place. Lots of Creosote bush though.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    Nice! I stand corrected. Quite the attractive flower.
    dang

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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    Looks like a Gum Tree, Eucalyptus.
    My mind went straight to Eucalyptus also. Wasn’t sure what species though. And Hawg I’ve seen those in SoCal before. You being a native I would thoink you would have seen them prior to this also. Even though Eucalyptus are an invasive speciesism to SoCal they are everywhere now.

    Interesting read how SoCal became Eucalyptus-ized in such a short time.

    https://www.kcet.org/shows/lost-la/w...ern-california
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    My mind went straight to Eucalyptus also. Wasn’t sure what species though. And Hawg I’ve seen those in SoCal before. You being a native I would thoink you would have seen them prior to this also. Even though Eucalyptus are an invasive speciesism to SoCal they are everywhere now.

    Interesting read how SoCal became Eucalyptus-ized in such a short time.

    https://www.kcet.org/shows/lost-la/w...ern-california
    It started when E.W., not John, Scripps and Kate Sessions decided that eucs would be a swell-and-fine tree for parks, ranches, and along rail lines. Scripps figured that growing along rail lines, eucs could be put to use as replacement ties for the rails on the spot, if the need should arise.
    Unfortunately, neither of them knew that nothing native here would do more than sit in the eucs, or that eucalyptus lumber warps and splits rapidly, or even that the damn things are in the habit of unpredictably dropping limbs onto whoever is on the ground below. Like that poor little kid killed just outside the entrance to the world famous San Diego Zoo just a few years back.
    Just call me Ray

  104. #1904
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    Spring has sprung

    Botany Thread-20200321_094556.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    some weird crazed desert dweller.

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    Azim thanks for the info on prickly pear stuff above, I have a huge one in the backyard, and have transplanted several to the side yard. I pan fried some up a while ago, so good, like bell peppers kinda. Nopales. Going to look into the pickling/canning thing you talked about.
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    some weird crazed desert dweller.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Radium View Post
    It started when E.W., not John, Scripps and Kate Sessions decided that eucs would be a swell-and-fine tree for parks, ranches, and along rail lines. Scripps figured that growing along rail lines, eucs could be put to use as replacement ties for the rails on the spot, if the need should arise.
    Unfortunately, neither of them knew that nothing native here would do more than sit in the eucs, or that eucalyptus lumber warps and splits rapidly, or even that the damn things are in the habit of unpredictably dropping limbs onto whoever is on the ground below. Like that poor little kid killed just outside the entrance to the world famous San Diego Zoo just a few years back.
    Or the large family in Wittier a few years back that were having a wedding party picnic and a large one fell and killed the mother of the bride and a three year old suffered a brain injury.

    https://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/w...-decay/163221/
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    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Botany Thread-768ccf8b-33ed-4da7-959d-55edc745fbe4.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EugeneTheJeep View Post
    Azim thanks for the info on prickly pear stuff above, I have a huge one in the backyard, and have transplanted several to the side yard. I pan fried some up a while ago, so good, like bell peppers kinda. Nopales. Going to look into the pickling/canning thing you talked about.
    Definitely worth it. Right now is a great time to pick some young pads off the pricky pear. I have picked some Cholla buds too. Get them before the grow spines. Kinda taste like asparagus. Also ocotillo are blooming with the desert rain. The flowers are very tasty in salads. Taste like citrus.

    I'm waiting for the wolf berry to fruit. It is a Sonoran goji berry. Very tasty.

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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    Definitely worth it. Right now is a great time to pick some young pads off the pricky pear. I have picked some Cholla buds too. Get them before the grow spines. Kinda taste like asparagus. Also ocotillo are blooming with the desert rain. The flowers are very tasty in salads. Taste like citrus.

    I'm waiting for the wolf berry to fruit. It is a Sonoran goji berry. Very tasty.
    Yep the old Mexican ladies told me to cut the pads off when they are young and tender, mine have a ways to go still but will def give it a go!
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    some weird crazed desert dweller.

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    great book for those who live in the southwest desert area.

    Botany Thread-img_20200321_175353827.jpg
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    great book for those who live in the southwest desert area.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Will check it out thx!
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    some weird crazed desert dweller.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EugeneTheJeep View Post
    Yep the old Mexican ladies told me to cut the pads off when they are young and tender, mine have a ways to go still but will def give it a go!
    if you have the prickly pear that has little to no thorns like eastern prickly pear you are good to go. the big older pads get very woody though. good if you need fiber in your diet. there are so many varieties of prickly pear it is amazing. most of what we have on our property and the area around us is very thorny, like the cows tongue or sawtooth and the desert prickly pear. a real good one to have is the wheel cactus. the pads are large and thick, the fruit is also very large and the juice is a deep burgundy. when we make jelly, wine, and mead from cactus we keep each variety separate for the color and the taste.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    Quote Originally Posted by azimiut View Post
    if you have the prickly pear that has little to no thorns like eastern prickly pear you are good to go. the big older pads get very woody though. good if you need fiber in your diet. there are so many varieties of prickly pear it is amazing. most of what we have on our property and the area around us is very thorny, like the cows tongue or sawtooth and the desert prickly pear. a real good one to have is the wheel cactus. the pads are large and thick, the fruit is also very large and the juice is a deep burgundy. when we make jelly, wine, and mead from cactus we keep each variety separate for the color and the taste.
    Nice! I'll post up some pics of mine probably tomorrow if you can give me some pointers
    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    some weird crazed desert dweller.

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    A cool thing for me is a few miles away is a place called fig springs. It is an artesian well surrounded by dozens of fig trees. Always great when they are ripe but it's on private property so you have to hike in. Know your surroundings and what plants can provide food. Not just in these troubling times but just for the fun of it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawgzilla View Post
    NDD, I've got a good one for ya! This is the weirdest tree I have ever seen in So Cal.

    It has grooved deep red bark (like a redwood) that is twisted around the trunk and the leaves a typical flat, semi-broad.

    What the hell is it?!
    Do you have any more pictures? Close up of leaves, a flower, more bark texture? It's hard for me to make out a lot of features.
    dang

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    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Do you have any more pictures? Close up of leaves, a flower, more bark texture? It's hard for me to make out a lot of features.
    I'll get some to you in a few weeks.
    life is... "All About Bikes"...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawgzilla View Post
    I'll get some to you in a few weeks.
    We need them STAT!
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawgzilla View Post
    NDD, I've got a good one for ya! This is the weirdest tree I have ever seen in So Cal.

    It has grooved deep red bark (like a redwood) that is twisted around the trunk and the leaves a typical flat, semi-broad.

    What the hell is it?!
    You know what this bark does look like one Eucalyptus that's planted in So Cal. It's not called a gum tree, though and doesn't have that characteristic smooth flaky bark like most Eucalyptus. E. sideroxylon, red iron bark.

    Then again, it's very likely not that.
    dang

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    I think it is in the Eucalyptus family. I’ve seen them in SoCa. and they grow just like a gum tree. The leaves and branches are very similar. The only real difference is the bark.
    Quote Originally Posted by mileslong View Post
    I passionately remove rocks and corners and other stuff I find too hard to ride.

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    I forgot to say it, but thanks for those great photos, Eugene!

    I went for a little hike last weekend, a little 100 acre plot close to the city. Really a 12 minute drive from the house. I think that many little areas like this have quite a bit of potential, but will not receive the attention to actualize that potential, because the area is small. I think that because of their urban proximity, their value for offering habitat for wildlife is skewed as more valuable than they otherwise would be, and their potential to inspire folks who would otherwise not see anything close to "natural" is great. However, much of the area is slowly being lost to bush honeysuckle and winter creeper. It's a shame. A Bio Blitz event a few years back found something like 350+ vascular plant species at this site, and there are a number of remnant glades, which could use some management. I didn't snap many photos, but I'll probably be back.



    These are the developing leaves of Astragalus canadensis (Canada milkvetch), which is a prolific native forb throughout much of the US. This was found on a bluff overlooking the road, where a few cedars abound. There were some invasive species present, like sweet clover, but those are easy to pull. Species like this one indicate that the habitat was probably a much more open woodland in the past. This is also found on the glades in open areas where little bluestem is common.



    Dutchman's Breeches (Dicentra cucullaria) in bloom. It's hard not to take a picture of this one, because the flowers look like little pairs of pants. A common spring ephemeral, perennial plants like this are done flowering and gone by the time most plants even start to do their thing. They are windows into the past, in which the land was not so degraded. In many places you can find these absolutely everywhere where you find any, but they were sparse, though not uncommon, at this location. This is a signal of lack of management.



    Rue anemone (Thalictrum thalictroides). Another purdy spring ephemeral wildflower.



    Also, because there's not an arachnid thread that I know of or want to know of, here's a trap door spider. I don't care for spiders, but I felt like I didn't mind seeing this guy walking about the leaf litter before he saw me. Clearly by this point he/she/they had taken notice and froze, but as it was a little chilly a spider can only be so spry.
    dang

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