Results 1 to 97 of 97
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    150

    American English?

    Being a US based website, mtbr.com naturally has a large percentage of posts from North America.
    The spellings and pronunciations used by Americans are mostly the same as the rest of the English speaking world, but there are still some significant differences.
    This got me thinking; when did this happen? Was there are deliberate attempt after 1776 to create a distictly American dialect so that a newly independent USA could further distance itself culturally from its former British master? Or was it a gradual change?
    Are most Americans aware of these differences, or do they sometimes read literature written in English by non-Americans and think it's rife with spelling mistakes?
    And what about Canadians? I imagine they might be sought of stuck in the middle.

    Here are some examples:

    - Color vs Colour
    - Defense vs Defence
    - Tire vs Tyre
    - Mom vs Mum
    - Aluminum vs Aluminium


    And a couple of pronunciation examples:

    - The letter Z is pronounced "Zee" in America and "Zed" elsewhere
    - The "Semi" in semi-circle is pronounced like "Sem - eye" in America, and "Sem - ee"
    elsewhere

    None of this is really a problem for anyone. But I am curious as to how it came about.
    Does anyone have any views about this?

    Cheers,

    Digger.

  2. #2
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,211
    One thing that I see mentioned frequently is that, for an audience including US and other English speaking people, it may be safer to use the US spellings. The stated reason being that a Brit, Aussie, etc. is likely to understand and ignore the "wrong" spelling, while a US English speaker would find the British spelling quite strange.

    Do you think there's some truth to this?

    .-.-.-.-.-.

    Idioms (No! Not Idiots! ) can be really hard. You use them without thinking but people who are used to a different dialect is likely to miss the point.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    150
    Yeah, from a pragmatic point of view that makes perfect sense.
    As a former career soldier in the Australian Army who has served on several operations alongside US forces, I can tell you that the issue of mis-communication was raised and discussed at a tactical level. This was especially important when air support was required - more often than not this was provided by Americans. All possible measures were taken to ensure a clear understanding over the net among the coalition partners.
    So from a pure percentage point of view it made sense to adopt "Americanisms"
    We also worked closely with Dutch Apache pilots and their english was good. But you could hear a distinct American style to their coms.

  4. #4
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,211
    The use of English in multinational military operations reminds me of a concept I learned about some months ago: Simplified Technical English (STE):
    Simplified English - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    ASD SIMPLIFIED TECHNICAL ENGLISH

    It is a "controlled language" designed for use in the aerospace industry. The vocabulary and grammar have been restricted to avoid misunderstandings. For example, you can use the word "close" for closing a circuit or door, but you cannot use "close" for something being "near".

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  5. #5
    ******
    Reputation: monzie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,990
    It was actually the British that started changing their dialect gradually. There's remarks from British sailors and merchants about how though the Americans are far removed from the Motherland, they still speak the queens English astonishingly well. And then, at some point in history, that thought line changed. As for aluminum/aluminium, it stems from the fact that there was a tradition of naming elements with the -ium suffix. The Discoverer of the element ( a Brit) flopped back and forth between the two and I think I remember him finall settling on the -um and British scientists thinking it was silly and sticking with -ium while Americans accepted the change. Or it might have been the other way round.

    All iformation is pulled from memory from a book by Patricia T. O'Conner entitled "Origin of the Specious". I highly recommend it. Short, fast read and very entertaining.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nuffink's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    768
    As monzie says, Americanised English has been a repository for earlier forms of the Language. A good example is the retention of the old English "Fall" (in relation to the season) over the Brits use of "Autumn".
    It's also, obviously, been a breeding ground for new words, usages and spellings. In general this has been a good thing (imo), even if the spelling changes tend toward the more literal and diminish some of the quirkier elements of the language. There are a few neologisms that grate on this particular Brits ear. For instance, anyone who utters "a whole nother" needs a good slapping.

  7. #7
    ******
    Reputation: monzie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,990
    ^^Yessir they do. I'm not a fan of the Internet making everything an acronym that people then use in verbal conversation. I also prefer the British spelling of certain words. Especially the ones the US uses a Z in place of an S. I think the S makes words like apologise softer and less "angry" looking. If that makes sense.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    150
    Thanks for the answers.
    One thing I can share for a bit of a laugh, was how we sent some of our USMC friends home (mostly fairly young guys barely over 20 yo) with a whole new level of swearing - aussie style
    This was after spending some time in northern Australia with us for the bi-annual ex Talisman Sabre.
    Just about to a man, they were extremely polite and always respectful.
    But I heard that some of their mothers, wives, girlfrinds etc were pretty horrified by their new found use of one word in particular - which I'm not about to repeat here.
    And there were some words they'd never heard of before such as "wanker".

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nuffink's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    768
    Wanker is a brilliant word. Not only is it short, pithy and satisfyingly offensive, it also has the inestimable benefit of sailing uncensored through most (American) forums swear blockers.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    652
    This seems like an appropriate place to inquire, wtf is bollocks? Why is bollocks bad but the dog's Bullocks is good? I'm dismayed.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nuffink's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    768
    Bollocks is bad, the dog's bollocks is bad. Capiche?

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by chugachjed View Post
    This seems like an appropriate place to inquire, wtf is bollocks? Why is bollocks bad but the dog's Bullocks is good? I'm dismayed.
    That would best be answered by a Pom (Englishman).
    But here's my two bobs worth.
    It is sometimes used here in Australia, but is very common in the uk. It has many uses and meanings.
    Bollocks can be your gonads.
    It can mean "rubbish" in the right context, ie; someone is talking BS.
    You could cop a "bollocking", ie; someone has told you off, or lambasted you, or even actually beaten you.

    I'm sure there are more meanings though.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nuffink's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    768
    In the more rarefied echelons of pom society, the dog's bollocks has been largely superseded by the mutt's nuts.

  14. #14
    No Stranger to danger....
    Reputation: Tone's's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    4,596
    hey digger how are you mate, yep im an aussie, n i have got plenty of lil red dots on here for not spelling the ''correct'' American way, i dont mind it, but i hope they realise that there are many diff ways to spell the same words, but i cant spell for s**t anyway so they are prob havin a dig about that i for one think that these yanks are a bit behind the times they think they are in front n the leaders but you n i know the truth dont we digger cheers, now time for some kangaroo chasing.......

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    150
    I'm still curious about Canadians.
    They're part of the British Commonwealth, but do they use mostly American spellings and pronunciations?

  16. #16
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5,926
    We speak the way we want.

    In Quebec, we don't speak french like those hipsters do in France. We speak french with a mix of frenglish expressions and often incorporate common words from US english. But don't be fooled, we're not switching between french and english every other words in a sentence

    We find the Bristish accent funny, US one is just normal to us and we easily get what you're trying to say, no matter where you're from (US, British, AU, etc).

    And we got a heluya of an accent when we go spend our cash in the US.

    For the rest of the country, they're pretty much like the northern US people. Except we don't have hillbillies anywhere else than the Parliament
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  17. #17
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    24,376
    Nope. I know plenty of Canadians, and they add the "u" and use "zed" and all that, too. However they use a lot of American idioms and whatnot so they are somewhat of a bridge between the US and the UK and Aus.

    I think a good bit has to do with the additional cultural influences in the US that the other countries don't have to the same degree. Not to mention, regional variation in the states can be huge, too. Take the southern dialect. And some if them are VERY localized. The dialect in Pittsburgh, PA and vicinity can be nearly unintelligible to outsiders at first. Same with the Cajun dialect. Or New England.

    A lot of those variations have to do with what cultures settled in an area centuries ago. There has been some homogenization but many dialects remain.

    The variations in English around the world are nothing like the variations in Spanish, though. That language is so different from country to country that native Spanish speakers often have a hard time going to another country.

    I learned "Mexican Spanish" over the years but have been thrown for a loop by my Argentinian advisor and had a few issues when I went to Costa Rica which was different from both other dialects I have been exposed to. I had Puerto Rican soccer teammates in high school and they were different still. Apparently Puerto Rican Spanish can be tough for native speakers of Mexican Spanish. Being a nonnative speaker who is not fluent it's all tough to me but I notice some differences.

  18. #18
    meow meow
    Reputation: b-kul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    10,622
    Quote Originally Posted by OldAusDigger View Post
    - The "Semi" in semi-circle is pronounced like "Sem - eye" in America, and "Sem - ee"
    elsewhere
    i think that is more of a tomato/ tomata situation rather than a american/ uk thing. i say sem-ee and most people i know do though i have heard people say sem-eye (mostly older people, idk).

  19. #19
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    24,376
    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul View Post
    i think that is more of a tomato/ tomata situation rather than a american/ uk thing. i say sem-ee and most people i know do though i have heard people say sem-eye (mostly older people, idk).
    Semi is used in different contexts here. In the conext above, I say sem-ee. For other uses, like the term for a tractor trailer, I say sem-eye.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,457
    Did you know that 70% of Asian Americans have Cataracts? ......The rest drive Rincoln Continentals..

    No but seriously, think that's one of the things that makes people and places so interesting. One of my my best friends is Chinese, who grew up in Brazil, and now lives in America. So he speaks English, Chinese, and Portuguese fluently, without much of an accent on any.
    My grandparents came from Italy at the same time, and when they arrived here only spoke Italian, yet latter in life my grandmother had no accent and my grandfather was barely understandable. Even in a small country like Italy the dialect can be so different from place to place.
    I grew up mostly in NYC, so my understanding of many types of broken English is excellent, yet in some places down south I can barely understand my own language.
    How boring a world would it be if everyone sounded, talked, lived, believed the same. There's no right or wrong just different, and I don't really care if a person calls it a semi, semee, or 18wheeler. In some places men wear skirts, even if it makes them feel better to call it a kilt. While I don't agree, some people look at dogs and cats as dinner, while others, like me, let them sleep on their bed. Live and let live I say. When in Rome...... or at least keep your eyes open cause you might learn something, and enjoy the local flava' while you're there.

    So Peace out, carry on, keep the rubber side down, take care, take it easy, catcha latta, see ya later, later, on the rebound, adios, cheers, chow, goodbye, shalom, keep it real, my friend, buddy, mate, pal, bro, homie, homles, homeboy, comrade, dawg, my boys, man, main man, mypac, blue, red, chum, companion, amigo, cuz, colleague, blood, dude,.....should I go on? Over and out, outy, I'm outa here.
    Last edited by theMeat; 06-23-2012 at 02:56 PM.
    Round and round we go

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,561
    Not trying to start something, but I think that after 1776 when
    we kicked the British asses, and became their masters, they
    started to distance them selves from American. Just my American
    take on things.

    Best, John

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Brewtality's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    5,735
    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl View Post
    Not trying to start something, but I think that after 1776 when
    we kicked the British asses, and became their masters, they
    started to distance them selves from American. Just my American
    take on things.

    Best, John
    That's how I see it.
    We speak American.
    They speak English.

    Wow, that sounds really redneck of me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Its all Shits and Giggles until somebody Giggles and Shits

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: FLMike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    974

    New question here.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's L'axeman View Post
    hey digger how are you mate, yep im an aussie, n i have got plenty of lil red dots on here for not spelling the ''correct'' American way, i dont mind it, but i hope they realise that there are many diff ways to spell the same words, but i cant spell for s**t anyway so they are prob havin a dig about that i for one think that these yanks are a bit behind the times they think they are in front n the leaders but you n i know the truth dont we digger cheers, now time for some kangaroo chasing.......
    Quote Originally Posted by Brewtality View Post
    That's how I see it.
    We speak American.
    They speak English.

    Wow, that sounds really redneck of me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    If they speak English and we speak American.... then what is that nonsense that comes off L'axeman's keyboard?

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nuffink's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    768
    Wankers.

  25. #25
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5,926
    Quote Originally Posted by Brewtality View Post
    That's how I see it.
    We speak American.
    They speak English.

    Wow, that sounds really redneck of me.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Not to start something, but I'm also American since I live in America. Which makes me an American Canadian and you an United States of America citizen.

    Just sayin'

    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    332
    different cultures value their different dialects. i think the typical american dialect is probably just a mix of all of them, but nobody really takes pride in it. there is a "standard" so to speak, but i'll have a lot of trouble communicating with yankees, deep south folk and people with an urban dialect.

    i had some really good friends growing up who were from canada, and they would say a few words differently, but basically it was no different. their mom loved to use words like chesterfield for couch and say aboot, but it was very minor and she did it just to be different. i used to play WoW with a ton of canadians (from toronto i think) and there was never a situation where i noticed a difference in vocabulary.

    when i went to quebec though the people who would speak english did talk a bit differently.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GiantMountainTroll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    252
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Did you know that 70% of Asian Americans have Cataracts? ......The rest drive Rincoln Continentals..

    No but seriously, think that's one of the things that makes people and places so interesting. One of my my best friends is Chinese, who grew up in Brazil, and now lives in America. So he speaks English, Chinese, and Portuguese fluently, without much of an accent on any.
    My grandparents came from Italy at the same time, and when they arrived here only spoke Italian, yet latter in life my grandmother had no accent and my grandfather was barely understandable. Even in a small country like Italy the dialect can be so different from place to place.
    I grew up mostly in NYC, so my understanding of many types of broken English is excellent, yet in some places down south I can barely understand my own language.
    How boring a world would it be if everyone sounded, talked, lived, believed the same. There's no right or wrong just different, and I don't really care if a person calls it a semi, semee, or 18wheeler. In some places men wear skirts, even if it makes them feel better to call it a kilt. While I don't agree, some people look at dogs and cats as dinner, while others, like me, let them sleep on their bed. Live and let live I say. When in Rome...... or at least keep your eyes open cause you might learn something, and enjoy the local flava' while you're there.

    So Peace out, carry on, keep the rubber side down, take care, take it easy, catcha latta, see ya later, later, on the rebound, adios, cheers, chow, goodbye, shalom, keep it real, my friend, buddy, mate, pal, bro, homie, homles, homeboy, comrade, dawg, my boys, man, main man, mypac, blue, red, chum, companion, amigo, cuz, colleague, blood, dude,.....should I go on? Over and out, outy, I'm outa here.
    x2 very well said broski
    2013 Specialized P 26 AM green/purple. Nuff said

    Giant Faith

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl View Post
    Not trying to start something, but I think that after 1776 when
    we kicked the British asses, and became their masters, they
    started to distance them selves from American. Just my American
    take on things.

    Best, John
    Less than 80 years after the American Declaration of Indepedence the USA and Great Britain were fighting together as allies for the first time - in China! The war was the 2nd Opium War.
    There is no doubt that Britains handling of its North American colonies prior to 1776 was very poor.
    I've often wondered just how different the world would've been if the whole of North America had remained as part of the British Empire. It is quite possibly Great Britains biggest blunder, losing the colonies that were to become the USA.
    I think that once hostilities started that the Americans were never going to lose. But, I think it was a closer run thing than many modern day Americans realise. I don't think any historian would regard it as "an ass kicking" though.
    Britain invaded again in the war of 1812, but as far as I'm aware a definate attempt was made after this to repair relations between both countries - which became permanent.
    As for when America emerged as the worlds most dominant nation, I'm not sure. Possibly it was around 1942/43.
    But one things for sure, they never looked back from there!

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,561
    OldAusDigger you said it pretty good. I just like to stir things
    up a little sometimes.

    Best, John

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dummyrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    189
    Coming from NZ we have similar types of mocking/teasing between ourselves and Ausies as what I've seen between Canadians and Americans.... Possibly even moreso. Our accents are significantly different and words like six and sex can generate ammunition for some severe verbal punishment. Australians and Kiwis alike can be pretty ruthless especially against each other when it comes to an opportunity to get one up on the other.

    I always spell with euro english on this site and have never been questioned about it. I actually find date formats more of an issue. In NZ we generally dd/mm/yy and in my work using internationaly manufactured ingredients for food products we make, it can be easy to get caught out.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,457
    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl View Post
    OldAusDigger you said it pretty good. I just like to stir things
    up a little sometimes.

    Best, John
    Agreed, he did say it pretty well, in a politician running for office kinda way, but if you like to stir things up why not question why an Ausie, would lecture an American, who's just showing some pride, on American history. And why he didn't bring up the colony, or type of, that good old England set up over there around that same 1776 timeline in that history lesson. LOL, Put that in your Didgerido and smoke it.

    Just kidding Mate, thanx for the history lesson.
    Round and round we go

  32. #32
    No Stranger to danger....
    Reputation: Tone's's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    4,596
    Quote Originally Posted by FLMike View Post
    If they speak English and we speak American.... then what is that nonsense that comes off L'axeman's keyboard?
    hey micky, on your bike ya flogga, get your hand off it champ, it will fall off when its ripe

  33. #33
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    24,376
    I always spell with euro english on this site and have never been questioned about it. I actually find date formats more of an issue. In NZ we generally dd/mm/yy and in my work using internationaly manufactured ingredients for food products we make, it can be easy to get caught out.
    I have no problems with the date format in other countries, but get irritated with my own. The scientific community everywhere uses more or less the ddmmyyy format (or more accurately dd month yyyy). Mmddyyyy gets on my nerves.

    It's no problem with the spelling variations and most dialect differences. I have spent some time in the UK and learned some. There's always some vocab that I haven't heard yet, though, and some of them truly leave me scratching my head

  34. #34
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,211
    What about "the ******s of Europe"? Anybody here from Ireland?

    edit:
    the forum doesn't allow a literary quote referring to the poor repressed people who used to be under British rule...

    When I was visiting Britain, I went to Scotland too. There were people there who didn't sound particularly British.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dummyrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    189
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post

    It's no problem with the spelling variations and most dialect differences. I have spent some time in the UK and learned some. There's always some vocab that I haven't heard yet, though, and some of them truly leave me scratching my head
    I can certainly relate. My Family on my fathers side are from East London. They settled out here in the 50s. I can well remember as a kid wondering what everyone was talking about at family get togethers when they had a few drinks in them and the cockney slang started flying.

  36. #36
    Pedaler of dirt
    Reputation: marzjennings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    902
    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    What about "the ******s of Europe
    When I was visiting Britain, I went to Scotland too. There were people there who didn't sound particularly British.
    But they are British, they're just not English.

    As a Brit working for an Aussie company in Texas I have completely given up on appropriate spelling of words. Working on joint presentations with colleagues we often end up with mixed spelling throughout the document. In a recent one I had to convince a colleague that 'learnt' is an ok alternative to 'learned'.

    The biggest hassle for me isn't spelling, but mixed units. We use French software that defaults to metres, while actually working in feet. We are constantly having to double check that our location information hasn't been flipped.

    On the bike I still find it amusing that my 26" wheels are connected to the 160mm travel forks through a 20mm axle connected to the frame via 1 1/8th" headset.

    I still like throwing out the odd english phrase or word just to confuse my wife who is American. The latest words are 'owt' and 'nowt' which until she googled them she thought I was making 'em up.
    Last edited by marzjennings; 06-24-2012 at 02:47 AM.
    It's not enough that we do our best; sometimes we have to do what's required.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: elcaro1101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    507
    For anybody looking for a crash course in UK English, you need to watch this guy.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Agreed, he did say it pretty well, in a politician running for office kinda way, but if you like to stir things up why not question why an Ausie, would lecture an American, who's just showing some pride, on American history. And why he didn't bring up the colony, or type of, that good old England set up over there around that same 1776 timeline in that history lesson. LOL, Put that in your Didgerido and smoke it.

    Just kidding Mate, thanx for the history lesson.
    This is one "colony" that you could say was British to the bootstraps prior to WW2. We thought that the massive Brit military presence in Singapore during that period would protect us from the Japs.
    After the fall of Singapore, who did we turn to? The USA that's who. And they saved our arses with victory in the battle of the Coral Sea, that's for sure.
    The Japs continued to bomb our cities, but they never managed to launch an invasion.
    It is a debt of gratitude that many younger Australians fail to acknowledge. They question why we followed America into Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan.
    In the last few weeks, the first few thousand US marines arrived in Darwin to begin setting up for the first time ever a permanent USMC presence in northern Australia.
    You could say that the Chinese are less than impressed!

    We had a referendum a few years back about whether to remain a Constitutional Monarchy under the Westminster System of government, ie; still tied to Britain, or become a Republic with a President as Head of State. Well, the latter failed to get up - but it was a real close vote.

  39. #39
    Ride More, Work Less
    Reputation: heyyall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    7,774
    I ain't sur' whatcha talkin bout in this here thread.

    Even within the US, American English isn't uniform--pronunciation to word choices. Part of this is the melting pot that is the US; part of it is environmental conditions. But, that is what makes it fun.
    Craigslist & MTBR --free ads for all

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    402
    US Here - I grew up in Cali / Nevada
    (BTW - Link to the proper way to pronounce Nevada - Nevada pronounce it right - NBC News - YouTube!)

    I have always been curious about other native speaking English peoples treat 'sport slang'. I went to the last 2 years of high school in Newport Bch. Everyone there was a surf doggie and we had our own sub-language that I'm sure the uninitiated would find un-intelligible. Even the adults had a pretty good handle on surf speak. It has been so long ago, I can't think of any examples.

    Here is one for rock climbing thou... 'Let's fire the way rad dead verts...'

    Do Brits, Aussies, etc. do this to?

  41. #41
    heaven help me
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,883
    For those of you who have been to Boonville Ca, there is Boontling.

    Anderson Valley Historical Society

  42. #42
    ******
    Reputation: monzie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,990
    Quote Originally Posted by norton55 View Post
    For those of you who have been to Boonville Ca, there is Boontling.

    Anderson Valley Historical Society
    Thanks dude. I've been trying to remember that language since this thread started.

    As a side note, has anyone read anything by Irvine Welsh? He writes phonetically to get the dialect across to the reader ocassionally. it's crazy to try and decypher sometimes but you get used to it after a while.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: edley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    344
    Sounds like someone is taking a piss in this thread. How did that expression get started anyway?

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nuffink's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    768
    Quote Originally Posted by monzie View Post
    Thanks dude. I've been trying to remember that language since this thread started.

    As a side note, has anyone read anything by Irvine Welsh? He writes phonetically to get the dialect across to the reader ocassionally. it's crazy to try and decypher sometimes but you get used to it after a while.
    The Patter... 1Glesga Glossary

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dummyrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    189
    Quote Originally Posted by edley View Post
    Sounds like someone is taking a piss in this thread. How did that expression get started anyway?
    Bro, its "taking the piss". We also might call a parody a pisstake.

    Taken from wikipedia...

    One theory is that during the age of the canals in Britain, urine would be brought up the canals to the wool mills in Northern England (particularly to Yorkshire), as urine was used in the process of fixing dye to wool. This was particularly the case for the dyeing items blue with indigo or more traditionally with woad, before synthetic dyes were invented or made commercially available.[9] Being in the business of transporting urine was much less lucrative than transporting wine, so when the boatmen were questioned what they were carrying they would lie and say "I'm taking wine" and the response would be "No you're taking the piss" to express disbelief.

  46. #46
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    24,376

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,175
    Quote Originally Posted by OldAusDigger View Post
    This is one "colony" that you could say was British to the bootstraps prior to WW2. We thought that the massive Brit military presence in Singapore during that period would protect us from the Japs.
    After the fall of Singapore, who did we turn to? The USA that's who. And they saved our arses with victory in the battle of the Coral Sea, that's for sure.
    The Japs continued to bomb our cities, but they never managed to launch an invasion.
    It is a debt of gratitude that many younger Australians fail to acknowledge. They question why we followed America into Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan.
    In the last few weeks, the first few thousand US marines arrived in Darwin to begin setting up for the first time ever a permanent USMC presence in northern Australia.
    You could say that the Chinese are less than impressed!

    We had a referendum a few years back about whether to remain a Constitutional Monarchy under the Westminster System of government, ie; still tied to Britain, or become a Republic with a President as Head of State. Well, the latter failed to get up - but it was a real close vote.
    To clarify, you guys ditched the queen? I thought you hadn't?

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bethany1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    712
    I think some of it has to do with illiteracy and spelling. Used to be that you spelled as it sounded for those who didn't know how to to read, or for translating. If you read through old documents like census records or back even into the 1700's/earlier for European documents, spelling and pronunciation was vastly different.

    Part of it might be the different dialects that each country has. You can tell where people are from based on how they talk or the words/phrases they use. I can always tell when someone is from Utah because they say, "Oh my heck". Then you have the soda/pop depending on where you live. America is such a vast melting pot that language/phrases from every culture is thrown in. Spanglish is one of them.

    I always laugh when a British swear word or finger gesture makes it through USA's censors.

    My husband's family is British and his uncle still refers to the US as the "Colonies" in a disdainful way..LOL.

    Looked at tire or tyre under Google and it looks like tire was used for the iron tires (ones with iron around like wagon wheels) and tyre was for for the pneumatic tire.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    4,926
    Quote Originally Posted by Bethany1 View Post
    ...................... Then you have the soda/pop depending on where you live. America is such a vast melting pot that language/phrases from every culture is thrown in. Spanglish is one of them. ..........................
    My family moved to live in Florida for couple years and then moved back to MN and they picked up on the soda thing. They've now reverted back to saying pop.
    But my wife (whos' from the south) started saying soda about a year ago after she's been living in MN for 10 years saying pop. That bugs the heck out of me.

    I can tolerate British English, Scottish English, Southern English, even Asian English, but Ebonics annoys the F*** out of me. Its like you're not even trying to sound intelligent!

  50. #50
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,198
    Quote Originally Posted by the-one1 View Post
    Ebonics annoys the F*** out of me. Its like you're not even trying to sound intelligent!
    They aren't trying, somehow it has become fashionable to be an uneducated street thug with the most minimal social skills possible. And people wonder what has happened to this country.

  51. #51
    barely a mtbr
    Reputation: jk13's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    165
    Quote Originally Posted by the-one1 View Post
    My family moved to live in Florida for couple years and then moved back to MN and they picked up on the soda thing. They've now reverted back to saying pop.
    But my wife (whos' from the south) started saying soda about a year ago after she's been living in MN for 10 years saying pop. That bugs the heck out of me.

    I can tolerate British English, Scottish English, Southern English, even Asian English, but Ebonics annoys the F*** out of me. Its like you're not even trying to sound intelligent!
    I'm in WI born and raised and I say soda. My parents say pop.


    Ebonics is tough to deal with. I can only remember a couple of things from my days in Milwaukee--I am in the car industry btw and here are some terms I've had to try and figure out:

    Cadillac convertible=catalytic converter.
    Leeds=l.e.d. lights
    "Goolie"= Pontiac 6000LE

    There are many, many more that I just can't remember at the moment. As much as I hated the movie "Idiocracy" I could see the potential for sure.

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,175
    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    They aren't trying, somehow it has become fashionable to be an uneducated street thug with the most minimal social skills possible. And people wonder what has happened to this country.
    Schools in Oakland California briefly flirted with teaching Ebonics until they became a national laughing stock.

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,561
    I live in SoCal and call it a soda, even though I would
    rather have a beer.

    Best, John

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    375
    i can understand kiwi's and brits easier than new jersey. i think they're trying for their own language there.

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,457
    Teaching ebonics in school is ridiculous. Guess if you'd like to talk that way on your own that's a choice.
    So lesson number 1. F*** is only half a word. It's Mother F*****.
    Lesson 2, hold your nose and say "Yo Mother F....
    Last edited by theMeat; 06-25-2012 at 04:08 PM.
    Round and round we go

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nuffink's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    768
    So, all variants and dialects welcome, or at least tolerated in the case of British English, Scottish English, Southern English, even Asian English (thanks for that, much appreciated) except for the Black patois. Splendid.

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation: luvdabeach2001's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    586
    I believe the broader use of American English is partly due to if it was not for the U.S. everyone in Europe would be speaking German.
    "Never let the facts get in the way of a good story."
    Mark Twain?

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nuffink's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    768
    Quote Originally Posted by luvdabeach2001 View Post
    I believe the broader use of American English is partly due to if it was not for the U.S. everyone in Europe would be speaking German.
    Hardly, Russian maybe.

  59. #59
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,267
    Quote Originally Posted by nuffink View Post
    So, all variants and dialects welcome, or at least tolerated in the case of British English, Scottish English, Southern English, even Asian English (thanks for that, much appreciated) except for the Black patois. Splendid.



    Just don't need to teach it in schools.

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    375
    Quote Originally Posted by nuffink View Post
    So, all variants and dialects welcome, or at least tolerated in the case of British English, Scottish English, Southern English, even Asian English (thanks for that, much appreciated) except for the Black patois. Splendid.
    engrish is completely different than "foshizzle". nothing racist about it.

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,175
    Quote Originally Posted by luvdabeach2001 View Post
    I believe the broader use of American English is partly due to if it was not for the U.S. everyone in Europe would be speaking German.
    Yep, or dead!

  62. #62
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,267
    A term coined in 1975, hardley an old world launguage.

    Urban Dictionary: ebonics

    Ebonics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    4,926
    Ebonics: "Yo G, you frontin me?"
    English: "Excuse me, my peer, are you attempting to influence me to engage in a violent action with you?"

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nuffink's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    768
    Quote Originally Posted by Slozomby View Post
    engrish is completely different than "foshizzle". nothing racist about it.
    Perish the thought, old chap. It just so happens that the whole thread celebrates the diversity of the language... up to a point. That point being the language of black America. Which, as far as I'm concerned, has contributed some of the most vibrant new additions the language has ever seen. From the time when it was mediated through the work of white writers like Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mark Twain, through to the genius of the likes of Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Langston Hughes and James Baldwin. Not to mention the vast treasury of neologisms coined by Jazz, Soul and Hip-Hop musicians and the legacy of Black film makers celebrating their own slang.

    And all it means to you is "foshizzle"?

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,542
    Back when my Dad arrived here, he had a "bery tick Pilipino ak-cent". This was back in the day when there were no Filipinos, and he worked with nothing but old white dudes.

    When he eventually made Senior Management, I remember seeing a picture and he was THE ONLY brown skinned slant eyed dog eater among the group of old white dudes. It always cracked me up.

    He worked so hard to rid himself of his accent. My mom said he would practice and practice and practice to properly pronounce words so he wouldn't be discriminated against. He believes it helped him in his career by doing so, in an industry that was entirely headed by white people. He never "fought the power" or "blamed the man" - language was very important to him and assimilation to the U.S. culture was required if he were to provide the life we had. Eventually, he became one of the highest paid engineers in his company.

    He came here when he was 17 with the American dream, and part of that was to adopt the english language entirely and master it so that he could work and share his ideas. At that time, who was going to pay attention to a funny talking 5'6" spear chucker? My dad knew there was underlying racism, so he fought it in his own way - by dissolving the stereotypes through becoming outstanding and well spoken.

    It's a shame that ethnic cultures don't pay attention to the old schools like my Dad. They really had it hard, but understood there was a way to make it work in America - and it wasn't selling out or being a coconut (brown on the outside, white on the inside).

    Coming from this, I have a very hard time knowing that we can't have an intelligent conversation with certain ethnic groups about ebonics, "Engrish" and other misuses of the English language without somebody saying it's racist. My dad lived it during a much more racist time, and he conquered it in an intelligent way that transcended skin color. When he took ownership of the English language - nobody looked at his race - they just saw him.

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    4,926
    ^ Here here.
    Somedays when I'm tired and have talked too much already, my Engrish slurs a bit and is hard to hear or understand. But most of the time I'm very aware of how I speak and how I pronounce words so others can understand me. I too work on my speech to get it as best as I can.

    In the end, it's not how you talk that defines you. It's the words that comes out that matters. If you don't care what comes out, then people won't care to listen no matter color, creed, weight, or sexual position (sic).

  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    375
    Quote Originally Posted by nuffink View Post
    Perish the thought, old chap. It just so happens that the whole thread celebrates the diversity of the language... up to a point. That point being the language of black America. Which, as far as I'm concerned, has contributed some of the most vibrant new additions the language has ever seen. From the time when it was mediated through the work of white writers like Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mark Twain, through to the genius of the likes of Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Langston Hughes and James Baldwin. Not to mention the vast treasury of neologisms coined by Jazz, Soul and Hip-Hop musicians and the legacy of Black film makers celebrating their own slang.

    And all it means to you is "foshizzle"?
    my explanation was overly simplistic i'll admit. but everywhere i've ever gone and everyone ive talked to spoke the same basic english, sure there are regional words and phrases and spelling differences and horrible accents and mistakes i ignore because their english is better than my whatever, the ebonics i hear doesnt really seem to fit that. i dont really know what it is, it think theres a difference between written and verbal versions. it seems to vary from speaker to speaker, its like people make it up as they go and a so i summed it up as foshizzle.

    i think it wants to be its own language, so that's what i'll call it. its own language.

  68. #68
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    13,322
    Grammar, a Victim in the Office - WSJ.com

    Test your grammar

    I got 21
    Question 10 surprised me
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  69. #69
    ******
    Reputation: monzie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,990
    Quote Originally Posted by nuffink View Post
    Perish the thought, old chap. It just so happens that the whole thread celebrates the diversity of the language... up to a point. That point being the language of black America. Which, as far as I'm concerned, has contributed some of the most vibrant new additions the language has ever seen. From the time when it was mediated through the work of white writers like Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mark Twain, through to the genius of the likes of Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Langston Hughes and James Baldwin. Not to mention the vast treasury of neologisms coined by Jazz, Soul and Hip-Hop musicians and the legacy of Black film makers celebrating their own slang.

    And all it means to you is "foshizzle"?
    Exceptionally put. About the only neologisms I can tolerate are the ones coined in economically depressed areas. That goes for any continents impoverished;
    Not just America's. Of course though, I am most heavily influenced. By America's urban coliquisms as that's where I am from. my writing belies my spoken word. When I talk it's a mixture of deep south slang, urban patois, proper English and sometimes me and a buddy of mine sit around and coin new phrases to add to our own vocabulary and hopefully spread them around for popular use. It's worked a few times. And, because of the ability for media to be shared internationally, I will sometimes use slang from other countries if it's fitting, though I guess people find hat pretentious. I find it a great way to contribute to/borrow from the rich diversity of words and terms available to us.

    Edit: a relevant and awesome hip-hop song: T.R.O.Y. By Joell Ortiz. I can't link from my phone but if you're interested, YouTube it. I'll try to link or imbed it later at a proper computer.

    Edit edit: that was the wrong song. Sorry folks the actual song is Puerto Rican Ebonics:
    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/6oCraDYAq-M" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    Which is a cypher over this big L song's beat:
    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/TMeFcVHNT1Q" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    Last edited by monzie; 06-26-2012 at 04:07 PM.

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    To clarify, you guys ditched the queen? I thought you hadn't?
    No, we haven't ditched the Queen.
    The vote was about 55% to 45% in favour of staying a Constitutional Monarchy.
    Most people who voted to keep the status quo were thinking "if it aint broke, don't fix it!"
    Plus it was estimated to cost billions of dollars.

  71. #71
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,175
    Quote Originally Posted by OldAusDigger View Post
    No, we haven't ditched the Queen.
    The vote was about 55% to 45% in favour of staying a Constitutional Monarchy.
    Most people who voted to keep the status quo were thinking "if it aint broke, don't fix it!"
    Plus it was estimated to cost billions of dollars.
    Wise move. The still powerful British Navy will stay at your beckon and call ... not that the US won't lend a hand when China invades.

  72. #72
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    402
    Quote Originally Posted by nuffink View Post
    Hardly, Russian maybe.
    I guess we will really never know how it would have turned out but the US was key in the success of the Russians. Aircraft, tanks, trucks, etc. Enough to keep them afloat until their own industry kicked in...

    Lend-Lease - Wikipedia

    Having a guy with only 5-10 rnds following another guy with a rifle, waiting for him to die so he can pick it and fight, does not sound like a good long term battle plan...

  73. #73
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,175
    Quote Originally Posted by dead_dog_canyon View Post
    I guess we will really never know how it would have turned out but the US was key in the success of the Russians. Aircraft, tanks, trucks, etc. Enough to keep them afloat until their own industry kicked in...

    Lend-Lease - Wikipedia

    Having a guy with only 5-10 rnds following another guy with a rifle, waiting for him to die so he can pick it and fight, does not sound like a good long term battle plan...
    I meant in the future, not past. Russia is no threat anymore, unless you live next door to them and have wooden tanks.

  74. #74
    psycho cyclo addict
    Reputation: edubfromktown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,524
    Headed South outta downtown Pittsburgh there is still a billboard advertising a place called Beer N-AT

  75. #75
    psycho cyclo addict
    Reputation: edubfromktown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,524
    Quote Originally Posted by OldAusDigger View Post
    Less than 80 years after the American Declaration of Indepedence the USA and Great Britain were fighting together as allies for the first time - in China! The war was the 2nd Opium War.
    There is no doubt that Britains handling of its North American colonies prior to 1776 was very poor.
    I've often wondered just how different the world would've been if the whole of North America had remained as part of the British Empire. It is quite possibly Great Britains biggest blunder, losing the colonies that were to become the USA.
    I think that once hostilities started that the Americans were never going to lose. But, I think it was a closer run thing than many modern day Americans realise. I don't think any historian would regard it as "an ass kicking" though.
    Britain invaded again in the war of 1812, but as far as I'm aware a definate attempt was made after this to repair relations between both countries - which became permanent.
    As for when America emerged as the worlds most dominant nation, I'm not sure. Possibly it was around 1942/43.
    But one things for sure, they never looked back from there!
    Regarding the war of 1812... the new Maryland license plate "celebrates" it. A bit of a slap in the face to Canadian neighbors. The US torched places like Niagara on the Lake so the British could not setup shop there

  76. #76
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,175
    Quote Originally Posted by edubfromktown View Post
    Regarding the war of 1812... the new Maryland license plate "celebrates" it. A bit of a slap in the face to Canadian neighbors. The US torched places like Niagara on the Lake so the British could not setup shop there
    Hey, they did try to invade right?

  77. #77
    ******
    Reputation: monzie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,990
    Check my previous post fools. I fixid it yo.

  78. #78
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,955
    Quote Originally Posted by OldAusDigger View Post
    But I am curious as to how it came about.

    Mencken's "The American Language."

    Definitive.

    Mencken, H.L. 1921. The American Language

  79. #79
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5,926
    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Hey, they did try to invade right?
    We're doing it again.

    I'm already in Maryland
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  80. #80
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Wise move. The still powerful British Navy will stay at your beckon and call ... not that the US won't lend a hand when China invades.
    I know you were only joking. But who knows whats going to happen in the next 20 or 30 years.
    For the last three decades of the 20th century, Australia's military doctrine was prepared for possible conflict in Indonesia. We now surreptitously base our strategic doctrine on possible conflict with China.
    And they know it!
    I think that the USA wants to re-establish a sizable presence in SE Asia after they had to get out of the Philipines, and now the USMC is setting up base here in Darwin - and that's just the start!
    As an individual nation we don't stand a chance of fending off any serious attack that a country as powerful as China could mount. Our alliance with America is absolutely steadfast. We could possibly be the most consistantly loyal ally that America has - we have fought with the US in EVERY major conflict of the last two centuries. We sent fifty thousand troops to Vietnam when no other western nation would touch it. We have a moderate sized military, but it is thoroughly professional and highly regarded. But we would rely on America's help should we become involved in a war with a powerful enemy.
    There is an organisation called ABCA ABCA Armies - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The formal ties between the armed forces of the english speaking world are strong.
    There could possibly come a time though, where having military ties with our english speaking "cousins" is not enough.
    To combat the rising power of Asia, maybe the countries in the ABCA (plus a few more) should federate together to create a new nation.
    But what would we call it?
    And where would the capital be?

  81. #81
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,175
    Quote Originally Posted by OldAusDigger View Post
    I know you were only joking. But who knows whats going to happen in the next 20 or 30 years.
    For the last three decades of the 20th century, Australia's military doctrine was prepared for possible conflict in Indonesia. We now surreptitously base our strategic doctrine on possible conflict with China.
    And they know it!
    I think that the USA wants to re-establish a sizable presence in SE Asia after they had to get out of the Philipines, and now the USMC is setting up base here in Darwin - and that's just the start!
    As an individual nation we don't stand a chance of fending off any serious attack that a country as powerful as China could mount. Our alliance with America is absolutely steadfast. We could possibly be the most consistantly loyal ally that America has - we have fought with the US in EVERY major conflict of the last two centuries. We sent fifty thousand troops to Vietnam when no other western nation would touch it. We have a moderate sized military, but it is thoroughly professional and highly regarded. But we would rely on America's help should we become involved in a war with a powerful enemy.
    There is an organisation called ABCA ABCA Armies - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The formal ties between the armed forces of the english speaking world are strong.
    There could possibly come a time though, where having military ties with our english speaking "cousins" is not enough.
    To combat the rising power of Asia, maybe the countries in the ABCA (plus a few more) should federate together to create a new nation.
    But what would we call it?
    And where would the capital be?
    I was only partly kidding ...

    If everyone in China wants the same standard of living we enjoy in the US or Australia than we've got big problems. China would be a formidable advisory. The US of course could go nuclear if needed. Sad but true.

  82. #82
    The White Jeff W
    Reputation: jeffw-13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,554
    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post

    I work onna Sahside, jus' acrossa river from dahntahn It crazy with the traffic n'at.


    I learned Euro English from watching Monty Python & Top Gear.

    Boot = Trunk
    Bonnet = Hood
    Saloon = Sedan
    Estate = Station Wagon
    Pikey = Clarkson
    No moss...

  83. #83
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GlennW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    405
    Very funny thread!

    As an Englishman temporarily living in the San Jose area I come across this kind of stuff all the time. If it's not the accent people struggle with, it's frequently the words... combine the two and it's comedy gold right there, particularly for those who I think probably haven't traveled much/experienced many different types of accents.
    Not really doing much Ridin' or Diggin'

  84. #84
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by GlennW View Post
    Very funny thread!

    As an Englishman temporarily living in the San Jose area I come across this kind of stuff all the time. If it's not the accent people struggle with, it's frequently the words... combine the two and it's comedy gold right there, particularly for those who I think probably haven't traveled much/experienced many different types of accents.
    Hey Glenn, here in Oz and in the UK there is a certain "C word" that is used a lot in general conversation
    I get the feeling it has a lot of shock value in the US and is pretty much taboo!
    And have you every used words like "wanker" in America?

  85. #85
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,175
    Quote Originally Posted by OldAusDigger View Post
    Hey Glenn, here in Oz and in the UK there is a certain "C word" that is used a lot in general conversation
    I get the feeling it has a lot of shock value in the US and is pretty much taboo!
    And have you every used words like "wanker" in America?
    Do you really use the F word like any other word down there? I here it's just another word ...

  86. #86
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Do you really use the F word like any other word down there? I here it's just another word ...
    Sort of. Around your mates or at the pub for sure.
    Personally, I've only sworn at my wife once or twice in the 15 years we've been married. And my parents have never heard me swear - not even once.
    So it depends on the situation.
    Sometimes my best mate will ring me on the phone and the first thing he'll say is, "How'ya goin' ya stupid c##t"
    A lot of immigrants from non english speaking backgrounds never get used to this, and are highly offended by this type of talk.
    Putting sh#t on your mates or taking the pi#s is like a term of endearment here.
    The closer your are to someone, the more you do it.

  87. #87
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,895
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffw-13 View Post
    I learned Euro English from watching Monty Python & Top Gear.

    Boot = Trunk
    Bonnet = Hood
    Saloon = Sedan
    Estate = Station Wagon
    Pikey = Clarkson
    You sure about Pikey?
    You forgot to mention the most impressive English English word: Wanker. I am not aware of any good enough American translation though.

  88. #88
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,175
    Quote Originally Posted by OldAusDigger View Post
    Sort of. Around your mates or at the pub for sure.
    Personally, I've only sworn at my wife once or twice in the 15 years we've been married. And my parents have never heard me swear - not even once.
    So it depends on the situation.
    Sometimes my best mate will ring me on the phone and the first thing he'll say is, "How'ya goin' ya stupid c##t"
    A lot of immigrants from non english speaking backgrounds never get used to this, and are highly offended by this type of talk.
    Putting sh#t on your mates or taking the pi#s is like a term of endearment here.
    The closer your are to someone, the more you do it.
    Interesting. We recently had a big to do on this website where a guy got called "dude" and was insulated. Now, in California we throw that around the way you might use "bloke" - but we found out the rest of the county is not as used to "dude". You're a fair dinkum bloke to explain you're version of English to us.

  89. #89
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    375
    Quote Originally Posted by StiHacka View Post
    You forgot to mention the most impressive English English word: Wanker. I am not aware of any good enough American translation though.
    jerk-off would be the closest direct translation. but i prefer the term asshat.

    wanker you'll hear occasionally, bugger makes some appearances. and ct most find offensive, particularly the bloody variety.

  90. #90
    conjoinicorned
    Reputation: ferday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,525
    Cool thread. I have a lot I could say, but due to the degeneration of the thread into politics I'll leave it with expressing my deep love for Ebonics.
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

  91. #91
    ******
    Reputation: monzie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,990
    Haha. I use the C word a lot. Always have. In the US I think the use of that word is more prevalant in the punk niche than anywhere else state side. If I'm telling my buddies to call me back I usually say some **** like give me a shout back on the squawk-box. I'm probably the only one that says that crap but they seem to get it.

    Ferday: say what you gotta. I'm interested. I love me some Ebonics.

  92. #92
    barely a mtbr
    Reputation: jk13's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    165
    I'll restart on the Ebonics. I do love it and agree with what was said about significant additions to the language, there certainly has been some. We use them everyday. Most of the good, useful words are actually well thought out and fit well into conversation. The issue is when there isn't a lot of thought put in and it just seems--I don't know--lazy, I guess? Combining words to form new ones that already exist with a different meaning is one of the problems that I've run into. It's the same type of problem you run into with any regional or sectional sub-languange. It's just the one I've had the most exposure to.

    Hopefully the good ones will stick and the not-so-good ones will fade away. That's how all language progresses, right?

  93. #93
    conjoinicorned
    Reputation: ferday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,525
    Quote Originally Posted by monzie View Post
    Haha. I use the C word a lot. Always have. In the US I think the use of that word is more prevalant in the punk niche than anywhere else state side. If I'm telling my buddies to call me back I usually say some **** like give me a shout back on the squawk-box. I'm probably the only one that says that crap but they seem to get it.

    Ferday: say what you gotta. I'm interested. I love me some Ebonics.
    LOL nothing so dramatic unfortunately. i just like this thread but i also like to keep politics out of my mtbr experience (especially those between canada and USA and especially when i'm drunk posting like i was last night). i love languages although i'm not as good at them as i would like

    i'm not much of a world traveller but i've been in every province and ~40 states and every dialect is different, sometimes even from city to city...like any large country probably. anyone interested in language should really look at Quebecois, it is really a weird mix of a lot of different languages combined with unique slang, my wife is french canadian and it's only barely french as i studied it in school.

    i really love ebonics, i think it's a beautiful form of expression and it changes a lot faster than "standard english", and offers so many opportunities to describe things (and hopefully rhyme while doing it LOL). my first experience was biz markie catching vapors and lately i've been going hard in the paint LOL. anyone who thinks "ebonics" is a bunch of gangstas swearing just don't understand the actual culture or language.
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

  94. #94
    ******
    Reputation: monzie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,990
    No a world traveler, eh? You beat me by all of the provinces and 37 states. You traveling bastard, you.

  95. #95
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KogKiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    132
    >mfw americans call chips "french fries"
    >mfw americans call crisps "chips"
    >mfw americans call choclate gobbernaughts "candy bars"
    >mfw americans call motorised rollinghams "cars"
    >mfw americans call merry fizzlebombs "fireworks"
    >mfw americans call wunderbahboxes a "PC"
    >mfw americans call meat water "gravy"
    >mfw americans call electro-rope "power cables"
    >mfw americans call beef wellington ensemble with lettuce a "burger"
    >mfw americans call whimsy flmsy mark and scribblers "pens"
    >mfw americans call twisting plankhandles "doorknobs"
    >mfw americans call breaddystack a "sandwich"
    >mfw americans call their hoighty toighty tippy typers "keyboards"
    >mfw americans call nutty-gum and fruit spleggings "peanut butter and jelly"
    >mfw americans call an upsy stairsy the "escalator"
    >mfw americans call forcey fun time "rape"
    >mfw americans call a knittedy wittedy sheepity sleepity a "sweater"
    >mfw americans call a rickedy-pop a "gear shift"
    >mfw americans call a choco chip bucky wicky as a "cookie"
    >mfw americans call peepee friction pleasure "sex"
    >mfw americans call a pip pip gollywock a "screwdriver"
    >mfw americans call a rooty tooty point-n-shooty a "gun"
    >mfw americans call a ceiling-bright a "lightbulb"
    >mfw americans call blimpy bounce bounce a "ball"
    >mfw americans call a slippery dippery long mover a "snake"




  96. #96
    ******
    Reputation: monzie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,990
    Words I'm going to start using from that list: ceiling-bright and forcy fun time. Rape jokes FTW.

  97. #97
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nuffink's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    768
    Quote Originally Posted by KogKiller View Post
    >mfw americans call chips "french fries"
    >mfw americans call crisps "chips"
    >mfw americans call choclate gobbernaughts "candy bars"
    >mfw americans call motorised rollinghams "cars"
    >mfw americans call merry fizzlebombs "fireworks"
    >mfw americans call wunderbahboxes a "PC"
    >mfw americans call meat water "gravy"
    >mfw americans call electro-rope "power cables"
    >mfw americans call beef wellington ensemble with lettuce a "burger"
    >mfw americans call whimsy flmsy mark and scribblers "pens"
    >mfw americans call twisting plankhandles "doorknobs"
    >mfw americans call breaddystack a "sandwich"
    >mfw americans call their hoighty toighty tippy typers "keyboards"
    >mfw americans call nutty-gum and fruit spleggings "peanut butter and jelly"
    >mfw americans call an upsy stairsy the "escalator"
    >mfw americans call forcey fun time "rape"
    >mfw americans call a knittedy wittedy sheepity sleepity a "sweater"
    >mfw americans call a rickedy-pop a "gear shift"
    >mfw americans call a choco chip bucky wicky as a "cookie"
    >mfw americans call peepee friction pleasure "sex"
    >mfw americans call a pip pip gollywock a "screwdriver"
    >mfw americans call a rooty tooty point-n-shooty a "gun"
    >mfw americans call a ceiling-bright a "lightbulb"
    >mfw americans call blimpy bounce bounce a "ball"
    >mfw americans call a slippery dippery long mover a "snake"



    LO very L. Even Brenda looks like she enjoyed it.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.