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  1. #1901
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    F*ck Cancer

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  2. #1902
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    Happy Easter, in advance! You can send a Fudgeina—vegan fudge in the shape of a vagina—to anyone worldwide, including yourself. Yeet!

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    United Kingdom-based Fudgeina recently developed an innovative gift : a vagina-shaped vegan fudge that can be delivered anonymously in a discreet box. “The internet is full of services to send your friends (or enemies) dicks, poop, or potatoes; but I couldn’t find a way to send a vagina, so I thought why not start it myself,” Fudgeina founder Matt Garbutt told Metro UK. “While searching for what I could make the vaginas out of, I stumbled upon fudge, and then the name really made itself. The fudge is made by our artisan fudge maker, and then hand poured into our one of a kind mold.” Garbutt’s vegan fudge vaginas (technically vulvas) are available in strawberry, vanilla, and a special crème egg-inspired (à la Cadbury) Easter flavor, along with a solid chocolate vagina variety. Fudgeina offers free shipping across the United Kingdom and can deliver its vegan vaginas, with an optional hand-written note, to customers worldwide.
    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/3/cadbury-c...YQYqRjZW5XQ_9I
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  3. #1903
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    The centers of these vegan (cookies and cream) donuts are 100% calorie free

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    A nice caturday treat. Raining all day during our long adventure walk in Toronto.
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  4. #1904
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    IKEA DEBUTS CBD-INFUSED VEGAN SWEDISH MEATBALLS


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    The furniture giant aims to make navigating its stores a far more pleasurable, and tasty, experience.

    International furniture company IKEA is introducing another vegan menu option to its in-store bistros. In line with current trends, IKEA has developed CBD-infused vegan Swedish meatballs which will debut at select stores beginning on April 20 of this year. The chickpea and vegetable-based balls are seared with a proprietary food-grade CBD oil then covered in CBD-infused vegan gravy. IKEA test kitchen recipe developers claim that consuming CBD with food allows the diner to slow down while eating and fully appreciate and savor each bite. Due to the relaxing and anxiety-reducing benefits of CBD, IKEA purports that these meatballs may also relieve some of the stress of furniture shopping and assembly. The company stresses that CBD does not contain marijuana (THC), and the meatballs do not contain any psychoactive ingredients. The CBD oil used is safe for all ages and legal in all 50 states.

    For now, stores in Washington, Oregon, California, Nevada, Colorado, and Sweden will serve this new vegan item, though the company plans to add it to the menus of all cafés by the end of 2020. A serving of six meatballs with gravy will cost $4.20, or 38.98 krona in Sweden. Catering and take-home trays which feed a family of four will roll out one week after the initial launch. The IKEA kitchen is also working on a frozen product which will include the vegan meatballs, CBD-infused gravy, and a packet of CBD oil for sautéeing and drizzling.

    This may be IKEA’s first venture into CBD products, but pending its success, the company said it is looking to expand the line with other food products. IKEA representative Hinga Dinga Durgen told VegNews that a CBD lingonberry juice is near the end of its consumer testing stage, as well as a frozen take-home CBD lingonberry pie. Further down the line, the company is hoping to partner with a startup Lithuanian hand sanitizer brand, TidyWipe, and install complementary CBD hand wipe dispensers throughout every store. IKEA executives claim that this new CBD initiative will not only create an overall more enjoyable shopping experience, it will also benefit employees and the company’s bottom line. Based on scientific trials, customers were far less likely to get lost in the store due to CBD’s calming abilities. After ingesting 5 mg of CBD, customers reported feeling “more present” and being able to recall their steps to find their way out of the store unaided. During these trials, shoppers also purchased higher-dollar items and spent time eating and socializing in the café afterward, driving sales in both furniture and food departments. The only downside, according to researchers, was that several customers were inclined to take prolonged naps in the bedroom displays.

    In addition to these new vegan Swedish meatballs, other plant-based options in IKEA cafés include vegan hot dogs, oat smoothies, and non-dairy soft-serve—the latter set to debut in the United States this summer.
    Sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/4/ikea-debu...1LdCDmKY8MFxqk

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  5. #1905
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    If there was hummus dip I'd be allover that

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    F*ck Cancer

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  6. #1906
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  7. #1907
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    Sadly, that cover is a photoshop.

  8. #1908
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    If there was hummus dip I'd be allover that

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    Gotta remember this one for next year!
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  9. #1909
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Sadly, that cover is a photoshop.
    Darn!
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  10. #1910
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    We celebrated Chris' birthday with an awesome vegan lunch at Planta on Queen West


    SHANGHAI SLAW- green papaya, cabbage, lemongrass, coriander, shaved onion rings
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-56236292_2348786878699083_8943950698756702208_n.jpg

    SEAWEED SALAD- soya, sesame dressing, cucumber
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    RAINBOW ROLL- ahi watermelon, avocado, crispy mushroom, gochujang
    SPICY TUNA ROLL- ahi watermelon, tempura, spicy aïoli, pickled watermelon

    POTATO TRUFFLE- cabbage, coconut milk lemongrass broth
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    Eat your veggies

  11. #1911
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    Bad Diets Are Responsible For More Deaths Than Smoking, Global Study Finds

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    About 11 million deaths a year are linked to poor diets around the globe.

    And what's driving this? As a planet we don't eat enough healthy foods including whole grains, nuts, seeds, fruits and vegetables. At the same time, we consume too many sugary drinks, too much salt and too much processed meat.

    As part of a new study published in The Lancet, researchers analyzed the diets of people in 195 countries using survey data, as well as sales data and household expenditure data. Then they estimated the impact of poor diets on the risk of death from diseases including heart disease, certain cancers and diabetes. (They also calculated the number of deaths related to other risk factors, such as smoking and drug use, at the global level.)

    "This study shows that poor diet is the leading risk factor for deaths in the majority of the countries of the world," says study author Ashkan Afshin of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. Unhealthy diets are "a larger determinant of ill health than either tobacco or high blood pressure," he says.

    So which countries do best when it comes to diet? Israel, France, Spain and Japan were among the countries with the lowest rates of diet-related disease. The U.S ranked 43rd, and China ranked 140th. It should be noted that there were data gaps for intake of key foods in some countries, so some estimates could be off.

    "Generally, the countries that have a diet close to the Mediterranean diet, which has higher intake of fruits, vegetables, nuts and healthy oils [including olive oil and omega-3 fatty acids from fish] are the countries where we see the lowest number of [diet-related] deaths," Afshin says. And as we've reported, the Mediterranean pattern of eating is linked to a reduced risk of heart attacks and memory decline.

    I asked Afshin which ranking surprised him and why. "Mexico is interesting," Afshin told me. The country ranked 11th on the list. On the one hand, people in Mexico consume a lot of whole grain corn tortillas, he says — and whole grains are beneficial. But on the other hand, "Mexico has one of the highest levels of consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages." It's hard to say how the benefits of whole grains may influence the risks of too much sugar, but Afshin says it underscores a problem seen in many countries: the overall pattern of eating could be improved.

    Of course, there are obstacles to eating well, including access and affordability. As the Trump administration and U.S. lawmakers debate whether able-bodied people who don't work should be entitled to public food assistance, it's clear that many people around the globe struggle to afford healthy foods.

    And at a time when 800 million people around the globe don't get enough to eat, and 1.9 billion people weigh too much, it's important to remember that hunger and obesity are both forms of malnutrition. And the costs are staggering. Consider a recent report from the Center for Strategic and International Studies, which notes: "Worldwide, malnutrition costs $3.5 trillion annually, with overweight- and obesity-related noncommunicable diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, adding $2 trillion."

    Globally, these findings may serve as a reminder that when it comes to ending hunger and improving health, people don't just need food. They need nourishment. If you fill up on a diet of packaged snacks made from refined-carbohydrates and sugary sodas, you may get the calories you need. But those calories will put you on a path toward disease.

    So, what would happen if everyone around the globe began to eat a healthy diet, filling three-fourths of their plates with fruits, vegetables and whole grains? We'd run out. Yep, that's right. A recent study published in the journal PLOS One by researchers at the University of Guelph found that there would not be enough fruit and vegetables to go around.

    "We simply can't all adopt a healthy diet under the current global agriculture system," says study co-author Evan Fraser, director of the Arrell Food Institute at the University of Guelph. Fraser says we produce too much fat, too much sugar and too many starchy products. So, food companies and farmers play a role, too. "At a global level, we have a mismatch between what we should be eating, and what we're producing," Fraser told me.

    Perhaps that's why the authors of the new Lancet study say their findings point to the need for coordinated, global efforts. Improving diets won't be easy: A range of initiatives may be needed, including nutrition education and increased access to healthy foods, as well as rethinking agricultural production.

    sauce https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt...JAcfQ56mS3XFPA
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  12. #1912
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    Here's another article about diet on a global basis, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

    What we aren't eating is killing us, global study finds
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  13. #1913
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    I'm glad to see Burger King offering some plant based stuff!

    Worth noting the Impossible Burger was tested on animals and is pretty far from a health food.

  15. #1915
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    Short film "73 Cows". Great story, really well done. No animals harmed.

    https://vimeo.com/293352305/descript...cSdmdiXWe1YaIQ

  16. #1916
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    ^ Heart-wrenching, thought-provoking and uplifting all at the same time.

    I really hope they’re both doing well and the farm is flourishing.
    F*ck Cancer

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  17. #1917
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    Vegans have a 'healthier biomarker profile'

    Over recent years, vegetarianism and veganism have experienced a boost in popularity.

    Although people might switch to a plant-based diet for a range of reasons, many choose this path for its health benefits.

    For instance, there is some evidence to suggest that a diet that includes fewer animal products reduces the risk of colorectal and prostate cancers.

    Also, vegetarianism appears to reduce the risk of diabetes and help control the condition for those who already have it.

    There is also evidence to suggest that adopting a vegetarian diet can boost weight loss.

    Why the benefits?
    Scientists are steadily unpicking how plant-based diets can improve health. It is clear that there are many factors involved.

    One obvious place to start is that vegetarians and vegans do not eat red meat or processed meat products, both of which experts consider to increase the risk of cancer.

    As well as choosing not to eat meat, people who follow a plant-based diet also tend to consume more vegetables, fruits, and nuts. With this increase in plant matter comes a similar increase in nutrients, fiber, and other potentially beneficial compounds.

    Vegetarians and vegans also typically have higher levels of compounds with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity, such as carotenoids and flavonoids, in their bodies. According to the team behind the new study, these chemicals protect against cell damage and chronic diseases.

    Also, vegetarians are likely to have higher levels of lignans and isoflavones in their blood serum; experts believe that both of these can protect against cardiovascular disease and cancer.

    Recently, a group of researchers at Loma Linda University School of Public Health in California took a detailed look at the metabolic changes that a vegetarian diet can bring. They published their findings in The Journal of Nutrition.

    The scientists wanted to understand whether dietary choices made a significant difference to the levels of disease-fighting markers in blood, urine, and fat tissue. To explore, they recruited 840 participants from five dietary categories:

    vegans, who consume no animal products
    lacto-ovo vegetarians, who consume eggs and dairy more than once per month but consume no meat or fish
    pesco-vegetarians, who consume fish once or more times each month but avoid meat
    semi-vegetarians, who eat meat more than once per month but less than once each week
    nonvegetarians, who eat meat at least once each week


    The analysis
    The scientists analyzed plasma, urine, and adipose (fatty) tissue from each of the participants. They tested for a range of markers, including carotenoids, isoflavonoids, saturated fat and unsaturated fats, and vitamins.

    As expected, the vegan group had the highest levels of bioactive markers that prevent disease.

    For instance, the highest levels of carotenoids, isoflavones, and enterolactone were present in the vegans, followed closely by vegetarians.

    Vegans also had the highest levels of omega-3 and the lowest levels of fatty acids.

    "An awareness that a healthier biomarker profile is obtained with a plant-based diet should motivate people to be proactive about dietary habits that promote good health and prevent disease."
    Lead study author Fayth Miles, Ph.D.


    Also, interestingly, Miles explains that the "results for semi-vegetarians look very similar to [those of] nonvegetarians."

    The study involved a large number of participants, which gives the findings weight. However, it is worth noting that the scientists only took tissue samples once for each participant.

    Also, they do not know how these biomarkers might fluctuate depending on nondietary factors, such as an individual's metabolic rate and their microbiome.

    The findings are good news for those who follow a plant-based diet, but the study will also be useful for researchers. Currently, scientists depend on participants to report their dietary intake using food diaries, which is not always reliable. As the study authors explain:

    "Under- or overreporting is common, attributable to subjects' perceptions of social desirability, poor recall, questionnaire design, and other issues."

    However, if researchers can develop a reliable way of assessing diet using biomarkers, it may help validate findings and avoid some of the issues that come with self-reporting.

    Understanding how nutrition affects health is a complex area of study; no two people eat the exact same diet. Hopefully, by understanding the biomarker profiles associated with different foods, it might be easier to pick out links between variations in levels and increased risk of disease.

    sauce https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...PYbmryYbUp2QD0
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  18. #1918
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    Unhealthy diets now kill more people than tobacco and high blood pressure, study finds

    Poor diet is associated with 1 in 5 deaths worldwide, according to a new, large study. That's equivalent to 11 million deaths a year, making unhealthy eating habits responsible for more deaths than tobacco and high blood pressure.


    "Poor dietary habits, which is a combination of high intake of unhealthy foods, such as red meat, processed meat, and sugar-sweetened beverages and a low intake of healthy foods such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains, and seeds, overall causes more deaths than any other risk factors globally," study author Dr. Ashkan Afshin, an assistant professor of Health Metrics Sciences at the University of Washington, told CBS News.

    The study, published in the journal The Lancet, tracked trends in consumption of 15 dietary elements from 1990 to 2017 in 195 countries. These included diets low in fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds, milk, fiber, calcium, seafood omega-3 fatty acids, polyunsaturated fats, and diets high in red meat, processed meat, sugar-sweetened beverages, trans fatty acids, and sodium.

    An analysis found that an estimated 11 million deaths were attributable to unhealthy diets in 2017. The causes of these deaths included 10 million deaths from heart disease, 913,000 deaths from obesity-related cancers, and nearly 339,000 deaths from type 2 diabetes.

    Diets high in sodium, low in whole grains, and low in fruit together accounted for more than half of all diet-related deaths around the world. Out of the 195 countries studied, Israel had the lowest rate of diet-related deaths; Uzbekistan had the most. The U.S. ranked 43rd.

    Focus on eating more healthy foods
    Strikingly, the researchers found more deaths were associated with not eating enough healthy foods rather than with eating too many unhealthy foods.

    "While historically the conversation around diet and nutrition has been focused on a high intake of unhealthy foods, mainly salt, sugar and fats and reducing their consumption, our study shows that in many countries, the main problem is low intake of healthy foods," Afshin said.

    For example, not eating enough whole grains was the leading dietary risk factor in several countries, including the United States. High sodium was the leading risk factor in many Asian countries, while a diet low in fruits was the biggest problem in sub-Saharan Africa and low intake of nuts and seeds ranked first in Mexico.

    On the flip side, consuming too much red meat, processed meat, trans fat, and sugar-sweetened beverages were also among the risk factors.

    Afshin said these findings have major health implications. "This concept of increasing intake of healthy food should be added to current policy debates for improving diets," he said. "It's important both policy makers and the food industry work together to be part of the solution to increase the consumption of not only fruits and vegetables but also whole grains, nuts, seeds, and legumes."

    He said instead of just focusing on messages that people should avoid unhealthy foods like processed meat and sugary drinks, "the ideal scenario would focus on healthy replacements for unhealthy foods. That should be the focus of public health interventions."

    The authors note several important limitations to the study. While the research uses the best available data, there are gaps in the data available for intake of key foods and nutrients around the world, which increases the statistical uncertainty of these estimates.

    Still, they conclude that people in almost every corner for the world could benefit from rebalancing their diets and consuming more healthy foods and less unhealthy foods.

    In an accompanying editorial, Professor Nita Forouhi of the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine said that despite the limitations, the study's findings "provide evidence to shift the focus, as the authors argue, from an emphasis on dietary restriction to promoting healthy food components in a global context."
    sauce https://www.cbsnews.com/news/unhealt...uJSI9dVCVmGxx4
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  19. #1919
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    What to Eat Instead of Meat

    There’s been lots of news coverage over the last while that hasn’t been exactly favourable to the meat industry. Processed meats were classified as a group 1 carcinogen, and red meat was tagged with the ‘probable’ label in terms of cancer-causing ability. Papers have come out talking about the environmental toll animal agriculture takes on this planet. I’ve talked about the differences in how animal proteins react in the body versus plant proteins. Even Canada’s new food guide emphasizes choosing plant-based proteins. All of this may have you looking for a little something else to fill your plate. So, I’m here to help with some suggestions for great meat substitutes. Let’s take a look at what you can eat instead of meat.

    Mushrooms
    Mushrooms make a great substitute for meat. They are low in fat, calories and cholesterol free, making them a much healthier option. Mushrooms are a really versatile food with a pretty neutral flavour. This makes it easy to marinate and spice them as you wish. They sub in nicely in dishes like shepherd’s pie, pasta dishes and more. Varieties like king oyster mushrooms work really well in any meal where you’d typically use shredded meat. Portobello mushrooms are also a popular choice. They work well sliced into a stir fry, or fajitas, or marinated and grilled up as a portobello burger or portobello steak.

    Tofu
    Tofu is another great versatile food. It’s a great source of protein, iron and calcium. It comes in many forms, which allows it to be used in multiple ways. Soft or silken tofu is great for dips and adding to smoothies. Anything where a smooth consistency would work well. Firm or extra firm is great for crumbling into tofu scramble or tofu crumbles. They also work well for tofu steaks or cubes. Tofu also has a very neutral flavour. This allows you to use it in both sweet and savoury preparations.

    Tempeh
    Tempeh is another good substitute that is high in protein as well as minerals like iron, calcium and magnesium. It’s made from fermented soybeans that have been pressed into a block. The result is a texture that is firmer and meatier than tofu. That meaty texture makes it a popular choice as a meat substitute. It can be sliced into tempeh steaks or strips or even chunks that resemble ribs. It can also be flavoured any way you like, which is why tempeh bacon is totally a thing. Strips work great on sandwiches, wraps, salads and even pizza.

    Beans
    Beans, beans, the magical fruit… Laugh all you want, but these beauties are full of powerful nutrition. They are packed with protein, fibre and all kinds of vitamins and minerals. In case you’ve forgotten, fibre does all kinds of great things for your body, and most people don’t get even close to their recommended daily intake. They help to feed the good bacteria in your gut and can blunt the effect of sugars, even in the meal consumed after them! That’s a pretty awesome superpower.

    Beans are an easy sub in a lot of dishes. They work really well in burritos, soups and stews, rice dishes or even just tossed on top of a salad or bowl. You can also slip beans into baked goods like brownies, and make hummus from them. Versatile and full of goodness. What’s not to love?

    Lentils
    Lentils come with all the same health benefits of beans, in a smaller package. They make a great starting point for those who have a hard time with beans, as they are smaller. Certain varieties, like red lentils or split peas, are, as the name suggests, split. This allows them to break down nicely in a soup or stew, adding some nice creamy texture as well as some filling bulk to the dish. They sub well in dishes like shepherd’s pie or pasta sauce. You can even form them to make things like lentil loaf or lentil meatballs. They also work great added to salads or bowls.

    Seitan
    Not exactly a whole food, seitan is made from vital wheat gluten. While it is not suitable for those with gluten intolerance, it is a popular choice among those who can tolerate gluten. This is due to the fact that once properly prepared, seitan’s texture most closely resembles meat. It’s also neutrally flavoured, so you can spice it up any way you like. Seitan can be used in a number of ways. I’ve even seen it pass convincingly as ‘steak’ or ‘chicken wings’. It’s high in protein and iron, but not something I’d suggest to eat every day. More of a once-in-awhile novelty.

    Eggplant
    Eggplants, also known as aubergines, are low in fat, cholesterol free and rich in fibre and antioxidants. With its meaty texture and umami flavour, it makes a great substitute for meat. You’ve probably seen it used in many Italian dishes, like eggplant parmesan. It can also be sliced and grilled for sandwiches and wraps, or even stuffed and baked.

    Jackfruit
    If you’ve never tried jackfruit as a meat substitute, then you are missing out. It comes in a giant fruit that requires a little work to break down. Once cooked through, jackfruit is typically shredded and has a texture remarkably similar to pulled pork. It can be cooked in whatever marinade you like and generally works best as a shredded meat substitute.

    Cauliflower
    Oh, cauliflower. One of my favourites. This cruciferous vegetable is very low in fat and calories, but just brimming with nutrients like vitamin C, vitamin K and folate. It also contains some pretty amazing antioxidants with cancer-fighting abilities. As such, you should definitely try adding cauliflower to your daily cruciferous veggie intake.

    You can season and roast a whole head of cauliflower like a roast, or slice it and grill like a steak. Cauliflower florets are also delicious roasted in the oven to add to salads and bowls. My favourite preparation is probably the cauliflower hot wing. Yes, I said hot wings. Coat those lovely little florets and bake them in the oven. They are seriously delicious.

    Potatoes
    Potatoes are one of the most satiating foods out there. You’ve seen them prepared in lots of different ways. Typically, as a side, such as scalloped potatoes, mashed potatoes roasted potatoes or oven fries. Or even twice baked, like these delicious gems.

    Who said potatoes need to be relegated to the ‘sides’ section of the menu? I mean, they do work well as an all-purpose side, but they can be used for so much more than that. If you think a potato can’t be considered a main dish then you’ve never loaded up a baked potato or sweet potato. I love to top these with greens, beans, and all kinds of sautéed vegetables. Add a little drizzle of your favourite sauce and you’re good to go with a hearty and satisfying meal.

    Quinoa

    Quinoa, technically a pseudo-grain, makes a great substitute for meat in many dishes. It’s naturally gluten-free and full of protein, fibre and lots of important minerals. It can be added to soups and stews to add some bulk, tossed onto a salad or bowl, or even formed into balls to make quinoa bites.

    I personally love adding some beans, spices and sautéed veggies and using that mixture in place of taco meat.

    Nuts
    Nuts and nut butters are high in protein, which makes them a great substitute for meat in your diet. They also contain other important minerals, in differing amounts, depending on the nut. Minced up, nuts like walnuts can work really well to add some texture to a sauce you’d typically add meat to. Just a word of warning, that while full of healthy fats, nuts are pretty high in fat and calories. So perhaps not a sub you want to be using every day if you’re trying to release some weight.

    Soy Curls
    Soy curls are basically dehydrated strips of soy, made completely from soybeans, with no added fats or flours. They are high in fibre and protein, which makes them a great meat substitute. I would file these under that category ‘minimally processed’, which means these are a-okay on a whole food, plant-based diet. Nothing harmful added, and nothing healthy taken away.

    They come dehydrated, and after rehydrating, can be added to a number of different dishes. Their flavour is rather neutral, so you can season in any style you prefer. They have a meaty texture, similar to chicken, so these would be well accepted by any non-vegans you may have to feed.

    Carrots
    Right about now you’re thinking I’ve lost my mind, but I promise you I haven’t. Carrots made the list for one main reason, carrot dogs! Now, I know this sounds like some crazy hippie shit, but seriously, give it a try. Once marinated and cooked through, the taste and texture are remarkably similar to a hotdog, without the saturated fat, nitrates and, oh yeah, carcinogens, you get with the old version.

    If you’re feeling fancy, you can also try carrot lox. Carrots sub really well for salmon in this classic, brunch-style dish.

    The Bottom Line
    There you have it, lots of alternatives to meat that you can use in your next meal. There are other meat substitutes on the market, but I’ve tried to list the least processed alternatives here. Many packaged alternatives are either highly processed or contain oils. They also tend to be more expensive than simple plant foods.

    Whether you’re new to plant-based eating or just trying to reduce the amount of meat in your diet, these ideas should help spark some creativity in your kitchen. Don’t be afraid to open your mind a little and change your outlook on what needs to be on your plate. It can take some getting used to, as many of us grew up with meat as the main part of our meals. But just because it’s always been, doesn’t mean it always must be. Experiment and get creative, before long you’ll be rocking the meat-free dishes.

    sauce https://mentalforlentils.com/meat-su...elDhEDJ8307NWc
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  20. #1920
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    Carrot dogs!? I have never heard of this one. Will have to give them a try.

  21. #1921
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Carrot dogs!? I have never heard of this one. Will have to give them a try.
    They are a big hit when my wife makes them for a big event.. they go fast and everyone talks about them the rest of the day.

  22. #1922
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    Interview with Kevin Smith and Rich Roll.

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    About 610,000 people die of heart disease in the United States every year. That means America's number one killer claims 1 out of every 4 deaths.
    . . . . .
    Not all heart attacks are fatal. But when your heart's left anterior descending artery becomes 100% blocked, the result is a massive heart event known as The Widowmaker.
    Few survive it's devastating clutch.
    . . . . .
    Kevin Smith is the rare exception that proves the rule.
    . . . . .
    The arch villain in his own personal superhero comic book narrative, Kevin's Widowmaker nemesis failed in it's dastardly quest to claim his young life. Instead, like Spiderman in the aftermath of that fateful bite, it made our protagonist hero stronger -- more convicted about purpose, family and art.
    . . . . .
    One might even say it gave him superpowers -- a new life animated by an urgent productivity fueled by positivity. An emboldened creativity. And, more than anything, a spirit ennobled.
    . . . . .
    This week's guest beat the odds. But this should come as no surprise for those well versed in the Kevin Smith canon. Because Kevin has always been an outlier. An exception to the rule. A fiercely independent voice who has been successfully cutting against the grain for as long as he can remember.
    . . . . .
    Today the charismatic master storyteller shares his most amazing tale to date -- the story of Kevin Smith.
    . . . . .
    As a long time fan of Kevin, it was an absolute delight and honor to spend a few hours with him. I love everything about this exchange. I hope you do too.
    Enjoy✌🏽🌱 - Rich
    sauce

    https://www.richroll.com/podcast/kev...Y53VHP-V7TXOLo
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  23. #1923
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    Boxed Mac n' Cheese Contains a Chemical You Don't Want to Eat


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    Anyone who's pondered the powder inside boxed macaroni and cheese has probably intuited that it's not terribly healthy. There's just something about powdered food products that sets off alarm bells. A new report, though, suggests a more concrete reason to be wary: That cheese powder may contain phthalates, a group of chemicals linked to birth defects and learning and behavior problems in children.

    The study, from a group of organizations that make up the Coalition for Safer Food and Processing, examined 30 cheese products, which were bought in grocery stores in the United States and shipped directly to a testing lab. All but one tested positive for phthalates, with the highest concentrations found in the cheese powder in boxed mac and cheese; ten varieties of mac and cheese were tested (including some labeled organic), and all showed high levels of phthalates.

    "The phthalate concentrations in powder from mac and cheese mixes were more than four times higher than in block cheese and other natural cheeses like shredded cheese, string cheese, and cottage cheese," Mike Belliveau, executive director of the Environmental Health Strategy Center, told The New York Times.

    One org in the coalition, the Environmental Health Strategy Center, along with three other advocacy groups (Ecology Center, Healthy Babies Bright Futures, and Safer States), urges consumers to pressure manufacturers to ensure their products are phthalate-free. It's directing that pressure at Kraft Foods, which makes most of the two million boxes of mac and cheese sold every day in the United States. The groups believe that if Kraft takes action, smaller producers will follow. It's worked before—the company recently removed artificial dyes from products aimed at children following a petition from consumers. (Kraft did not respond to Tonic's request for comment, nor did it respond to the Times.)

    Phthalates aren't intentionally added to food products. Instead, they're found in plastic materials such as tubing (where they're added to increase flexibility) used in food processing. From there, and from some types of packaging, they can seep into food. In an effort to keep children from consuming phthalates, the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission has banned six types of them from children's toys. Europe has gone further, banning them from products that contact fatty food, which is especially good at absorbing phthalates. The Food and Drug Administration allows them to be used, classifying them as indirect food additives.

    Research suggests that relatively small amounts of phthalates can disrupt hormone production. Specifically, they block testosterone production in pregnant women, which can affect the reproductive development of male fetuses, leading to birth defects, infertility, low sperm count, and a heightened risk of testicular cancer later in life. Exposure to phthalates in young children has been linked to learning and behavior problems, including aggression and hyperactivity.

    "Mounting scientific evidence links phthalates to problems with brain development. Pregnant women's exposures to these chemicals in products and food may put their babies at higher risk for learning and developmental disabilities," Maureen Swanson, director of the Healthy Children Project at the Learning Disabilities Association of America, said in a statement.

    Unfortunately, phthalates are called "the everywhere chemical" by the National Institutes of Health, which advises consumers trying to avoid exposure to "support companies committed to producing phthalate-free products." For now, that also means avoiding boxed mac and cheese.



    Correction (7/13/2017): A previous version of this story said that nine out of ten boxes tested contained phthalates. In fact all varieties of mac and cheese tested contained the chemicals.


    sauce https://tonic.vice.com/en_us/article...6YiD75BS_FT0gw
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  24. #1924
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    6 TIPS FOR LOSING WEIGHT ON A VEGAN DIET

    Up your protein, lower your soy, and as always: go for the greens

    According to a study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, individuals who follow a vegan diet for approximately 18 weeks shed, on average, four pounds more than those who follow animal-based diets. While this fact is great for anyone looking to lose weight, conversion to a plant-based regimen and weight loss are not always synonymous.

    Many who switch to a vegan diet for weight-loss reasons often find themselves filling the meatless void with an array of plant-based processed food. Luckily, a veg diet is so much more than packaged food that just happens to be animal-free, especially for those looking to lose weight. By following these six tips, you’ll fit into your favorite pair of jeans in no time, all while doing good for animals and the environment.

    1. Review the vegan food pyramid
    The foundation of the vegan food pyramid is greens and vegetables followed by fruit and whole grains. This is an updated version of MyPyramid—the food guide that replaced the Food Guide Pyramid in 2005—which emphasized grains, bread, cereal, and pasta as the foundation of a good nutritional regimen. Although the vegan food pyramid serves as a guide, caloric intake and portion control are key factors for any healthy weight-loss program.

    2. Eat greens
    The versatility of spinach, broccoli, Swiss chard, bok choy, Brussels sprouts, and zucchini makes dark leafy greens a wonderful addition to any meal. These foods are ideal for weight loss because they are the “most nutrient-dense healthy items” and “are extremely low in calorie and high in fiber,” says Lisa Odenweller, CEO of Santa Monica-based superfood café Beaming. The high-fiber content keeps you satiated throughout the day while helping you avoid unhealthy snacking. Other high-fiber options include fruit (be mindful of the sugar content) and raw tree nuts (almonds, walnuts, and cashews), which are packed with protein and fiber and can help lower cholesterol.

    3. Up your protein
    Consumption of protein-rich food is vital in many weight-loss programs because protein fills you up faster; thus, you need less food to be satisfied. According to Stephanie Goldfinger of vegetarian website Cooking for Luv, proteins are available in many forms, which makes them convenient to incorporate into meals because they can be eaten raw or cooked quickly. Protein powders are ideal for a grab-and-go breakfast or mid-day smoothie, while other plant-based proteins such as tempeh, beans, lentils, quinoa, and oats are versatile and can serve as the main component of a veggie burrito, salad, or stir-fry.

    4. Limit processed soy

    Soy products can be the easiest and most convenient “go-to” items when transitioning to a vegan diet. Soy isn’t necessarily unhealthy, but it is imperative that attention be paid to the amount of processed products in a meal plan. For instance, a tofu scramble for breakfast, soy veggie burger for lunch, and pad Thai with tofu for dinner is excessive. Instead, choose vegan cheese made with nuts, a black bean burger, or a pad Thai with vegetables and tempeh for whole-food versions of your favorite foods.

    5. Prepare healthy meals
    Meal planning is a vital component to ensure proper nutrition and weight loss, and, thankfully, supermarkets now sell pre-packaged vegetables that are table-ready in minutes. Examples of fast-and-easy dishes include quinoa bowls with tempeh; a mixed stir-fry blend of broccoli, carrots, and mushrooms; eggplant cutlets with marinara sauce, vegan cheese, and basil; and soba noodles with greens. If these meals are beyond your scope, meal delivery services such as Purple Carrot and meal-planning services such as Forks Meal Planner provide easy-to-follow recipes that are pre-measured and dietitian-approved.

    6. Get exercise and stay hydrated
    Healthy meals, water, and exercise are key components for any successful weight-loss program. People should engage in 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity weekly in order to burn calories and lose weight. High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) is a form of cardiovascular interval training focusing on alternating short periods of intense anaerobic exercise with less-intense recovery periods. To achieve maximum results, HIIT should be practiced three times a week and supplemented with jogging or hiking, says Jorge Cruise, trainer and author of Tiny and Full. And don’t forget to stay hydrated! Drinking a minimum of 64 ounces of water daily keeps your body cleansed, which improves fitness and overall health.

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2018/6/6-tips-fo...Cw3n0K5d5KfZPg
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  25. #1925
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    Not specifically vegan/vegetarian but an interesting article:

    The Land of Immortals: How and what Japan's oldest population eats

    A few highlights incase you don't want to go to the link:

    Nearly two-thirds of the residents of Okinawa are still functioning independently at age 97. That meant they were in their own homes, cooking their own meals and living their lives fully -- at nearly 100 years old!

    The elders there are less likely than their counterparts in the United States to have heart disease, dementia or certain cancers.

    Remember this term: hara hachi bu. Translation: Stop eating when you are 80% full. With all the talk about calorie restriction, this notion is often hard to incorporate into your life, especially in a "clean your plate" culture.
    With hara hachi bu, the philosophy is that you should still be a little hungry when you push the plate away.


    I'm not very good at hara hachi bu, even though I lived in Japan.
    By continuing to browse my posts, you agree to send me cookies.

  26. #1926
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    6 TIPS FOR LOSING WEIGHT ON A VEGAN DIET
    I recently went oil-free and I'm losing weight while eating my fill. That coincides with not eating tofu, since it's sticks to the pan so badly without oil.

  27. #1927
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    6 TIPS FOR LOSING WEIGHT ON A VEGAN DIET



    4. Limit processed soy

    Soy products can be the easiest and most convenient “go-to” items when transitioning to a vegan diet. Soy isn’t necessarily unhealthy, but it is imperative that attention be paid to the amount of processed products in a meal plan. For instance, a tofu scramble for breakfast, soy veggie burger for lunch, and pad Thai with tofu for dinner is excessive. Instead, choose vegan cheese made with nuts, a black bean burger, or a pad Thai with vegetables and tempeh for whole-food versions of your favorite foods.
    Limit processed soy, but replace it with processed vegan cheese, veggie burger, or lower processed tempeh? That doesn't seem to make sense to me. I do agree that tempeh is a better alternative to tofu, but unless the cheese and burger are made in house or are home made, they are just as processed.

  28. #1928
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    Interesting read, thanks! I think this helps point out one of the bigger downfalls of the western world which is that we are always looking for a fix to an issue instead of seeing the entire picture. The Okinawans have an entire lifestyle that allows them to lead healthier lives. Personally, I am working toward that myself. My diet has always been good, but I need to ride more, and work less. I also need to move out of the city.

  29. #1929
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    A Guide to Sustainable Eating
    Have you considered the effects of what you eat on the planet, and made changes that will protect not only the Earth but also your health and the well-being of generations to come?

    I suspect most of you already do many things to help preserve the viability of the planet we all call home. Perhaps you recycle glass, plastic and paper and compost organic waste; shop with reusable bags; rely heavily on public transportation or bicycles or, failing that, at least drive fuel-efficient cars.

    But have you given serious thought to the planetary effects of what you eat and made changes that will protect not only terra firma and surrounding waters but also your health and the well-being of generations to come?

    In January, The New York Times described a comprehensive new report from the EAT-Lancet Commission on Food, Planet and Health. It was compiled by 37 scientists and other experts from 16 countries, with the aim of establishing a global food economy that could combat chronic diseases in wealthy nations like ours and provide better nutrition for poor ones, all without destroying the planet. The scientists’ goal was to outline a healthy sustainable diet that could feed the nearly 10 billion people expected to inhabit the world by 2050.

    For more than a century, most Americans have been eating far too high on the hog for the sake of their own health and the health of the planet. In 1900, two-thirds of our protein came not from animals but from plant foods. By 1985, that statistic was reversed, with more than two-thirds of our protein coming from animals, primarily beef cattle. They consume up to eight pounds of grain to produce one pound of meat and release tons of greenhouse gases in the process while their saturated fat and calories contribute heavily to our high rates of chronic diseases.

    As Dr. Walter C. Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and a contributor to the Lancet report told Nutrition Action Healthletter, “We simply cannot eat the amounts of beef that we’re now consuming and still have a future for our grandchildren.”

    In an editorial, The Lancet wrote: “Intensive meat production is on an unstoppable trajectory comprising the single greatest contributor to climate change. Humanity’s dominant diets are not good for us, and they are not good for the planet.”

    The Lancet report does not insist that everyone become a vegetarian or vegan, but does set as a goal that people in wealthy countries limit consumption of red meat — beef and lamb in particular — to one 3-ounce serving a week, or one 6-ounce serving every two weeks. You can be somewhat more generous with pork, poultry and fish, which are better for your health and less damaging to the earth. The grain-to-meat ratio for poultry and hogs is only about 2.5 to 1, and the fat in fish is mostly unsaturated and high in omega-3 fatty acids.

    But you would do best for your health and the planet by gradually adopting a diet that derives most of its protein from plants — including legumes and nuts — with farmed seafood as your primary animal food along with moderate amounts of poultry and eggs. The fact is, we don’t need nearly as much protein as most Americans now consume. Studies in both animals and people have shown that high-protein diets limit longevity.

    Chickpeas and lentils account for a large percentage of the protein in my current diet, which has gradually become heavily plant-based. A favorite recipe starts with 2 cups of cubed butternut squash and 1 cup of coarsely chopped onion tossed with 1 tablespoon of olive oil, roasted on a sheet pan at 450 degrees for 20 minutes. Combine this with a 15-ounce can of drained chickpeas tossed with 2 teaspoons of curry powder, ¼ teaspoon coarse salt and 1 tablespoon olive oil that has been roasted separately on a sheet pan for 15 minutes. Yum! For more ideas, check out Menus of Change 2018 conference recipes.

    I often have what some may consider an unusual breakfast — soup laden with baby spinach and/or kale and roasted baby carrots, and a salad supper with salmon, tuna, low-fat chicken sausage, beans or chickpeas for protein. An alternate breakfast consists of slices of banana topped with peanut butter. Hummus on whole-wheat bread or crackers with grape tomatoes is a favorite lunch or snack.

    Another critically important change is in our consumption of carbohydrates, nearly half of which come in the form of nutrition-deficient unhealthy carbs: mostly refined starches like white bread and white rice, added sugars and potatoes, all of which contribute to the rampant incidence of obesity and Type 2 diabetes in this country. Nearly all my carbohydrates come from beans, whole-grain breads and milk, and I’m gradually decreasing consumption of my favorite treat: low-fat ice cream.

    As Dr. Willett pointed out, “Switching from refined starches to whole grains doesn’t make a big difference to the environment, but it does for your health.”

    My biggest failing vis-à-vis the EAT-Lancet dietary advice is the amount of dairy products — primarily nonfat, lactose-free milk and nonfat yogurt — I consume. Dr. Willett suggests only one serving a day while I usually consume three, making dairy a large portion of my protein and calcium intake.

    Suggestions about dietary fats mimic those you’ve been hearing for years: stick with unsaturated vegetable oils like olive, canola, soybean and corn oils, but steer clear of palm oil, which is high in saturated fats and its production is responsible for massive destruction of tropical rain forests needed to protect both the earth’s climate and diversity of wildlife.

    Coconut oil is currently enjoying a moment in dietary fame; even though it is a highly saturated fat, the particular type of fat in coconut oil gives a greater-than-usual boost to blood levels of HDL cholesterol, which is considered heart-protective. Dr. Willett suggests limiting it to occasional use, perhaps for Thai cooking or (do we dare?) making a pie crust or other baked goods that call for a solid fat.

    The EAT-Lancet Commission emphasized that its advice to eat more plant-based foods and fewer foods from animals is “not a question of all or nothing, but rather small changes for a large and positive impact.” It pointed out that “foods sourced from animals, especially red meat, have relatively high environmental footprints per serving compared to other food groups,” which Dr. Willett called “unsustainable.”

    But even if environmental issues are not high on your list of concerns, health should be. As the commission concluded, “Today, over two billion adults are overweight and obese, and diet-related noncommunicable diseases including diabetes, cancer and heart diseases are among the leading causes of global deaths,” risks now being exported worldwide.


    sauce https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/08/w...Ad6xbrwGRAfM5k
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  30. #1930
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    Since going vegan /plant-based 5 years ago, I get asked this often. The short answer is "plants" but here is another explanation

    PROTEIN REQUIREMENTS FOR VEGANS—KEY RECOMMENDATIONS

    From the 1970s to the 1990s, people widely believed that vegetarians and vegans ran severe risks of protein deficiency. Much of this concern arose from the first bestselling vegetarian advocacy book, Diet for a Small Planet (published in 1971), which offered protein recommendations that, in hindsight, were needlessly stringent.

    Today, many vegans show disregard for the topic. In fact, many some vegans dismiss all concerns about protein intake. But belittling the importance of protein is as unwise as believing that vegans are taking grave risks with their health. The truth is that while it’s easy for vegans to get plenty of protein, it’s also easy to come up short. And in fact, it’s fair to assume that many vegans fall far short of achieving an optimal protein intake. So if you believe that protein needs don’t merit attention you could be setting yourself up for trouble.

    Perhaps the main source of confusion about this topic relates to a dire medical condition called kwashiorkor. The reason you may never have heard of kwashiorkor is because it arises from an extreme protein deficiency, which basically unheard of in thriving parts of the world. It’s impossible to develop kwashiorkor without a diet that’s extraordinarily protein deficient. In fact, kwashiorkor only appears in areas of famine, or among people with severe eating disorders. Relatively tiny amounts of protein are all it takes to avoid kwashiorkor, so for obvious reasons this deficiency disease is unheard of in the vegan community.

    But just because you don’t have kwashiorkor doesn’t mean your protein intake is even close to ideal. What’s more, even blood tests can’t reliably tell you if your intake is a bit short of ideal. Instead, there are a variety of symptoms that may be associated with deficiency:

    chronic fatigue
    high blood sugar or triglyceride levels
    inability to maintain sufficient muscle mass
    depression
    While there are countless terrible things about meat, milk, and eggs, it’s undeniable that all these foods are rich in protein. So if you stop eating animal products and don’t replace them with vegan foods that are protein-rich, there’s a possibility that your intake will decline from adequate to insufficient. Fortunately, just a little effort can ensure your protein needs are nicely met on a vegan diet.

    RECOMMENDED PROTEIN SOURCES AND DAILY INTAKE
    VeganHealth.org recommends a daily intake of 1 to 1.1 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. In practice this means a 68 kilogram (150 pound) adult needs to take in about 70 grams a day. What’s more, much of this protein ought to be rich in the amino acid lysine. Beans are rich in lysine, whereas rice, wheat, and nuts are significantly lower in this amino acid.

    If you crunch the numbers and see how this advice translates to everyday eating you’ll discover that you may need to make a concerted effort to cover your needs. One way to step up your intake is to get into the habit of incorporating rich protein sources into the majority of your meals, including foods like:

    Soy milk
    Tofu
    Seitan (Wheat Gluten)
    Beans, including lentils and split peas
    Nuts & peanuts
    Green peas
    Orgain and other vegan protein powders
    Quinoa
    Buckwheat
    Clif Bars and Probars
    One food that is surprisingly low in protein is commercially-made almond milk. The stuff generally contains loads of sugar but very little protein. Soy milk is therefore typically a better choice for people wanting to boost their protein intake. In fact, it’s common for soy milk to have about six times more protein than almond milk!

    TIPS FOR STEPPING UP YOUR PROTEIN CONSUMPTION
    If you don’t like the taste of beans or you have trouble digesting them, it can be a challenge to get sufficient protein on a vegan diet. Our beans page offers advice about how to prepare beans in ways that maximize digestibility. You may find that tofu, tempeh, and soymilk easier to digest than other bean-based foods. Alternately, nuts, seeds, and quinoa are all rich in protein, and easily digested.

    Protein powders can be a godsend to anyone who can’t tolerate beans or nuts. They can give you a big dose of protein, in a form that’s more digestible than meals made with beans. Most brands of protein powder deliver about 20 grams of lysine-rich protein per scoop. Orgain makes an inexpensive all-organic vegan protein powder, and it sells for about half the price of some comparable organic brands. Buy a shaker cup and you won’t have to dirty a blender each time you prepare a serving.

    Adding just a few protein-rich meals to your cooking repertoire may be all it takes to boost your intake to adequate levels. There is an entire cookbook devoted to these sorts of vegan meals. This book contains more than 100 recipes, each based on protein-rich foods like beans, nuts, quinoa, tempeh, and tofu.

    It’s reasonable to speculate that many people who fail to thrive on a vegan diet aren’t eating sufficient protein. Since meat is loaded with protein, a vegan who becomes protein deficient would doubtless feel better within days of putting meat back into the diet. The best way to ensure that you don’t develop a deficiency is to keep an eye on getting sufficient amounts each day. A little attention and vigilance is all it takes to avoid problems down the road.



    sauce and links: https://www.vegan.com/protein/?fbcli...XX3P07Km6PX718
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  31. #1931
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-57240693_10156638633691107_737387026491375616_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

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  32. #1932
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    Throwback Thursday! Looking waaaaaay back

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    Haha! Pour out a little beet juice.

    I like to think early humans were very knowledgeable about their natural surroundings, even if understood through myth/taboo/shamanism etc rather than science.

    Some Neanderthals were vegetarians who used natural forms of penicillin and aspirin as medicine

  34. #1934
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-57989034_1070114059842420_3721411788424609792_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

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  35. #1935
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    Why plant protein is better for you than animal protein

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    It’d be great if a burger-a-day diet was healthy. Don’t get me wrong—it’s not the worst. You’ve got protein in there and hopefully some veggies on top (and on the side) , and even some fiber from the roll (you used whole grain, right?).

    Unfortunately, study after study shows that meat as a protein source just isn’t that healthy. It’s far better to get that necessary protein from plants. And yes, that association is a correlation, not a causation. There are some legitimate reasons that plant-based protein sources like beans are a healthier alternative to bacon. The researchers aren’t saying you can’t or shouldn’t indulge in a thick Delmonico or a flame-grilled cheeseburger. Rather that you should enjoy them in moderation. Generally, research shows that less animal meat is better than more, in terms of long term health. You don’t have to love tofu, either (it’s not the best plant-based protein anyway), as long as you strive to eat more of your protein from the ground and less from animals.

    Here’s a deeper dive into why:

    Plant protein has more nutrients and fiber (though not all of the amino acids)

    Animal meat is known for its many nutrients. If you eat a variety of animal meats (light and dark, not just beef, as well as various organs), you can take in all the amino acids you need to manufacture your own bodily proteins plus vitamins like B12, niacin, thiamine, B5, B6, B7, and vitamins A and K.

    But here’s the thing: If you swap all that animal protein for an equally diverse diet of plant-based proteins like nuts, seeds, and beans, you are no worse off. That’s because these foods are also packed full of a similar spectrum of nutrients. The biggest difference is vitamin B12, which most plants cannot produce on their own. You can get B12 from edible seaweed and in fortified cereals, though the easiest way is through supplementation or by eating animal products.

    Given their equal vitamin profile, Andrea Giancoli, a registered dietitian in California says plant-based proteins are far healthier than their meat counterparts. That’s because, pound-for-pound they pack more nutrients into fewer calories. They also have one thing that animal proteins completely lack: fiber. (That’s of course except for things like tofu, which is processed, Giancoli notes.) Let’s not forget the fiber. Fiber aids in digestion, promotes a healthy gut microbiome, and is strongly associated with lower cardiovascular disease risk.

    People who eat plant proteins in part have healthier habits

    Meta-analyses that compared people who eat animal versus plant proteins consistently find that, even after adjusting for other influential factors like socioeconomic class, weight, and exercise habits, those who eat plants tend to live longer, healthier lives. They tend to have less cardiovascular disease and fewer cancer cases, though especially the cancer association tends to drop away once other factors have been controlled for. Despite all that controlling, though, there’s still an association with living a longer life with fewer heart problems. There are almost certainly some small factors contributing to the association. People who eat plant proteins may see their doctor more regularly and thus get better preventive care. Maybe they tend to live in quieter, less polluted places.

    Since correlations still exist between eating plant proteins and overall health, even after controlling for other factors, meta-analyses have generally concluded that lifestyle factors alone can’t account for the correlation. One recent such analysis in the Journal of the American Medical Association noted that “Substitution of plant protein for animal protein, especially from processed red meat, may confer a substantial health benefit” and advised that policies promote plant proteins.

    Meat has more saturated fats

    Another reason that steak isn’t great for you: the fat that often accompanies it. Fat is part of why steaks and burgers are delicious—it adds mouthfeel and flavor. But it also tend to clog up your heart. “[With plant proteins] you get less saturated fat and no cholesterol,” Giancoli explains, “so you’re getting that benefit as well.”

    Saturated fats are those that are solid at room temperature and tend to contribute to cardiovascular disease (though not as much as trans fats) because it drives up your total cholesterol levels. That may, in the long run, tip the scales towards the LDL (low density lipid) side, which is what clogs up arteries. Foods like nuts, avocados, and fish have far less saturated fats than red and other dark meats. As such, they are dubbed healthy fats.

    Processed, red meat is carcinogenic, and grilled meat may be too

    You probably heard about the massive World Health Organization (WHO) report a few years ago proclaiming that processed, red meats were carcinogenic. Colorectal cancer in particular has been associated with eating red meat, and so have pancreatic and prostate cancer. Processed meats, like bacon and sausage, also contribute to colorectal cancer. Even grilled meat is known to have some carcinogenic compounds in it (those black char marks are where they mostly lie); seared meat has a similar effect.

    In the grand scheme of cancer, meat isn’t the biggest player. Recent estimates by the Global Burden of Disease Project, a subset of the WHO, put the number of annual cancer cases from red meat at 50,000. That’s compared to 200,000 from air pollution, 600,000 from alcohol, and one million from tobacco. But it’s not nothing.

    If we’re taking an exclusively long-range, zoomed-out, big picture view it’s fairly undeniable that getting your protein from plants would be healthier overall. But nutritionists like Giancoli are also adamant about one other important thing: Food should be enjoyable. We shouldn’t spend our lives gorging only on ice cream and pizza, but if you love burgers you should have them. Not every night—just sometimes. The key to a successful diet, as many dieticians will tell you, is balance and moderation. And beans.

    sauce https://www.popsci.com/plant-protein...LPRgGGI#page-2
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  36. #1936
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    I'm 5 years vegan (vegetarian since 20) plus doing weightlifting (ie crossfit) 6 days/wk, mountain biking (2 x's /week) and running (approx 50km/week). Not easy when you're over 50 with a full time career but it works for me. For me eating plant based isn't complicated. I have plenty of strength and energy and feel very fit and healthy. This is an interesting article

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-58376325_2358782257699545_251624241038884864_n.jpg

    How to build muscle on a vegan diet

    When articles proclaim that “veganism is growing in popularity,” it’s not just because Instagram and Youtube makes it feel that way. It’s because veganism is, in fact, growing in popularity.

    Some fast facts:

    On Dec. 30, 2018 more than 14,000 people formally promised (by signing up through this website) to not eat animal products in January. Participation in Veganuary has more than doubled every year since the campaign began in 2014.

    Last year, restaurant consulting group Baum + Whitman identified plant-based food as a major trend for 2018. “That’s still true” for 2019, the copywriter(s) note [PDF], adding that this year lab-grown meats “look like profound long-range game changers.” (The brief writer also describes cows as “prolific poopers,” so BRB going to hire them to write for Popular Science.)

    In 2017, Nestle—whose brands range from Hot Pockets to Coffeemate to Haagen-Dazs to Digiorno—also identified plant-based foods a trend the company, in the words of its Executive Vice President of Strategic Business Units, “believe[s] is here to stay and amplify."

    6 percent of U.S. consumers now claim to be vegan, up from 1 percent in 2014. That’s a 500 percent increase, or a difference of 1.6 million people.

    Ariana Grande is vegan.

    If you are one of the millions of folks who now call themselves vegan (or plant-based or whatever) and you have divulged this fact to anybody, you have probably been asked about your protein intake. People may have wondered about your muscle mass, or your strength. And it’s not a totally unreasonable concern. Generous protein intake is essential for maintaining and building muscle. Eggs, meat, and dairy make up roughly 62 percent of the protein consumed by U.S. adults—and that number may actually be greater when you consider that 8 percent of the protein consumed “could not be classified” (hot dogs??). The remaining 30 percent is plant protein, the largest dietary source of which is bread, which doesn’t exactly have a reputation for being protein-rich.

    When I transitioned out of animal products a year ago—there are many science-backed reasons to reduce your animal product intake—the move seemed to run counter to my goals for athleticism and overall beefcakiness (pun intended). I’ve drained hours researching what humans need to build muscle optimally. When I tried to find research on how people who don’t eat egg whites, whey protein powder, or 93-percent-lean ground beef can optimize their gains, the Google Scholar well ran dry.

    But even without recent or replicated peer-reviews papers, we have proof enough that getting buff with plants is, in fact, possible. There are enough vegan bodybuilders and Olympic athletes to show us it can be done. But how? I asked four experts and compiled their knowledge below.

    Our panel: (1) Dr. Anastasia Zinchenko, a vegan bodybuilder, powerlifter, and coach with a PhD in biochemistry and books full of high-protein bake recipes. (2) Jordan David, a vegan bodybuilder, health coach, and founder of Conscious Muscle, which sells coaching, apparel, and supplements. (3) Dr. Rachele Pojednic, an assistant professor of nutrition at Simmons University. (4) Kendrick Farris, a vegan weightlifter who represented the U.S.A. in the 2008, 2012, and 2016 Olympic Games.

    It’s worth noting that you don’t need to follow their guidelines to get adequate nutrition. These people are experts on gaining maximum strength and/or muscle mass, so they're giving advice on getting jacked—not on simply being healthy. Humans actually do not need very much protein to stay well. But if you want to get buff with plants, read on.

    How much protein the aspiring buff vegan should eat
    As previously mentioned, the survival of our species does not require as much protein as many Westerners are led to believe. Adequacy, according to the United States’ recommended dietary allowance, is just 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. So, for example, a person who weighs 170 pounds (or 77 kilograms) should eat about 62 grams of protein (that’s 77 x 0.8). Most people (especially meat eaters) get that without even really trying. A peanut butter sandwich on wheat bread, for example, has about 18 grams of protein.

    But how much protein should people eat if they want to get ripped? “It depends on the training stage,” Zinchenko says. “Usually people who are new to lifting can build muscle faster than those who are already advanced. So a beginner lifter should eat more protein. But I usually recommend the same for all stages of training, because more protein doesn’t hurt anything.”

    Zinchenko, who shares tips on her website Science Strength, recommends vegans eat 2.4 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight (or about 1.1 grams per pound). That’s a lot higher than what governmental organizations recommend, but her clients want to bulk up, not simply be healthy. And muscle gain requires the amino acids in protein. (More on that below.)

    People who go to David for coaching are prescribed 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight, which shakes out to just a bit less protein than Zinchenko prescribes. Pojednic, a nutritionist, recommends training athletes get anywhere from 1.6 to 2.2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight.

    For context, a 170-pound individual would consume 185 grams of protein on Zinchenko’s plan, 170 grams of protein on David’s plan, and 123-169 grams of protein on Pojednic’s plan. That difference in protein consumption equates to roughly two protein shakes, or a block and a half of tofu.

    The difference between vegan proteins and proteins that come from animal products
    If you aren’t vegan, Zinchenko says, you can get away with eating 2.1 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight, because the amino acid profiles in animal products are slightly better for making muscle. Pojednic notes that amino acid composition is “one of the key distinctions” between a vegan and an omnivorous diet.

    Both Zinchenko and Pojednic call out amino acids leucine and lysine, in particular. Animal proteins generally have more of these amino acids than plant proteins (here’s a graph), which is significant because these building blocks seem to be particularly good drivers of muscle protein synthesis. You can boost your levels by incorporating a supplement, which Zinchenko recommends, though Pojednic notes that there are plenty of vegan sources of leucine: soy isolates (like soy protein powder), seaweed and spirulina, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, and tofu.

    “It’s not just about getting enough protein,” Zinchenko says, “The distribution of amino acid types is also important. It’s like building a house. It must have windows, bricks, and doors. You can have all the bricks in the world, but without a door, it’s not going to be a house.”

    That doesn’t mean you need to make sure each serving of protein includes a mix of all the necessary amino acids, Pojednic says. If you’re eating a variety of foods throughout the day, there’s no need to pair up rice and beans for every meal. Your body can still put all the pieces together.

    Fiber and protein bioavailability
    Even if your lunchtime salad has all the nutrients you want, your body may not be absorbing them. Some foods are harder for the human digestive system to turn into nutrients. Compared to meats, eggs, and dairy, vegetal proteins are not as bioavailable, meaning your body might not actually get to use all the protein contained in the raw spinach you scarfed.

    Whole (also known as unprocessed) foods, which are recommended by the USDA, contain fiber and other substances that can limit absorption in the small intestine. “If you eat a raw vegan diet, you may need to aim for 2.7 grams per kilogram of body weight, which is just an insane amount of broccoli and beans,” Zinchenko says.

    Whole foods generally take longer to digest, which is why serious muscle-builders may want to chug a protein shake on a relatively empty stomach—and why both David and Zinchenko recommend some sort of protein supplementation. Pojednic suggests it too, particularly if your stomach can’t handle a full meal after lifting.

    Do vegans need to supplement?
    Vegans need to take a B12 supplement. Most of the B12 humans get in their diet comes from animal products, as a result of microorganisms being processed in the guts of cattle and sheep. Without foods from those critters, it’s a lot harder to get adequate B12, which means vegans rely on fortified plant milks and cereals or supplementation. (Unless they are really into eating seaweeds like spirulina or dried nori, which contain B12.)

    Otherwise, no, you don’t need to use a protein shake or branched chain amino acid powder—but they can make it a whole lot easier to get your protein in. Otherwise, 150 grams of protein a day (without just oodles of carbs) can be overwhelming.

    The ideal ratio of vegan protein sources
    David was a bodybuilder before he went vegan. In fact, he was “a total meathead.” His transition to vegan bodybuilding was simple: replace meat with meat substitutes. He is a “big proponent of tempeh” and usually advises his clients to eat two whole foods meals (like black beans and veggies or lentil soup), one meat substitute meal (like tacos with beefless ground), and one or two shakes.

    Zinchenko encourages vegan lifters to “err on the side of caution” and eat about 50 percent of your protein from legumes (beans, peas, soy, etc.), 25 percent from grains, and 25 percent from nuts and seeds to make sure you’re getting adequate amounts of the necessary amino acids.

    Meal timing
    “The most recent recommendations clarify not just how many grams of protein you should eat, but also how those grams are pulsed throughout the day,” Pojednic says. “Scientists are thinking now that there’s only a certain amount of protein your muscles can uptake and utilize in one sitting. If you flood your system with amino acids, at some point they’re a little bit wasted.”

    Aim to get 0.25 and 0.4 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per meal. Or, to put it way simpler, space out your protein over 3 or 4 meals a day, not just all at once in a mega smoothie.

    The other science-backed tip is to make sure you’re eating 20-30 grams of protein within 30 minutes (up to an hour is probably fine) of training. “The literature shows that ingesting both protein and carbs in that window promotes muscle growth and recovery, which helps you stay up on your training regimen.” Yes, that can be a protein shake—but it can also be a peanut butter sandwich.

    The science is a little bit muddier for eating before and during training. Pojednic says to go with your preference, and how much food you want in your digestive tract while you’re doing heavy squats. Overloading your G.I. system is particularly easy for vegans, whose foods contain so much fiber. You can definitely get a tummy ache from eating a salad before training, because all the blood is “shunted away” from your digestive organs in favor of, say, your quads. If you don’t want to eat before training, but want to make sure you’ve got enough sugar in your system to get the most out of your workout, Pojednic recommends fruit juice.

    But the most crucial aspects of gaining muscle have nothing to do with being vegan.

    It’s not all about getting enough amino acids. You’ve got to eat enough calories to gain mass, and you’ve got to train hard. Farris, who went plant-based in November 2014 (between Olympics appearances), is a world-class athlete who happens to be vegan—and he doesn’t track his protein at all. Still, he was able to “make some gains and, more importantly, stay healthy.” He says a vegan diet has let him recover faster. “If you can do that, you can do more work. You can beat your body up more. Simply, just train.”

    (It’s worth noting that part of the reason Farris had no qualms about changing his diet while in a high point of his career was because he spent his prime lifting years (19-22) gaining strength without reliable access to any type of food at all. “If I could lift and do it all when I didn’t have access to regular meals, how was I going to get weaker eating enough food but switching out the ingredients?”)

    In case that doesn’t drive the point home, know that every single person I spoke to for this article mentioned the importance of simply eating enough food.

    “A big problem for vegans is that they can easily under eat,” Zinchenko says. “Especially active people who eat a lot of whole foods. Without calories, your body can’t make muscle.”

    “The main thing is high-volume weight training and getting adequate nutrients,” David says. “That’s it. There are no shortcuts. The harder you hit it, the more you feed it, the more it will grow.” (I believe we were talking about butts at this point in the conversation.)

    "Obviously diet is going to give you that tiny push at the end, but the training and the dedication is really what’s going matter in the long term for high-level athletes,” Polojic says.

    Oh, and for what it’s worth, we sorely need more research on vegans. “Even the studies that examine vegan protein powders are not done on vegans,” Zinchenko says. “If there is somebody who would like to donate money to study vegan muscle growth, I would be happy to run the study.”


    sauce https://www.popsci.com/vegan-diet-we...zPEuToY#page-3

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-58382234_2360126974231740_4578405356232769536_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-57578675_2360127524231685_2268323231477792768_n.jpg
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  37. #1937
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    Vegan Engineer Predicts 'UK Will Be Vegan By 2030'

    Vegan Engineer Predicts 'UK Will Be Vegan By 2030'
    https://www.plantbasednews.org/post/...-uk-vegan-2030

    The researcher suggests animal agriculture will 'financially collapse' when the UK has a vegan population of 15 percent

    Vegan engineer, Tom Milner, has predicted that the UK will be vegan by the year 2030.

    Dubbed as 'The Vegan Engineer', Milner conducted a survey of more than 2,800 vegans to find the rate at which veganism is skyrocketing.

    The survey, which asked participants only four questions - length of time being vegan, age, gender, and location - demonstrates how 82.6 percent of respondents turned vegan in the last five years.

    'Exponential growth curve'
    Milner also attributed the spike in new vegans transitions during December-February to the success of the Veganuary movement.

    Overall, the survey shows an 'exponential growth curve' with the vegan population doubling every two years since 2011.

    If this growth continues at its current rate, Milner claims the UK's vegan population will reach around 15 percent by 2030 - enough to cause the animal agricultural industry to 'financially collapse' according to DR Melanie Joy.

    'The entire population becoming vegan'
    "This seems reasonable to me because 15 percent of the population being vegan would mean there were even more significant numbers of vegetarians, pescatarians and meat reducers," Milner said.

    "With such a drop in demand for meat, dairy, and eggs it would be very difficult for any animal product based business to survive.

    "2030 is, therefore, my prediction for a financial crippling of the UK animal agriculture industry and the entire UK population becoming de facto vegans. This is actually a slower growth rate than the Finder survey results which indicated 5.5% by the end of 2019."

  38. #1938
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    12,000 DOCTORS FILE LAWSUIT AGAINST USDA TO GET FECAL MATTER OUT OF MEAT

    This week, medical group Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) filed a lawsuit against the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) regarding the removal of fecal matter from meat products. Currently, the USDA prohibits visible fecal matter on meat, stating it can be removed during the trimming process.

    PCRM—which is comprised of 12,000 medical professionals who advocate for a plant-based diet—contends that fecal matter is currently present in meat products that are available to the consumer. The new lawsuit is a measure to compel the USDA to act on a petition PCRM filed in 2013 after conducting independent tests on 120 chicken products sold in 15 supermarkets across 10 cities—48 percent of which contained fecal matter. “We often see birds going down the line with intestines still attached, which are full of fecal contamination,” a federal inspector is quoted saying in the lawsuit. “If there is no fecal contamination on the bird’s skin, however, we can do nothing to stop that bird from going down that line. It is more than reasonable to assume that once the bird gets into the chill tank (a large vat of cold water), that contamination will enter the water and contaminate all of the other carcasses in the chiller. That’s why it is sometimes called ‘fecal soup.’”

    The lawsuit demands that the USDA remove labels that tout the term “wholesome” from packaged meat and, because contamination is “common and even expected,” according to the lawsuit, replace it with messaging that warns the consumer of possible fecal contamination. “USDA misleads consumers every time inspectors slap a ‘wholesome’ label on contaminated food,” Deborah Dubow Press, associate general counsel for PCRM, who authored the lawsuit, said. “Consumers should be horrified to know that USDA’s standard for wholesomeness is ‘no visible feces.’” On Friday, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention linked ground beef to the E. coli outbreak that sickened 109 people across six states. E. coli is only found in fecal matter.

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/4/12000-doc...Ov9rDekeWClHeM
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  39. #1939
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    Sexy Fruit... happy hump day!

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    Beyond Meat is going public. Investors are betting on a new future for food.

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    Beyond Meat, the plant-based meat company, is going public next week.

    The company sells burgers that contain no meat, but taste like they do. Its stated goal is to fix our food system. Its initial public offering (IPO) is the latest sign that alt-meat is going mainstream — and that’s a big deal.

    It’s been a good few years for Beyond Meat. National chains including Del Taco, Carl’s Jr., and T.G.I. Friday’s have started carrying their products. They’ve also found their way onto grocery store shelves at Whole Foods, Kroger, and Target. In total, Beyond Meat says its products are available in more than 35,000 outlets, from hotels and college campuses to grocery stores and sports stadiums. Sales have been growing fast — last year the company reported revenues of $87.9 million, up from $32.6 million in 2017.

    Now, the company has filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission for an IPO, scheduled for next week. They’ll sell shares in the company for between $19 and $21 per share, allowing them to raise $183 million for additional manufacturing facilities, research and development, and sales. If their stock sells at the high end of that, the company would be valued at $1.2 billion. They’ll be listed on NASDAQ as BYND.

    Founded in 2009 by CEO Ethan Brown, the Los Angeles-based company’s products first hit supermarket shelves in 2013. Its rapid rise — food is not an easy industry to break into — reflects intense consumer demand and investor interest in meat alternatives. The company has never been profitable, and lost $29 million in 2018, but its rapidly growing revenues made it a good bet to many investors — as did its positioning on the frontier of a transformation of our food system.

    “Beyond Meat was the first company to really set its sights on creating meat from plants that could compete on the basis of the things that meat eaters like about meat,” Bruce Friedrich of the Good Food Institute, which works on policy and investment surrounding meat alternatives, told me. “Before Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods, there was really this sense that plant-based foods was for vegetarians. People like Ethan Brown said, ‘No, we can make plant-based foods that meat eaters like just as much.’”

    Brown will soon have a billion-dollar company to prove it. And while it’s the first plant-based meat company to go public, it looks likely that it won’t be the last. The trend that brought Beyond Meat racing to its billion-dollar valuation and IPO are just getting started — and that has the potential to be game-changing, not just for the industry, but for the world.

    Plant-based meat alternatives are getting big

    There’s a lot wrong with our food system. Producing meat by raising animals on factory farms produces tons of greenhouse gases, and many analysts think we can’t tackle climate change without tackling the enormous emissions that go into agriculture. Animals in close quarters are fed low-dose antibiotics constantly so they don’t make one another sick, which contributes to antibiotic resistance, a huge threat on the horizon for public health. And animals on factory farms are routinely subjected to intense cruelty and conditions that disgust the average American consumer.

    That’s what inspired people to start working on meat alternatives — and it may be what’s inspiring the consumer enthusiasm that has buoyed them in recent years. Products like veggie burgers, fake chicken, and soy and almond milk are growing in popularity and market share — and even better, they’re getting tastier and harder to distinguish from animal products.

    New breakthroughs in food science have made it easier to imitate the flavor and texture of real meat. While early veggie burgers were almost exclusively purchased by vegetarians, Brown says that 93 percent of Beyond Meat customers buy regular meat too — suggesting the company has succeeded at making something that appeals to meat eaters.

    Beyond Meat was among the pioneers of this new generation of plant-based meat, which aimed to replace bean-based veggie burgers marketed mostly to vegans. Now, they’ll be the first plant-based meat company to have an IPO. It’s a remarkable success for the company. It’s also remarkable because food companies rarely go public, Friedrich told me: “The food industry is highly centralized, and most exits are mergers or acquisitions by large food conglomerates.”

    Last year, there were rumors that industry giant (and Beyond Meat investor) Tyson Foods was considering buying the company. Beyond Meat stayed independent, though. A few months later, the company added the chief financial officers of Coca-Cola and of Twitter to their board, signaling that it was getting the expertise on-board that it needed to become a huge public company.

    The rest of the plant-based meat industry has been thriving too. Qdoba announced last week that it would be serving Beyond Meat competitor Impossible Foods. Earlier in April, Burger King launched the Impossible Whopper. Industry giants Tyson and Purdue are pursuing their own plant-based product lines. A few years ago, the Impossible Burger was available in a handful of restaurants — now it can be found in more than 5,000.

    “There’s a sense that there’s a movement going on that’s much bigger than any one company,” Brown told Vox two weeks ago.

    The interesting thing about that movement is that plant-based meats don’t have to displace all animal meats in order to make a big difference. Every burger replaced with a Beyond Burger has an impact on CO2 emissions, demand for factory farming, and demand for antibiotics. The more the plant-based meat industry grows, the more those impacts will be visible — and that might, in turn, itself fuel more interest in plant-based meats. Beyond Burger’s team doesn’t just believe they’ve found a niche — they say they’ve figured out the “Future of Protein.” Here’s hoping they’re right.


    Sauce https://www.vox.com/future-perfect/2...stainable-food

    I have never tried Beyond Meat but I am curious. Since I am not a meat eater and haven't been for over 40 years, I can't compare it to meat eg texture

    Some consumers feel the price is steep. I believe livestock farming gets subsidized.

    Hopefully as the products get more popular there's more demand and they'll become cheaper.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  41. #1941
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    I am not a fan of their burgers. I did try their brat style sausages they other day, and was pleasantly surprised. I was never a big sausage fan when I was a meat eater some 20 years ago, but these were quite tasty. Do they feel and taste like real meat? I have no idea, but my meat eating gf liked them. The weird thing about them is that they make fat in the pan when cooked. It is really quite odd.

  42. #1942
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    Thanks for your comments dubthang

    I like the taste and texture of veggie patties. Beyond meat is high in protein and low in carbs so it's a good healthy choice for anyone. I just haven't had a chance to try it in pattie or sausage form.

    I went vegan for 2 reasons, health, and animal welfare. But health was first.
    The more we can make copycat meat products that can actually replace meat, the more people will switch over.
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  43. #1943
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-58796911_2435608566490311_4835480228597858304_n.jpg
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  44. #1944
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    A good rebuttal to antivitamin forces

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  45. #1945
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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  46. #1946
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-59504148_10100433406432144_7102122474300506112_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  47. #1947
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-59616322_316823908985848_8400441038627405824_n.jpg
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  48. #1948
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    4 Caffeine Myths Debunked

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    Caffeine is right up there with salt and water as one of the bedrocks of the human diet. In fact, caffeine is the world's most frequently consumed ingredient. You can find it in coffee, tea, soda, chocolate, alcohol, ice cream, pain relievers, and breath fresheners. It's even finding its way into unexpected places like specially formulated sunflower seeds, beef jerky, oatmeal, and, yes, water. And, of course, caffeine is in lots of sports nutrition products.

    And why not? No matter how you consume it, caffeine can increase your mental acuity, improve your mood, and ratchet up your performance. What's not to like? But, given its popularity inside the gym and out, you'd think we'd all know everything about this wondrous substance. And yet the caffeine myths persist. Here's my take on four of the most common ones.

    Myth 1: Caffeine Causes Dehydration
    Most people who drink coffee regularly know from experience that caffeine can have a strong diuretic effect, meaning it can make you urinate. If you partake in activities that make it hard to continually replenish your fluids, this can be cause for concern since dehydration and fluid loss can affect athletic performance.

    But, since most people get their caffeine from drinking coffee, black tea, or a pre-workout, the water they consume as a part of those beverages makes up for some of this fluid loss. Studies have found that a 155-pound person can drink as many as 7 cups (about 600 milligrams of caffeine) of coffee a day without experiencing a significant increase in fluid loss.

    Even if you did experience increased urination or fluid loss, you'd just have to drink an extra 8 ounces of water or so for every 100 milligrams of caffeine you consume. Some people who drink a lot of coffee can even build up resistance to the potentially dehydrating effects of caffeine.

    Myth 2: Caffeine Is Bad For Your Heart
    There is a traditional belief among cardiologists that caffeine consumption can lead to cardiovascular disease, but studies show that is not true for people who consume normal amounts of it.

    A study of almost 50,000 coffee drinkers found no association between moderate caffeine intake (set at 10 cups per day in this study) and cardiovascular disease. A Harvard University study also found no association between coffee consumption and coronary heart disease

    Ultimately, the devil is in the dose. If you're drinking three pots of very strong coffee each day, you may want to cut back on your consumption, but 2-3 cups a day won't hurt.

    Myth 3: There's No Caffeine In Decaf Coffee
    When people who enjoy coffee are sometimes asked to avoid it for various reasons (allergies, interactions with other medications, certain illnesses, during pregnancy), they usually switch to decaffeinated coffee. But "decaffeinated" isn't the same as caffeine-free. The U.S. Food & Drug Administration regulations specify that coffee makers must remove 97 percent of the caffeine for a coffee to be considered decaffeinated. University of Florida researchers found up to 15 milligrams of caffeine in 16 ounces of a commercial "decaffeinated" beverage. That's not zero caffeine, but it is close.

    Myth 4: Caffeine Is Addictive
    It isn't uncommon to develop a tolerance to caffeine, which is why so many people need to drink more and more of it to get the same buzz. If you no longer get that familiar high from your cuppa joe, cut back on your intake for a few weeks.

    Having said that, if you stop abruptly, you may experience withdrawal symptoms such as headaches, irritability, and difficulty concentrating in the short term.

    The good news is that these symptoms are usually short-lived. Once you start up again, the symptoms should diminish and your heightened sensitivity to caffeine reemerge. The less-than-good news is that along with this renewed caffeine sensitivity can come side effects, including sleep disruption, restlessness, and heightened feelings of stress.

    Before you hit the gym, there's nothing more helpful than the kick you get from a good pre-workout. Just pay attention to how it—and caffeine in all its forms—affects your performance, sleep, appetite, and mood. As they say: Moderation in all things—including moderation.


    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...LbuMXwej7YBO1o
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  49. #1949
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    While I like the Beyond Burgers I have had, I find them to be very salty tasting- could be the place I eat it.

    My wife felt the same from that place but does like the ones she gets from Carl's Jr.

    The Beyond Tacos at Del Taco are OK... but the best I have had are the asada tacos from the "La Taqueria Vegiee SD" taco truck- OMG... so good...
    "The free press doesn't serve the government, it serves the governed."

  50. #1950
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    Meat Producers File Official Complaint Against Beyond Meat With Canada Food Inspection Agency
    They're saying "plant-based meat" is false representation...


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    The Quebec Cattle Producers alongside the Union of Agricultural Producers of Quebec have filed an official complaint with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency to stop the "Beyond Meat" brand from using the phrase plant-based "meat" on their products.

    Beyond Meat burgers and other vegetarian products became available in Canadian grocery stores at the beginning of this month, while their burgers have been for sale at quick-serve franchises like A&W for months.

    The meat producers are making the claim that calling these vegetarian products "meat" is a method of "false representation," according to TVA Nouvelles.

    The meat producers are hoping the Canadian Food Inspection Agency will side with them and stop plant-based food producers from using the word "meat" in their advertisements - which would likely mean the removal of the word "meat" from all packaging.

    In the TVA Nouvelles article the president of the Producteurs Agricoles du Quebec makes the statement that in his experience, "meat comes from an animal" and he's worried using the word "meat" for plant-based products will "lead to confusion."


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-oiwbdip.jpg

    The primary concern, according to the President of the PBQ, is that plant-based products don't have the same nutritional value as similar looking meat-based products.

    He also notes that meat products are "completely pure," while the plant-based patties, for example, are "a processed product" made in California with "about forty ingredients."

    To their credit, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency does, in fact, define "meat" on their website as the "edible part of a carcass" - which does imply animal involvement in the production process.

    However, the claim that consumers are going to be confused or mislead by the use of the word "meat" is weak. Most people eating these products know full well there are no animal by-products involved - that's exactly why they're eating it.

    sauce https://www.mtlblog.com/news/canada/...uIKXRH9fjR0h5Q
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  51. #1951
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    Another reason .... Thanks, I’m vegan

    Your Meat-Heavy Diet Might Be Giving You 'Keto Crotch'

    You know all of the jokes, yeah? Like how you can tell if someone is vegan, or if someone does Crossfit, or if someone is convinced that a room filled with essential oil diffusers is just as effective as all of those silly-billy vaccines? The answer to all three is “Don’t worry, they’ll tell you about it, and they’ll post on Facebook about it, and they’ll angrily comment on all of the posts you’ve made complaining about it until you ultimately have to report them for hate speech.”

    But the keto diet requires a slightly different punchline for its slightly different side-effects. Given that ketosis can cause your breath, your pee, and everything else that comes out of any number of your orifices to have a strong odor, you don’t need to tell anyone that you’re on keto; we might already be able to smell it. (BUT YOU LOOK GREAT, AUNT BRENDA. REALLY.).

    According to Women’s Health, some women on the keto diet have noticed that their personal areas have a more distinct smell, a phenomenon that has been described as ‘keto crotch.’ One thread on the r/xxketo subreddit attempted to address this topic with a desperate “HELP LADIES!” in its title. “I am very SMELLY. It started on this diet and BV (bacteria vaginosis) just popped up with a vengeance,” a user named imisswaffles wrote. “I’ve read [it] could be KETO CROTCH (yeast die off/hormonal changes with the diet), like getting smelly breath? I’m only 2 weeks in. No other symptoms but smell.”

    Several other Redditors said they’d noticed the same thing (about themselves, not about that particular Reddit user), and were able to share some rational-sounding advice. “Make an appointment with your [gynecologist] ASAP,” one person responded, before suggesting that the unpleasant situation could be caused by not showering or changing into non-sweaty clothing immediately after a workout. “Hot and moist areas are breeding grounds for bacteria,” she added.

    That echoes what one gynecologist told Women’s Health as well. Dr. Jessica Shepherd said that any diet—not just the keto one—can change a woman’s vaginal pH, which might affect the way it smells. Another gyno said that any other changes, like rashes, abnormal discharge, or an unpleasant itch, should be mentioned to a medical professional. (The subtext there is “Don’t just type about it on an internet forum, even if you use all capital letters to write the word HELP.” Oh, and this is a good time to re-remind you not to put parsley in your vaginas either.)

    And sorry, gentlemen, but you might not be exempt from your own keto-related genital issues. A post on r/keto that doubly specified “For guys” and “Male” suggested that some men may have problems with dryness down there. “Take some of that coconut oil we all have on hand and lather up,” a person named Mr_Apocalyptic_ wrote. “I do that with dry skin due to cold air on my legs and such. It works like magic and your twig and berries region will smell like a tropical getaway.”

    Well, we’ve all learned something today, mostly that there are worse things than your former college roommate telling you about the Crossfit Open in great detail.

    sauce https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/n...YcYLDcPjxEkP_o
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    Eat your veggies

  52. #1952
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    4 reasons you should eat more mushrooms

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    Even setting aside magic mushrooms, our favorite fungal fruiting bodies supposedly have some spectacular healing properties. Search for the health benefits of mushrooms and you’ll turn up pages of info about how they can treat or prevent everything from cancer to heart disease.

    But as a savvy reader, you might wonder how much of the hype is really true. Should I be eating mushrooms all the time? Or is this all just overblown? We dug into the science and came up with four excellent reasons to eat your ‘shrooms.

    They’re one of the few vegan sources of vitamin D (kind of)
    You only need 10 to 15 minutes of sunshine three times a week to get your necessary dose of vitamin D, but if you’re still running low you can supplement with food sources. The only problem? They’re all from animals. Fatty fishes (or fish liver oil) and fortified dairy products are the main repositories. Some cereals are fortified with it, but they don’t pack much of a punch. Mushrooms, on the other hand, produce vitamin D naturally and in abundance. One study estimates that a 100-gram serving (that’s 3.5 ounces) would give you 50 to 100 percent of your daily dose. There’s just one problem: they only make vitamin D if they’re exposed to UV light. According to studies about the vitamin D content of mushrooms, fresh mushrooms should get plenty of exposure. But many commercially available sources are grown in the dark, then shipped around in closed containers. Some large growers do intentionally irradiate their crop, however.

    They’re full of fiber and low in fat

    By weight, many mushroom species are at least 50 percent carbohydrates (many are well above 60 or 70), and though we think of carbs as starchy or unhealthy, most of the carbs in mushrooms are actually fiber. A mushroom’s cells have all kinds of non-digestible carbohydrates, which is what we call dietary fiber, and that fiber fuels the healthy microbes in your gut.

    As a bonus, they also have other nutrients like selenium, copper, niacin, phosphorous, and potassium—all elements important (in small amounts) for your health. Cooking mushrooms helps release these, so toss those ‘shrooms in a frying pan before chowing down.

    They might help stave off cancer, heart disease, and neurodegenerative diseases (but we're not sure yet)
    There have been a number of studies claiming to find links between mushrooms and various diseases. Some note that people who eat more mushrooms tend to have lower rates of cancer or heart disease, while others look at how specific nutrients isolated from mushrooms affect cells in the lab. Various components are anti-inflammatory, for instance, and others purportedly fight tumors or protect the nervous system. One recent study linked mushroom consumption to less cognitive decline in old age.

    But these claims lack solid proof. A meta-analysis of such studies concluded that most were poorly designed, had small sample sizes, failed to replicate their work, and had troublesome statistics. The authors wrote that it was unwise to extrapolate the results of these mushroom studies to humans, and advocated for better clinical trials to investigate whether fungal food can actually improve our health.

    Another analysis, this time focusing on mushrooms as used in traditional Chinese medicine, not only concluded that “there is no scientific evidence to support the effectiveness of these preparations in the treatment of human disease,” but also warned about potentially dangerous contaminants in mushroom-based herbal medicines.

    It could very well be that the associations we see between people who eat more mushrooms and better health are just that—associations. Much like those who eat plenty of leafy greens or folks who consume nuts on a daily basis, they may just live healthier lives in general. Or maybe mushrooms really are helping! Maybe they do have chemicals that help stave off cancer or Alzheimer’s. Or maybe they’re nutritious and full of fiber, and that’s all part of the type of healthy diet we already know reduces your risk for a wide variety of disease.

    No one is quite sure yet.

    They’re delicious!
    Here’s the thing: mushrooms are definitely nutritious, but they’re also just darn tasty. Sauté up some onions and mushrooms in a little butter with a sprinkling of salt and try to deny it. And apart from foraging for them yourself (please don't do this unless you're properly trained!), there’s really no reason to eat less of them. So go for it. Mushrooms don’t need to be some kind of superfood that staves off brain plaque or protects your cells from cancer for it to be a good idea to eat more of them. Remember: no one food is going to make or break your diet. Enjoy some mushrooms if you like, and don’t worry about it if you don’t.

    sauce https://www.popsci.com/mushrooms-hea...vkY4XC8#page-2
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  53. #1953
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  54. #1954
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    Doris Day was an actor, singer and vegetarian... and animal champion. From refusing to work on set when animals were mistreated, to personally rescuing and finding homes for countless animals — she left a legacy of pure integrity and love.

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    R.I.P. Apr 3, 1922 - May 13, 2019 (age 97)
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  55. #1955
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  56. #1956
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    Processed food is unhealthy; we know that. More research why and how

    Processed food really does make you gain weight


    You probably already know that processed food is bad for you. Twinkies, after all, are not eaten for health, but for the joy of chewing yellow sponge cake injected with non-perishable cream. But it might surprise you to know that there's never been any real data to back this up.

    Most researchers and nutritionists theorized that ultra-processed food makes you overeat, on top of being high in calories, sugar, and fat while being low in fiber. To test that hypothesis, researchers at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases recruited 20 volunteers, evenly split by gender, and kept them in a special wing of the NIH Clinical Center for 28 days straight. Nutrition studies are often plagued by having too many variables you can’t control for. People who eat more processed foods also tend to have other factors that might influence their health, like having less money to pay for healthcare or less time to spend exercising. Just observing the general traits of folks consuming junk food won’t get you to any definitive conclusions—you can only ever get associations.

    So instead of just observing what people ate, the NIH researchers prescribed and controlled every single meal, plus the amount of daily exercise the participants got. For the first two weeks, half of the group ate a diet rich in veggies, whole grains, and other unprocessed food, while the other half ate ultra-processed stuff. Every meal contained twice as many calories as the person would actually need to maintain their body weight, and everyone was told to eat as much or as little as they wanted. Then the groups swapped menus for the last two weeks of the study, which was published this week in the journal Cell Metabolism.

    The most important part of this study, though, is that the meals were matched on their macros. Whether you were on the processed or unprocessed week, each meal had roughly the same number of carbs, fat, protein, fiber, sugar, and total calories. The researchers couldn’t match more specific categories, like added sugar or saturated fat, simply because it’s hard to find chips and fruit juice that are as low in those unhealthy nutrients as whole foods are.

    Even eating these macro-matched meals, the folks eating ultra-processed food consumed an average of 508 calories more per day, mostly in the form of carbs and fat (protein intake remained the same, as did total fiber and total sugar consumption). Those extra calories added up to about 0.9 pounds of extra weight at the end of the two weeks compared to their baseline. In the end, though, they came out even—folks eating only unprocessed food lost an average of 0.9 pounds.

    Part of this difference may have been from changes in appetite. While participants were downing whole foods, the hormones controlling appetite—PYY and ghrelin—shifted to favor less hunger. And it may also have had to do with the speed at which they ate. Chowing on processed stuff made folks eat faster, both in terms of grams and calories. Because it takes a while for your brain to get the signal that your stomach is full, eating too quickly can make a big difference in the total amount you consume.

    Interestingly, the participants’ glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and average blood glucose levels all remained unchanged. The researchers think this might have to do with the physical activity the participants engaged in. Prior research has suggested that exercise can temper the glucose response, though that’s not why the volunteers were prescribed physical activity. Most studies of metabolism involve being trapped in a hospital for days, where you’re mostly sedentary. The exercise in the study was just meant to match the amount of activity one would get on an average day in the outside world, so it was very low intensity—just three 20-minute bouts of cycling at 30 to 40 percent of their max heart rate. If even that amount of working out can influence glucose metabolism, that’s a great sign for promoting even small amounts of exercise.

    Of course, none of this solves the systemic reasons that some people overindulge in junk food. As the researchers point out, processed foods cost less in both time and money, both of which may be in short supply if you’re not wealthy. But whatever level of whole-food-iness you can afford, this study suggests it’s well worth the investment.


    sauce https://www.popsci.com/processed-foo...zXJFYtY#page-2
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  57. #1957
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    Neat story. I'm sure there is a vegan cyclist out there with the same goals.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-9w9a4762.jpg

    WHEN A VEGAN RUNS ACROSS AMERICA, HERE’S WHAT HE EATS

    Robbie Balenger is running across America. That’s 3,200 miles, in 75 days, averaging just under 45 miles each day. Beyond one heck of a runner’s high, he took on this self-imposed challenge to spread the plant-based word. Accompanied by a bright blue camper van displaying the NadaMoo! vegan ice cream and the dairy-free nonprofit Switch4Good branding, he’s running to leave a lasting impression and prove that one can accomplish incredible physical feats when powered by plants. We were curious about what his nutrition plan looked like, so we caught up with Balenger and his crew to see what makes up his 8,000-calorie days.

    Meal Planning is Non-Negotiable
    When running across the country on a vegan diet, there is no choice but to meal plan. Balenger’s nutritionist (and soon-to-be sister-in-law) Jackie Howard shared her immaculate nutrition spreadsheet with us. The exceptionally detailed tool laid out every single edible item accompanying him on the trip including the caloric content, serving size, cost, and more. A few items that caught our eye were Soylent, Daiya Mac and Cheese, a variety of naturally made vegan gels and electrolyte drinks, smoothie ingredients, and various Bobo’s products such as the Toast’r Protein Pastries. Howard is an athlete in her own right, having accomplished several endurance challenges such as hiking the Appalachian Trail and “dabbling in the 50k trail running scene.” In regards to her “giant spreadsheet with tons of tabs,” Howard told VegNews, “I was able to adopt this planning sheet from my Appalachian Trail spreadsheet template. I customized the sheet to be tailored specifically for Robbie’s Run. Once we had the ideas housed in an organized fashion, we shared it with the whole crew; it makes it much easier to make any tweaks needed to the original plan.”

    A Note on Macros
    Athletes are trained to view nutrition through the lens of macronutrients—protein, carbs, and fats. While vegan athletes understand that micronutrients are truly their secret weapon, Howard was kind enough to break down the macros to help us plebeians understand the basics. She explained: “[Balenger] consumes a lot of good fats (1.5-2 cans of coconut milk per day!) trying to get plenty of carbs as well (oats, tortillas, and pasta). Peanut butter, cashews, and leafy greens all contribute to his protein. We are working under the basic assumption that when you get enough calories on a whole foods plant-based diet it is impossible to be protein deficient.” There you have it. That’s where he gets his protein. Moving on.

    The Essentials
    Despite the orthodox runner’s diet of gels, powders, and bars, Balenger consumes most of his nutrition in the form of whole foods. This requires equipment. He told VegNews that his camper is equipped with three burners, a mini-fridge and freezer, and the holy grail of all kitchen equipment: a Vitamix. The crew relies on these simple appliances to prepare his morning oats, blend up superfood smoothies, and whip up a hot meal when he gets in for the night. Howard also let us in on a secret: the fridge is vital to keeping the beer cold, something that helps Balenger wind down after a long day of running. Another end-of-the-day treat is a spoonful or two of NadaMoo! The vegan ice cream brand is a sponsor, which means Balenger and the crew always have several pints in stock. Balenger noted that Maple Pecan is his favorite flavor and enjoys it on occasion. He joked that Elliot Preater, his crew-based running buddy from the UK, dives into a bowl every day (NadaMoo! hasn’t made it to the UK … yet!).

    An 8,000 Calorie-Day of Food
    Balenger’s early morning begins with coffee and a loaded bowl of hot instant oats made with chia seeds, maple syrup, bananas, walnuts or peanut butter, and raisins. Throughout the day of running, he takes in a plant-powered smoothie every ten miles and a form of carbohydrates (such as fruit or Pringles—he needs the salt) every five miles. He also fuels with Soylent, vegan cheese quesadillas, Spring Energy Gels, and tofu wraps. We were surprised when he mentioned his hydration routine. “I don’t drink a lot of water,” Balenger noted. “I mostly drink Skratch,” which is a natural vegan hydration mix that provides key electrolytes. For dinner, Balenger enjoys a meal prepared by his crew, many of which consist of Outdoor Herbivore vegan-friendly camping meals; however, on occasion, the crew will order takeout if available. “In small towns, we seek out Thai places. Those are always vegan-friendly. However, I just had a beet burger at Three Carrots in Indianapolis, and that was good. Also, the Flagstaff [AZ] vegan scene is on point. The Thai food there was absolutely fantastic.” When asked if he was tired of any particular road food, he sighed and replied, “I’m just tired of eating. The constant eating and the amount of food … it’s just a lot.” However, Balenger did admit to daydreaming about one specific meal back in his hometown of Denver, CO: seitan wings from City, O’ City. Further, when he completes his journey in New York City (tentatively predicted for May 29), he’s looking forward to trying the pizza at Matthew Kenney’s Double Zero. Balenger was a pizzeria restaurant manager in his former life and remains a self-proclaimed lover of all (vegan) pizza.

    The Mission
    Balenger has put more than just miles past him. He has served his purpose to change the way people think about plant-based fuel. However, he was surprised to find that “Everyone is really aware of [veganism]. It’s something people are thinking about or at least have even just heard about even in extremely rural areas.” He noted that many of his non-vegan friends who came out to run with him went home and either adopted a fully vegan diet or at least made significant changes to be “more conscious” eaters. Looking ahead, Balenger hopes to use his platform to continue spreading the plant-based message through endurance events. Whether he’ll be attempting another fantastic challenge or aiding others, Balenger is in it for the long haul.

    To track Robbie’s Run, see the Robbie's Tracker . He invites anyone to run a mile or a marathon with him as he completes the final few weeks of this adventure. His crew also encourages all to send him virtual kudos by following him on Instagram @RobbieBalenger and engaging with his daily posts and stories. Finally, to run with Balenger on his final day (or even participate in the Central Park celebration with complimentary NadaMoo! ice cream), RSVP to the event’s Facebook page or join the vegan pizza and ice cream party at Screamer’s Pizzeria the following day.


    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/5/when-a-ve...l3nMuaRW8z769w
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    Eat your veggies

  58. #1958
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  59. #1959
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  60. #1960
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    Millions of Birds Are Vacuumed to Death Every Year for Our Martini Olives

    I had no idea olives were harvested like this. So many questions. Article ends on the right note though...we'll be fine with slightly less flavorful olives. Seems like animals are always on the losing end of the profit incentive.

  61. #1961
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    ^ I didn't know this! Thanks for the link
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  62. #1962
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