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  1. #2201
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  2. #2202
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    F*ck Cancer

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  3. #2203
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    Happy Hump day too

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  4. #2204
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    6 Edible Weeds that are More Nutritious than Store-Bought Veggies

    1. Chickweed

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-chickweed.jpg

    Chickweed provides all the minerals most Americans are lacking — calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, selenium, silica, phosphorus, potassium, and zinc.

    It’s also high in vitamin A, vitamin B-1, vitamin B-2, niacin, and vitamin C.

    It also contains 14.5 grams of protein per serving, about half a cup of dried leaves, according to the Plants For A Future database.

    Chickweed has a delicate flavor, much like spinach. It tastes great in sandwiches and salads.

    If you don’t like the taste, you can still reap the benefits by hiding it in soups and stews.

    Medicinally, chickweed can be used as a topical treatment for minor cuts, burns, eczema and rashes. It’s also a mild diuretic and is said to relieve cystitis and irritable-bladder-symptoms.

    2. Dandelion

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    Dandelions are loaded with vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, B9, C and K.

    They’re also high in the minerals calcium, iron, potassium, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, and copper.

    Probably the most common of North American weeds, they’re also among the most medicinal, used throughout history to treat everything from liver problems and kidney disease to heartburn and appendicitis.

    More recently, a study found the plant kills cancer cells without harming surrounding healthy cells.

    Every part of this common weed is edible, from the roots to the blossoms. Use the leaves in sandwiches and stir-fries. Add the sweet flower heads to salads to salads or smoothies. The roots can be made into a herbal-tea, or roasted and ground as a coffee substitute.

    3. Chicory

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-cichorium-intybus-8347-9.jpg

    Chicory contains at least a little of nearly every essential, yet hard-to-find, trace mineral, including 7% of our daily value of selenium and manganese and 5% of our daily value of iron.

    Selenium helps regulate thyroid hormones and the immune system, while manganese supports the formation of healthy bones, tissues, and sex hormones.

    It’s also high in the macro minerals calcium, potassium and phosphorus and vitamins A,B and C

    Chicory roots contain a prebiotic vital to the growth and activity of probiotics, called oligosaccharide-enriched inulin.

    Oligosaccharides are present in only a few sources: breast milk, Jerusalem artichokes, onions, leeks, garlic, legumes, and bananas.

    Add fresh chicory leaves to a salad for a mild-to-peppery flavor. The remove some of the bitterness, boil or sauté.

    4. Curly Dock

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    Curly dock is one of the hardiest and most widespread weeds, so you should have no trouble finding a source.

    The leaves are high in beta-carotene, Vitamins A, B, C and the trace mineral zinc, strengthening your immune system, and the seeds are rich in calcium and magnesium for bone health.

    The stems of the curly-dock can be peeled and eaten either cooked or raw, and the mature seeds can be roasted to make an earthy, warm-drink.

    5. Common Mallow

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-mallowleaves-768x576.jpg

    Mallow is high in vitamins A and C and calcium and iron.

    Unlike its name suggests, the flavor of this plant is nothing like marshmallow. Tea made from common mallow root forms a gelatinous mixture, which is soothing for the digestive and genitourinary tracts.

    6. Lambsquarters

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    Lambsquarters is high in Vitamin A and C, calcium, phosphorus and potassium. It’s also a decent source of protein.

    This rapidly growing summer weed produces black-seeds which are related to the protein-rich superfood quinoa.

    You can enjoy the young shoots and leaves of the plant. Whether raw or sautéed, they make a great replacement for spinach and are just as nutritious.


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  5. #2205
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    Happy "Plant Powered" Valentine's Day

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  7. #2207
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    oyster mushrooms sweet and savory coating
    Chef Jeff is seen making the dosas in the top left corner


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    Dosas

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    plant based
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  8. #2208
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    Will Cultured Meat Soon Be A Common Sight In Supermarkets Across The Globe?

    Up until now, plant-based food companies like Beyond Meat, Impossible Foods, and Quorn have almost singlehandedly worked to lessen the impacts of industrial animal agriculture.

    Supermarket shelves and fast food restaurants across the US are serving up vegan burgers and meatballs and plant-based chicken nuggets are showing consumers there is an alternative to relying on animal-based protein.

    But a quiet revolution is also taking place in labs, where scientists are working to cultivate meat and seafood grown from cells, with the potential to reduce demand for industrial animal agriculture even further.

    Here’s how the process works: Stem cells are taken from the muscle of an animal, usually with a small biopsy under anesthesia, then they’re put with nutrients, salts, pH buffers, and growth factor and left to multiply. Finessing the technology and getting the cost to an affordable level is happening at a slower pace than the plant-based industry, but a number of start-ups are nevertheless aiming to get their products on the market soon.

    Cell-based meat (also known as cultured, cultivated, slaughter-free, cell-cultured, and clean meat) could be a common sight in supermarkets across the west in the next three years, according to the Institute of the Future in Palo Alto. California-based Memphis Meats made headlines for its world-first cell-based meatballs four years ago, and is currently building a pilot plant to produce its cultured beef, chicken, and duck on a bigger scale – with plans to launch more plants around the world.

    And it isn’t the only cell-based meat start-up in the The Golden State. There’s the recently formed San Francisco-based Artemys Foods, co-founded by biochemist Jess Krieger, who has spent the past six years working at Kent State University in Ohio growing cell-based meat in a lab, Berkeley-based Mission Barns, focused on creating animal fat, which it has mixed with other ingredients to make duck sausages, and San Diego-based BlueNalu, a startup developing seafood from fish cells through a process called “cellular aquaculture.”

    But innovation isn’t limited to the US – it’s happening across the world. The global cell-based meat market is predicted to be worth $15.5m by 2021 and $20m by 2027, according to analysis. One report estimates that 35% of all meat will be cultured by 2040.

    While estimates vary, one study found that cell-based beef is projected to use 95 per cent fewer global greenhouse gas emissions, 98 per cent less land use and up to half as much energy. It also significantly reduces the amount of antibiotics needed, which are widely used in agriculture and contribute hugely to worsening antibiotic resistance. And since the animal cells are extracted humanely and grown in a facility rather than within the animals themselves, cell-based meat has the potential to all but eliminate animal suffering.

    The industry has made huge progress since the first cell-based hamburger was unveiled in 2013 in London by Dutch stem cell researcher Mark Post, chief scientific officer at Dutch company Mosa Meat. While this was a huge achievement, it also showed the world how far the industry had to go before commercially viable cell-based meat could be a reality. It cost $325,000 to make, and wasn’t totally animal-free, as most of the burger’s muscle strands were grown with fetal bovine serum, which comes from blood drawn from bovine fetuses.

    In the intervening years, Mosa Meat has made several breakthroughs, and aims to bring the price down to a commercial price. It now doesn’t require fetal bovine serum, and has developed a process that allows industrial scale production.

    Also in the Netherlands, start-up Meatable has recently raised €9m to help reduce costs and scale-up production of its beef and pork. It aims to have an industry-scale plant by 2025, and will have a small-scale bioreactor – the machine where cell-growth takes place - this year. Meatable’s cofounder Krijn de Nood hopes to unveil its first prototype this summer.

    Elsewhere in Europe, the UK’s Higher Steaks is growing stem cells for the production of mince for pork sausages. Instead of using fetal bovine serum, the company uses protocols exclusively licensed to it by its collaborators, the University of Minnesota, that allow it to reprogram stem cells into muscle and fat tissues.

    Instead of adult stem cells, it uses induced pluripotent stem cells, which means they have an infinite supply as the cells proliferate infinitely. With adult stem cells, researchers have to go to the animal every time they need a new batch.

    And Spain’s Cubiq Foods is producing cell-based fat, which is used to enhance the flavor of food and enrich it with essential fatty acids, such as omega-3.

    But when it comes to cell-based meat, all eyes are on Israel, where a number of start-ups like Future Meat Technologies and SuperMeat are making huge progress. The country’s interest in cell-based meat has also been attributed to its thriving vegan culture.

    Future Meat Technologies, founded in 2018, has shortened the manufacturing process to two weeks, with a patent-pending method they say allows for higher production yields of cell-based beef. The start-up's technologies enable producers, farmers and retailers to manufacture biomass and process it locally. The company hopes to get cost down to $10 per pound by 2022.

    As for SuperMeat, it is developing cell-based meat from chicken cells (it claimed during its launch in 2016 that it was the first company to work on clean chicken products for mass production). One of Europe's largest poultry producers, PHW-Gruppe formed a partnership with SuperMeat in 2018. “We believe 2020 will be the tipping point for the cultivated meat industry, once the proof of scale will be introduced to the world,” says Shir Friedman, Co-Founder and Chief Communications Officer of the company. “SuperMeat is excited to take a lead part in this historical event."

    Another Israeli start-up, Aleph Farms, created the world’s first cell-based steak at the end of 2018. It was co-founded only one year prior together with The Kitchen Hub from the Strauss Group, and with Professor Shulamit Levenberg of the Technion Institute of Technology. And in fall of 2019, Aleph Farms successfully “3D printed” meat on the International Space Station. “Our experiment of bioprinting meat in space... consisted of printing a small-scale muscle tissue using 3D Bioprinting Solutions’ bioprinting technology,” says Yoav Reisler, External Relations Manager for the company. “The proof of concept sought to assess the potential of producing cultivated meat in a zero-gravity environment away from land and local water resources. Our approach for cultivating beef steaks is imperative to the experiment, as it relies on mirroring the natural process of tissue regeneration that happens in a cow’s body but under controlled and animal-free conditions. Our overarching goal is to produce meat products that have a significantly reduced ecological impact and this was a milestone in towards achieving that.” Earlier this month, Aleph Farms announced plans to open an educational complex next to its production facility to provide the general public a more in-depth view of how cell-based meat is grown.

    Also in Israel, BioFood Systems aims to produce beef products using bovine embryonic stem cells. It also hopes to scale up technology that it can license globally to enable meat manufacturers to produce their own cell-based meat.

    But other parts of the world aren’t far behind Israel, including Asia. Singaporean Shiok Meats is working on bringing cell-based based crustaceans (shrimp, crab and lobster) to market, and says it’s the first company of its kind in Singapore and South-East Asia. It hopes to have a commercially viable product in the next few years, and is currently researching and developing.

    And in Japan, meat producer Toriyama and its export agent, Awano Food Group has partnered with JUST to grow, distribute and sell its cell-based wagyu beef worldwide.

    n-between Asia and Europe, innovation is also happing in Turkey. Biftek is the first and still the only company developing cultured meat in the country. It uses a plant-based formulation, made up of 44 proteins, in place of fetal bovine serum. Founder Can Akcali said in a recent interview that the media in Turkey is showing a growing interest in its work, and cell-based meat more widely.

    Since the first cell-based unveiling of a cell-based burger in 2013, scientists have been flocking to labs in a race to iron out numerous teething problems and be the first to make a commercially viable cell-based meat product. Meanwhile, private investment into the industry has soared. Last year, twelve companies raised $50 million in 14 deals – double the amount of 2018. US-based Memphis Meats raised $22 million, Spain's Cubiq Foods raised $14 million and Mosa Meat drew in $9 million.

    Memphis Meats now plans to build a pilot production facility, thanks to additional investments in January this year from Cargill and Tyson Foods, as well as high-profile investors Bill Gates, Richard Branson, and Kimbal Musk.

    Ido Savir, SuperMeat’s chief executive, said Mosa Meat introduced the concept of cell-based meat to the world, and that the main challenge start-ups are still facing is proof of scaling up production to a commercially viable size that's cost-efficient. Once these hurdles are overcome, it will be a much smoother process to get cell-based meat on shelves. At the moment, cell-based products are being prototyped in labs - but once scientists have finessed the process and the cost, they’re produced at scale and can grow in facilities like any other food.

    Many cell-based start-ups expect to get their products to market in the next few years. Whether or not they are actually able to meet that projection is an open question. “I worry most startups in the cultured meat space are overestimating their short-term timeline to get to market and underestimating their potential long-term impact on completely redesigning our food system from the cell-level up,” says Max Elder, Research Director in the Food Futures Lab at Institute for the Future. “Regardless of the timeline, one thing is clear: we desperately need to undo the damage industrialized animal agriculture is wreaking on our communities, animals, and the planet.” While it may indeed be unwise to count our cultured chickens before they hatch, especially in light of the urgent challenges we are facing, we can no doubt expect more innovation in the coming years. Perhaps one day - even if not in the near future - all the meat on our plates will indeed be slaughter-free.

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  9. #2209
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    The mystery of why there are more women vegans

    “Manly man,” the narrator observes, as a groom emerges from a house, carrying his bride. “Calm,” he marvels, as a man in a packed train carriage smiles tolerantly at the lady who just stepped on his foot. And on it goes… a sequence of scenes depicting men carrying out impressively gallant feats, as an orchestral soundtrack rises to a crescendo. At the end of the advert, a man bites into a burger. The tagline reads: “100% manly man. 100% pure beef”.

    This McDonald’s advert, broadcast in China in 2012, relies on the well-trodden stereotype that meat is masculine. And oddly, there is actually some truth to this. It turns out that – in almost every part of the globe, from Sweden to Australia – there are significantly fewer male vegans and vegetarians. In the US, one survey of 11,000 people found that just 24% of vegans are men.

    Anecdotally, this seems to stand up. The tally of famous female vegans is a glittering line-up, reportedly including – deep breath – Natalie Portman, Miley Cyrus, Venus Williams, Ariana Grande, Ellie Goulding, Jessica Chastain, Alanis Morissette, Jane Goodall, Princess Beatrice and Beyonce.

    Meanwhile, the cast of male celebrity vegans appears tiny in comparison, though it does feature Benedict Cumberbatch, Peter Dinklage, Zac Efron, and – notoriously – the singer Morrissey, who masterminded a Smiths album called Meat Is Murder and is said to have forbidden his band members from being photographed eating meat.

    As it happens, psychologists have been aware of the mysterious abundance of female vegans for decades. They’ve come up with plenty of compelling explanations already – and they don’t reflect well on men.

    One possibility involves “precarious masculinity” – the idea that men are constantly worrying they will lose their manly status, and therefore feel the need to prove it at every opportunity. For example, when men are forced to do something “girly”, like braiding a doll’s hair, they tend to want to exhibit their machismo afterwards.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-p083bmgv.jpg

    This could potentially be a major stumbling block for aspiring male vegans, who must run the gauntlet of the red-blooded carnivore stereotype. But where did this come from in the first place?

    Steven Heine, a psychologist at the University of British Columbia, suggests that it’s largely down to historical factors. “Meat has always been associated with danger, because you used to have to hunt to get it, and status, because it was a prized food and we lived in patriarchal societies – so men arranged that it would go to themselves,” he says.

    It’s also thought to have been perpetuated by marketing. Starting in the 19th Century, when it became more socially acceptable for parties of women to dine alone, restaurants and advertising executives scrambled to decide which foods were suitably feminine. Their verdict? Fussy desserts and dainty salads were for women, while steak was for men.

    Fast-forward to today, and we’re still passing these views on to the next generation.

    Merely listing the vegetarian foods a person enjoys, below a detailed description of their personality and habits, can be enough to make them seem less masculine
    Take “soy boys”. The Urban Dictionary defines the slang term as applying to “males who completely and utterly lack all necessary masculine qualities,” and claims it originates from the (scientifically dubious) link between the over-consumption of soya products and harm to the male physique and libido.

    In his research, Heine has found that merely listing the vegetarian foods a person enjoys, below a detailed description of their personality and habits, can be enough to make them seem less masculine. Knowing that, “perhaps some men are concerned about what will happen if they order a salad at a restaurant,” he says.

    Margaret Thomas, a psychologist at Earlham College, Indiana, agrees. “I don’t think people necessarily recognise the extent to which the food they choose to eat affects their identity,” she says. Thomas has also found that vegans are seen as less masculine – but only if it’s a choice. When her study participants were told that a person had been forced into the diet because of mysterious “digestive issues”, they weren’t judged so harshly.

    Of course, the story of why there are more women vegans isn’t all about men. Research has consistently shown that women are more compassionate in general, and particularly when it comes to animals. We’re more likely to have a problem with animal use in general and experimentation in particular, more likely to keep pets, and less likely to abuse them.

    Likewise, women make up 75% of the members of animal rights groups. In fact, feminists and animal activists have been working together for more than a century. Two prominent campaigners for women’s suffrage, Alice Wright and Edith Good, lobbied the United Nations to give animals formal rights back in the 1940s – a proposition which is only just beginning to be considered today.

    In 2018, the psychologist Carolyn Semmler set out to uncover if women are better at resolving the so-called “meat paradox” too. “There’s a lot of literature about this,” she says. “The idea that people claim to love animals – and yet they eat them.”

    Research has shown that women are more likely to use “avoidance” strategies to cope, such as avoiding connecting meat with animals
    Together with colleagues from the University of Adelaide, Semmler recruited 460 people for the study, and split them into two groups. Both were asked to select a lamb dish that they would like to eat, and then provided with some information.

    But while one half was merely asked to read about the nutritional content of their meal, the other was given a breakdown of exactly how lambs are reared and slaughtered, then shown a video of a precocious individual who had learnt to open a farm gate, all by him or herself. Each participant was surveyed at the beginning and the end of the study, to see how they felt and if their attitudes to meat had changed.

    “We saw some really interesting things happen,” says Semmler. First of all, most women felt worse after reading about the connection between animals and meat, while the men were more or less unaffected. Second, while the women were generally less attached to meat by the end of the study, the men were more carnivorous than ever.

    “There was a group of male participants who had a really strong reaction to the study – saying that they were going to eat more meat, because they thought we wanted them to eat less.” One explained: “…Based on the line of questioning in this survey, I am concerned that some lunatics might try to ban meat; I had better enjoy as much as possible while I am able.” Though not all the men felt this way, a significant proportion did. The team didn’t get the same response from a single woman.

    One possible reason for this is the discrepancy in the ways men and women deal with the meat paradox. A 2013 study, led by Hank Rothgerber from Bellarmine University, Kentucky, found that women are more likely to use “avoidance” strategies to cope, such as avoiding connecting meat with animals.

    This is surprisingly easy to implement in everyday life, since most supermarkets, restaurants and food brands tend to helpfully remove the more gruesome clues, such as eyeballs, feet and fur. If animals are depicted in their marketing, they’re usually happy cartoons. Even the language we use helps to keep up the ruse, since we usually to refer to pork instead of pig, mutton instead of sheep, beef instead of cow, etc.

    n contrast to the “dissociation” strategy favoured by women, Semmler’s study found that men generally to tackle the troubling reality that they like animals and also eat them more directly, by denying that they can feel pain, suggesting that meat is essential if you want to be healthy, and invoking the hierarchy of the natural world, to justify the idea that humans can do what they like with other creatures.

    With this in mind, it makes sense that the female participants would be more affected – since the information they were asked to read snatched their usual coping mechanism away from them. The men, meanwhile, simply pressed on with their usual justifications and dug themselves in.

    But that might not be the only reason. Intriguingly, Semmler says her results fit nicely with what other research has shown about how men and women usually deal with any set of incompatible beliefs or behaviours. “While men tend to go on the attack, women tend to think ‘I’m going to modify my behaviour because the problem is with me – I’m going to accept responsibility for this’,” she says.

    For example, when women are forced to confront the unhealthy reality of certain behaviours, such as smoking or sex without condoms – and then remember instances when they have engaged in these risks – in some cases, they change their attitudes and behaviour to a greater extent than men do.


    Finally, there’s “social dominance theory”, which suggests that men might find meat more appealing when they’re reminded it’s made from animals, because it reinforces their sense of dominance and superiority – by viewing animals as unworthy of respect, they are asserting their power over them.

    There is some evidence to support this idea. A survey of the attitudes of American college students, conducted in 2015, found a link between a preference for a more hierarchically stratified society and the use – and endorsement of the use of – animals.

    The link between meat and dominance isn’t just about animals – it also seems to extend to our own species. One early study, conducted in the 1980s by the anthropologist Peggy Sanday, involved comparing the power structures of a hundred hunter-gatherer cultures, some of which relied more on meat for food, and some of which relied more on gathered fruits and vegetables. She found that the meat-based societies tended to be more patriarchal, while the plant-based ones were generally more egalitarian.

    This is thought to be because men are more likely to be hunters, so where meat is important they automatically have more power if they want it – which the study findings suggest they do. Meanwhile, where gathered foods dominate, women might use the status this affords them to carve out more equal societies.

    Semmler thinks we need a lot more research before we can truly unravel the enigma of the women vegans. But it looks like it’s down to a combination of the empathy gap between the sexes, our different strategies for overcoming the meat paradox, and the uniquely male fear that a salad could undermine their carefully manicured status.

    One thing is clear: as the global popularity of veganism gathers pace – the number of US vegans increased by 600% between 2014 and 2017 – women are way ahead.


    sauce https://www.bbc.com/future/article/2...TOQuEPwvDP1xT8
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  10. #2210
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    Two studies highlight effects of diet and microbiome on heart and aging

    Two newly published studies are offering novel insights into the relationship between our diets, gut microbiome, and general health. One study is suggesting a Mediterranean diet can reconfigure gut bacteria to promote healthy aging, while a second study reveals plant-based diets can reduce gut microbe production of a metabolite linked to heart disease.

    Our gut microbiome, much like the rest of our body, changes distinctly as we age. Prior research has found poor diets in older subjects are linked to less diverse gut microbiomes and more rapid signs of frailty and aging. In one new study an international team of researchers set out to investigate whether a Mediterranean diet, sustained for 12 months, altered an older microbiome and improved biomarkers associated with healthy aging.

    Over 600 subjects were studied, aged between 65 and 79. Half of the cohort continued on their normal diet, while the other half followed a form of Mediterranean diet particularly designed for senior citizens, called the NU-AGE diet.

    “We observed that increased adherence to the MedDiet modulates specific components of the gut microbiota that were associated with a reduction in risk of frailty, improved cognitive function and reduced inflammatory status,” the researchers explain in the new study.

    After 12 months on the Mediterranean diet the researchers identified increased gut bacterial diversity and improved metabolic markers associated with general healthy aging. Interestingly, the study does reference a prior trial investigating the effect of prebiotic supplementation on microbiome diversity in the same age group. That study found little change to overall microbiome diversity after six months of daily prebiotic supplementation. Although the prebiotics did enhance specific microbial populations, overall gut microbiome diversity was not improved and, despite the specific bacterial changes, the study did not detect improvements in inflammatory biomarkers.

    These results, taken in tandem with the new results, suggest overall dietary interventions are more effective at maintaining general health and microbiome diversity, instead of focusing on particular pre or probiotic supplementation.

    A second newly published study looking at diet, health, and the microbiome, homed in more specifically on a very specific gut metabolite strongly linked to heart disease. Prior study has revealed a significant association between high levels of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and increased risk of heart disease.

    TMAO is produced in the gut when certain bacteria digest animal products, primarily red meat. A small Australian study last year found individuals consuming the popular Paleo diet had significantly higher levels of TMAO in their bloodstream compared to a cohort eating more traditional diets.

    The new research examined data from a large longitudinal study known as the Nurses’ Health Study, which followed over 100,000 nurses for a decade. This data offers some of the first insights into the long-term relationship between TMAO blood levels and cardiovascular health.

    Over 10 years a distinct link between increased TMAO levels and coronary heart disease (CHD) was detected. Women with the largest TMAO blood level increase across the 10-year period displayed a 63-percent higher risk of CHD.

    "No previous prospective cohort study has addressed whether long-term changes in TMAO are associated with CHD, and whether dietary intakes can modify these associations,” says senior author on the new TMAO study, Lu Qi. “Our findings show that decreasing TMAO levels may contribute to reducing the risk of CHD, and suggest that gut-microbiomes may be new areas to explore in heart disease prevention."

    These two new studies don’t imply the gut microbiome is the singular causal factor controlling general health and aging, but points more to a complex and bi-directional interplay between the bacteria living inside of us, the food we eat, and our overall health.

    While it is still early days in the field of gut microbiome science, it’s becoming increasingly clear there is not one single magical probiotic that will be the key to perfect health. Instead the secret may be what we already know, that a balanced diet and active lifestyle is the best path to positive general health.

    The interplay of diet, microbiome and host health is a complex phenomenon influenced by several factors," the Mediterranean diet researchers conclude in their new study. "While the results of this study shed light on some of the rules of this three-way interplay, several factors such as age, body mass index, disease status and initial dietary patterns may play a key role in determining the extent of success of these interactions."

    The Mediterranean diet study was published in the journal Gut, while the TMAO study was published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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  11. #2211
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    How Vegans Can Get the Nutrients They Need

    One of the most challenging aspects of eating a vegan diet is ensuring that all your nutrition needs are met despite eliminating major food groups from your diet. Following a vegan diet means cutting out all animal-based foods like meat, poultry, eggs and dairy. It can feel restrictive and also be unhealthy without the proper knowledge and resources at hand. Studies have shown that vegans tend to have lower intakes of vitamin B12, iron, calcium, vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids and zinc compared to nonvegetarians; therefore, it's important for vegans to identify vegan-friendly sources of these nutrients.

    Vitamin B12

    Vitamin B12, found primarily in animal-derived foods, such as meat, fish and poultry, is essential for red blood cell production and neurological function. Low B12 levels often go undetected in vegans because high folate levels can mask deficiencies, so be sure to talk to your doctor about getting tested and possibly taking a supplement. A 2010 study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that 52 percent of vegans were vitamin B12 deficient.

    Vegan foods to include for B12:
    Fortified breads, cereals and energy bars
    Fortified soy products (soy milk and faux meats)
    Fortified plant-based milks (soy, rice, almond, hemp and coconut)
    Nutritional yeast (a vegan-friendly seasoning with a cheesy flavor)

    Iron

    Iron is necessary for blood production, growth and development, metabolism and cellular functioning. Unfortunately for vegans and vegetarians, the type of iron found in plant-based foods (nonheme iron) isn't as easily absorbed as the iron found in meat (heme iron). Since the body can't use it as effeciently, vegans need more iron: the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for vegans is 1.8 times higher than for meat eaters. However, there are lots of yummy plant-based sources of iron that vegans can eat. So be sure to include enough plant-based sources of iron, and eat these foods together with vitamin C-rich foods to help with iron absorption.

    Vegan foods to include for more iron:
    Dark leafy green vegetables (spinach, Swiss chard, collard greens and kale)
    Whole grains (quinoa, barley, bulgur and brown rice)
    Legumes, pulses, nuts and seeds (beans, peas and lentils)
    Dried fruit (peaches, prunes, apricots and raisins)
    Fortified cereals and rice
    Spirulina (powder made from microalgae)
    Vegan foods high in vitamin C to increase iron absorption:
    Citrus fruits (oranges, grapefruit and lemons)
    Tomatoes
    Bell peppers
    Berries

    Calcium and Vitamin D

    Bone health is a concern for vegans, since plant-based diets typically fall short of the recommended intakes for calcium and vitamin D. In fact, a 2010 study in the journal Public Health Nutrition showed that vegans had the lowest vitamin D levels, compared to vegetarians and nonvegetarians.

    Vegan foods rich in calcium to include:
    Dark leafy greens (spinach, collard greens, bok choy, turnip and mustard greens)
    Fortified nondairy alternatives (soy, almond and coconut-based milk and yogurt)
    Fortified soy products (tofu, milk and yogurt)
    Fortified juices
    Beans (navy and white)
    Vegan foods high in vitamin D to include:
    Fortified cereals and juices
    Fortified soy (milk and yogurt)
    Mushrooms (maitake and shiitake or UV-exposed white, cremini and portobello)
    Omega-3s

    Without seafood in the diet, vegans struggle to get enough of the heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA. Plus, vegans' requirements for essential fatty acids may be higher than those for nonvegetarians because of the inefficient conversion of plant-based ALA into EPA and DHA.

    Vegan foods to Include:
    Seeds (chia, ground flaxseed and hemp)
    Walnuts
    Sea vegetables and microalgae

    Zinc

    Zinc plays an important role in many cellular functions, including the immune system, wound healing, and growth and development. The high phytate content (found in grains, legumes and seeds) of vegan diets decreases zinc absorption, making it that much more important for vegans to include food sources of zinc in their diets. Try soaking and sprouting beans and grains to reduce their phytate content and maximize zinc absorption.

    Vegan foods to Include:
    Beans
    Nuts
    Seeds
    Whole grains and fortified cereals
    Soy (tofu, tempeh)

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-80838568_2569091443335291_3684362069089452032_o.jpg

    sauce How Vegans Can Get the Nutrients They Need | EatingWell
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    10 Health Benefits of Kale

    Of all the super healthy greens, kale is king.

    It is definitely one of the healthiest and most nutritious plant foods in existence.

    Kale is loaded with all sorts of beneficial compounds, some of which have powerful medicinal properties.

    Here are 10 health benefits of kale that are supported by science.

    1. Kale Is Among The Most Nutrient-Dense Foods on The Planet

    Kale is a popular vegetable and a member of the cabbage family.

    It is a cruciferous vegetable like cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, collard greens and Brussels sprouts.

    There are many different types of kale. The leaves can be green or purple, and have either a smooth or curly shape.

    The most common type of kale is called curly kale or Scots kale, which has green and curly leaves and a hard, fibrous stem.

    A single cup of raw kale (about 67 grams or 2.4 ounces) contains :

    Vitamin A: 206% of the DV (from beta-carotene)
    Vitamin K: 684% of the DV
    Vitamin C: 134% of the DV
    Vitamin B6: 9% of the DV
    Manganese: 26% of the DV
    Calcium: 9% of the DV
    Copper: 10% of the DV
    Potassium: 9% of the DV
    Magnesium: 6% of the DV

    It also contains 3% or more of the DV for vitamin B1 (thiamin), vitamin B2 (riboflavin), vitamin B3 (niacin), iron and phosphorus
    This is coming with a total of 33 calories, 6 grams of carbs (2 of which are fiber) and 3 grams of protein.

    Kale contains very little fat, but a large portion of the fat in it is an omega-3 fatty acid called alpha linolenic-acid.

    Given its incredibly low calorie content, kale is among the most nutrient-dense foods in existence. Eating more kale is a great way to dramatically increase the total nutrient content of your diet.

    SUMMARY
    Kale is very high in nutrients and very low in calories, making it one of the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet.

    2. Kale Is Loaded With Powerful Antioxidants Like Quercetin and Kaempferol


    Kale, like other leafy greens, is very high in antioxidants.

    These include beta-carotene and vitamin C, as well as various flavonoids and polyphenols.

    Antioxidants are substances that help counteract oxidative damage by free radicals in the body .

    Oxidative damage is believed to be among the leading drivers of aging and many diseases, including cancer.

    But many substances that happen to be antioxidants also have other important functions.

    This includes the flavonoids quercetin and kaempferol, which are found in relatively large amounts in kale.

    These substances have been studied thoroughly in test tubes and animals.

    They have powerful heart-protective, blood pressure-lowering, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, anti-depressant and anti-cancer effects, to name a few.

    SUMMARY
    Many powerful antioxidants are found in kale, including quercetin and kaempferol, which have numerous beneficial effects on health
    .

    3. It Is an Excellent Source of Vitamin C

    Vitamin C is an important water-soluble antioxidant that serves many vital functions in the body's cells.

    For example, it is necessary for the synthesis of collagen, the most abundant structural protein in the body.

    Kale is much higher in vitamin C than most other vegetables, containing about 4.5 times much as spinach.

    The truth is, kale is actually one of the world's best sources of vitamin C. A cup of raw kale contains even more vitamin C than a whole orange.

    SUMMARY
    Kale is extremely high in vitamin C, an antioxidant that has many important roles in the body.
    A single cup of raw kale actually contains more vitamin C than an orange.

    4. Kale Can Help Lower Cholesterol, Which May Reduce The Risk of Heart Disease


    Cholesterol has many important functions in the body.

    For instance, it is used to make bile acids, which is are substances that help the body digest fats.

    The liver turns cholesterol into bile acids, which are then released into the digestive system whenever you eat a fatty meal.

    When all the fat has been absorbed and the bile acids have served their purpose, they are reabsorbed into the bloodstream and used again.

    Substances called bile acid sequestrants can bind bile acids in the digestive system and prevent them from being reabsorbed. This reduces the total amount of cholesterol in the body.

    Kale actually contains bile acid sequestrants, which can lower cholesterol levels. This might lead to a reduced risk of heart disease over time.

    One study found that drinking kale juice every day for 12 weeks increased HDL (the "good") cholesterol by 27% and lowered LDL levels by 10%, while also improving antioxidant status.

    According to one study, steaming kale dramatically increases the bile acid binding effect. Steamed kale is actually 43% as potent as cholestyramine, a cholesterol-lowering drug that functions in a similar way (13).

    SUMMARY
    Kale contains substances that bind bile acids and lower cholesterol levels in the body. Steamed kale is particularly effective.

    5. Kale Is One of The World's Best Sources of Vitamin K


    Vitamin K is an important nutrient.

    It is absolutely critical for blood clotting, and does this by "activating" certain proteins and giving them the ability to bind calcium.

    The well-known anticoagulant drug Warfarin actually works by blocking the function of this vitamin.

    Kale is one of the world's best sources of vitamin K, with a single raw cup containing almost 7 times the recommended daily amount.

    The form of vitamin K in kale is K1, which is different than vitamin K2. K2 is found in fermented soy foods and certain animal products. It helps prevent heart disease and osteoporosis.

    SUMMARY
    Vitamin K is an important nutrient that is involved in blood clotting. A single cup of kale contains 7 times the RDA for vitamin K.


    6. There Are Numerous Cancer-Fighting Substances in Kale

    Cancer is a terrible disease characterized by the uncontrolled growth of cells.

    Kale is actually loaded with compounds that are believed to have protective effects against cancer.

    One of these is sulforaphane, a substance that has been shown to help fight the formation of cancer at the molecular level.

    It also contains a indole-3-carbinol, another substance that is believed to help prevent cancer.

    Studies have shown that cruciferous vegetables (including kale) may significantly lower the risk of several cancers, although the evidence in humans is mixed

    SUMMARY
    Kale contains substances that have been shown to help fight cancer in test-tube and animal studies, but the human evidence is mixed.

    7. Kale Is Very High in Beta-Carotene


    Kale is often claimed to be high in vitamin A, but this is not entirely accurate.

    It is actually high in beta-carotene, an antioxidant that the body can turn into vitamin A .

    For this reason, kale can be an effective way to increase your body's levels of this very important vitamin.

    SUMMARY
    Kale is very high in beta-carotene, an antioxidant that the body can turn into vitamin A.

    8. Kale Is a Good Source of Minerals That Most People Don't Get Enough Of


    Kale is high in minerals, some of which many people are deficient in.

    It is a good plant-based source of calcium, a nutrient that is very important for bone health and plays a role in all sorts of cellular functions.

    It is also a decent source of magnesium, an incredibly important mineral that most people don't get enough of. Eating plenty of magnesium may be protective against type 2 diabetes and heart disease .

    Kale also contains quite a bit of potassium, a mineral that helps maintain electrical gradients in the body's cells. Adequate potassium intake has been linked to reduced blood pressure and a lower risk of heart disease .

    One advantage that kale has over leafy greens like spinach is that it is low in oxalate, a substance found in some plants that can prevent minerals from being absorbed.

    SUMMARY
    Many important minerals are found in kale, some of which are generally lacking in the modern diet. These include calcium, potassium and magnesium.

    9. Kale Is High in Lutein and Zeaxanthin, Powerful Nutrients That Protect the Eyes


    One of the most common consequences of aging is that eyesight gets worse.

    Fortunately, there are several nutrients in the diet that can help prevent this from happening.

    Two of the main ones are lutein and zeaxanthin, carotenoid antioxidants that are found in large amounts in kale and some other foods.

    Many studies have shown that people who eat enough lutein and zeaxanthin have a much lower risk of macular degeneration and cataracts, two very common eye disorders.

    SUMMARY
    Kale is high in lutein and zeaxanthin, nutrients that have been linked to a drastically reduced risk of macular degeneration and cataracts.

    10. Kale Should Be Able to Help You Lose Weight


    Kale has several properties that make it a weight loss friendly food.

    It is very low in calories but still provides significant bulk that should help you feel full.

    Because of the low calorie and high water content, kale has a low energy density. Eating plenty of foods with a low energy density has been shown to aid weight loss in numerous studies.

    Kale also contains small amounts of protein and fiber. These are two of the most important nutrients when it comes to losing weight.

    Although there is no study directly testing the effects of kale on weight loss, it makes sense that it could be a useful addition to a weight loss diet.

    SUMMARY
    As a nutrient-dense, low-calorie food, kale makes an excellent addition to a weight loss diet.

    The Bottom Line


    Fortunately, adding kale to your diet is relatively simple. You can simply add it to your salads or use it in recipes.

    A popular snack is kale chips, where you drizzle some extra virgin olive oil or avocado oil on your kale, add some salt and then bake in it an oven until dry.

    It tastes absolutely delicious and makes a great crunchy, super healthy snack.

    A lot of people also add kale to their smoothies in order to boost the nutritional value.

    At the end of the day, kale is definitely one of the healthiest and most nutritious foods on the planet.

    If you want to dramatically boost the amount of nutrients you take in, consider loading up on kale.

    sauce https://www.healthline.com/nutrition...21vw#section11
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    Eat your veggies

  13. #2213
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-87836827_134345678070616_4230410943948914688_n.jpg
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    Eat your veggies

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    Holy stickerblast meat is murdercycle!

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-87957530_2656639827764495_8445866897672503296_n.jpg
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    Eat your veggies

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    Veganism Isn’t Good - It’s just not bad

    When I first went vegan, I was naive enough to imagine that I was performing an act of heroism whenever I ate a veggie burger. By eating a patty made of beans instead of flesh, I believed I was rescuing animals, stopping climate change, and tackling a vast array of humanitarian issues. I, like many vegans, saw going vegan as a good deed.

    Surprisingly, non-vegans often participate in this same fantasy. When a vegan outs themselves — as we are wont to do — nearby omnivores will often praise them for their willpower, or brag to them that they only eat meat a few times a week. Reducitarians feel virtuous for their participation in Meatless Monday, and even normal omnivores feel a bit of pride when they choose the vegan option. In picking the vegan item off the menu, an educated omnivore is likely to feel the same faint glow that might come with giving money to a homeless person or volunteering at a soup kitchen.

    This self-flattery is, unfortunately, unjustified. In truth, veganism is not a good thing to do — it is merely not a bad thing to do. Though it’s tempting to conflate “good” and “not bad,” the differences between these concepts have profound consequences for our behavior and our attitudes.

    Vegans are correct that consuming animal products is bad — most of us, if only in some rarely visited corner of our brain, know this. We know that animal agriculture is the number one cause of habitat loss, and a leading cause of climate change. We know that animal agriculture causes a range of humanitarian issues, from indigenous land theft to zoonotic diseases (including the recent coronavirus outbreak). We know that livestock animals are confined, forcibly impregnated, branded, mutilated, castrated, and slaughtered, all without any anesthesia. When we needlessly purchase animal products, we know we’re paying people to treat animals worse than we would treat our most despised enemies. We know none of the animals we eat wanted to die.

    It does not follow, however, that being vegan is therefore good. Vegans don’t help the environment, we just hurt it less than non-vegans — though we profoundly reduce our impact on climate change, we are still a net-negative on the earth. Vegans do not cure zoonotic diseases, we only make it significantly less likely that there will be one. Veganism doesn’t actively help animals, it merely creates less incentives to hurt them. “Vegan” is just a noun for someone who does not actively support unnecessary animal cruelty. Vegans do not rescue animals any more than non-murderers rescue humans, and we haven’t helped the environment any more than those who choose not to dump gasoline in the oceans.

    If these distinctions sound semantic or unnecessary, you need only look at the results of not making them. Our current mentality towards veganism would be patently absurd in a comparable context: Imagine if we felt the same way about stealing. Imagine if we lived in a society that praised people for their willpower for abstaining from theft, wherein flexitarian thieves only stole if they forgot their wallet, and reducitarian robbers virtue-signaled about their participation in Theftless Thursday. What if people who retired from thievery viewed themselves as generous, and imagined themselves to be giving a great gift to all the people they didn’t mug? Why shouldn’t we treat theft this way?

    If the analogy to human-on-human crime is too invidious for you, we can instead compare going vegan to another animal cruelty scenario: Imagine if I retired from dog-fighting, and upon announcing it, others praised me for my charity. What if active dog-fighters boasted to me that they were cutting down on their dog-fighting, too? How about if society praised those who tried to create humane, free-range dog-fighting operations? If this stretches your imagination, look around — we live in a world that is just as strange.

    If you aren’t vegan, you are needlessly supporting animal abuse that makes dog-fighting look like fetch — if you are vegan, you’ve just retired from the same practice. It’s vitally important that we start to see the act of going vegan less like donating to charity, and more like quitting dog-fighting.

    This shift in our mentality would change our relationship to veganism in a few useful ways. First, it would make veganism a moral mandate, rather than a virtue. We’ve created a climate where it is too easy to be easy on ourselves. We shouldn’t feel pride when we choose the vegan option; we should feel guilt when we don’t. Counter-intuitively, in downplaying the moral valence of veganism, we make boycotting animal products more important, as it becomes the neutral position.

    Second, this view would make activism seem essential for existing vegans. Too often, I hear vegans say they don’t want to get active because they feel they are “doing enough already” merely by being vegan. This is as illogical as me refusing to give money to a homeless man because I’m “doing enough already” by not robbing him. We need to acknowledge that by going vegan, we are technically doing nothing. If we want our impact to be net-positive, we have to do things like volunteer with farm sanctuaries, engage in compassionate conversations, share vegan content with our non-vegan friends, rescue animals, and take part in vegan outreach.

    Third, this mentality shift would promote humility among vegans. If you view your veganism as a heroic act of sacrifice, you’ll be liable to confuse yourself with Gandhi while pouring almond milk in your coffee. In truth, being proud of your veganism is like being proud that you didn’t kick a dog today. This humility is desirable not just to keep you grounded, but to make yourself a better advocate for veganism.

    Finally, this frame shift would keep us tied to the facts of the situation. If you believe there is value in having an accurate worldview, then you will want vegans not to conceive of themselves as good actors, but as neutral ones. I recognize that the language of double-negatives is a clumsy one, and we will inevitably describe veganism as “good” in ordinary contexts. But when calibrating our emotions surrounding our own lifestyle choices, we must do so against an accurate standard.

    Some of you will see this as a depressing message. After all, the do-gooder in the mirror makes for a pleasant reflection, and a stricter view of one’s own moral behavior isn’t exactly liberating. For those of you looking for the bright side in this essay, remember the efficacy of your inaction: In choosing to go vegan, you showed mercy on up to 16,000 animals, who, thanks only to you, will not be born into a life of misery. You reduced your contribution to environmental degradation and mitigated your impact on a whole host of humanitarian issues. If everyone adopted a vegan lifestyle, it would dismantle animal agriculture just as surely as a legal ban. There’s an elegance here: By doing nothing, we can accomplish something magnificent. By failing to be bad, we can change the world for good.

    https://medium.com/tenderlymag/vegan...--------------

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    ^ good article
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    Another reason to ditch dairy

    One cup of milk per day associated with up to 50 per cent increase in breast cancer risk: study

    New evidence suggests that women who drink as little as one cup of dairy milk per day could increase their risk of developing breast cancer by up to 50 per cent.

    Researchers say the observational study gives fairly strong evidence that dairy milk or factors closely related to the consumption of dairy milk is linked to the development of breast cancer in women.

    "Consuming as little as one-quarter to one-third of a cup of dairy milk per day was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer of 30 per cent," study author Dr. Gary Fraser said in a press release.

    "By drinking up to one cup per day, the associated risk went up to 50 per cent, and for those drinking two to three cups per day, the risk increased further to 70 per cent to 80 per cent."

    More alarmingly, Fraser points out that these figures correspond with the current U.S. dietary guidelines, which recommend three cups of milk per day for adults.

    "Evidence from this study suggests that people should view that recommendation with caution," Fraser said.

    Researchers followed the dairy consumption of nearly 53,000 women across North America for eight years as part of the study which compared dairy and soy product consumption. Participants’ family history of breast cancer, physical activity, alcohol consumption, medication use, and reproductive and gynecological history were also taken into consideration.

    By the end of the study, 1,057 new breast cancer cases had been diagnosed.

    Although no clear associations were found between soy products and breast cancer, those who had higher intakes of dairy milk were at greater risk of developing breast cancer when compared to those who drank little to no milk.

    "The data predicted a marked reduction in risk associated with substituting soymilk for dairy milk. This raises the possibility that dairy-alternate milks may be an optimal choice,” said Fraser.

    Researchers noted that the consumption of full fat versus reduced or nonfat milks had little impact on the results.

    The study notes that the association between breast cancer and dairy milk could be related to the sex hormone content of the milk, noting that often 75 per cent of the dairy herd is pregnant.

    Researchers also note that intake of dairy and other animal proteins has previously been associated with higher blood levels of the growth factor-1 (IGF-1) hormone, which is thought to promote certain cancers.

    Fraser said that although dairy milk does have “some positive nutritional qualities," additional research is required to understand the link between dairy consumption and certain cancers.

    In January, Canada's Food Guide was updated for the first time in more than a decade and noticeably de-emphasized dairy consumption, suggesting instead that water should be Canadians’ "beverage of choice."

    Lower-fat milk and plant-based beverages are listed as other options, though less preferred.

    sauce https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/one-cu...tudy-1.4826979
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    Well it's a start

    CHINA PERMANENTLY BANS CONSUMPTION OF WILD ANIMALS

    This week, Chinese legislative body The National People’s Congress Standing Committee approved a permanent nationwide ban on the consumption and illegal trade of wild animals—an industry that is estimated to be worth $74 billion. According to CNN, the Chinese state media said the ban aims to “safeguard public health and ecological security,” with the mission to “completely ban the eating of wild animals” and “[to] crack down on illegal trade of wildlife.”

    The ban comes after China temporarily suspended the sale and consumption of wild animals on January 26 in an effort to stop the spread of the most recent strain of coronavirus, which is thought to have originated in Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market in the city of Wuhan and transmitted to humans by either civets, pigs, or pangolins—who were already protected under China’s Wildlife Protection Law that prohibits the consumption of endangered species. “There has been a growing concern among people over the consumption of wild animals and the hidden dangers it brings to public health security since the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak,” China’s Legislative Affairs Commission spokesman Zhang Tiewei told Reuters. The exact species protected under the new permanent ban are not yet clear but it does not include aquatic animals, poultry, and “livestock”—even though pigs have not been ruled out as the species responsible for transmitting the latest coronavirus to humans. Under the ban, wild animals used for scientific and medical research will now have to go through a stricter government approval process. To date, more than 80,400 people worldwide have been sickened by the coronavirus and more than 2,700 people have died as a result.

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2020/2/china-per...hsbrB1xU7c6tWk
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    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-vegan-plant-based-news-meme11-1-696x626.jpeg  


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    4 Ways to Sneak More Greens into Your Diet

    1. Add greens to your favorite foods.
    Leafy greens and other non-starchy green veggies such as broccoli, brussels sprouts, and cabbage can easily be added to almost any meal without sacrificing flavor. Try adding kale, collards, broccoli, and spinach to your favorite noodle- and grain-based dishes. The greens add nutrition, texture, flavor, and a beautiful burst of color to otherwise monotone meals. Greens can also be added to smoothies, burritos, tacos, and casseroles.

    2. Snack on green veggies all day long.
    Believe it or not, greens make delicious and satisfying snack foods. Kale chips (homemade or store bought), roasted broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and raw collard leaves dipped in hummus can be incredibly satisfying. Crowd out your current snack foods with green veggies, and you’ll notice you have more energy throughout the day.

    3. Stock up on frozen greens.
    Frozen vegetables are flash frozen at their peak freshness and retain a great deal of their nutrition, often more than fresh veggies that are shipped long distances. Frozen veggies are also a lot easier to prepare than fresh because you don’t have to go through the trouble of cleaning and chopping them. And, you can keep them on hand at all times without worrying about them going limp before getting put to good use. Sure, the texture of frozen veggies doesn’t quite compare to fresh, but they’re the next best thing.


    4. Drink your greens.
    Juicing green vegetables removes the fiber and leaves you with vitamins and enzymes that are easily absorbed into your bloodstream. Purchase a good juicer to make your own juice concoctions, or pick up a green juice at your local juice bar. Make sure the juice is raw, as pasteurization kills beneficial nutrients. Smoothies are different from juice because they are blended and retain all of their fiber. They’re more filling than juices, and a particularly great choice for breakfast.


    https://www.vegetariantimes.com/reci...NTOTHQo26j10CI
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    Coke and Pepsi Are Getting Sued for Lying About Recycling



    Coke, Pepsi and several other big plastic polluters are getting sued for lying about their products’ recyclability and clogging up the oceans with millions of tons of waste.

    A California-based environmental group, the Earth Island Institute, filed the lawsuit in San Mateo County on Thursday against the companies, arguing that they’ve knowingly polluted the oceans while misleading the public. The lawsuit notes that 8 million to 20 million tons of plastic end up in the world’s oceans every year — and that much of it can be traced back to these few companies.

    “At this rate, plastic is set to outweigh fish in the ocean by 2050,” the complaint reads.

    The lawsuit calls on these companies to pay to clean up the mess they’ve allegedly made — and to stop labeling their plastic bottles as recyclable. Convincing the public that the solution to plastics pollution is recycling is fundamentally misleading, the complaint argues, because so little plastic actually gets recycled.

    Recent studies suggest of the plastic produced since the 1950s, 91% of it hasn’t been recycled. Instead, the scrap winds up in landfills, burned in incinerators, or in the oceans.

    But in 2018, China, which used to buy up most of the U.S.’ plastic scrap, passed a ban on most types of plastic imports. Smaller countries have tried to pick up the pace on plastics recycling but haven’t been able to sustain it. It’s likely that less than 5% of plastic produced today is getting recycled, according to an estimate from the Plastic Pollution Coalition. The group projects that the rate will drop further if other countries follow China’s lead and ban plastic scrap imports.

    “This is the first lawsuit directly to take on these plastic peddlers who for years have spread the fake narrative that their products can be recycled when they know in many cases this is simply not true,” Josh Floum, president of Earth Island’s board of directors, said in a statement.

    Earth Island is taking a page from the lawsuits brought against tobacco companies, claiming that these plastic-producing companies are doing something similar to what cigarette manufacturers did: contributing knowingly to a public harm and lying to the public about it.

    “These companies push a product and then create misinformation campaigns so the public isn’t fully aware of the harms of the products when making purchasing decisions,” Sumona Majumdar, general counsel for Earth Island, said in a statement.

    The lawsuit is aimed at the 10 companies whose packaging was found most often in beach cleanups organized by another environmental group, Break Free from Plastic. Nestlé, Clorox, Crystal Geyser, Mars, and Colgate-Palmolive are among the other companies getting sued.

    Some of the companies sued have said they’re already fighting plastics pollution.

    “America’s beverage companies are already taking action to address the issue by reducing our use of new plastic, investing to increase the collection of our bottles so they can be remade into new bottles as intended, and collaborating with legislators and third-party experts to achieve meaningful policy resolutions,” a spokesperson for the American Beverage Association, which represents Coke, Pepsi, and others in the non-alcoholic beverage industry, said in a statement sent to the Guardian and Bloomberg Environment.

    sauce https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/q...twiR_ljzwrUth8
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  23. #2223
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    New Study Links Low Fruit And Veg Intake To Anxiety Disorders

    Adults who consume low levels of fruit and vegetables have a higher likelihood of being diagnosed with an anxiety disorder, according to new research from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging.

    Researchers also discovered that higher body fat could play a role in increasing the risk. Other factors associated with anxiety disorders among mid-age and older Canadians include gender, marital status, income, immigrant status, and several health issues.

    Anxiety
    The study team behind the research, which was published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, analyzed data from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging which included 26,991 men and women between the ages of 45 and 85.

    Study lead Karen Davison, health science faculty member, nutrition informatics lab director at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, (KPU) and North American Primary Care Research Group Fellow, said in a press release that an estimated 10 percent of the global population will suffer from anxiety disorders which are a leading cause of disability.

    She added: "Our findings suggest that comprehensive approaches that target health behaviors, including diet, as well as social factors, such as economic status, may help to minimize the burden of anxiety disorders among middle-aged and older adults, including immigrants."

    Fruit and vegetables
    Speaking about the link between fruit and vegetable intake and anxiety, Davidson said: "For those who consumed less than three sources of fruits and vegetables daily, there was at least at 24 percent higher odds of anxiety disorder diagnosis.

    "Increased body fat may be linked to greater inflammation. Emerging research suggests that some anxiety disorders can be linked to inflammation."

    Co-author Jose Mora-Almanza, a Mitacs Globalink Intern who worked with the study at KPU, added: "This may also partly explain the findings associated with body composition measures. As levels of total body fat increased beyond 36 percent, the likelihood of anxiety disorder was increased by more than 70 percent."

    Gender
    Gender was also found to be a factor: one in nine women had an anxiety disorder compared to one in 15 men.

    Co-author Karen Kobayashi, Professor in the Department of Sociology and a Research Affiliate at the Institute on Aging & Lifelong Health at the University of Victoria, said: "Our findings are in keeping with previous research which has also indicated that women are more vulnerable to anxiety disorders than men."

    Income
    When it comes to income, researchers discovered that approximately one in five respondents with household incomes under $20,000 per year had anxiety disorders, more than double the prevalence of their richer peers.

    "We were not surprised to find that those in poverty had such a high prevalence of anxiety disorders; struggling to afford basics such as food and housing causes relentless stress and is inherently anxiety-inducing," said co-author Hongmei Tong, Assistant Professor of Social Work at MacEwan University in Edmonton.

    Chronic health conditions
    Another factor which increases the risk of anxiety disorders, according to the researchers, is if an individual has chronic conditions, with those who suffer from chronic pain having double the prevalence of anxiety disorders in comparison to those who were free of pain.

    Co-author Shen (Lamson) Lin, a doctoral student at University of Toronto's Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work (FIFSW), said: "Chronic pain and multiple health conditions make life very unpredictable and can be anxiety-producing. One never knows whether health problems will interfere with work or family responsibilities and many activities become more challenging and time consuming."

    Study limitations
    The study team notes than a limitation of the study is that 'the assessment of anxiety disorders was based upon self-reporting of a medical diagnosis'.

    "The authors also conducted multivariate analyses taking into account the use of a family physician in the past year to address the possibility of under-reporting of anxiety disorders among those who rarely visited health professionals. This adjustment was not found to substantially change the associations discussed above," says the release.


    sauce https://www.plantbasednews.org/lifes...nZU5BwkTSzXvvo
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  24. #2224
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    Substitute water with vodka for a nice wobble

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  25. #2225
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    This pic was back when sars happened


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  26. #2226
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    Five Reasons Why Sport Is Going Vegan

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-89356496_2633412520236516_4528983090248286208_o.jpg

    Veganism is on the rise worldwide and pop culture, retail— and sports— have taken notice.

    Scientific evidence shows that diets high in unrefined plant foods are associated with beneficial health outcomes, including general health, immune function, cardiovascular health and lifespan. It would appear logical that plant based diets have the ability to enhance performance in a variety of areas, including sports.

    Many critics have dismissed this shift in sports culture to a fad with no concrete scientific evidence to back it. And whether the merits can be substantiated or not, one thing is for sure— plant based is a growing trend in the sports world with an increasing number of athletes advocating for its game changing qualities.

    Here are five reasons why sports are going vegan.

    Many plant-based products have more protein than meat

    Traditionally athletes believed that the only way to meet their daily protein requirement was via meat consumption, but with increased awareness around nutrition, this has changed.

    Many plant-based foods are actually richer in protein than meat. One ounce of meat protein contains 7 grams of protein, which is comparable to many plant based sources

    A 2019 German study, reported in the journal Nutrients found that athletes following a plant based diet with B-12 supplementation actually had marginally higher nutrient adequacy than athletes who were meat eaters.

    With 15g of protein per serving, black beans for example, have more protein than a chicken drumstick and one cup of lentils has 18g of protein— more than a hamburger. The need for other nutrients, such as calcium, iron, and vitamin B-12, can be met via plant based sources such as edemame which provides 27.6 per cent of the daily requirement of calcium, one cup of fortified orange juice which meets one half of the daily calcium requirement, spinach which carries more than twice the amount of iron than meat and dark chocolate which carries more than six times the amount of iron as meat. As for B-12, fortified foods and supplements can be used to ensure good health.

    Sports drinks and performance enhancers are going plant based

    According to research from Lumina Intelligence, 21 per cent of online bestselling protein powders in the USA are plant-based (March 2019).

    A sharp increase in the availability of plant-based, performance enhancing products has made it easier and more enticing for athletes to embrace a plant-based lifestyle.

    The sector is booming and is intensely competitive. Lumina reveals that there is an “innovation race, as brands chase the elusive ‘perfect plant protein’ with pea protein currently taking the number one spot.

    Vegan sports nutrition is also coming in the form of pre-prepared meals and nutritional programs. In 2016 Tom Brady teamed up with Purple Carrot, a vegan meal delivery service to create a meatless, dairy-free TB12 performance meal plan.

    Plant based gives endurance athletes an edge when it comes to heart health

    In a 2019 review entitled, ‘Plant-Based Diets for Cardiovascular Safety and Performance in Endurance Sports,’ it was reported that the elevated cardiovascular risks faced by endurance athletes, such as atherosclerosis (plaque building up inside arteries) and myocardial damage (decreased blood flow to the heart) can be reduced by a plant based dairy free diet.

    Researchers at the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine have also suggested that a vegan diet can enhance athletic performance due to enhanced cardiovascular health, reduced blood pressure and cholesterol and weight loss.

    Plant based diets are more conducive to recovery

    Armenian-German “strongest man in the world” and former body builder, Patrik Baboumian credited his body building success to a vegan lifestyle. “My recovery time was so much faster so I could train more,” he said.

    Evidence from Harvard Medical School shows that plants’ antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties help to shorten recovery times, reduce delayed onset muscle soreness, lessen joint pain, and enable quicker healing from injuries. Plant based diets also improve blood viscosity, which helps to efficiently deliver oxygen around the body, promoting healing. All of these factors can also contribute to career longevity.

    Pro athletes are endorsing the plant-based link to performance

    The plant based shift in sports culture is evident in the Netflix documentary, “The Game Changers” produced by Arnold Schwarzenegger, that uses first hand testimonials from elite athletes to depict how a vegan diet improves athletic performance.

    Venus Williams opted to transition to a raw, vegan diet when she was diagnosed with an autoimmune disorder called Sjögren’s syndrome that caused her to suffer from joint and muscle pain. In an interview with Health magazine, Williams revealed that her new diet was life changing, allowing her to return to tennis. “I feel like I’m doing the right thing for me," she said.

    Pro athletes are increasingly adopting vegan or vegetarian diets, while advocating for their overall health benefits, improved performance and enhanced recovery. Footballer, Tom Brady eats a predominantly plant based diet, the Williams sisters are vegan, elite rock climber, Steph Davis is vegan… Lionel Messi, Novak Djokovic, Colin Kaepernick, Lewis Hamilton… The list goes on.

    According to Barny du Plessis, the world’s first vegan bodybuilder and Mr Universe 2014, “These days I train half as much, do half as much but get better results. Why? Only one answer, going vegan, GMO free, and organic. My body is running perfectly."

    sauce https://www.forbes.com/sites/daphnee...Y#513ed5d77664

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  27. #2227
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    T.P. shortage? Vegans save the day again

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  28. #2228
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    We stopped at the local grocery store after the gym to pick up a few things. Stuff was picked over including the obvious like t.p., water, pasta and canned goods... but we did find a loaf of bread the size of a toddler


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-89853785_2637801073130994_8557216248398610432_o.jpg



    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-89722054_2637801409797627_9221286074318323712_o.jpg

    Everyone panicked except the vegans


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-89760004_2638090156435419_9102654834175115264_o.jpg

    There was plenty vegan stuff left !
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  29. #2229
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  31. #2231
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
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    Not vegan but close. Must be big potatoes.


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    Here's a really good article from the National Review. It's encouraging to see this kind of argument from the conservative side - animal welfare concerns are too often associated with the left but this shouldn't be a partisan issue.


    Senator Booker Is Right about Factory Farming
    By Spencer Case

    Contrary to common belief, Senator Cory Booker’s best idea wasn’t dropping out of the 2020 presidential race. That was his second-best idea. His best idea was introducing the Farm System Reform Bill of 2019 to the U.S. Senate.

    This legislation would curtail concentrated animal-feeding operations (CAFOs), so-called factory farms, in the U.S. Let’s hope it becomes law. Factory farms are an abomination, cruel to animals and a bad deal for humans, too. The sooner we abolish them, the better. Until then, we should take steps to reduce them.

    Let’s first consider the costs to humans. Factory farms are hazardous work environments, and they produce enormous amounts of untreated animal waste that we have to deal with. But of the many anthropocentric considerations against factory farms, the most compelling is that they elevate the risk of pandemic diseases.

    Many pandemics are the result of zoonotic pathogens, diseases transmitted from animals to humans. The COVID-19 coronavirus, which has lately been dominating headlines and rattling markets, is believed to be zoonotic. The H1N1 “swine flu” virus likely originated in American factory farms. H1N1 is believed to have killed more than 12,000 Americans from 2009 to 2010 and hospitalized over 274,000 in the same period.

    We’ll see what kind of damage COVID-19 inflicts, but both COVID-19 and H1N1 are tame compared with what we might see. The Spanish flu pandemic of 1918–20 killed between 50 and 100 million people at a time when the global population was less than 2 billion. It’s believed to have originated on a pig farm before the creation of factory farms.

    Modern factory farms are even better breeding grounds for diseases. Animals are packed tightly together, and the stressful conditions weaken their immune systems. It’s common for farmers to feed them antibiotics at low levels to prevent outbreaks and spur growth. Over time this erodes the effectiveness of those antibiotics, including those useful for treating infections in humans, as pathogens adapt. This is what is meant by “antibiotic resistance.”

    Since each use of an antibiotic potentially increases resistance, health experts advise doctors to prescribe antibiotics sparingly. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which is clearly very worried about this issue, offers guidelines for “antibiotic stewardship” in hospitals, nursing homes, and other institutions. According to the CDC, “each year in the U.S., at least 2.8 million people are infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria or fungi, and more than 35,000 people die as a result.”

    A 2011 U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) report revealed that 80 percent of antibiotics in the U.S. in 2009 were used for animals. Most were antibiotics that could be effective in treating humans. A 2017 GAO report noted that “there is strong evidence that some resistance in bacteria is caused by antibiotic use in food animals (cattle, poultry, and swine).” This is dubious “antibiotic stewardship” indeed.

    Granted, we could regulate the use of antibiotics in CAFOs more stringently, as Denmark has done, without abolishing factory farming. But Denmark hasn’t eliminated antibiotic use in CAFOs, so even supposedly progressive Danish CAFOs jeopardize our shields against germs. Other risk factors, such as confining many animals close together, are intrinsic to factory farming. So as long as factory farms exist, they will endanger human welfare.

    Let’s turn now to cruelty. Animal advocacy is often associated with causes such as feminism and anti-capitalism — misleadingly, in my view. Certainly left-wing activists concerned about animals could do more to win converts from across the political spectrum. If activists concerned about animals did more to win converts from across the political spectrum, they’d find that conservatives can get on board with the argument that factory farms are cruel. Conservatives in turn should be careful not to reject sound arguments just because they come from the mouths of liberals.

    It’s common sense, and not at odds with capitalism, to think that some profitable pursuits are immoral and shouldn’t be legal. Few conservatives, or Americans of any political stripe, would legalize dog fighting even if they knew that doing so would create jobs. When I hear defenses of factory farms based on their alleged economic importance, I can only think that the moral considerations haven’t really sunk in (and neither, in all likelihood, have all the economic considerations).

    If you think there should be laws against animal cruelty, then you agree that how we treat animals matters morally and should matter legally. This doesn’t mean that animals have the same moral worth as humans do, just that they’re categorically different from inanimate objects. Dogs, cats, elephants, dolphins, and gorillas all have moral significance of some kind, and so, I think, do chickens, pigs, cows, and other farm animals.

    It doesn’t really matter why you think animals are morally significant. Maybe you think that God gave humans stewardship over the earth, which includes a responsibility not to abuse His creation. Maybe you accept some secular philosophy, such as some form of consequentialism, that directs us to minimize all suffering, human or animal. Maybe you have no grand theory; it just strikes you as obviously wrong to torture a dog. That’s fine.

    Moral significance isn’t in the eye of the beholder. Pro-life conservatives recognize this when they insist that the moral status of a fetus can’t depend on whether the mother wants to keep her child. Likewise, whether an animal deserves moral consideration can’t depend on whether it looks cute to you, or to humans generally. Do you think that dogs have moral standing, but that chickens, pigs, and cows don’t? Then identify the difference in their capacities that justifies drawing that line.

    Cards on the table: I think there are no good grounds for denying that the sentient creatures in factory farms have moral standing. Our current practices can’t be justified. If you haven’t seen any of the videos documenting the cruelty of factory farms, I encourage you to do so. The possibility of having a moral insight is worth a few minutes of uncomfortable viewing. (“Meet Your Meat” and “Face Your Food,” both short and available on YouTube, are suitable.) In his Dialogues on Ethical Vegetarianism — which is excellent and available for free online — philosophy professor Michael Huemer summarizes some of these routine cruelties:

    Chickens and pigs are commonly confined in tiny cages where they can’t move for their entire lives. Cows are branded with hot irons, to produce third-degree burns on their skin. People cut off pigs’ tails without anesthetic. They cut off the ends of chickens’ beaks, again without anesthetic. These tails and beaks are sensitive tissue, so it probably feels something like having a finger chopped off.

    Globally, humans consume about 74 billion land animals per year, nearly all of which are raised and killed in factory farms after living miserable lives. That’s a staggering figure, about ten for every human being on the planet (though they are concentrated in rich countries — the average American consumes the equivalent of 31 animals per year). None of these animals would exist without factory farming, but they’d be better off not existing. We shouldn’t cause this much death and suffering unless we have some extremely compelling reason for doing so.

    The one obvious benefit that factory farms provide Americans is cheap meat, mostly for domestic consumption. According to one pro-beef-industry website, the U.S. exported about 3 billion pounds of beef in 2019 and was projected to produce over 27 billion pounds. The U.S. also produces about 20 billion pounds of pork and 50 billion pounds of chicken, exporting only a fraction of each. Nearly all of this meat comes from factory farms.

    So ending or curtailing factory farming in the U.S. would entail reducing domestic meat consumption (dairy too). If you love meat, then you might think that would be terrible. But it would probably be a dietary improvement if we substituted vegetables, beans, lentils, and other foods for some of these animal products. We don’t have any imperative to maintain current rates of meat and dairy consumption that competes with the imperatives to reduce animal cruelty and minimize the risk of pandemics.

    Booker’s bill puts a moratorium on the creation of new factory farms and the expansion of existing ones and makes “large” CAFOs, as specified by the Environmental Protection Agency, illegal by 2040. At that point, legally operating CAFOs would need to have, e.g., fewer than 1,000 cattle or cattle–calf pairs, 2,500 swine (weighing over 55 pounds), 82,000 laying hens, and 125,000 chickens other than laying hens.

    It also sets aside $100 billion over ten years to help owners of factory farms repay debts, and for transition to “alternative agriculture activities, such as raising pasture-based livestock, growing specialty crops, or organic commodity production.”
    Comments

    I don’t rejoice in those expenses, or in the fact that smaller, but still large, CAFOs would still be allowed to operate. Passage of this bill would nevertheless move us away from the dreadful status quo and, hopefully, toward the eventual abolition of factory farming. It would reduce the risk of deadly diseases, including pandemics that could kill millions or more. By reducing animal cruelty on an unprecedented scale, it would also represent a moral advance that future generations could be proud of.

    I think that if you reflect on this issue with an open mind, you’ll agree that ending factory farms is a good idea — even if Cory Booker thinks that it is.

    https://www.nationalreview.com/magaz...ctory-farming/

  33. #2233
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    ^ Good article Squeaky!
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    The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Publishes Stance on Vegan and Vegetarian Diets


    Vegetarian and vegan diets are healthful, may prevent and treat chronic diseases, and are better for the environment, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the world’s largest organization of nutrition professionals. Researchers updated the 2009 position paper on vegetarian diets and concluded that not only are vegetarian and vegan diets appropriate for all stages of the life cycle (pregnancy, infancy, childhood, etc.), but they also help reduce the risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, stroke, obesity, and some types of cancer. The updated position paper presents a section on environmental issues which concludes plant-based diets are more sustainable and less damaging to the environment.

    References
    Melina V, Craig W, Levin S. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: vegetarian diets. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2016;116:1970-1980.

    https://www.pcrm.org/news/health-nut...hyo1Ds-gS86mgs
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  35. #2235
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    Need some inspiration to jump-start your foray into a new lifestyle? This easy WFPB meal plan has some tasty recipes. Each daily menu sets you up with breakfast, lunch, dinner, a snack and a “salad of the day.” Enjoy!

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-90442063_2644611202449981_353811679198314496_o.jpg

    3-Day Whole Food, Plant-Based Meal Plan

    An increasing number of people are transitioning to a whole food, plant-based (WFPB) lifestyle as a way to improve their health and reduce the risk of chronic disease, but making the switch means rethinking the way meals are planned and prepared. A plant-based diet meal plan includes a wide variety of:

    Vegetables and fruits
    Whole grains
    Beans and legumes
    Nuts and seeds
    What isn’t on the list? Meat (including poultry), fish, eggs, dairy products, oil and processed foods. Working toward eliminating these foods from your diet has a range of well-documented health benefits, some of which you can start seeing within just a few weeks!

    Vegan or Whole Food, Plant-Based?
    Although plant-based diets can be described as vegan because animal foods are absent, avoiding processed foods and oils takes the concept one step further. Known as a whole food, plant-based diet, this way of eating aims to include as many health-promoting foods as possible. For a more detailed breakdown of how and why to go the extra step and try a whole food, plant-based diet plan, see our comprehensive diet guide.

    Getting Started With Plant-Based Meals
    Need some inspiration to jump-start your foray into a new lifestyle? This easy WFPB meal plan has some tasty recipes to whet your appetite. Each daily menu sets you up with breakfast, lunch, dinner, a snack and a “salad of the day.” There are tons of familiar flavors and some new surprises, so get ready to dive right in!

    Day 1
    Your first plant-based menu combines classic favorites with fresh, unique ideas. You’ll start off the day with a delicious twist on toast featuring sweet potatoes and blueberries, then move on to a creamy tomato soup that’s sure to invoke memories of childhood. And who can resist hearty lentil burgers for dinner? Make a big batch to store in the freezer for even easier meal planning.

    Day 2
    Bet you didn’t expect to be eating carrot cake and “tuna” salad on your second day of going plant-based! With a few adjustments, these delicious classics fit right into a whole food vegan meal plan. Today’s menu is made for a busy schedule, including “grab-and-go” salads in a jar to simplify your lunch plans. In the evening, you’ll enjoy a big bowl of “sushi” — just like the takeout you used to order, but much better for your body (and your wallet)!

    Day 3
    Comfort food, anyone? Day 3 kicks off with a warm, smoky mix of tofu and vegetables and cruises right on into lunch with a bountiful bowl that will put you in mind of your favorite burrito joint. When dinner rolls around, surprise your family by tossing millet-based “meatballs” with whole-grain noodles and a quick homemade sauce.


    check the link for more

    sauce https://nutritionstudies.org/3-day-w...VAQHfmeSExvZK0
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    Throwback Thursday: This may be the reason for cognitive decline in some people. Stay healthy


    A Daily Diet Soda Habit May Be Linked to Dementia

    People who drink soda and sugary juices on a regular basis have smaller brains and accelerated signs of brain aging, according to a recent study. But artificially sweetened beverages may not be any better for your mind: In a second study, people who drank diet soda every day were there times as likely to have a stroke or develop dementia than those who didn’t.

    In other words, there’s not much of an upside to drinking sugary sodas—and swapping them for artificial sweeteners doesn’t seem to help. The new research can’t prove a cause-and-effect relationship between drinking habits and health effects, but it does strongly suggest a connection, says Matthew Pase, PhD, a neurology fellow at Boston University School of Medicine and contributing author on both new papers.


    The first study, published last month in Alzheimer’s & Dementia, analyzed food questionnaires, MRI scans, and cognitive exams of about 4,000 people ages 30 and up.In this group, researchers found that people who consumed more than three sodas per week—or more than two sugary drinks of any type (soda, fruit juice, and other soft drinks) per day—were more likely to have memory problems, a smaller brain volume, and a smaller hippocampus (an area of the brain used in learning and memory). Drinking at least one diet soda a day was associated with smaller brain volume, as well.

    In the second study, published yesterday in the journal Stroke, the researchers followed two different groups of adults for 10 years. Out of nearly 3,000 adults over age 45, 97 suffered a stroke during that time. And out of nearly 1,500 adults over 60, 81 developed Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia.


    The researchers found no correlation between sugary beverage intake and either health condition. “This was a little surprising, because previous studies have found associations between high intake of sugary beverages and higher risk of stroke,” says Pase. Sugar has long been associated with obesity, heart disease, and diabetes, he adds, but fewer studies have been done on its long-term effects on the brain.


    They did find a link, however, between health outcomes and artificially sweetened beverages: People who’d reported drinking at least one diet soda per day were three times as likely to have had a stroke, and 2.9 times as likely to have developed dementia. (The studies did not differentiate between types of artificial sweeteners.)

    Previous studies have linked diet sodas to an increased risk of weight gain and stroke, and scientists have hypothesized that artificial sweeteners may affect the body in several different ways—from transforming gut bacteria to tricking the brain into craving more calories. This is the first time diet sodas have been linked to dementia—although it’s not that surprising, says Pase, since stroke is a risk factor.


    The analysis adjusted for factors such as age, smoking status, diet quality, and education. But it wasn’t able to control completely for conditions like diabetes, which may have developed over the course of the study.

    Because diabetics drink more diet soda than the general population, the authors say that the disease may partially explain the increase in dementia rates—but not completely. When diabetics were excluded from the calculations, the association still remained.

    According to the United States Department of Agriculture, Americans consumed nearly 11 million metric tons of sugar in 2016, much of it in the form of sweetened beverages. Pase says the studies focused specifically on beverages because it would be difficult to measure total sugar intake from all different food sources.


    If you have been a soda drinker, that doesn’t mean you should panic. “This is by no means a certain fate," says Pase. He points out that only 3% and 5% of people in the study had a stroke and developed dementia, respectively, so the overall numbers are still small.

    In an editorial accompanying the Stroke study, neurologists from the University of Miami and the University of Munster in Germany write that current research is inconclusive about whether diet beverages actually contribute to an increased risk of stroke, dementia, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome

    But a growing number of studies suggest that they may not be a safe alternative to sugary drinks, they add, and more research is highly encouraged. “Even small causal effects would have tremendous effects on public health,” they write, given the popularity of both regular and diet sodas. They conclude that both sugar- and artificially sweetened soft drinks “may be hard on the brain.”

    Pase agrees that, until more is known, it’s smart to limit both types of soft drinks. “We know that sodas have no real nutritional value, so it’s not that strange to say we should be cautious about consuming them in excess,” he says. “I think water is the best choice.”

    sauce https://www.health.com/condition/alz...ementia-stroke
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  37. #2237
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    Facts:

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    Eat your veggies

  38. #2238
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-91983324_2479603969021341_8040976001351548928_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

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    8 Easy Ways To Support Your Immune System

    Foods won't make you virus proof, but it's important to nourish your body with foods that support your immune system

    During these trying times, we want to do everything we can to shield ourselves from an illness.

    One of the most powerful things you can do is nourish your body with foods that support your immune system. It won’t make you virus-proof but the stronger your immunity is, the better your chance of either avoiding the infection or fighting it with only mild symptoms.

    Here are some of the most potent foods, supplements, and ideas to make a part of your daily diet. They are inexpensive, widely available foods and can be enjoyed by everyone.

    1. Gorgeous Garlic
    Love it or hate it, garlic has superpowers when it comes your immune system. Research shows it stimulates and activates your white blood cells – immune system soldiers –supercharging their powers. (Arreola, 2015).

    It also contains sulphur phytochemicals which offer a number of health benefits. They act as antioxidants, are anti-inflammatory and help to fight both infection and inflammation in the body.If you’re wondering whether garlic supplements are as powerful as fresh garlic, the answer might disappoint you.

    Processed garlic extracts don’t seem to have as powerful an effect as fresh garlic. Two cloves a day should be enough to give you a boost.

    2. Fruit and Vegetables
    Bursting with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and healthy carbs, fruit and vegetables are truly irreplaceable. They give your body what it needs to stay strong. Fresh, raw (and well-washed) fruit is best or you can blend it into a smoothie.

    Vegetables are the most powerful either raw or lightly cooked (steamed or stir-fried) so they retain their goodness. Frozen fruit and veg are also very nutritious and often cheaper than fresh.

    Aim for at least eight servings a day and include some green leafy vegetables, citrus fruit and berries – those have the most antioxidants. Avoid preserved fruit and pasteurised fruit juices – they have lost most of their nutritional value and won’t give your body what it needs.

    3. Ginger and turmeric

    Both from the same family, ginger and turmeric contain several potent biochemicals which are very strong antioxidants. They also have antimicrobial properties, helping to fight infection (Grzanna et al., 2005; Kunnumakkara et al., 2017).

    Ginger is best fresh – slice it and make ginger and lemon tea or grate it and add in just about any meal, even your morning cereal can be spiced up with it.

    Turmeric is widely available as a powder and is perfect for cooking or making ‘golden milk’ – a delicious drink made from plant milk, turmeric, natural sweetener and extra spices (you can add cinnamon or black pepper). They key is to use enough turmeric for it to have the desired effect – about one teaspoon.

    4. Vitamin D

    Often overlooked, vitamin D plays an important role in our immune system and can help protect us from infection. It’s the 'sunshine vitamin' that our skin makes when exposed to sunlight but in winter we simply don’t get enough.

    It’s recommended that we take a supplement from October to April. Make sure your supplement is suitable for vegans. When it comes to dosage, 10 micrograms (400 IU) per day is enough and you shouldn’t go above 25 micrograms (1,000 IU).

    5. Zinc it up

    Zinc is a mineral we all need but don’t always get enough. It is crucial for a healthy immune system so make sure these foods make an appearance on your daily menu – pumpkin seeds, lentils, tofu, tempeh, wholemeal pasta or wheat germ.

    6. Perfect package

    When discussing the immune system, we mustn’t forget protein. Vital to strong immunity, it’s important to include protein-rich meals in our routine. And it just so happens that the best protein sources – pulses, nuts and seeds – are also excellent for many other important vitamins and minerals.

    So meals like chickpea curry, lentil dhal, tomato and lentil soup, bean chilli, tofu stir-fry or falafel wrap are perfect options. Add to them a snack of nuts and seeds, or fruit slices with nut butter and you’re set.

    7. Foods to limit

    When you kickstart your immune system with all the foods above, it’s also a good idea not to undermine it with other foods you eat.

    Limit sugar, sweets, processed snacks high in fat, white flour products and sweetened cereal products. Those weaken your immune system because they are pro-inflammatory, making your body work harder just to process it all.

    8. Look after yourself

    What we eat is crucial to our well-being but so is our mental health. Stress can seriously weaken your immune system so make sure you are kind to yourself. By that, we don’t mean eating a gallon of vegan ice-cream, but perhaps calling a friend, watching a film or taking a relaxing bath – small things that can have a big impact.

    Last but not least, make sure you get enough sleep. When you're tired and your body

    cannot rest properly overnight, your immune system suffers. Aim for seven or eight hours each night and you can't go wrong.

    References

    Arreola R, Quintero-Fabián S, López-Roa RI, et al. 2015. Immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory effects of garlic compounds. Journal of Immunology Research. 2015:401630.

    Grzanna R, Lindmark L, Frondoza CG. 2005. Ginger - an herbal medicinal product with broad anti-inflammatory actions. Journal of Medicinal Food. 8 (2) 125–132.

    Kunnumakkara AB, Bordoloi D, Padmavathi G, et al. 2017. Curcumin, the golden nutraceutical: multitargeting for multiple chronic diseases. British Journal of Pharmacology. 174 (11) 1325–1348.

    https://www.plantbasednews.org/lifes...7NWrMSCy9hXb-g
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  40. #2240
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-91874757_208152560511907_8081170740553973760_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

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  41. #2241
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    Always beware of information you are seeing online! Check the source! Many meat-based companies release false information in an effort to keep their industry thriving. With more people switching to plant based diets, this is becoming more and more common!

    Claims Tofu 'Could' Be Worse For Environment Than Meat Branded 'Meaningless'

    This week’s vegan-bashing article award goes to the Independent who has published an astonishing piece claiming that tofu 'could' be worse for the environment than meat – according to farmers!

    Their arguments are getting increasingly ridiculous as the number of people ditching meat continues to rise.

    The story came from a talk given by Dr. Graham McAuliffe of the Rothamsted Institute, who spoke at the National Farmers Union this week explaining that his unpublished research on tofu suggests that it could have a more drastic impact on the planet than beef, pork, and chicken.

    His findings, he said, should be interpreted with caution given they were currently just a proof of concept. So, basically meaningless then.

    Plant foods have a lower impact
    "Without a doubt, peas and groundnuts always have a lower environmental impact than any livestock products," said McAuliffe, "But if you look at tofu, which is processed so there is more energy going into its production, when you correct for the fact that the protein in it is not as digestible compared to the meat-based products, you can see that it could actually have a higher global warming potential than any of the monogastric animals."

    Monogastric animals only have one stomach (the clue is in the name) like us, horses, rabbits, rats, dogs, and pigs. Cows are ruminants, they have complex, four-chambered stomachs. So why is beef included in the list of meats that tofu may be worse than? Olivia Petter, who wrote this article, should have looked up 'monogastric'.

    Whilst she was at it, she should have read Joseph Poore's study, which she quoted in her article, saying that cutting meat and dairy products from your diet could reduce an individual's carbon footprint (from food) by up to 73 percent. Poore's study, which attracted much praise from fellow scientists, shows how catastrophic the environmental impact of meat and dairy foods are compared to plant foods – including tofu – see Poore's graph here or the BBC's simple diagram here.

    Own goal!
    Calling tofu a 'processed food' and implying it takes a lot of energy to produce is a bit of a stretch – it's hardly as if to get a burger a cow just hops in between your buns!

    Tofu is a traditional food made by coagulating soya milk and pressing the curds into a block – a very similar process is used to make cheese in fact; so does the NFU say cheese is a processed food to be avoided for the sake of the environment? That's what you call an own goal.

    Tofu is a low-fat great source of protein and should not be considered an ultra-processed food. If you look at the ingredients of Cauldron Foods tofu for example – who've been making tofu in the UK for 40 years – it contains water, soya beans and calcium sulfate (a coagulant which improves the calcium content of tofu).

    This is not a highly processed food in the same league as bacon, sausages or hot dogs, and it is also not linked – as they all are – to environmental damage and cancer.

    Eat more tofu

    Targeting tofu as an environmental villain is ludicrous given that so much of the devastating deforestation in the Amazon is being done to grow soya for animal feed so that people can eat meat.

    Much of the soyfoods consumed in the UK are made with organic beans sourced from Europe and the US. If you care about the environment, you should ditch meat and eat more tofu!

    https://www.plantbasednews.org/opini...du53pgNfqieBTU
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  42. #2242
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    DOCTOR ANTHONY FAUCI CALLS FOR GLOBAL SHUTDOWN OF WET ANIMAL MARKETS

    Today, Anthony Fauci, MD—the leading COVID-19 pandemic expert in the United States—called for a global shutdown of wet animal markets. “I think we should shut down those things right away,” Fauci said on Fox & Friends. “It boggles my mind how when we have so many diseases that emanate out of that unusual human-animal interface, that we don’t just shut it down. I don’t know what else has to happen to get us to appreciate that…because what we’re going through right now, is a direct result of that.” COVID-19 is thought to have originated in a wet animal market—where wild animals, such as bats and pangolins, and traditional “livestock” are sold and slaughtered side-by-side—late last year in Wuhan, China. Fauci urged that the international community unite to force the closures of such markets worldwide.

    Fauci’s views are echoed by many others, including Republican senator Lindsey Graham and conservative journalist Tucker Carlson. However, limiting the shut down to wet animal markets alone may not be enough to stop the spread of future zoonotic diseases as many, such as swine flu (pigs) and H5N1 (poultry), have originated from slaughterhouses where “traditional” animals are killed for food.

    In March, national investment firm Karner Blue Capital (KBC) urged governments worldwide to take action across industries where animals are exploited, including in animal agriculture. “Shutting down or regulating China’s wet markets will wipe out a dangerous set of human-animal interactions, but it’s just one step toward sound public health policies and interactions,” KBC President Vicki Benjamin said. “We need to completely rethink our relationship with animals and begin taking steps to transition toward regenerative agriculture, biodiversity protection, and a plant-based economy.”

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2020/4/doctor-an...msJALZH0UTRQZU
    F*ck Cancer

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  43. #2243
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    Ironic given that meat sales probably created this catastrophe in the first place.

    Meat plants are shutting down as workers get sick

    New York (CNN Business)Across the country, major meat processors are starting to shut down plants as employees are getting infected by coronavirus.

    Tyson (TSN), one of the world's largest meat processors, suspended operations at its Columbus Junction, Iowa, pork plant this week after more than two dozen workers contracted Covid-19 there. Tyson said it would divert livestock that was headed to Columbus Junction to other pork plants in the region to minimize the impact on its production.

    JBS USA, another major meat processor, has stopped operations at its beef plant in Souderton, Pennsylvania with plans to reopen April 16, after two weeks. The company decided to close the facility after several members of the plant's management team stopped going to work because they were experiencing flu-like symptoms, a company representative explained, adding that all other JBS USA's plants are still open. Cargill has also paused operations at its protein plant in Hazleton, Pennsylvania, where 900 people typically work.

    "This will allow us to minimize the impact of COVID-19  and continue [to] follow health department guidelines," said Jon Nash, North America lead for Cargill Protein, in a statement to CNN Business.

    Consumers are unlikely to see any shortages because of production disturbances. But the closures are devastating for some meat producers, which have remained open during the pandemic. Food suppliers are essential businesses.

    The United States has a large enough meat inventory to prevent shortages for consumers, explained Christine McCracken, senior analyst of animal protein for Rabobank. Processors that were previously servicing restaurants or cafes have started to sell to retailers. And some restaurants are selling groceries, including meat, directly to customers.

    "Retail is full," said McCracken. "I don't anticipate any real shortages for the consumer."

    The closures mark "a very small fraction of the overall slaughter," in the United States, she added. "At this point there's really no reason to think that there'd be any major disruptions."

    But there is potential for the closures to accelerate, which could put a strain on the system and further harm producers.

    If workers sicken each other, plants could remain closed for longer or operate at reduced speeds. Already, fewer employees are working because they may have to stay home to care for children or sick relatives, among other reasons.

    "The smart money would say that it will be an issue at more plants, we just hope they don't all overlap at the same time," she said. "If it expands to more plants it becomes a serious issue."

    Producers would "suddenly have nowhere to go," she said. If local outbreaks mean closures of a number of regional plants, producers used to selling their products locally could run out of options. For those producers, "it is a crisis."
    National Cattlemen's Beef Association President Marty Smith outlined the situation faced by cattle ranchers in a letter to President Trump on Wednesday.

    "The onset of COVID-19 has resulted in the steep decline of both the cattle futures market and cash trade -— resulting in significant financial challenges for our members," he wrote, warning that "the market woes for cattle producers will only grow if packing plants shut down or slow down for an extended period."

    Sauce https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/08/busin...UgICZpkmmH1H40
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  44. #2244
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    China’s Wet Markets, America’s Factory Farming


    Although no government is better than China’s at making troublesome people disappear, a strange leniency has been accorded vendors at the country’s live-animal meat markets, who by most accounts gave us the pandemic and yet, reports the Daily Mail, have lately been allowed to set up shop again. China’s coronavirus lockdown is over, authorities have encouraged celebrations of “victory,” and citizens may once again go about their food shopping amid the cries and mayhem of animal slaughter. Ahh, back to normal life!

    In these parts, we’re told, you’re not really celebrating unless there’s bat, pangolin, cat, or dog meat on the table — the latter, notes the Daily Mail, “a traditional ‘warming’ winter dish.” Reporter George Knowles, writing late last month, provides one of the milder accounts of scenes that will quickly exhaust anyone’s supply of culturally sensitive euphemisms, describing one of the markets — also known as “wet markets,” where both live and dead animals are on offer — in China’s southwestern city of Guilin: “Terrified dogs and cats crammed into rusty cages. Bats and scorpions offered for sale as traditional medicine. Rabbits and ducks slaughtered and skinned side by side on a stone floor covered with blood, filth, and animal remains.”

    If you’re up for a few further details, we have travel writer Paula Froelich, in a recent New York Post column, recalling how in the Asian live-animal markets she has visited the doomed creatures “stare back at you.” When their turn comes, she writes,

    the animals that have not yet been dispatched by the butcher’s knife make desperate bids to escape by climbing on top of each other and flopping or jumping out of their containers (to no avail). At least in the wet areas [where marine creatures are sold], the animals don’t make a sound. The screams from mammals and fowl are unbearable and heartbreaking.

    The People’s Republic has supposedly banned the exotic-meat trade, and one major city, Shenzhen, has proscribed dog and cat meat as well. In reality, observes a second Daily Mail correspondent, anonymously reporting from the city of Dongguan, “the markets have gone back to operating in exactly the same way as they did before coronavirus.” Nothing has changed, except in one feature: “The only difference is that security guards try to stop anyone taking pictures, which would never have happened before.”

    Lest we hope too much for some post-pandemic stirring of conscience, consider the Chinese government’s idea of a palliative for those suffering from the coronavirus. As the crisis spread, apparently some fast-thinking experts in “traditional medicine” at China’s National Health Commission turned to an ancient remedy known as Tan Re Qing, adding it to their official list of recommended treatments. The potion consists chiefly of bile extracted from bears. The more fortunate of these bears are shot in the wild for use of their gallbladders. The others, across China and Southeast Asia, are captured and “farmed” by the thousands, in a process that involves their interminable, year-after-year confinement in fit-to-size cages, interrupted only by the agonies of having the bile drained. Do an image search on “bear bile farming” sometime when you’re ready to be reminded of what hellish animal torments only human stupidity, arrogance, and selfishness could devise.

    If one abomination could yield an antidote for the consequences of another, Tan Re Qing would surely be just the thing to treat a virus loosed in the pathogenic filth and blood-spilling of Wuhan’s live market. There’s actually a synthetic alternative to the bile acids, but Tradition can be everything in these matters, and devotees insist that the substance must come from a bear, even as real medical science rates the whole concoction at somewhere between needless and worthless. President Xi Jinping has promoted such traditional medicines as a “treasure of Chinese civilization.” In this case, the keys to the treasure open small, squalid cages in dark rooms, where the suffering of innocent creatures goes completely disregarded. And perhaps right there, in the willfulness and hardness of heart of all such practices, is the source of the trouble that started in China.

    Already, in the Western media, chronologies of the pandemic have taken to passing over details of the live-animal markets, which have caused viral outbreaks before and would all warrant proper judgment in any case. News coverage picks up the story with the Chinese government’s cover-up of early coronavirus cases and its silencing of the heroic Wuhan doctors and nurses who tried to warn us. To brush past the live markets in fear of seeming “xenophobic,” “racist,” or unduly judgmental of other people and other ways is, however, to lose sight of perhaps the most crucial fact of all. We don’t know the endpoint of this catastrophe, but we are pretty certain that its precise point of origin was what Dr. Anthony Fauci politely calls “that unusual human–animal interface” of the live markets, which he says should all be shut down immediately — presumably including the markets quietly tolerated in our own country. In other words, the plague began with savage cruelty to animals.

    Discussion of the live-animal markets is another of those points where moral common sense encounters the slavishly politically correct, though it’s not as if we’re dealing here with Asia’s most sensitive types anyway. No Western critic need worry about hurting the feelings or reputations of people who maximize the pain and stress of dogs in the belief that this freshens the flavor of the meat, and who then kill them at the market as the other dogs watch. Customers of such people aren’t likely to feel the sting of our disapproval either.

    About the many customers and suppliers in Asia, and especially in China, of exotic fare, endless ancient remedies, and carvings and trinkets made of ivory, the best that can be said is that these men and women are no more representative of their nations than are the riffraff running the meat markets. Their demands and appetites have caused a merciless pillaging of wildlife across the earth — everything that moves a “living resource,” no creature rare or stealthy enough to escape their gluttony or vanity. Of late even donkeys, such peaceable and unoffending creatures, have been rounded up by the millions in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and South America for shipment and slaughter, all to satisfy demand for yet another of China’s traditional-medicine manias.

    Easy to blame for all of this is the government of China. Authorities took forever, for example, to enforce prohibitions on ivory carving, despite an unquestioned competence in carrying out swift crackdowns. And in general, at every level, the government tends to tolerate a culture of cruelty, or else to actively promote it at the prodding of lucrative industries, both legal and illicit. But the problem runs deeper than that, even as many younger Chinese, to their enormous credit, have tried to organize against the ivory trade, the wet markets, and other depravities in their midst.

    In the treatment of animals and in safeguarding human health, there are elementary standards to which all must answer. The challenge to clear thinking, as Melissa Chen writes in Spectator USA

    is to avoid falling into the trap of cultural relativism. It’s perfectly appropriate to criticize China’s rampant consumption of exotic animals, lack of hygiene standards and otherwise risky behavior that puts people at risk for zoonotic infections. Until these entrenched behaviors based on cultural or magical beliefs are divorced from Chinese culture, wet wildlife markets will linger as time-bombs ready to set off the next pandemic.
    Acknowledging that Western societies have every moral reason to condemn the barbarism and recklessness of the live-animal markets only invites, however, a tougher question: Do we have the moral standing? And if any of us are guilty of blind cultural prejudice or of a smug sense of superiority toward Chinese practices, a moment’s serious thought will quickly set us straight.

    When the Daily Mail describes how Chinese guards at the live-animal market now “try to stop anyone from taking pictures,” who does that remind us of? How about our own livestock companies, whose entire mode of operation these days is systematic concealment by efforts to criminalize the taking of pictures in or around their factory farms and slaughterhouses? The foulest live-animal-market slayer in China, Vietnam, Laos, or elsewhere would be entitled to ask what our big corporations are afraid the public might see in photographic evidence, or what’s really the difference between his trade and theirs except walls, machinery, and public-relations departments

    If you watch online videos of the wet markets, likewise, it’s striking how the meat shoppers just go on browsing, haggling, chatting, and even laughing, some with their children along. Were it not for the horrors and whimpers in the background, the scene could be a pleasant morning at anyone’s local farmer’s market. As the camera follows them from counter to counter, you keep thinking What’s wrong with these people? — except that it’s not so easy, rationally, to find comparisons that work in our favor.

    No, we in the Western world don’t get involved while grim-faced primitives execute and skin animals for meat. We have companies with people of similar temperament to handle everything for us. And there’s none of that “staring back” that the Post’s Paula Froelich describes, because, in general, we keep the sadness and desperation of those creatures as deeply suppressed from conscious thought as possible. An etiquette of denial pushes the subject away, leaving it all for others to bear. Addressing a shareholders’ meeting of Tyson Foods in 2006, one worker from a slaughterhouse in Sioux City, Iowa, unburdened himself: “The worst thing, worse than the physical danger, is the emotional toll. Pigs down on the kill floor have come up and nuzzled me like a puppy. Two minutes later I had to kill them — beat them to death with a pipe. I can’t care.”

    Following the only consistent rule in both live-animal markets and industrial livestock agriculture — that the most basic animal needs are always to be subordinated to the most trivial human desires — this process yields the meats that people crave so much, old favorites like bacon, veal, steak, and lamb that customers must have, no matter how these are obtained. When the pleasures of food become an inordinate desire, forcing demands without need or limit and regardless of the moral consequences, there’s a word for that, and the fault is always easier to see in foreigners with more free-roaming tastes in flesh. But listen carefully to how these foods or other accustomed fare are spoken of in our culture, and the mindset of certain Asians — those ravenous, inflexible folks who will let nothing hinder their next serving of pangolin scales or winter dish of dog — no longer seems a world away.

    We in the West don’t eat pangolins, turtles, civets, peacocks, monkeys, horses, foxes, and wolf cubs — that’s all a plus. But for the animals we do eat, we have sprawling, toxic, industrial “mass-confinement” farms that look like concentration camps. National “herds” and “flocks” that all would expire in their misery but for a massive use of antibiotics, among other techniques, to maintain their existence amid squalor and disease — an infectious “time bomb” closer to home as bacterial and viral pathogens gain in resistance. And a whole array of other standard practices like the “intensive confinement” of pigs, in gestation cages that look borrowed from Asia’s bear-bile farms; the bulldozing of lame “downer cows”; and “maceration” of unwanted chicks, billions routinely tossed into grinders. All of which leave us very badly compromised as any model in the decent treatment of animals.

    Such influence as we have, in fact, is usually nothing to be proud of. It made for a perfect partnership when, for instance, one of the most disreputable of all our factory-farming companies, Smithfield Foods, was acquired in 2013 by a Chinese firm, in keeping with some state-run, five-year plan of the People’s Republic to refine agricultural techniques and drive up meat production. Now, thanks to American innovation, Smithfield-style, the Chinese can be just as rotten to farm animals as we are — and just as sickly from buying into the worst elements of the Western diet.

    In China and Southeast Asia, they have still not received our divine revelation in the West that human beings shall not eat or inflict extreme abuse on dogs but that all atrocities to pigs are as nothing. They’re moving in our culinary direction, however, and more than half the world’s factory-farmed pigs are now in China and neighboring countries. In the swine-fever contagion spreading across that region right now — addressed as usual by mass cullings: gassing tens of millions of pigs or burying them alive — our industrial animal-agriculture system is leaving its mark, while providing yet further evidence that factory farms are all pandemic risks themselves.

    How many diseases, cullings, burial pits, and bans on photographing these places even at their wretched best will we need before realizing that the entire system is profoundly in error, at times even wicked, and that nothing good can ever come of it? Perhaps the live-animal markets of China, with all the danger and ruin they have spread, will help us to see those awful scenes as what they are, just variants of unnatural, unnecessary, and unworthy practices that every society and culture would be better off without.

    Plagues, as we’re all discovering, have a way of prompting us to take stock of our lives and to remember what really matters. If, while we’re at, we begin to feel in this time of confinement and fear a little more regard for the lives of animals, a little more compassion, that would be at least one good sign for a post-pandemic world.

    sauce https://www.nationalreview.com/2020/...-common-sense/
    F*ck Cancer

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  45. #2245
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    Hundreds of U.S. Meat Workers Have Now Tested Positive for Virus

    There’s been a spike in coronavirus cases at meat plants in the U.S., with hundreds of reported infections in just the last week. That’s adding to questions over the fragility of the food-supply chain and raising concerns over worker safety.

    As many as 50 people at a JBS SA beef facility in Colorado’s Weld County tested positive, adding to more than 160 cases at a Cargill Inc. meat-packaging plant in Pennsylvania, union officials said on Friday. South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem on Friday reported 190 cases at a Smithfield Foods Inc. pork facility, the Associated Press said. The Cargill and Smithfield plants are being shuttered, while JBS said it will continue operations.

    Workers are also starting to die. Two more deaths were reported by union officials on Friday, one at the Greeley, Colorado meat plant and one in Pennsylvania. Both those facilities are owned by JBS SA, the world’s top meat producer, which didn’t confirm the deaths.

    “As our communities and our country collectively face the coronavirus challenge, JBS USA has had team members impacted by COVID-19,” the American unit of the Brazilian meatpacker said in an emailed statement. “We are offering support to those team members and their families. Out of respect for the families, we are not releasing further information.”

    While it’s unclear whether the deaths and other cases have anything to do with the workplaces, the news exposes the vulnerability of global supply chains that are needed to keep grocery stores stocked after panic buying left shelves empty. President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence both addressed the sudden jump in cases at meat plants when speaking to reporters on Friday.

    Pence said as many as 300 people have been “impacted” by the coronavirus at the Colorado meat plant. It’s unclear what that figure was referring to, whether it was people who have been quarantined, or possible cases.

    Trump also referred to the outbreak at Colorado meat plants on Friday. Neither Pence nor Trump specified exactly which plant they were talking about. Greeley is about 65 miles northeast of Denver.

    “We’re looking at this graph where everything’s looking beautiful and is coming down and then you’ve got this one spike. I said, ‘What happened to Denver?,’” Trump said. “And many people, very quickly.”

    Plants across the U.S. are starting to reduce output or idle as cases spread from the main cities to rural America. Laborers have, in some cases, staged walk-outs to protest working conditions. In meat plants, stations on processing lines can be close together, creating challenges for social distancing. Workers share break and locker rooms.

    The deaths reported Friday bring the total reported for JBS employees to three. On Tuesday, the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, which represents thousands of poultry workers, said two of its members working at a Tyson Foods Inc. plant in Camilla, Georgia, died from the virus.

    Smithfield said it will close its South Dakota plant for three days. The company will suspend operations in a large section of the plant on April 11 and completely shutter on April 12 and April 13. The facility has 3,700 employees

    Deep Cleaning
    During the suspension, “essential personnel will repeat the rigorous deep cleaning and sanitization that have been ongoing at the facility and install additional physical barriers to further enhance social distancing,” Smithfield said in a statement. “Employees will be paid for any previously scheduled hours during the temporary closure.”

    The Cargill plant is located in an area where there are large manufacturing plants and a large influx of people coming in from New York City. Those were among factors that contributed to a high number of cases in that region of Pennsylvania, it’s not a Cargill-only issue, said Wendell Young IV, president of Local 1776 of the United Food & Commercial Workers. The Minneapolis-based company declined to comment on the number of cases at the facility that employs 900 people.

    “We’ve taken extra steps to focus on safety,” said Jon Nash, head of Cargill’s North American protein business. The company is implementing temperature testing, providing and encouraging employees to wear face coverings, doing enhanced cleaning and sanitizing, among other measures, he said, while also citing temporary wage increases, bonuses and waiving co-pays for Covid-19 testing.

    “Our facility will re-open as soon as is it is safe to do so.”

    JBS said there were 36 employees who work at the Greeley plant with the virus, fewer than the 50 positive cases reported by the local union. JBS also confirmed “increased absenteeism” at the beef production facility.

    The company said it was working in partnership with the U.S. federal government, Colorado Governor Jared Polis and Senator Cory Gardner to secure Covid-19 tests for all team members at the Greeley plant, which it’s aiming to complete through Monday. JBS will also “further enhance previously announced deep cleaning efforts at the facility,” it said in a statement, while adding it planned to continue operations.

    The Greeley plant employs more than 3,000 workers, according to the JBS website.

    Meanwhile, the local union sent a letter to Governor Polis along with company and county officials demanding that the Greeley plant be shut down for at least a week for “extensive and repeated deep cleanings.” The union asked that employees be paid regular wages during the shutdown, and that upon re-opening workers receive an additional $3 per hour as “hazard pay” on top of usual hourly rates.

    “You cannot make sacrifices like this with people’s lives,” Kim Cordova, president of Local 7 of the United Food & Commercial Workers Union, said by telephone. “People can live without beef.”

    sauce https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...Xv7S1Y_KePoPew
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  46. #2246
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    ^That National Review article on wet markets and factory farms was really good. It's hard to read about that stuff, but looking the other way is what got us to this point.

  47. #2247
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  48. #2248
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    Throwback Thursday article from 2012... Unsetting the balance of nature could unleash a pandemic...relevant today

    The Ecology of Disease


    THERE’S a term biologists and economists use these days — ecosystem services — which refers to the many ways nature supports the human endeavor. Forests filter the water we drink, for example, and birds and bees pollinate crops, both of which have substantial economic as well as biological value.

    If we fail to understand and take care of the natural world, it can cause a breakdown of these systems and come back to haunt us in ways we know little about. A critical example is a developing model of infectious disease that shows that most epidemics — AIDS, Ebola, West Nile, SARS, Lyme disease and hundreds more that have occurred over the last several decades — don’t just happen. They are a result of things people do to nature.

    Disease, it turns out, is largely an environmental issue. Sixty percent of emerging infectious diseases that affect humans are zoonotic — they originate in animals. And more than two-thirds of those originate in wildlife.

    Teams of veterinarians and conservation biologists are in the midst of a global effort with medical doctors and epidemiologists to understand the “ecology of disease.” It is part of a project called Predict, which is financed by the United States Agency for International Development. Experts are trying to figure out, based on how people alter the landscape — with a new farm or road, for example — where the next diseases are likely to spill over into humans and how to spot them when they do emerge, before they can spread. They are gathering blood, saliva and other samples from high-risk wildlife species to create a library of viruses so that if one does infect humans, it can be more quickly identified. And they are studying ways of managing forests, wildlife and livestock to prevent diseases from leaving the woods and becoming the next pandemic.

    It isn’t only a public health issue, but an economic one. The World Bank has estimated that a severe influenza pandemic, for example, could cost the world economy $3 trillion.

    The problem is exacerbated by how livestock are kept in poor countries, which can magnify diseases borne by wild animals. A study released earlier this month by the International Livestock Research Institute found that more than two million people a year are killed by diseases that spread to humans from wild and domestic animals.

    The Nipah virus in South Asia, and the closely related Hendra virus in Australia, both in the genus of henipah viruses, are the most urgent examples of how disrupting an ecosystem can cause disease. The viruses originated with flying foxes, Pteropus vampyrus, also known as fruit bats. They are messy eaters, no small matter in this scenario. They often hang upside down, looking like Dracula wrapped tightly in their membranous wings, and eat fruit by masticating the pulp and then spitting out the juices and seeds.

    The bats have evolved with henipah over millions of years, and because of this co-evolution, they experience little more from it than the fruit bat equivalent of a cold. But once the virus breaks out of the bats and into species that haven’t evolved with it, a horror show can occur, as one did in 1999 in rural Malaysia. It is likely that a bat dropped a piece of chewed fruit into a piggery in a forest. The pigs became infected with the virus, and amplified it, and it jumped to humans. It was startling in its lethality. Out of 276 people infected in Malaysia, 106 died, and many others suffered permanent and crippling neurological disorders. There is no cure or vaccine. Since then there have been 12 smaller outbreaks in South Asia.

    In Australia, where four people and dozens of horses have died of Hendra, the scenario was different: suburbanization lured infected bats that were once forest-dwellers into backyards and pastures. If a henipah virus evolves to be transmitted readily through casual contact, the concern is that it could leave the jungle and spread throughout Asia or the world. “Nipah is spilling over, and we are observing these small clusters of cases — and it’s a matter of time that the right strain will come along and efficiently spread among people,” says Jonathan Epstein, a veterinarian with EcoHealth Alliance, a New York-based organization that studies the ecological causes of disease.

    That’s why experts say it’s critical to understand underlying causes. “Any emerging disease in the last 30 or 40 years has come about as a result of encroachment into wild lands and changes in demography,” says Peter Daszak, a disease ecologist and the president of EcoHealth.

    Emerging infectious diseases are either new types of pathogens or old ones that have mutated to become novel, as the flu does every year. AIDS, for example, crossed into humans from chimpanzees in the 1920s when bush-meat hunters in Africa killed and butchered them.

    Diseases have always come out of the woods and wildlife and found their way into human populations — the plague and malaria are two examples. But emerging diseases have quadrupled in the last half-century, experts say, largely because of increasing human encroachment into habitat, especially in disease “hot spots” around the globe, mostly in tropical regions. And with modern air travel and a robust market in wildlife trafficking, the potential for a serious outbreak in large population centers is enormous.

    The key to forecasting and preventing the next pandemic, experts say, is understanding what they call the “protective effects” of nature intact. In the Amazon, for example, one study showed an increase in deforestation by some 4 percent increased the incidence of malaria by nearly 50 percent, because mosquitoes, which transmit the disease, thrive in the right mix of sunlight and water in recently deforested areas. Developing the forest in the wrong way can be like opening Pandora’s box. These are the kinds of connections the new teams are unraveling.

    Public health experts have begun to factor ecology into their models. Australia, for example, has just announced a multimillion-dollar effort to understand the ecology of the Hendra virus and bats.

    IT’S not just the invasion of intact tropical landscapes that can cause disease. The West Nile virus came to the United States from Africa but spread here because one of its favored hosts is the American robin, which thrives in a world of lawns and agricultural fields. And mosquitoes, which spread the disease, find robins especially appealing. “The virus has had an important impact on human health in the United States because it took advantage of species that do well around people,” says Marm Kilpatrick, a biologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz. The pivotal role of the robin in West Nile has earned it the title “super spreader.”

    And Lyme disease, the East Coast scourge, is very much a product of human changes to the environment: the reduction and fragmentation of large contiguous forests. Development chased off predators — wolves, foxes, owls and hawks. That has resulted in a fivefold increase in white-footed mice, which are great “reservoirs” for the Lyme bacteria, probably because they have poor immune systems. And they are terrible groomers. When possums or gray squirrels groom, they remove 90 percent of the larval ticks that spread the disease, while mice kill just half. “So mice are producing huge numbers of infected nymphs,” says the Lyme disease researcher Richard Ostfeld.

    “When we do things in an ecosystem that erode biodiversity — we chop forests into bits or replace habitat with agricultural fields — we tend to get rid of species that serve a protective role,” Dr. Ostfeld told me. “There are a few species that are reservoirs and a lot of species that are not. The ones we encourage are the ones that play reservoir roles.”

    Dr. Ostfeld has seen two emerging diseases — babesiosis and anaplasmosis — that affect humans in the ticks he studies, and he has raised the alarm about the possibility of their spread.

    The best way to prevent the next outbreak in humans, specialists say, is with what they call the One Health Initiative — a worldwide program, involving more than 600 scientists and other professionals, that advances the idea that human, animal and ecological health are inextricably linked and need to be studied and managed holistically.

    “It’s not about keeping pristine forest pristine and free of people,” says Simon Anthony, a molecular virologist at the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. “It’s learning how to do things sustainably. If you can get a handle on what it is that drives the emergence of a disease, then you can learn to modify environments sustainably.”

    The scope of the problem is huge and complex. Just an estimated 1 percent of wildlife viruses are known. Another major factor is the immunology of wildlife, a science in its infancy. Raina K. Plowright, a biologist at Pennsylvania State University who studies the ecology of disease, found that outbreaks of the Hendra virus in flying foxes in rural areas were rare but were much higher in urban and suburban animals. She hypothesizes that urbanized bats are sedentary and miss the frequent exposure to the virus they used to get in the wild, which kept the infection at low levels. That means more bats — whether from poor nutrition, loss of habitat or other factors — become infected and shed more of the virus into backyards.

    THE fate of the next pandemic may be riding on the work of Predict. EcoHealth and its partners — the University of California at Davis, the Wildlife Conservation Society, the Smithsonian Institution and Global Viral Forecasting — are looking at wildlife-borne viruses across the tropics, building a virus library. Most of the work focuses on primates, rats and bats, which are most likely to carry diseases that affect people.

    Most critically, Predict researchers are watching the interface where deadly viruses are known to exist and where people are breaking open the forest, as they are along the new highway from the Atlantic to the Pacific across the Andes in Brazil and Peru. “By mapping encroachment into the forest you can predict where the next disease could emerge,” Dr. Daszak, EcoHealth’s president, says. “So we’re going to the edge of villages, we’re going to places where mines have just opened up, areas where new roads are being built. We are going to talk to people who live within these zones and saying, ‘what you are doing is potentially a risk.’ ”

    It might mean talking to people about how they butcher and eat bush meat or to those who are building a feed lot in bat habitat. In Bangladesh, where Nipah broke out several times, the disease was traced to bats that were raiding containers that collected date palm sap, which people drank. The disease source was eliminated by placing bamboo screens (which cost 8 cents each) over the collectors.

    EcoHealth also scans luggage and packages at airports, looking for imported wildlife likely to be carrying deadly viruses. And they have a program called PetWatch to warn consumers about exotic pets that are pulled out of the forest in disease hot spots and shipped to market.

    All in all, the knowledge gained in the last couple of years about emerging diseases should allow us to sleep a little easier, says Dr. Epstein, the EcoHealth veterinarian. “For the first time,” he said, “there is a coordinated effort in 20 countries to develop an early warning system for emerging zoonotic outbreaks.”

    sauce https://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/15/s...61QvfTBgsXDIl0
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  49. #2249
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    Ramps!

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-93166687_2628675923928066_799916003654893568_o.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  50. #2250
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    Nice! I used to work at a farmers market and ramps and morels were a favorite spring combo. I know where to find morels nearby but I don't have a hook up for ramps anymore.

  51. #2251
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-94143895_2884538368249151_249914036601225216_n.jpg


    And yet I'm not addicted to them
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  52. #2252
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    8 Ways You Can Help Humans And Animals During The Coronavirus Crisis


    It's easy to feel useless during the coronavirus (COVID 19) crisis, especially if you're one of the countries currently on lockdown to help flatten the curve.

    However, in an effort to keep positive, here are eight simple ways you can help both humans and animals during the pandemic.

    1. Donating to food banks

    In the midst of people irresponsibly bulk buying and supermarkets consequently struggling to keep up with demand, food banks can easily be forgotten about.

    But arguably, they're needed now more than ever, as many vulnerable people are struggling to access basic essentials including food and hygiene products.

    Find your local food bank and donate non-perishable, in-date food (tins are a great example) as well as hygiene products.

    Recently, Worthing resident Pia Offord founded The Worthing Vegan Food Bank Network, which is completely volunteer-led, in an effort to help those most affected by the coronavirus outbreak.

    2. Supporting local businesses

    Many local businesses are still operating on a delivery-only basis, including Neat Burger - a chain backed by Formula 1 champion Lewis Hamilton - which has recently expanded its deliveries to eight new areas.

    If your fave vegan eatery is completely shut. You can still support them by buying gift cards online to use post-quarantine and use social media to help them attract new custom. Some companies also have an online-store filled with goodies you can get delivered!

    3. Sign petitions

    The power of social-media prevails through times like this, and signing petitions is one of the easiest ways to make a difference while staying at home. Below are a few examples of petitions you can sign:

    PETA is urging the World Health Organization (WHO) to end all live animal markets after the Covid 19 pandemic is believed to have originated in a 'wet' market in Wuhan, China*.

    While nonprofit Pause The System has created a petition to close down factory farms -highlighting the link between animal agriculture and zoonotic diseases.

    4. Self isolate and bake vegan cookies

    If self-isolating has left you with too much time on your hands - why not have some fun and bake vegan cookies. Baking is a great way to also get the kids involved, and teaches them a valuable skill

    You can also check out these five vegan recipes that are bound to keep you occupied (and satisfied) for a little while.

    5. Use Social Media

    If anyone knows the power of social media when it comes to activism, it's public speaker John Oberg. Check out our recent podcast where Oberg discusses how he got into activism, the key challenges vegans face in furthering the movement and using social media for the better.

    6. Rescue/ Adopt an animal

    Rescuing or adopting an animal isn't something you should do on a whim, or because self-isolation has left you feeling a little bored. But if you were contemplating rescuing a new companion, now is the best time to do so - as many rescue centers are struggling to keep up with the number of unwanted or abandoned animals.

    If you're unable to permanently rescue an animal, you can still help shelters out by donating items such as pet food, toys, blankets, and leads.

    7. Buy vegan food

    It's simple, but it's effective. Even if you're not vegan, but you still can't get your hands on milk in the supermarket - why not check out some of the many plant-based alternatives? There's soy, oat, rice, coconut, banana, pea - the list is endless!

    You never know, you might end up loving it and make the switch permanently.

    8. Volunteer

    In England, the government called for half a million volunteers to take on tasks such as shopping for the vulnerable and collecting medication. if you're able to do, volunteering is a great way to help protect those most vulnerable.


    sauce https://www.plantbasednews.org/cultu...23QLjTVLVZGskE
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  53. #2253
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    ^ No way am I clicking that link no no nope
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  54. #2254
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    F*ck Cancer

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    12 Vegetables You Can Grow From Scraps

    When you are on a budget, re-growing your food scraps is one of the best ways to save money! In fact, there are many vegetables you can grow from scraps, whether it be from cut off ends, or from the seeds they bear. This will not only help keep your wallet fuller, but it is an incredibly sustainable way of living!

    12 Vegetables You Can Regrow From Scraps

    There are many different vegetables you can regrow from kitchen scraps. All you need is some water and a shallow pan to get started. In some instances, you don’t even need water, and can directly plant your sprouts into the soil.

    1) Garlic

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-garlic-sprouting-1.jpg

    You may have a couple cloves of garlic laying around – why not grow them? The key to successfully growing garlic to plant them in full sun, and to remember to chop off the tall stalk that sprouts from the bulb. Once you cut this piece off, the garlic bulb will instead put all of its energy into growing large bulbs for tasty consumption.

    2. Potato or Sweet Potato

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-yam-sprouting.jpg

    Cut about one-inch of a chunk from a potato that includes 1-2 eyes. Give the piece a day or two to dry out and skin over. Then, plant with the eye facing up.

    3. Pumpkin

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-pumpkin-sprout.jpg

    During Halloween, you may take your pumpkin seeds and throw them in the oven to make some roasted pumpkin seeds (or you may just eat them raw – which is totally fine, and they taste amazing!), or you may throw them out. Why not plant some pumpkins from the seeds? Pumpkin is rich in nutrients like beta-carotene which protect your eyes from nasty free radicals which leads to poor eyesight. Find out how to grow pumpkins here.

    4. Avocado

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-avocado-sprout.jpg

    Avocado trees are actually quite easy to grow, and they are beautiful plants to keep inside or outside the home (they have a better chance of fruiting outside, where they can be pollinated by bees). To find out how to grow an avocado tree from the seed, click here.

    5. Scallions

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-spring-onions-sprouting.jpg

    Cut off the last inch of each onion, so that you still have the bulb and roots (lower white part). Put these ends in mud, making sure to leave a portion of each stem sticking out above the soil. Water regularly, and your onions will start growing. You can take cuttings from the green portion of the plant, and it will still continue to regrow more greens. You can do this about 3 times before you will need to plant more bulbs.
    Alternatively, if you have some onions that are already sprouting greens, you can place their root-end in a mason jar of water, and fresh greens will sprout on top.

    6. Carrots

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-carrot-sprouting-1.jpg

    Those carrot tops you usually toss into the garbage can actually be used to produce more carrots! You cannot physically regrow the carrot from the carrot top, but you can regrow the plant. Cut about one inch from the top of a carrot. Stick a toothpick into either side of the carrot stump and balance it on top of a small glass. Fill the glass up with water so that the water barely touches the bottom edge of the stump. Set this glass in light, but not in a window that has full sun. Continue to add water as it evaporates, and soon you will have sprouting roots from the carrot edge. You can now plant your carrot in mud!

    7. Apples

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-apple-seed-sprout.jpg

    Apples can be grown from the seeds inside, as with any fruit. To grow an apple tree, take the seeds from the fruit and lay them out to dry until there is no more moisture on the outside of the shell. Next, lay the seeds on some damp paper towel and place them in the fridge. Make sure the paper towel remains damp, so checking ever so often is a must. Once the seeds have been in the fridge for about one month, the seeds should have sprouted. Take your sprouted seedlings and place them in a small cup of potting soil, making sure that the soil remains moist but not wet with watering. When the plant starts to grow, make sure you transplant as needed, until you can finally grow your tree outside.

    8. Ginger

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-ginger-sprout-1024x675.jpg

    Soak your ginger root overnight and then cut it into pieces. Make sure that there are a couple of growth buds on each piece (the little bumps on the end of each “finger”), and plant the ginger with these growth buds pointing up or to the side (do not have them facing down). Then, water regularly, but not so much that the soil becomes soggy. Harvesting your ginger is easy since all you need to do is dig up pieces of the root, and cut off what you need, leaving what you don’t. It will continue to grow.

    9. Romaine

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-romaine-sprout-625x1024.jpg

    Growing romaine is the same as celery. Cut off about an inch from the bottom of the romaine stalk, let it sit in water to wait for roots and slightly longer growing leaves from the top, and then re-plant in the mud! Any time you want to harvest leaf lettuce from your garden, just pick the outer leaves but leave the inner leaves untouched. This will ensure that your lettuce continues to produce new leaves all season long.

    10. Celery

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-vegetables-you-can-regrow-scraps-1024x683.jpg


    Cut off the bottom inch of a bunch of celery, and place this piece in a bowl, with the cut side facing up. Add a little bit of water, just enough so that the bottom of the celery is submerged in water. Move this bowl into a sunny place in your home, and water for the leaves and roots to form. Then you can plant the celery in soil, covering everything cut the leaves, and within a couple of weeks, the stalks will start to grow back.

    11. Pineapple

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-pineapple-sprout.jpg

    A lot of people have seen or heard that you can re-grow pineapples, and I am currently in the process of doing so (I will let you know how it goes!). To re-grow pineapple How to Grow a Pineapple Top Indoors

    12. Bok Choy

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-how-grow-bok-choy.jpg

    Same method as celery and romaine: see above.

    sauce https://livelovefruit.com/vegetables...Tq2rpG_vBXxOFs
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  56. #2256
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    This is inevitable when we use living beings as a means of production.


    Piglets aborted, chickens gassed as pandemic slams meat sector

    CHICAGO (Reuters) - With the pandemic hobbling the meat-packing industry, Iowa farmer Al Van Beek had nowhere to ship his full-grown pigs to make room for the 7,500 piglets he expected from his breeding operation. The crisis forced a decision that still troubles him: He ordered his employees to give injections to the pregnant sows, one by one, that would cause them to abort their baby pigs.

    Van Beek and other farmers say they have no choice but to cull livestock as they run short on space to house their animals or money to feed them, or both. The world’s biggest meat companies - including Smithfield Foods Inc, Cargill Inc, JBS USA and Tyson Foods Inc - have halted operations at about 20 slaughterhouses and processing plants in North America since April as workers fall ill, stoking global fears of a meat shortage.

    Van Beek’s piglets are victims of a sprawling food-industry crisis that began with the mass closure of restaurants - upending that sector’s supply chain, overwhelming storage and forcing farmers and processors to destroy everything from milk to salad greens to animals. Processors geared up to serve the food-service industry can’t immediately switch to supplying grocery stores.

    Millions of pigs, chickens and cattle will be euthanized because of slaughterhouse closures, limiting supplies at grocers, said John Tyson, chairman of top U.S. meat supplier Tyson Foods.

    Pork has been hit especially hard, with daily production cut by about a third. Unlike cattle, which can be housed outside on pasture, U.S. hogs are fattened up for slaughter inside temperature-controlled buildings. If they are housed too long, they can get too big and injure themselves. The barns need to be emptied out by sending adult hogs to slaughter before the arrival of new piglets from sows that were impregnated just before the pandemic.

    “We have nowhere to go with the pigs,” said Van Beek, who lamented the waste of so much meat. “What are we going to do?”

    In Minnesota, farmers Kerry and Barb Mergen felt their hearts pound when a crew from Daybreak Foods Inc arrived with carts and tanks of carbon dioxide to euthanize their 61,000 egg-laying hens earlier this month.

    Daybreak Foods, based in Lake Mills, Wisconsin, supplies liquid eggs to restaurants and food-service companies. The company, which owns the birds, pays contract farmers like the Mergens to feed and care for them. Drivers normally load the eggs onto trucks and haul them to a plant in Big Lake, Minnesota, which uses them to make liquid eggs for restaurants and ready-to-serve dishes for food-service companies. But the plant’s operator, Cargill Inc, said it idled the facility because the pandemic reduced demand.

    Daybreak Foods, which has about 14.5 million hens with contractor-run or company-owned farms in the Midwest, is trying to switch gears and ship eggs to grocery stores, said Chief Executive Officer William Rehm. But egg cartons are in shortage nationwide and the company now must grade each egg for size, he said.

    Rehm declined to say how much of the company’s flock has been euthanized.

    “We’re trying to balance our supply with our customers’ needs, and still keep everyone safe - including all of our people and all our hens,” Rehm said.

    DUMPING HOGS IN A LANDFILL

    In Iowa, farmer Dean Meyer said he is part of a group of about nine producers who are euthanizing the smallest 5% of their newly born pigs, or about 125 piglets a week. They will continue euthanizing animals until disruptions ease, and could increase the number of pigs killed each week, he said. The small bodies are composted and will become fertilizer. Meyer’s group is also killing mother hogs, or sows, to reduce their numbers, he said.

    “Packers are backed up every day, more and more,” said Meyer.

    As the United States faces a possible food shortage, and supermarkets and food banks are struggling to meet demand, the forced slaughters are becoming more widespread across the country, according to agricultural economists, farm trade groups and federal lawmakers who are hearing from farmer constituents.

    Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds, along with both U.S. senators from a state that provides a third of the nation’s pork, sent a letter to the Trump administration pleading for financial help and assistance with culling animals and properly disposing of their carcasses.
    Hog farmer Mike Patterson's animals, who have been put on a diet so they take longer to fatten up due to the supply chain disruptions caused by coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreaks, at his property in Kenyon, Minnesota, U.S. April 23, 2020. REUTERS/Nicholas Pfosi

    “There are 700,000 pigs across the nation that cannot be processed each week and must be humanely euthanized,” said the April 27 letter.

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) said late Friday it is establishing a National Incident Coordination Center to help farmers find markets for their livestock, or euthanize and dispose of animals if necessary.

    Some producers who breed livestock and sell baby pigs to farmers are now giving them away for free, farmers said, translating to a loss about $38 on each piglet, according to commodity firm Kerns & Associates.

    Farmers in neighboring Canada are also killing animals they can’t sell or afford to feed. The value of Canadian isoweans - baby pigs – has fallen to zero because of U.S. processing plant disruptions, said Rick Bergmann, a Manitoba hog farmer and chair of the Canadian Pork Council. In Quebec alone, a backlog of 92,000 pigs waits for slaughter, said Quebec hog producer Rene Roy, an executive with the pork council.

    A hog farm on Prince Edward Island in Canada euthanized 270-pound hogs that were ready for slaughter because there was no place to process them, Bergmann said. The animals were dumped in a landfill.

    DEATH THREATS

    The latest economic disaster to befall the farm sector comes after years of extreme weather, sagging commodity prices and the Trump administration’s trade war with China and other key export markets. But it’s more than lost income. The pandemic barreling through farm towns has mired rural communities in despair, a potent mix of shame and grief.

    Farmers take pride in the fact that their crops and animals are meant to feed people, especially in a crisis that has idled millions of workers and forced many to rely on food banks. Now, they’re destroying crops and killing animals for no purpose.

    Farmers flinch when talking about killing off animals early or plowing crops into the ground, for fear of public wrath. Two Wisconsin dairy farmers, forced to dump milk by their buyers, told Reuters they recently received anonymous death threats.

    “They say, ‘How dare you throw away food when so many people are hungry?’,” said one farmer, speaking on condition of anonymity. “They don’t know how farming works. This makes me sick, too.”

    Even as livestock and crop prices plummet, prices for meat and eggs at grocery stores are up. The average retail price of eggs was up nearly 40% for the week ended April 18, compared to a year earlier, according to Nielsen data. Average retail fresh chicken prices were up 5.4%, while beef was up 5.8% and pork up 6.6%.

    On Van Beek’s farm in Rock Valley, Iowa, one hog broke a leg because it grew too heavy while waiting to be slaughtered. He has delivered pigs to facilities that are still operating, but they are too full to take all of his animals.

    Van Beek paid $2,000 to truck pigs about seven hours to a Smithfield plant in Illinois, more than quadruple the usual cost to haul them to a Sioux Falls, South Dakota, slaughterhouse that the company has closed indefinitely. He said Smithfield is supposed to pay the extra transportation costs under his contract. But the company is refusing to do so, claiming “force majeure” – that an extraordinary and unforeseeable event prevents it from fulfilling its agreement.

    Smithfield, the world’s largest pork processor, declined to comment on whether it has refused to make contracted payments. It said the company is working with suppliers “to navigate these challenging and unprecedented times.”

    Hog farmers nationwide will lose an estimated $5 billion, or $37 per head, for the rest of the year due to pandemic disruptions, according to the industry group National Pork Producers Council.

    A recently announced $19 billion U.S. government coronavirus aid package for farmers will not pay for livestock that are culled, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation, the nation’s largest farmer trade group. The USDA said in a statement the payment program is still being developed and the agency has received more requests for assistance than it has money to handle.

    Minnesota farmer Mike Patterson started feeding his pigs more soybean hulls – which fill animals’ stomachs but offer negligible nutritional value – to keep them from getting too large for their barns. He’s considering euthanizing them because he cannot find enough buyers after Smithfield indefinitely shut its massive Sioux Falls plant.

    “They have to be housed humanely,” Patterson said. “If there’s not enough room, we have to have less hogs somehow. One way or another, we’ve got to have less hogs.”

  57. #2257
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    ^ And to add to your post Squeaky...factory farms are just as despicable as wet markets

    AS SLAUGHTERHOUSES CLOSE, FARMERS START DESTROYING MILLIONS OF ANIMALS

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-vegnews.pigsnout.jpg

    Farmers across the United States have begun killing pigs and chickens as slaughterhouses close amid the coronavirus pandemic. In Iowa, farmer Al Van Beek ordered workers chemically induce abortions in pregnant mother pigs to eliminate 7,500 piglets as the farm no longer has room to house the animals, according to Rueters. Other farmers in Iowa are killing piglets and composting their bodies at a rate of approximately 125 per week as available meatpackers are at capacity. The practice is becoming widespread amongst animal farmers, including in Canada.

    Since March, COVID-19 has been rapidly spreading amongst workers in the meat industry, who often work shoulder-to-shoulder without sufficient protective equipment—and return to work, even if sick, due to insufficient sick leave policies—to keep up with ever-increasing slaughter speeds. This month, meat industry giants halted operations at approximately 20 slaughterhouses nationwide after workers tested positive for COVID-19, including Smithfield, Cargill, National Beef, JBS, and Tyson. Business Insider analysts report that approximately 1,185 employees across Tyson’s workforce have tested positive and at least eight have died from COVID-19. The closures are behind the widespread disruption to meat industry operations as farmers who raise animals have nowhere to send them to be killed for food. “As pork, beef, and chicken plants are being forced to close, even for short periods of time, millions of pounds of meat will disappear from the supply chain,” Tyson Chairman John Tyson said. “As a result, there will be limited supply of our products available in grocery stores until we are able to reopen our facilities that are currently closed.”

    Some researchers believe that the forthcoming shortage of animal meat exposes the volatility of meat industry operations and could result in an opportunity for plant-based meat products, which are expected to be available in stores with no disruption. “African swine fever (ASF) had already decimated Asian swine herds before COVID-19 came along to put further strain on Asia’s meat supply, and the rest of the world’s meat industries are in serious danger of being unable to maintain status quo production,” Sara Olson, Director of Research at data insight firm Lux Research, said. “Agricultural challenges in commodity crop production and processing will be slower to percolate into the food chain, meaning plant-based burgers and chicken alternatives have a window of opportunity right now to present themselves as more reliable alternatives—or potentially the only choice—next to empty meat cases in grocery stores. Only products in retail today will benefit immediately, but longer-term, expect more people to shift to ‘flexitarian’ approaches to protein consumption.”


    Market research firm MarketsandMarkets concurs with Olson’s sentiment and predicts that the forthcoming meat shortage will lead to the growth of the plant-based meat industry from $3.6 billion in 2020 to $4.2 billion by 2021, driven by consumers’ fears of future animal-borne illnesses.

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2020/4/as-slaugh...P0b8UuZ8EcaEJs
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  58. #2258
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    It's not just a fad — there's real value to eating local during this pandemic

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    Many of us are stressed out over food, side-stepping down grocery store aisles to maintain proper physical distancing and making plans for long wait-times.

    And what is this experience doing to us?

    Recently, in a chain grocer line, I watched a gentleman berate store workers for enforcing the new rules. Under mounting pressure, we're in a win-lose competition for that last bag of frozen peas, stocking up on groceries — whether we need them or not. If the worst is still to come, what will this crisis yet reveal of our better natures?

    But there is another way. There's a good chance a local farmer nearby has fresh produce, ready for immediate sale. This simple act will connect us to the local community of food producers and strengthen our community.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-horseradish.jpg

    The horseradish root I purchased last week caused no end of tears as I peeled and processed it in my kitchen.

    But learning something new and having a locally-grown, homemade jar of heat and flavour in the refrigerator will warm my heart for days. And talking with the farmer who grew the gnarled root was something I won't get at the grocery store, as she enlightened me about the nature of horseradish and the nutritional properties of the duck and goose eggs she was selling.

    These producers are all around us. On a recent walk in my Vancouver Island neighbourhood, I stumbled upon a small farm and left with 10 perfectly ripe kiwis for $3. Canadian kiwis! I had no idea. Soon I'll make jam, something I've never done. As badly as I may fail, it will taste sweeter knowing the fruit came from "farmer Pat," as he's known around here.

    As people choose to reconnect with the lost art of bread baking and others get back to the land — even if just in their backyard — some local producers have seen a surge in orders, notably for flour, garden seeds and manure. Sadly, other producers are seeing barely a trickle of customers, in striking contrast to the grocery stores.

    That's a shame, because while local food is sometimes more expensive, that's not always the case and you get so much more value in the quality.

    Over the past weeks, I've made a point of shopping at smaller, local producers, and what I learned surprised me. The soft, sweet kale I discovered locally was $3 for a large bunch and picked the day I bought it, while the grocery store kale cost the same and had been shipped from California weeks ago. Research confirms that nutrition is highest when food is freshest.

    While I'm not suggesting that every one of us dirty our fingernails in the soil, I am advocating that we at least try rejoining our local economy, using food to build community bonds that reach far beyond economics.

    Robust local food systems offer immunity from food shortages, such as those caused by recent hoarding behaviour or what will surely occur if borders are further tightened by our neighbours to the south. And buying food from a local farmer adds a human connection to the purchase, increasing feelings of well-being and connectedness to nature, the farmers and each other.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-canadian-kiwis.jpg

    Human connections are something we all need in this crisis.

    This participation transforms us from passive consumers of our food, to active participants in agriculture and in the nourishment of our bodies. In a period when more rules and restrictions are being imposed, we can still exercise the freedom to know the source of our food and what we choose to eat.

    To those for whom going from farm to farm is difficult, such as those who live in cities, you should be able to source local food in independent shops until the farmers markets reopen.

    Instead of regarding eating as something to be done with the greatest efficiency — which usually means processed or prepared food — let's acknowledge and appreciate the caring hands which grew those potatoes or parsnips. The joys of finding, supporting and getting to know local farmers are many, and have been lost by many as well.

    But they can be found again.

    At a time when joy can seem in short supply, let's spend some of these unending days rediscovering the pleasures of connecting with food. If we don't patronize our local producers now, they won't be here tomorrow, and we'll be left to the mercy of a faceless, nameless "supply chain" for food.

    And let's make it the "new normal" long after this is over, learning not only how to prepare what we eat, but where it came from and the community of people that grow it ... for us.

    sauce https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/briti...5Dzn7Vh3Z4igx0
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  59. #2259
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    Is Sugary Fruit Healthy?

    We all know that fruit contains valuable nutrients (e.g. vitamin C), but most of the calories in fruit come from carbohydrates—specifically sugar. While most fruit contains a mixture of different sugars, a major sugar in fruit is fructose. You may have heard of fructose in soda and other processed foods(e.g. high fructose corn syrup), which can be detrimental to human health. So for those interested in health, should we eat fruit, be cautious, or avoid it?

    The simple answer is eat fruit!

    Although fructose is naturally found in fruits, it can also be created artificially to be used as a sweetener in processed foods like soda, candy etc. The sugar in processed foods is harmful, while eating sugar in the form of whole fruits is beneficial. For example, research has reported that artificially made fructose is associated with liver and blood pressure problems while fruit is not and may even be beneficial.

    The reasons for this are complicated, but fruits can be thought of as one of the most nutrient dense foods on the planet. Most are naturally low in overall calories while containing many micronutrients, including vitamins, minerals, and a variety of phytochemicals such as beta carotene, polyphenols, and other antioxidants. This is the exact opposite of fructose containing processed foods!

    Can fruit cause type 2 diabetes?

    There has been concern about the sugar content of fruit with regards to those with diabetes or at high risk for developing diabetes, and many healthcare professionals recommend limiting fruit consumption for those individuals. However, increased fruit consumption has been associated with lower diabetes risk.[2][3] Further, a 2011 study specifically among diabetics compared medical nutrition therapy with a restriction of the amount of fruit eaten to a group who had to eat at least two pieces of fruit daily. The group limiting fruit consumption had no benefit compared to those eating lots of fruit! Considering the many benefits of fruit consumption, the authors wrote that “the intake of fruit should not be restricted in patients with type 2 diabetes.”[4] A more recent study even reported that higher fresh fruit consumption was associated lower risk of diabetic complications and death among those who already had diabetes.[3] Those with blood sugar issues should follow individualised advice from their healthcare professional, but consuming fruit with other foods—for example, chopped banana on oatmeal—can help keep blood sugar more stable in those experiencing difficulty.

    Can fruit cause weight problems?

    Some are afraid that because fruits contain sugar that they contribute to weight problems. One study from researchers at Harvard reported that 0.22 portions of fruit daily (e.g. one fifth of an apple) was associated with a reduced risk of obesity by up to 14%.[5] A separate study from five European countries reported that a 100g increase in whole fruit intake per day was associated with a small loss of weight.[6] In a 2011 study, researchers asked one group of volunteers to decrease consumption of all sugars, including fruits while another group were asked to decrease added sugars only. The group who ate less fruit and sugar lost weight (6.5lbs) but the group consuming fruit but less added sugar lost even more weight (9lbs).[7] In fact, a major review article published in 2016 in the journal Nutrients summarised existing scientific evidence which consistently reports that fruit is associated with less obesity and even with weight loss.[8]

    There are several proposed mechanisms by which fruit seems to help control weight, including high nutrient content but perhaps more importantly modulating the gut microbiome and providing prolonged satiety (feeling fuller for longer) leading to decreased overall calorie intake.[8] A fascinating 2009 trial from Pennsylvania State University compared the effect of apple, apple sauce, apple juice or apple juice with added fiber on energy energy intake. The whole apple led to increased fullness and decreased energy intake, even compared to apple juice + fiber.[9] This trial agrees with Professor Campbell’s stance of wholism versus reductionism. In other words the benefits of a piece of fruit can not be replicated by isolating individual components e.g. vitamins, minerals, fiber.

    What are the benefits?

    There is also consistent evidence that eating fruit is associated with lower risk of multiple cancers and cardiovascular diseases, including stroke.[10] Increasing fruit consumption has even been associated with decreased risk of dying from Alzheimer’s disease[11] and COPD.[12]

    As long ago as 1985, it was suggested that fruit and vegetables may protect against early death.[13] Multiple subsequent studies also observed decreased risk of early death with higher fruit consumption. Indeed a 2017 review of 95 studies published in the International Journal of Epidemiology noted that increased fruit consumption was associated with less cardiovascular disease, including stroke, less cancer and less premature death.[10] Some studies reported that those eating the most fruit compared to the least fruit had a 40-50% decreased risk of premature death.[14][15] Another study reported that compared to those who didn’t eat fruit, consuming a single portion of fruit each day was associated with a 19 month longer life.[16] Imagine what five portions of fruit daily might do!

    Low fruit consumption is considered to be the fourth leading contributor to the global disease burden[17] and it has even been estimated that 7.8 million premature deaths worldwide may be caused to a low fruit and vegetable intake.[10]

    What type of fruit?

    It should come as no surprise that fresh fruits are consistently regarded as the best type of fruit. Frozen fruit is a close second and can make a cheaper, convenient source, especially when certain fruit is not in season. Dried fruits generally contain similar nutrients as fresh or frozen but are more concentrated. However, the sugar content will also be more concentrated.

    Juice made from fruit, even freshly squeezed fruit, will have most of the fiber and lots of nutrients stripped away. There is consistent evidence that fruit juice consumption increases the risk of weight gain, particularly in children.[8] Fruit juice consumption has been associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes.[2] One interesting study compared whole apple, clear apple juice, and cloudy apple juice. The whole apple would be the highest in fiber while the clear juice would contain virtually no fiber. The people who ate whole apples had a drop in total and LDL cholesterol, while the people who consumed the clear apple juice actually had an increase in cholesterol. Those who consumed cloudy apple juice had a drop in cholesterol but not as much as the whole apple group. This suggests that fiber is very important for the health benefits of fruit.[18] Additionally, caution is required with canned or tinned fruit, which often contains added sugar or syrup. One study even reported that tinned fruit was associated with increased risk of death.[19] Therefore, try to stick to fresh or frozen fruit. Occasional dried fruit is fine for most too. Increase your consumption of fresh fruit by snacking on various fruits, preparing fruit based desserts, and blending fruits to make tasty smoothies!

    So there you have it: eating more fruit helps decrease risk of obesity, disease, and death. Perhaps an apple a day does keep the doctor away… if accompanied by other whole plant foods!

    Sauce https://nutritionstudies.org/sugary-...h_WP0MG0bmjfKg
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  60. #2260
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    Among the many things we’ll reconsider after COVID-19: Do we really need lab animals?

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    The basic model for testing vaccines is much the same as for any drug: conduct animal trials first, then, if deemed safe and possibly effective, human trials next. This long-standing method is widely accepted as scientifically efficient and ethically necessary. But in the race to develop a vaccine for COVID-19, one American biotech company, Moderna, reportedly did without that apparently crucial preliminary step. On March 16, at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, the first-ever injection of a possible COVID-19 vaccine was administered to a human volunteer, in a phase one trial funded by the National Institute of Health. In a time of such urgency, the strict prerequisite of animal testing can simply cease to exist.

    Meanwhile, mass euthanasia may be the fate of lab animals currently involved in research not involving coronavirus or otherwise seen as non-essential, according to animal rights group PETA. This comes as the result of shuttered universities and scarce animal care staff. On March 18, one graduate researcher at the University of Toronto, reportedly tweeted (and since deleted): “Today, due to lab closures and #COVID-19, I have to cull around 100+ rats.” PETA subsequently sent a letter to U of T president Meric Gertler, demanding to know why the school conducts non-essential research upon animals in the first place.

    The Canadian Animal Care Counsel, a non-governmental organization that oversees the treatment of animals in publicly funded research, confirmed via e-mail: “Because of the COVID-19 crisis some research institutions may have to make the difficult ethical decision to euthanize animals.”

    And on April 2, The Globe and Mail reported that the export of test monkeys from China had been halted in an effort to prevent possible future outbreaks.

    The various roles that lab animals have played throughout the COVID-19 pandemic highlight a growing need to re-evaluate current scientific research models and requirements.

    If a possible vaccine can be rushed into human trials, if lab animals can be so easily and suddenly discarded, and the importation of animals for experimentation can increase the risk of virus spread, then the exclusive focus on first using animal models should be reconsidered.

    Dr. Charu Chandrasekera, executive director of the Canadian Centre for Alternatives to Animal Methods (CCAAM) at the University of Windsor, says this is especially true since more than 90 per cent of drugs tested and found to be safe and effective in animal models fail in human clinical trials.

    “We are all counting down the days until we return to ‘normal.’ But should we?" asks Dr. Chandrasekera.

    A long-time biomedical researcher, Dr. Chandrasekera acknowledges that animals have made “tremendous contributions to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, health and disease, and in medical advancement.” But she says there are tremendous differences between humans and other animals, and now is the time to take those differences seriously.

    As such, the current system of scientific research and testing has become outdated and stuck in a culture ingrained in animal research. “The fundamental problem is that animals are the first choice, when they should be the last resort,” she says. “No single animal model can ever recapitulate the human disease condition, so you end up creating these animal models that mimic certain aspects of human disease, but they are not accurate representations of the disease. This is why we have had such big failures."

    Dr. Chandrasekera says science is missing out on a lot, “because we are not focusing on the human model first," which is the basis of her work at CCAAM: developing human biology-based research models, utilizing human stem cells and bio-printing to create what are called “organ on a chip” and “disease in a dish,” to see how diseases and treatments act in human bodies, rather than in the bodies of genetically modified mice.

    It is work that requires much more government commitment, meaning funding and legislative mandates. Nearly four million animals were used in tax-payer funded research, teaching and testing in Canada in 2018.

    Upon emerging from the COVID-19 pandemic, Dr. Chandrasekera says she does not want to go back to the old normal, “where mouse biology is the gold standard.” Rather, she believes “there is more than enough brilliance, ingenuity and resourcefulness within the scientific community to create a new model, where **** sapiens serve as the quintessential animal model, and our biology is the gold standard.”

    So as we sit in pandemic-induced isolation, reflecting on all that has changed and imagining all that will be, let us also take time to reconsider old ways that don’t work and new ways that could make us better.

    The mandatory use of animal models in scientific research has been illuminated during this time as an old system. It is worth rethinking for the sake of science, human health, and the animals.

    link https://www.theglobeandmail.com/amp/...2ok0-OvaWi4kdQ
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  61. #2261
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    Inside the slaughterhouse
    North America’s largest single coronavirus outbreak started at this Alberta meat-packing plant. Take a look within.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-img_8836.jpg

    Hiep Bui spent 23 years at the Cargill meat-packing plant in southern Alberta — picking out bones from ground beef in a refrigerated room.

    The 67-year-old was one of around 2,000 workers at the plant, located near the town of High River, south of Calgary.

    The plant is the site of the largest COVID-19 outbreak linked to a single facility in North America, according to outbreak data from Canadian and U.S. health authorities. A total of 1,560 cases have been linked to the plant, provincial health officials say, with 949 employees testing positive and two deaths — Bui was the first.

    The second was Armando Sallegue, who died of COVID-19 on Tuesday. Sallegue's son, Arwyn, worked at the plant and was confirmed to have the virus the same day his father began to show symptoms.

    The deaths, and the coronavirus outbreak, put into sharp relief the heavy toll meat-packing work can take on members of a workforce that often have few other opportunities.

    "The union asked for help, the workers asked for help. The workplace was declared safe ... and a worker has died," said Alex Shevalier, president of the Calgary and District Labour Council, during an online vigil for workers who have lost their lives on the job.

    "What we do now is what matters. We cannot bring that sister back but we have to fight for the living. We need a public inquiry and we need a criminal investigation and we need them now.”

    On Monday, the same day the Cargill plant reopened after a two-week closure, Bui’s memorial service was livestreamed on social media.

    Bui’s husband of more than 25 years, Nga Nguyen — who also works at Cargill and contracted COVID-19 — was asked whether Cargill had called him to express its condolences.

    Nguyen shrugged and shook his head. Communicating in Vietnamese through an interpreter, he said, no, the company hadn’t called.

    “He’s feeling numb,” his interpreter said. “He doesn’t know if he’s angry. Just numb.”

    Cargill, a company worth billions, has been accused by employees and the union of caring more about its bottom line than worker wellbeing.

    "Honestly speaking, they don't care about their employees," one worker said. "They're saying they can replace people at any time. They don't care."

    John Keating, president of Cargill Meat Solutions, a subsidiary of Cargill, said the company puts people first. He said his heart hurts to lose an employee, and he was surprised to hear the company has yet to reach out to Bui's husband.

    He said the company was “hit overnight” by the outbreak and there are lessons to be learned.

    “If we need to feel the need to apologize, absolutely, we will apologize. We're a very humble organization, we feel bad about what happened but at the same time we're very confident in how we run our businesses, how we run our processes.”

    On Tuesday, the day after CBC News spoke to Keating, the company said it had reached out to Nguyen to offer condolences.

    After employees first began to test positive for the coronavirus, some told CBC News they continued to work in close quarters with colleagues despite physical distancing measures put in place by the company and said Cargill pressured them to return to work even after they contracted COVID-19.

    The number of cases at Cargill is staggering even when compared with the U.S., which has the highest total number of active COVID-19 cases and deaths in the world. As of May 1, there were 4,913 COVID-19 cases in total among all meat-packing plants in the U.S., according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

    CBC News interviewed 14 current employees of Cargill for this story. Their identities have been kept confidential because they fear negative impacts on their employment should they be identified.


    The workers at the plant are primarily immigrants to Canada or temporary foreign workers and many speak limited to no English. Some say their job security is key to them remaining in the country.

    Employees have said they’ve sustained injuries at the plant, from blackened fingers to knee damage that has made it difficult to walk.

    Cargill said ergonomic experts were in place at the facility to guide the work.

    "We have a ramp-up plan in place to ensure our team builds strength and protects their long-term health. We are focused on keeping our employees safe and healthy now and for the future," company spokesperson Daniel Sullivan said in an email.

    The 'kill floor'
    The first thing employees say you notice when you enter the Cargill facility in High River is the smell — something familiar, like that of an animal, but with a distinctive note of blood hanging in the air.

    There are two main areas of Cargill’s facility. On the harvest floor, colloquially dubbed the "kill floor," workers bleed cattle, skin them and hang them from hooks in a warm environment.

    The majority of the area on the kill floor is more spaced out, allowing for two metres of space between employees in most areas. But the work can still be challenging, employees say.

    Cattle are led into what’s known as the knocking area, where they are hit in the head with a bolt gun meant to stun them. Then, using a knife, a worker will cut the throat of the animal to bleed it.

    This work can be dangerous for employees, as the behaviour of a nervous animal is difficult to predict.

    Then there's the fabrication line, where workers say they're packed in elbow to elbow. Here, they work cutting meat for eight hours a day, often using knives to trim carcasses and remove fat.

    Workers say part of the challenge of working on the fabrication line is the speed with which it moves — rates of speed which they say have led to injuries.

    "My fingernail is all black. Not only me, all the employees," said one worker on the fabrication line, "because there’s no blood circulation, because of too much grip. You need to hurry and then your hand is numb.

    "Some of my [fellow] employees, not only one, two, three fingers, all black."

    Another employee who works in maintenance at the facility said those on the line feel constant pressure to keep their speed up. Delays, such as mechanical issues, can exacerbate those stressors.

    "Some machines are just worn out [and will fail]. Then, it’s constant screaming, cursing ... and I mean, people are getting frustrated with that," he said.

    "But some of these people are new in Canada, they’re from the Philippines. So basically, they get scared, they think they’re going to be sent back home or they’ll lose their permanent residence. So they basically just shut up and do what they’re being told."

    These workers, completing repetitive tasks over and over all day, are particularly at risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders like carpal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis and muscle strain, said Jessica Leibler, an environmental health professor from Boston University.

    'I cannot walk'
    One worker said a fellow employee cut off three of his fingers while slicing meat on a weekend shift and began to bleed.

    "He was bleeding for 40 minutes because they don’t want us to call 911," he said. "They wanted us to call the on-call nurse because she will evaluate the guy, whether he needs to go to hospital."

    Sullivan, the Cargill spokesperson, said employees with concerns should report it through the "many reporting channels" open to them.

    "To our knowledge, this [incident] is false. Our policy is to contact medical professionals or our nursing staff when an injury occurs," Sullivan said in an email.

    Injuries have also occurred in other areas. One worker in the packaging area of the facility said she damaged her knee repeatedly lifting heavy boxes.

    "Now, I cannot even stand too long, I cannot walk," she said.

    The cramped facilities mean breaks are just as crowded as regular shifts, employees said.

    Without fail, one worker said, coffee breaks and lunchtime see the cafeteria — referred to as the "feedlot" — fill to capacity with employees.

    When employees are done eating, they’ll move into the locker-room, chatting and lounging while they wait to be let back onto the main floor.

    "In the locker-room, it’s super-crowded," one employee said. "Very filthy."
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-img_8837-1_censored.jpg

    A 'clear danger'
    Concerns for workers' well-being extend beyond their physical health.

    Leibler said although meat-processing workers experience some of the highest rates of occupational injury for all types of injuries, there have been very few studies of workers’ mental health.

    She has studied workers at a U.S. meat-packing plant and found they experienced higher levels of serious psychological distress than those in the general population.

    "They open themselves up, working in these environments, to laceration injury, to repetitive injury, to musculoskeletal injury in addition to the mental health stress," she said.

    "There is clear danger in working in these environments, but many of the people who work in them appreciate the income. Many of them are immigrants, many of them are supporting families. And so it’s a cost-benefit analysis for them, I think, even on a daily basis."

    The bloody and often depressing nature of the work often means many employees burn out quickly, one employee working on the kill floor said.

    "It’s hard to do this every day. Especially when the cow, when they knock it, it makes a voice. Like it’s screaming or something like that," he said. "If people are emotional, it’s hard for them to keep that job."

    Other studies have found workers in meat-packing plants face intense psychological pressure and sometimes a disconnect in empathy because of their work environments.

    Leibler also said her research may underestimate the mental health impacts among workers — as more mentally or physically robust workers are likely to remain in the job and those who have experienced a major injury (mental or physical) might be less likely to participate in research.

    "I think fundamentally the industrial slaughterhouse model is not sustainable," she said.

    "The system is optimized for maximal output but with much less concern for the experience of the workers throughout the process.”

    Leibler said the more immediate challenge faced by meat-packing corporations is to show they value workers by allowing them to stay home with pay while sick or if they are possibly infectious.

    United Food and Commercial Workers Local 401, the union that represents workers at the plant, had requested a stop-work order and filed an unfair labour practice complaint against the plant and the provincial government in hope of preventing the reopening. It has also called for a criminal investigation.

    The plant asked all employees who are eligible to return to work in the harvest department to report for their shifts.

    Days before the reopening, the union surveyed more than 600 workers in four languages; 85 per cent said they were afraid to return to work.

    Ricardo Morales, director of community development and integration services with the Calgary Catholic Immigration Society, has been leading a team to support workers at the plant.

    They’ve been translating health and safety information into Oromo, Tagalog, Spanish, Vietnamese and Chinese for workers.

    "I think Cargill probably could have done a better job communicating with employees as to what support they could receive from the company," he said.

    Immigrants in Canada have more concerns about their health and financial security during the COVID-19 pandemic than the Canadian population as a whole, according to the results of a recent survey from Statistics Canada, and Morales said he’s seen evidence of that on the ground with Cargill workers.

    "You are just not dealing with an ordinary situation. You need to look at ways, culturally, how are people responding and how are people coping under these circumstances."

    Morales said while the community has banded together, Cargill workers still face intense stressors over their immigration status and food security — with some quarantining workers unsure where their next meal will come from.

    Revenue in the billions
    Cargill Ltd. is a Canadian subsidiary of the U.S.-based Cargill, which reported revenue of $113.5 billion US and net earnings of $2.56 billion last year.

    The company is the largest private company in the U.S. in terms of revenue, and the Cargills, a family of reclusive billionaires, still own more than 90 per cent of the corporation.

    Cargill's High River plant opened in 1989 with an initial slaughter capacity of 1,200 head of cattle per day, eventually growing to become the largest beef processing facility in Canada, processing 4,500 head a day.

    Before opening, news reports at the time show some critics worried the company was buying its way into a market already suffering from overcapacity and would lead to the closures of other plants.

    The plant — which was not unionized at the time and paid its employees less per hour than other Alberta plants — did, in fact, lower production costs and plants around the province began to close.

    Today, the Cargill plant, which has since been unionized, provides around 40 per cent of all beef processing in Canada.

    Wages at the Cargill plant start at $17.95 per hour, according to the collective agreement.

    Cargill has said that as an essential part of Canada’s food supply chain, it is committed to continuing production.

    ‘That’s only flu … you’re fit to work’
    To stay open at this time, the company said it has implemented measures to keep employees safe.

    It has installed protective barriers on the production floor to allow for more spacing between employees and introduced face shields where that wasn’t possible.

    Cargill also said it hoped to reduce carpooling by workers through utilizing buses with protective barriers between the seats. Many of the employees live in large households and share transportation.

    But some employees feel other actions by the company increased their risk, like offering bonuses during the COVID-19 outbreak. Workers worried that by missing work, they would miss out on the bonus.

    Some say the company continued to try to lure them back to work from self-isolation as the plant prepared to reopen on May 4.

    "They called my husband, the [Cargill] nurse called, but he still has symptoms," one worker said of her husband, who is also an employee. "They said, ‘That’s only flu, that’s only cough. You’re fit to work.’"

    In an email, Cargill spokesperson Daniel Sullivan said the company had been "very clear" in communications to employees that they should not come to work sick or if they have had contact with someone with COVID-19 in the past 14 days.

    "Employees who must remain off work due to COVID-19 impacts have access to up to 80 hours of paid leave and short-term disability benefits are available to eligible employees," the company said.

    After the COVID-19 pandemic was declared, CBC News reported that no preventative or in-person inspection of the Cargill plant was done.

    A live video inspection by Alberta Occupational Health and Safety (OHS), conducted after dozens at the plant were already sick with COVID-19, concluded the work site was safe to remain open. The inspection didn’t include the harvest or kill floor because slaughter activities weren’t taking place that day.

    OHS is now investigating and provincial health officials were in attendance for the reopening.

    Other slaughterhouse outbreaks
    While Cargill is the site of the largest outbreak, it’s far from alone — meat-packing facilities across North America are hotspots for coronavirus.

    Alberta’s second-largest outbreak, where at least 487 workers have tested positive as of Tuesday, is at the JBS Canada beef plant in the southeastern city of Brooks. That plant remains open.

    Meat-processing plants in Quebec, Ontario and B.C., and two dozen across the U.S. have had to temporarily suspend operations because of smaller outbreaks. In the U.S., 20 meat-processing workers have died because of COVID-19, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

    There have been similar allegations of unsafe practices, like those workers have made at the Cargill plant, reported at multiple facilities.


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    The outbreak at Cargill has spread into the greater community. Cases among staff at a High River retirement facility and on a nearby First Nation have been traced back to the plant.

    Leibler, the environmental health professor, said the outbreaks have hopefully shone some light on the undervalued role of meat-processing workers and the profit-maximizing environment in which food is produced.

    "I think in a lot of developed countries, the process as to how we produce the meat that we buy in our supermarket is very much like a black box. People don’t think about it," she said.

    "Hopefully it’s beneficial for all of us to learn a little bit more about this workforce in this terrible context."

    Another worker on the kill floor said his job at Cargill has its pluses, like working with and developing relationships with people from all over the world.

    But after the company’s response to the COVID-19 outbreak, he said he feels betrayed.

    "They ignored it even after employees spoke out," he said. "They don’t care about the [workers]. They care about the profit."




    link https://newsinteractives.cbc.ca/long...vid19-outbreak
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  62. #2262
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    These outbreaks and the infection rate at meat processing plants is very curious. Here in the states there are 190 USDA inspectors that have tested positive as well. One's got to wonder if the working conditions and close proximity is the sole driver here? Surely there are other sectors of factory work, heaps of them, that work under similar conditions without the same overwhelming infection rate. What's going on?

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    Sad on so many accounts. You have to wonder what horrible lives these people left to find these conditions as a better life, and now the companies are taking even more advantage of them.
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  64. #2264
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    The Tyson plant across from my work in Portland, Maine is now up to 51 cases. They reopened today after being closed since last Friday.

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    This will contaminate the ground water... nothing to see here

    Wood chippers employed to help compost thousands of excess hogs near Worthington plant


    ROUND LAKE, Minn. — A parcel of land in Nobles County has been transformed into a major composting operation for euthanized hogs coming from the crippled JBS pork processing plant in nearby Worthington, as well as hogs from area farmers.

    Mike Crusan, communications director with the Minnesota Board of Animal Health, said delivery of hog carcasses to the southwest Minnesota site began over the weekend. The parcel of land can accommodate the delivery of up to 2,000 head per day, though it hasn’t reached peak capacity at this point.

    JBS announced last week it could euthanize 3,000 head of market-weight hogs per day because they couldn’t be processed before they grew too large for slaughter and packaging. The JBS plant in Worthington shut down temporarily because of an outbreak of COVID-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus, among workers at the plant. On Wednesday, it resumed operations but at reduced levels.

    Crusan said the site northwest of Round Lake would not have been chosen if there were any potential environmental risks.

    An incident management team that includes staff from the Board of Animal Health is overseeing the composting operation to ensure the compost pile is constructed correctly. Proper construction should eliminate the attraction of flies or scavengers, and should not emit an odor, Crusan said.

    “It should just be, to the naked eye, a pile of wood chips out there,” he said. “The wood chips over the top of the pile, beneath the pile and all around it are going to be keeping all of those odors and all of those things contained as the microbes inside the pile do their work.”

    The Minnesota Pork Producers Association is working with the team to establish three other composting sites in the state.

    “They are trying to find other areas where there are congregations of large swine operations so they can better serve those people with a centralized site,” Crusan said, adding that farmers will have the option to deliver hog carcasses to those sites or compost on their own property.

    The hog carcasses delivered to the Nobles County site will be run through the chipper simultaneously with the wood material — a new concept in the hog industry.

    “This whole approach … began being evaluated in composting just within the last year because of African swine fever,” Crusan said. “The pork industry nationwide was studying ways of effectively composting mass carcasses if we were to get that in the United States.”

    Chipping the hog carcasses with the carbon material was studied in the Carolinas, Crusan said.

    “This is one of the ways we know that we can effectively compost and probably speed up the composting process,” he said.

    Crusan said they don’t yet know how many days it will take for the hogs to be fully composted, though it will be considerably shorter than the 60 days it takes for a fully intact carcass to be composted.

    Once the composting process is complete, the material can either be spread over the land or incorporated, adding nutrient-rich material to the soil.

    A third-party contractor was hired to operate the chipping equipment and build the compost pile in Nobles County. The composting service is being offered to farmers at no cost to them, other than trucking the carcasses to the site.

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  66. #2266
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    Meat is not essential. Why are we killing for it?

    President Trump’s recent use of the Defense Production Act to order slaughterhouses and meatpacking plants to stay open is misunderstood if viewed only as the next tragic misstep in his handling of the coronavirus pandemic. It marks the nadir of the increasingly broken meat industry. For years, we have knowingly destroyed our planet for the sake of a protein preference. Now, we are sending humans to their deaths.

    Trump’s “order” was, in fact, the result of meat industry executives requesting his relief from legal liability for worker deaths. The number of slaughterhouse workers who have already died this year is on par with the number of U.S. servicemembers who have died annually fighting in Afghanistan over the last five years. Military personnel risking their lives to fight terrorism is one thing. How did the president arrive at the absurdity of requiring civilians to risk their lives for the sake of a particular food?

    The answer lies in how we have let agribusiness effectively normalize worker exploitation, and the mercenary skill we sometimes employ to deny or forget our support for that industry’s actions. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, meatpacking has long been the nation’s most dangerous occupation. It is not just the nature of the job; there is systemic disregard for the safety and dignity of the people working in the meat industry. An in-depth report by Oxfam documents that, for years, workers in U.S. poultry slaughter plants — including those operated by Tyson Foods, Sanderson Farms, Perdue and Pilgrim’s Pride — commonly wear adult diapers or simply urinate on themselves because bathroom breaks are routinely denied by supervisors under threats of retribution.

    The industry has continued such cruel practices with relative impunity, because workers are too dependent on their jobs to effectively resist unscrupulous managers, and the public has continued to underwrite the abuse. But manslaughter is a new level of depravity. The magical thinking that imagines calling meat “essential” in a time when schools, bypass surgeries and funerals are not, amounts to a sort of state-sponsored witchcraft.

    In the past months, we have relied upon the bravery of essential workers. Most of us, including myself, have also bent language to our preferences. It is not “brave” for a delivery person to continue to work when he has no way to feed his family otherwise. Calling it brave is both condescending, and a method of masking our own guilt about people forced into those situations.

    Perhaps what we’re really talking about when we use the word “essential” isn’t the necessity of the service, but the presumed disposability of the person performing it. In my hometown, black New Yorkers have died from covid-19 at twice the rate of white New Yorkers. Across the country, people of color comprise a grossly disproportionate share of “essential” service workers such as bus drivers, postal workers, food deliverers and, of course, slaughterhouse workers. These jobs rarely offer paid sick leave and never allow for remote working.

    We often hear that people of color are putting themselves at greater personal risk during this pandemic, but the truth is they are being put at greater risk. White people generate 97 percent of all income from the operation of farms. Yet Latinx farmers alone comprise more than 80 percent of farm laborers. The fact that the overwhelming majority of people who will suffer from Trump’s slaughter order are black and brown, and that the overwhelming majority of the executives who pleaded with him to do it are white, cannot be ignored.

    As if to offer a balm to our conscience, Tyson Foods published full-page newspaper ads making the strange case that a reduction in meat supply amounts to the entire food-supply system “breaking.” The food-supply system is indeed badly broken, but the coronavirus did not create the problem.

    Companies such as Tyson Foods did it by inventing a business model that requires environmental destruction, worker exploitation, animal cruelty and conditions that create “novel” viruses. (Of the 16 strains of novel influenza viruses that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified as being of highest concern, all but two converted to human viruses in commercial poultry farms.) Letting the monstrous factory farm system fail would allow safer, most just and sustainable models of agriculture to gain a foothold. Yes, meat supplies would be lower, but food supplies would not be. We would have more than enough protein.

    Meat is not essential and slaughterhouse workers in diapers are not brave. They are being oppressed and, in a free society, each of us who continues to underwrite that abuse bears some of the responsibility. Nor is this problem limited to the time of covid-19. This pandemic is like a lightning strike that has, for a brief moment, illuminated for all of us the values that guide factory farm corporations. Are these also to be the values that determine what we feed ourselves and our families? If not, what can one person hope to do?

    It would be arrogant to think our personal buying decisions alone are sufficient to end decades of normalized exploitation, but it is more arrogant to think our decisions mean nothing. We can begin by ceasing to pretend that public-health measures are “breaking” the food supply chain, and by holding the corporations that have hijacked it responsible. Your next meal is the moment to withdraw your support from the most cruel and destructive industry in America.

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    4 WAYS TO FINALLY END EMOTIONAL EATING WITH A VEGAN DIET

    n these uncertain times, most people are experiencing increasing levels of stress about what the future holds. And with that stress can come eating behaviors that don’t benefit our overall wellbeing. Though following a vegan diet is a step in the right direction when it comes to optimizing our health, there are still some of us who struggle with emotional eating. The behavior is typically triggered by emotions such as stress, sadness, or boredom, and the need to fill a void. It might feel satisfying to eat when these feelings occur, but it is only a temporary sense of relief, and doing it on a regular basis can lead to unneeded weight gain, digestive issues, or other health-related difficulties. By applying these four tips, the good news is that these issues can be managed with a little time and practice.

    1. Eat more fiber from whole foods.
    Eating more fiber is one of the best ways to combat emotional eating on a vegan diet. Fiber is important for digestion, but it is also a key component for our emotional wellbeing. New studies from UCLA prove that our gut and its microbiome are related to neurological health and balance. When fiber intake is sufficient, it triggers an “I am satisfied” switch in our brain, called propionate. Propionate is a short-chain fatty acid caused by your gut bacteria breaking down fiber that alerts the body when it reaches the necessary amount of food intake. Most vegans will obtain plenty of fiber if they’re eating enough whole-food plants. As a result, those who have an issue with emotional eating will likely feel more satisfied and in control of their habits eating whole, plant-based foods than those who do not.

    2. Learn to eat in balance.
    A lack of nutrition can trigger cravings for sweet, comforting, or salty foods that some people struggle with. To overcome emotional eating, consciously following a balanced vegan diet is an important piece of the puzzle. The human body is a complex organism that thrives when it’s fueled with the proper diet, which allows it to receive all the necessary nutrients from different components of our meals, making us less tempted to grab a snack or binge while watching Netflix. It also helps regulate our digestive system. Our stomach is referred to as the second brain because serotonin is created in our stomach and in our brain—so a happy belly will help stabilize the mood. There are many resources online that give examples of what a balanced meal looks like, but a basic rule of thumb is to eat at least two servings of vegetables or greens, and fill one-quarter of your plate with whole grains and another one-quarter with protein (a meal that can cover all these categories is a classic Buddha Bowl).

    3. Learn what it feels like to be truly hungry.

    The feelings of true or physical hunger can be characterized by how hunger comes up during the day. If hunger is brought on slowly and many different kinds of foods sound appetizing, this will most likely be true hunger. When a craving comes up suddenly and it is aimed toward one particular type of food, such as sweets, this can be categorized as emotionally driven hunger. Another way to tell the two apart is by identifying what feelings are coming up after eating. If these feelings are of being satisfied and content at the end of the meal, this is likely from physical hunger. If it’s emotionally driven, the food does not give the same satisfaction. Eating for emotional satisfaction can also cause feelings of guilt and shame after eating food that was not needed. Keeping a journal close by to record these sensations is a great first step in identifying the source of your hunger. If emotional cravings come up, drinking a glass of water can also keep you from acting on your emotions. Instead, sit with the sensation for a minute—doing so can help ease the trigger and it might pass quicker than you think.

    4. Be kind to yourself.

    Being kind to yourself might sound cliché but it can help tremendously when dealing with negative eating habits. Some people might experience guilt or remorse that comes along with the type of foods they are consuming during stressful moments. Creating new and better eating habits might take a little more time than expected and that is okay. Celebrating small victories help keep the marathon going instead of seeing the change as a short-distance sprint. Creating kindness can be as simple as enjoying a vegan dessert or vegan pizza on occasion. Remember that food is not the enemy. If emotional eating does happen, a better way to handle the situation is to be kind to yourself instead and beating yourself up. You’ll overcome it, in time.
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    Fred Willard Always Gave Animals the Last Laugh

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    Fred Willard had audiences in stitches with his portrayal of a clueless dog show commentator in the mockumentary Best in Show. But the real-life Fred not only was knowledgeable about animals but also was one of their biggest advocates.

    A PETA supporter, Fred’s comedic genius put just the right silly spin on serious subjects, including the underestimated intelligence of animals as well as the importance of spaying and neutering and adopting animals from shelters.

    In a brilliantly scathing New York Daily News piece about the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show’s addition of cats, Fred observed, “Not only is throwing cats into a venue packed with dogs pretty nuts, so is the whole premise of the Westminster Kennel Club: promoting the breeding and purchasing of animals, especially when we are in the midst of a homeless-animal crisis so massive, it makes Lady Gaga’s halftime show look like a school production of ‘Mary Poppins.'”

    A big proponent of adopting homeless animals, Fred loved to point out the absurdity of buying dogs and cats from breeders while millions of loving animals wait in shelters for someone to give them a home. In a public service announcement (PSA) for PETA, he asks viewers if they’d pay $5 for a blade of grass, $10 for a glass of tap water, or $50 for a handful of soil, before remarking, “Pretty silly, huh? … With all those lives at stake, I hope you’ll always adopt, and never buy.”

    Fred and his late wife, Mary, followed that advice: They were “adopted” by a stray cat who used to hang around their house. Later, Fred made a hilarious cameo alongside his one-eyed feline companion in PETA’s “Howlin’ for You” video to encourage others to open their hearts and homes to animals in need.

    To help prevent more animals from ending up homeless, Fred starred in a video promoting PETA’s Animal Birth Control campaign. In the spot, he searched for the perfect name for the campaign, musing, “What’s neutered, *****cat? I’ll call Tom Jones. Maybe he’ll sing the theme song!” Fred also starred in an aww-inspiring video in which he learned to speak dog. And he frequently stuck up for the animals often overlooked by humans, including in his clever “fishbowl therapy” PSA that showed what life was like for a sensitive betta fish who had been confined alone to a cramped bowl just so that he could be someone’s decoration.

    PETA was fortunate to have Fred as a stalwart supporter. He had a packed house laughing until its sides hurt as the host of our Stand-Up for Animals benefit show at the famous Comedy Store in Los Angeles, and he cohosted our 25th Anniversary Gala. At our 35th Anniversary Gala, he was honored with PETA’s Humanitarian Award for his dedication to animal rights.

    Thank you, Fred, for making a huge difference for animals.

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    Millions of US farm animals to be culled by suffocation, drowning and shooting

    Closure of meat plants due to coronavirus means ‘depopulation’ of hens and pigs with methods experts say are inhumane, despite unprecedented demand at food banks
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    More than 10 million hens are estimated to have been culled due to Covid-19 related slaughterhouse shutdowns. The majority will have been smothered by a water-based foam, similar to fire-fighting foam, a method that animal welfare groups are calling “inhumane”.

    The pork industry has warned that more than 10 million pigs could be culled by September for the same reason. The techniques used to cull pigs include gassing, shooting, anaesthetic overdose, or “blunt force trauma”.

    In “constrained circumstances”, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), techniques [pdf] might also include a combination of shutting down pig barn ventilator systems with the addition of CO2 so the animals suffocate.

    The ‘depopulation’ comes despite food banks across the US reporting unprecedented demand and widespread hunger during the pandemic, with six-mile-long queues for aid forming at some newly set up distribution centres.

    The American meat supply chain has been hit hard by the closure of slaughterhouses, due to Covid-19 infection rates among workers. 30 to 40 plants have closed, which means that in the highly consolidated US system beef and pork slaughtering capacity has been cut by 25% and 40% respectively, according to the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW).

    The closures have meant that animals cannot be killed for food and many must instead be culled, or “depopulated” at home.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-3162.jpg

    More pigs to be ‘depopulated’
    As it is comparatively easier to keep cattle on farms, cow culls do not appear to be an issue as yet, and the chicken cull may have peaked, said Adam Speck, an agribusiness analyst with IHS Markit.

    “[Cattle] could stay on ranches another six months if necessary. The peak of the chicken cull has passed for now. North of about 10 million chickens were depopulated, either at the chick or egg stage,” Speck said.

    At the hen stage, Leah Garcés, president of US welfare organisation Mercy for Animals, said it is hard to be sure of the numbers. But, “what we know with certainty is that 2 million meat chickens [and] 61,000 laying hens”, have been killed on farms.

    Compared with poultry, said Garcés, stopping or slowing the production cycle of pigs is harder, mainly because pig growing periods are about six months compared to six weeks for hens. “Pregnancies had already been set in motion when the slaughterhouse closures occurred,” she said, and pigs were already in the system.

    The National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) has estimated that: “up to 10,069,000 market hogs will need to be euthanised between the weeks ending on 25 April and 19 September 2020, resulting in a severe emotional and financial toll on hog farmers”.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-5564.jpg

    For pig culls, AVMA “preferred methods” include injectable anaesthetic overdose, gassing, shooting with guns or bolts, electrocution and manual blunt force trauma. AVMA methods “permitted in constrained circumstances” include ventilator shutdown (VSD), potentially combined with carbon dioxide gassing, and sodium nitrite which would be ingested by pigs.

    Speaking more graphically, Garcés said manual blunt force trauma can mean slamming piglets against the ground while VSD would “essentially cook the pigs alive”.

    Asked to estimate numbers of pigs that have already been culled, Speck said producers are very reluctant to depopulate. “About two million might have been culled so far due to the Covid-19 pandemic, over the last six or so weeks.”

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    Speck added that with slaughterhouses likely to return to 85% capacity by the end of May, the NPPC’s depopulation estimate of 10 million pigs could be significantly reduced.

    Speck said breeders are thinning herds and slowing growth to reduce pig supply. “They are sending breeding sows to slaughter, aborting pregnant sows on a small scale and [keeping market-bound pigs] on maintenance style rations with less protein. Coming into the summer months the pigs will also gain weight more slowly as the weather heats up.”

    Methods are ‘inhumane’
    Asked about growth slowdown, Garcés said it posed other welfare risks. “One method to slow down growth is to turn the heat up inside of the warehouses beyond the pigs ‘comfort zone’ because pigs eat less when they are too hot,” she said.

    The combination of feed restrictions and higher barn temperatures, she said, mean pigs are “hungry and hot, increasing their overall discomfort, which is already high in a factory farm setting”.

    In what appears to be an attempt by the industry to reduce any negative depopulation impact, a blog managed by the National Pork Board called Real Pig Farming offers social media sharing tips for farmers. The blog suggests farmers: “Think twice before engaging with posts that show what may be happening on farms right now.”

    It said: “Most people do not understand the complexity of raising pigs and getting pork from the farm to their table. That means, “[a] good rule of thumb is to speak to a level a third grader [eight to 10 years old] would understand to ensure that things are not taken out of context.”

    NPPC spokesperson Jim Monroe said that as of the week ending on 15 May, less than 25% of overall slaughter capacity was idled and the situation was improving. Monroe, added that the “tragic need to euthanise animals is to prevent animal suffering.”

    For poultry, culling options are no easier. Filling sheds with carbon dioxide gas is one method, said Kim Sturla, director of welfare organisation Animal Place. Another cull method, she said, is to smother hens with water-based foam, similar to firefighting foam. Water-based foaming is categorised as the “preferred” method by the AVMA.

    Previously asked about water-based foaming and other cull methods such VSD, an AVMA spokesperson said depopulation decisions were difficult and “and contingent upon several factors, such as the species and number of animals involved, available means of animal restraint, safety of personnel, and other considerations such as availability of equipment, agents and personnel”.

    European campaigners said firefighting foam causes prolonged suffering. Although risks of similar livestock culls appear low in Europe so far, welfare group, Compassion in World Farming advised using foam that contains nitrogen gas because death is faster.

    A 2019 European Food Safety Authority journal report said it did not find water-based or firefighting foam acceptable because “death due to drowning in fluids or suffocation by occlusion of the airways” is not seen as “a humane method for killing animals, including poultry”.

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    How to eat less meat and more plants

    Whether you enjoy meat on a regular basis or savor a steak once in a while, one thing is true: Many people love meat.

    The average American consumes about 222 pounds of red meat and poultry per year, according to a recent estimate by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, while a February 2020 report projected that global meat and poultry consumption is expected to reach 313 million metric tons in 2023.
    But with meat shortages becoming a new reality, we may have no choice but to consume less meat these days. That means now is as good a time as any to try plant-based meals and snacks, which can provide health benefits at a time when we may feel increasingly vulnerable to illness.

    "Eating more plants and going meatless is a good way to preserve your health," said Dr. Robert Graham, who is board certified in both internal and integrative medicine.
    "Eighty percent of chronic diseases we face are preventable and reversible by eating a more plant-based diet. This [pandemic] is a call to action to switch to more plant-based meals and to cook more. They are the two silver linings," said Graham, who is also a chef and co-founder of FRESH Med, an integrative health and wellness center in New York City.
    We know getting started can be difficult, especially if burgers, meatballs and sausage with eggs have been your go-tos. So here are some simple ways to start eating less meat.

    I'm not talking about becoming a vegetarian overnight or even adopting a strict vegan lifestyle. These are simply easy ways to cut back on your meat consumption as meat prices increase, and they're easy ways to improve your health, too.

    10 ways to eat more plants and less meat

    Designate one day each week for meatless eating. "Even going meatless one day a week can make a difference," said Sharon Palmer, a registered dietitian and author of "Plant-Powered for Life."
    The nonprofit group Meatless Monday promotes the notion of cutting out meat every Monday for your personal health and the health of the environment, and it offers helpful tips and recipes for vegetarian cooking.

    The group also offers a Meatless Monday family cookbook with comfort food recipes and plant-based versions of meals that are typically meat-heavy, like a "meaty" mushroom stew over garlic mashed potatoes

    Plantify your favorite dishes. You can make your favorite entrees or meals plant-based with a few simple swaps, according to Palmer.

    "If you have a mean lasagna recipe, skip the meat and add layers of greens, broccoli and peppers and perhaps some pine nuts and cashew cheese instead of the meat and cheese. If you love Taco Tuesday, make your tacos veggie by skipping the meat and serving black beans or a vegetarian mushroom tofu filling," Palmer said.

    Go global. Many international cuisines incorporate plant-based proteins, including chickpeas, beans and lentils.

    For example, a Mediterranean meal might include chickpeas; a Mexican meal might have black beans or pintos; an Asian meal might include edamame; and an Italian meal might use white beans or lentils to make a Bolognese-inspired pasta sauce, said registered dietitian nutritionist Dawn Jackson Blatner, author of The Flexitarian Diet.

    And if you love Indian food, Palmer recommended chickpea masala in place of chicken masala.
    For inspiration, check out recipes from cookbooks focused on international cuisines such as Mediterranean, Indian, Mexican, Thai and Japanese.

    Search your pantry. Stocking your pantry with a variety of beans, whole grains, seasonal veggies, fruits, spices, herbs, healthy oils, nuts and seeds is the secret to eating more plant-based meals, according to Palmer. But even without conscious effort, your pantry is likely already stocked with plant-based ingredients that can be easily assembled into meals.

    Canned corn, kidney beans and quinoa are among the most neglected pantry items, according to Meatless Monday's social media followers. To "rescue" quinoa, chef Adam Kenworthy recommended cooking it in a big batch by itself; then adding cucumber, thinly sliced celery, avocado, cilantro, basil or shiso; and salt and olive oil.

    You can also combine quinoa, beans and corn along with other spices to make a vegetarian chili. And if a recipe calls for frozen corn, you can just swap it with canned, drained corn. It's delicious in soups, stews, casseroles and salads, according to Palmer.
    Experiment with new recipes. Some fun meatless recipes include jackfruit sandwiches in place of pulled pork; black bean meatless balls or eggplant and shiitake "meatballs."

    You can also try making a vegan-friendly Philly cheesesteak using seitan, a high-protein meat substitute made from wheat gluten.

    For more innovative ideas, try carrot "bacon" wrapped dates, or as barbecue season approaches, you can give carrot "hotdogs" a try!

    Try tofu. In addition to serving as a substitute for taco meat, tofu can be used as an ingredient in many other dishes. For example, you can make "chicken fried" tofu instead of chicken fried steak, tofu wings in place of buffalo wings and tofu parmigiana. For a seasonal dish, you might try a springtime asparagus quiche made with a creamy tofu filling.

    Freezing tofu and then thawing it will limit moisture and give more meat-like texture when cooking, according to Graham. Additionally, when you freeze tofu before marinating it, it will soak up the flavor of the marinade better, Graham added. Note: The extra firm tofu is your best option to replace meat.

    Use herbs and spices to mimic meat flavor. "Umami is the flavor that people miss from plant-based sources," Graham said. He recommended using ingredients such as miso and tomatoes, as well as mushrooms and lentils to help deliver a meat-like taste to foods.

    "One of my favorite things to cook is a lentil, mushroom, tomato Bolognese (see recipe for Vegan Bolognese below). I love it because it's stealth health — people think they are eating meat," Graham said.

    Consider faux meat burgers. A Beyond Burger or Impossible Burger may be worth a try if you are looking to mimic the flavor, aroma and even the bleeding color of meat, though it's wise to consider how these burgers fit into your daily nutrient goals.

    If you're not interested in faux meat, try making your own grain burger. My tasty DIY meat-free burger recipe includes beets for a red color, as well as mushrooms, brown rice, lentils and walnuts.

    Keep in mind, you don't necessarily have to replace meat entirely in a recipe.

    "Using less meat is what I encourage," Graham said. "Even if you add a little bit of chopped mushroom to a ground beef patty mixture, that can help to reduce the meat you consume." Graham likes a burger made with half beef and half roasted mushrooms.
    Find fun frozen meatless meals. Frozen foods provide a convenient way to prepare meals when you're constantly eating from home. Amy's Kitchen offers a range of meatless options including a vegan supreme pizza with meatless pepperoni and veggie sausage, a mac and cheese meatless pepperoni bowl as well as a new Greek-inspired red rice and veggies entree. Amy's Kitchen also offers a variety of vegetarian burgers, including a black bean veggie burger.

    Dr. Praeger's, another plant-focused frozen food brand, offers a California veggie burger as well as a meat-alternative Perfect Burger. However, the company also offers meat-alternative recipes on its website that incorporate its frozen foods, such as pan-fried veggie burger dumplings, a California veggie burger bowl, Thai chicken rice bowl and breakfast quesadillas with veggie sausage.

    Download a meatless app. Lastly, if you decide to venture out and you're looking for meat-free meals from a local eatery, apps such as HappyCow or Vegman can come in handy, especially when you are in an unfamiliar area.

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    Purple fruits and vegetables are rich in anthocyanins, which are natural plant pigments that provide foods with their unique colour. Studies have shown that anthocyanins may benefit brain health, help to lower inflammation and fight cancer and heart disease.

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    Celebritities don't have an influence on my personal interests (like diet, or activities such as mtb, running or crossfit etc) or life choices but it is interesting to know what factors inspired them to go vegan or plant based or vegetarian.

    35 Vegan Celebrities Enjoying the Benefits of a Plant-Based Diet

    It seems like every other day a new vegan celebrity emerges touting the benefits of a plant-based diet.

    And it's no wonder why.

    Science has proven beyond doubt that a healthy vegan diet is the best way to improve mental health, build a strong body, reduce the chance of heart disease, type 2 diabetes and some cancers, and to extend your life.

    Plus, you reduce the suffering of animals and help improve the health of our planet.

    Who doesn't want a piece of that!?

    Well, here's 35 vegan celebrities that most certainly do.

    1. Miley Cyrus
    Animal lover and wild child, Miley Cyrus, is extremely vocal about her commitment to animal rights and cruelty free living. A proud owner of a passel of pets, Cyrus went vegan after the death of her beloved dog, Floyd, and now owns a pet pig.

    2. Joaquin Phoenix
    Many vegans can credit their conversion to Phoenix- he played an instrumental narrative role in the gripping documentary, Earthlings, which exposes the horrors of the industrial meat and dairy industry and challenges watchers to rethink their stance on eating animals. Though occasionally erratic in interviews, Phoenix’s commitment to a vegan lifestyle is unwavering.

    3. Evanna Lynch
    Known for her portrayal of the mysterious Luna Lovegood from J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter, Lynch is a vegan advocate who frequently speaks against the violence of the animal agriculture industry. Lynch noted that she’s been a vegetarian since she was 11, but that her transition to veganism didn’t happen until 2015.

    4. Bill Clinton
    Former United States president, Bill Clinton, has stated that he wouldn’t be alive if he hadn’t switched to a vegan diet. Clinton has lauded the lifestyle for its many benefits: namely, energy and continued health, especially in the wake of his quadruple coronary bypass surgery in 2004.

    5. Woody Harrelson
    A long-time vegan, Harrelson first eschewed animal products nearly 30 years ago. Since then, he’s been an advocate for animal rights and healthy living. Reports state that Harrelson has even adopted a raw vegan diet during different periods of his life, proving that a vegan diet is entirely sustainable.

    8. Pamela Anderson
    While Pamela Anderson’s racy PETA ads have made quite the splash like those in her early career, the actress is a longtime supporter of the organization for animal rights. Anderson has been vegan herself for quite some time and she remains a vocal advocate for cruelty free food and fashion.

    9. Ellen DeGeneres
    High profile vegan celebrity Ellen DeGeneres has used her talk show platform to explain her reasoning behind her decision to become vegan: compassion. She and wife, Portia de Rossi, have been vegan since 2008 and are very vocal about the health benefits of a plant based lifestyle.

    6. Mayim Bialik
    Actress and PhD scientist, Mayim Bialik, has been a longtime vegetarian and began eschewing all animal products after the birth of her two young children. After reading the book Eating Animals, Bialik was convinced that a plant-based diet was the right path for both her and her young family.

    7. Casey Affleck
    Make no mistake, this typically soft spoken actor has staunch views on the animal agriculture industry, calling meat ‘poison.’ He has vocally refused to contribute to the ‘violent and inhumane’ animal agriculture industry, and has even teamed up with PETA to get his message across.

    10. Moby
    For musician Moby, the reasoning behind his veganism is simple: a love for animals. Moby has been vegan for over 30 years now, crediting a deep bond with a cat named Tucker as the catalyst that turned him fully plant based. Since then, the musician has been vocal about his support for animal rights and the benefits of a vegan diet.

    11. Morrissey
    Best known for the line ‘meat is murder,’ Morrissey didn’t actually turn vegan until 2015 when he began to realize that the entire animal industry was problematic. A longtime vegetarian, Morrissey’s decision to turn completely plant based has led to collaborations with PETA and an increase in animal advocacy on behalf of the musician.

    12. Stevie Wonder
    Though Stevie Wonder admitted to James Corden that he missed chicken, he also attests that he loves eating a vegan diet. Wonder has also praised the plant-based lifestyle for providing him with options he wasn’t even aware of.

    13. Peter Dinklage
    Dinklage’s character on Game of Thrones might be a tad violent, but this is a far cry from reality as this British actor has been vegetarian since childhood. In recent years, Dinklage has turned completely vegan and has even partnered with PETA to create a ‘Face Your Food’ campaign that introduces viewers to the reality of factory farming.

    14. James Cameron
    This academy award winning director found veganism in 2011 and has never looked back. After listing the benefits (health, better skin, a slimmer waistline, a higher sex drive and a longer life), Cameron admits that his entire family has gone plant-based and reaped massive benefits.

    15. Alicia Silverstone
    Long-term vegetarian, Alicia Silverstone, has been an animal activist and vegan since she was 20 years old, making her one of Hollywood’s most well known and outspoken advocates of a plant-based diet. Silverstone’s revelations about the animal agriculture industry and her tips for a healthier lifestyle are outlined in her book, The Kind Life.

    16. Brad Pitt
    Pitt’s disdain for red meat led to a vegetarian- and then vegan- way of life. The actor, though not extremely outspoken about his lifestyle choices, remains committed to a plant-based diet for health and environmental reasons. Even still, he is a massive vegan celebrity. Nice one, Brad.

    17. Jessica Chastain
    As the daughter of a vegan chef, it makes perfect sense that Chastain herself would be vegan, but she didn’t make the transition from vegetarianism until nearly 2007. At that time, Chastain gifted her mother a food truck (Seed on the Go) that serves up plant-based fare in Northern California.

    18. Sinead O’Connor
    Acclaimed Irish singer/songwriter Sinead O’Connor eschews all animal products in favor of a plant-based diet, and has her health and vitality to thank for it! Incidentally, the late Prince, who wrote her hit song Nothing Compares To U, was also supposedly a vegan.

    19. Penn Jillette
    After losing 100 pounds in a little over 80 days- a feat that almost seems like magic, Jillette revealed that he had adopted a vegan diet. Since then, Jillette has been vocal about how drastically a plant-based diet has improved his health and fitness.

    20. Russell Simmons
    Hip-hop mogul Simmons faced the music years ago and changed his unhealthy ways, becoming deeply committed to both his yoga practice and his belief in animal rights. Since then, Simmons has practiced the yogic principle of ‘ahimsa’ (non-harming) and seeks to spread his message through a new book on veganism- The Happy Vegan.

    21. Jennifer Lopez
    Though she admits to missing butter, JLo praises a plant-based diet for helping her feel (and look) her best. After initially trying out a 22 day meal plan, JLo decided to stick with the meat and dairy free diet after she lost 10 pounds. The singer and actress is now totally committed to living a cruelty free lifestyle, with even her book entitled True Love.

    22. Ellie Goulding
    Goulding credits her newfound body confidence and abundance of energy to her transition to a vegan diet, noting that it’s improved her skin, toned her body and improved her overall health. The best part? Goulding has noted that her eyes are brighter and and that she is definitely happier.

    23. Liam Hemsworth
    Who ever said that vegans don’t have muscle? Named PETA’s sexiest male celebrity in 2016, Hemsworth credits friend and costar, Woody Harrelson, for the information that changed his lifestyle. Citing incidences of animal cruelty and the unhealthy nature of animal products, Hemsworth says he’s happy with his plant-based lifestyle and will maintain it.

    24. Al Gore
    United States Presidential candidate, Al Gore, is a well known environmentalist whose advocacy has extended to his plate. After realizing that diet is a major contributor to global warming, Gore decided to eschew animal products in 2013. More a famous vegan than a celebrity vegan, I suppose.

    26. Novak Djokovic
    Serbian tennis phenom, Novak Djokovic, is plant-powered! This athlete knows how well plants can prep you for professional success. He’s such a believer in a vegan diet that he’s even opened his own restaurant, Eqvita, which is entirely cruelty-free.

    27. Brendan Brazier
    If triathlete Brendan Brazier can get enough protein on a vegan diet, so can you. Brazier, who has performed successfully in a number of competitions, cites environmental and health concerns as the motivating factors behind his transition. The picture of health, Brazier proves that you can be vegan and strong.

    28. Olivia Wilde
    Actress Olivia Wilde credits her youthful looks and overall well-being to an exclusively vegan diet. Though Wilde is a long-time vegetarian (she decided to stop eating meat at age 12), her journey to veganism was not always easy and has frequently noted that support is necessary for those considering a transition.

    25. Kristen Bell
    Though Bell- a long-time vegetarian- fluctuated between vegetarianism and veganism during her two pregnancies, her commitment to healthy living and animal rights has never wavered. A lover of animals, Bell’s commitment to animal advocacy was ignited nearly 20 years ago.

    33. Angela Davis
    There’s no way activist Angela Davis was going to forget about the animals. Davis- a long-time vegan- challenges her supporters to explore connections between race, gender, liberation and veganism. Her decision to eschew animal products came from a conscious desire to reject speciesism.

    29. Jared Leto
    After Leto realized that the side effects of his acting career (lack of sleep and fast food) was taking a toll on his body, he turned to veganism with the hope that his health would improve. It did, drastically, and Leto now enjoys extreme outdoor adventures, when he’s not acting.

    30. James Cromwell
    When James Cromwell accepted a role in the movie, Babe, he wasn’t expecting to become an animal activist, but that’s exactly what happened. Citing the film as the factor behind his decision to go vegan, Cromwell is also quite active as an advocate of animal rights.

    31. Mac Danzig
    If anyone knows the importance of strength, it’s former MMA fighter, Mac Danzig, who is also, coincidentally, a vegan. Danzig has proved time and time again that his diet is no detriment to his skill and strength, and he remains a pioneer for plant-based athletes

    32. Natalie Portman
    Though Natalie Portman transitioned back to vegetarianism during her pregnancies, her passion for veganism is well known. Portman has been an outspoken proponent of animal rights and the adoption of a plant-based diet ever since she read Jonathan Safran Foer’s novel, Eating Animals.

    34. Bryan Adams
    For Bryan Adams, it’s quite simple: “if you love animals, don’t eat them.” Adams’ love for his dogs inspired this philosophy and the rock star went vegetarian almost 20 years ago. Though his transition to veganism took some time, Adams is a staunch proponent of a cruelty-free lifestyle and a vegan diet.

    35. Steve-O
    Though Steve-O (the outspoken, fun loving and wild star of Jackass) doesn’t seem like the type to care about health and wellness, the past few years have brought quite a change for this star. After giving up drugs in 2008, Steve-O began a commitment to his health that led him to adopt a vegan diet and a compassionate lifestyle.

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    Vegan Protein Sources: How to Meet Your Requirements

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    Protein for Vegans: Basic Information
    From the 1970s and 1980s, conventional wisdom said that vegetarians and vegans run severe risks of protein deficiency. Much of this concern arose from the first bestselling vegetarian advocacy book, Diet for a Small Planet (published in 1971), which offered protein recommendations that, in hindsight, were needlessly stringent.

    Today, the pendulum may have swung too far in the opposite direction. Some vegans believe that their protein intake isn’t worth much consideration. In fact, you can even find vegans who outright dismiss the topic as unworthy of attention.

    But belittling the importance of protein is as unwise as believing that vegans are courting deadly protein deficiencies. The truth is that while it’s easy for vegans to get plenty of protein, it’s also easy to come up short. Unfortunately, it’s fair to assume that many vegans fall far short of achieving an optimal protein intake. It’s needlessly risky to believe that, as a vegan, you’re exempt from having to pay attention to protein.

    Perhaps the main source of confusion about this topic relates to a dire medical condition called kwashiorkor. This disease only appears in areas of famine, or among people with severe eating disorders. Relatively tiny amounts of protein are all it takes to avoid kwashiorkor, so for obvious reasons this deficiency disease is unheard of in the vegan community.

    Symptoms of Moderate Protein Deficiency
    Some vegans make the mistake of thinking that avoiding kwashiorkor means that protein levels are acceptable. This is a dangerously misguided belief—avoiding kwashiorkor doesn’t mean your protein intake is even close to ideal.

    What’s more, there’s no clear-cut way to know for sure if you’re getting all the protein your body needs. Even blood tests can’t reliably tell you if your intake is sub-optimum. Instead, a variety of symptoms that indicate mild to moderate protein deficiency. These symptoms include:

    chronic fatigue
    high blood sugar or triglyceride levels
    inability to maintain sufficient muscle mass
    depression
    While there are countless terrible things about meat, milk, and eggs, it’s undeniable that all these foods are rich in protein. So if you stop eating animal products and don’t replace them with vegan foods that are protein-rich, there’s a possibility that your intake will decline from adequate to insufficient. Fortunately, just a little effort can ensure your protein needs are nicely met on a vegan diet.

    Vegan Protein Intake Recommendations
    VeganHealth.org recommends a daily intake of 1 to 1.1 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. In practice this means a 68 kilogram (150 pound) adult needs to take in about 70 grams of protein per day. What’s more, much of this protein ought to be rich in the amino acid lysine. Beans are rich in lysine, whereas rice, wheat, and nuts are significantly lower in this amino acid.

    If you crunch the numbers and see how this advice translates to everyday eating you’ll discover that you may need to make a concerted effort to cover your needs.

    The Best Vegan Protein Sources
    One way to step up your intake is to get into the habit of incorporating rich protein sources into the majority of your meals, including foods like:

    Soy milk
    Tofu
    Seitan (Wheat Gluten)
    Beans, including lentils and split peas
    Nuts & peanuts
    Green peas
    Orgain and other vegan protein powders
    Quinoa
    Buckwheat
    Clif Bars and Probars
    One food that is surprisingly low in protein is commercially-made almond milk. The stuff generally contains loads of sugar but very little protein. Soy milk is therefore typically a better choice for people wanting to boost their protein intake. In fact, it’s common for soy milk to have about six times more protein than almond milk!

    Tips for Increasing Your Protein Consumption
    If you don’t like the taste of beans or you have trouble digesting them, it can be a challenge to get sufficient protein on a vegan diet. Our beans page offers advice about how to prepare beans in ways that maximize digestibility. You may find that tofu, tempeh, and soy-milk easier to digest than other bean-based foods. Alternately, nuts, seeds, and quinoa are all rich in protein, and easily digested.

    Protein powders can be a godsend to anyone who can’t tolerate beans or nuts. They can give you a big dose of protein, in a form that’s more digestible than meals made with beans. Most brands of protein powder deliver about 20 grams of lysine-rich protein per scoop. Orgain makes an inexpensive all-organic vegan protein powder, and it sells for about half the price of some comparable organic brands. Buy a shaker cup and you won’t have to dirty a blender each time you prepare a serving.

    Protein-Rich Recipes
    Adding just a few protein-rich meals to your cooking repertoire may be all it takes to boost your intake to adequate levels. There are two different cookbooks devoted entirely to protein-rich vegan meals.

    The High-Protein Vegan Cookbook, by Ginny Kay McMeans
    The Great Vegan Protein Book, by Steen & Noyes
    It’s reasonable to speculate that many people who fail to thrive on a vegan diet aren’t eating sufficient protein. Since meat is loaded with protein, a vegan who becomes protein deficient would doubtless feel better within days of putting meat back into the diet. The best way to ensure that you don’t develop a deficiency is to keep an eye on getting sufficient amounts each day. A little attention and vigilance is all it takes to avoid problems down the road.

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  79. #2279
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    Vegan seafood: The next plant-based meat trend?

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    Seafood is difficult to veganise well, but some companies are betting on new technologies and customers to overcome the challenges.

    Seaweed-wrapped deep-fried tofu, served in newspaper. Marinated aubergine slices pressed over rice. Chunks of legume protein coated in oil and herbs. These products are intended to mimic various fish dishes – fish and chips, unagi, canned tuna – and they’re all available now.

    Faux seafood isn’t entirely new, but products are limited and many of those that have been available so far have been underwhelming and undermarketed. These range from bland tofish and chips served in pubs to rubbery faux shrimp sold in Chinese grocers’ freezer sections, part of the long tradition of imitation meats in Chinese Buddhist cuisine.

    These products are ripe for the kind of innovation that has driven and expanded the plant-based meat industry. Yet faux seafood manufacturers seeking to make niche products mainstream face some unique challenges, from cultivating great taste and texture through to scaling costs for ambitious new offerings.

    Small market, challenging product

    At the moment, faux seafood is a tiny sector in the food supply chain. In the US, the country with the most vegan seafood start-ups, plant-based seafood made up only 1% ($9.5m) of the dollar amount of all retail sales of plant-based meat in 2019. (And plant-based meat, in turn, made up 1% of total meat sales.) Total research and development on alternative seafood has only amounted to $10m–$20m so far.

    One issue is the technical challenge of replicating flaky, fragile seafood. That means shelf-stable mock tuna has been easier to produce than fillets, and the great majority of plant-based seafood retail sales are of frozen products. The few companies in this space also tend to focus on perfecting a single faux seafood product rather than working on multiple products simultaneously.

    Another thorny issue is nutrition. “People typically turn to conventional seafood for health benefits. And so being able to come really close to those benefits is extremely important on the plant-based seafood side,” says Jen Lamy, the sustainable seafood manager for the Good Food Institute (GFI).

    Yet that’s been difficult to achieve. Good Catch’s fish-free tuna may come closest, with a legume blend providing protein and algal oil providing a source of omega-3 fatty acids. Perceived health benefit is the main driver of flexitarianism in the UK, and flexitarianism is in turn the main driver of mainstream take-up of faux meat. So nutrition is key if alternative seafood companies want to expand their consumer base for currently niche products.

    Rising demand, rising opportunity

    Overall, it’s taken consumers a while to begin clamouring for plant-based seafood. Nutrition aside, it’s also because animal welfare concerns about lobsters and farmed fish may not motivate vegetarians and vegans the way pigs and cows do. This is partly cultural and historical: fish aren’t considered meat under Catholicism, for instance, and so their consumption is acceptable on Fridays during Lent.

    Yet the UK opened its first pop-up vegan fish and chip shop in 2018, with the vegan menu subsequently being rolled out to all locations of London chippy chain Sutton & Sons. Vegan items now contribute about 20% of their total revenue, reports Sutton & Sons spokesperson Nicholas O’Connor. And the vegan menu continues to expand, from ‘prawn’ cocktail to ‘calamari’ strips and the recently added ‘lobster’ roll.

    In general, alternative seafood poses an enormous opportunity for investors. There’s huge potential for replicating the many types of seafood that end up on dinner plates. As well, shellfish allergy is the most common food allergy in many countries, creating space for shellfish simulacra (after all, lactose-sensitive people were important to the expansion of dairy-free milk).

    Some observers believe that the transition from conventional seafood to plant-based versions will happen more rapidly than the shift from dairy milk to dairy-free, because of the high demand for seafood and the dwindling wild supply (and as many large fish species can’t be easily farmed). And even if ethical eaters are less concerned about the welfare of marine animals, awareness of the human rights abuses in global fishing chains and the potential depletion of certain marine species may be compelling.

    Scaling the start-ups

    The last 18 months have seen a number of important product launches and fundraising rounds; for instance, the company BlueNalu completed a $20m fundraising round in February 2020. A single company or investor could have an outsize impact on the overall market.

    So could a government. Singapore, which has been working to move away from its dependence on imported food, has become a leader in alternative seafood. The Singapore Institute of Food and Biotechnology Innovation began collaborating in August 2019 with the Singaporean branch of Sophie’s Kitchen, a US plant-based seafood company, on fermenting microalgae to produce a protein substitute.

    And Singapore’s Shiok Meats, which is working on cell-based crustacean products, could well become the first cell-based seafood company to enter the market. Sandhya Sriram, the CEO of Shiok Meats, explains that the company has received grants, tax rebates and regulatory assistance from the Singaporean government thus far, and is hoping to obtain additional funding and manufacturing support in the future.

    Cell-based meat, sometimes called lab-grown meat or clean meat, has identical cellular structure to animal meat but doesn’t require slaughter. Instead cells from initial “donor animals” are grown in a bioreactor. The cell lines can continue to be used over and over, creating great potential to reduce animal suffering – although for the moment the process is energy-intensive and divisive.

    Sriram acknowledges that not all vegetarians and vegans will be on board with this kind of seafood of the future. “At the end of the day, cell-based meats are still very much meats to the biological and cellular level – so if you do not eat meat, for example, for religious reasons, cell-based meats may not suit you. But for me as a vegetarian, for ethical reasons, I can consume cell-based meats without any guilt.”

    It will take some time to get there, in any case. A single dumpling made with Shiok shrimp would cost about S$150 ($107, or £85). Sriram says that the company is still at the “R&D scale” but has plans to grow operations and reduce costs. In general, cell-based and plant-based meats are still more expensive than the conventional versions; as with Shiok, this is primarily an issue of a smaller scale.

    ‘Early days’

    Of course, Covid-19 has altered everything. The traditional meat supply has been disrupted by the spread of infection in crowded processing plants and fishing boats. (Mock meat products are easier to produce in socially distanced conditions.)

    One result is that seafood consumption is down in some countries. Overall, demand for plant-based meats has risen since the start of lockdown. Some 23% of surveyed US consumers say they’ve been eating more plant-based meals due to Covid-19 (about twice as many as those eating more meat). The figure is highest among 18-24-year-olds. During the lockdown in the US, both animal-based and plant-based meats have experienced surges in sales growth, but the percentage gains have been much higher for the alternative meats. “Plant-based meat has grown a lot relative to this period last year,” says Lamy.

    But it’s hard to predict the long-term effects of the pandemic on innovative seafood companies, which are prone to excessive exuberance about how soon they can reach the market or how quickly they can spread. For one thing, consumers are likely to be very price sensitive, so the higher prices of seafood alternatives may be more of a stumbling block than usual.

    Yet there’s more capital and technology flowing into this area than ever before, and Lamy is particularly enthusiastic about partnerships between established seafood companies like Bumble Bee (famous for canned tuna) and Good Catch (getting more famous for faux tuna). “There’s room for so many more entrants in this market,” she emphasises. “It’s still early days.”


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    82-YEAR-OLD VEGAN TO RUN 100K FOR ANIMALS IN THE UK

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    Starting on June 21, 82-year-old vegan Paul Youd is set to run 100 kilometers (62 miles) over the course of 10 days to raise funds for the 200 residents of Dean Farm Trust animal sanctuary in Chepstow, England. Youd began running as a hobby in March to learn a new skill during the COVID-19 lockdown. He worked up to a three-kilometer-a-day distance around a small track that he marked out in his garden. Feeling good about his new abilities, Youd decided to take on the 100K running challenge in an effort to raise £10 ($13) for every kilometer he ran.

    “I wanted to challenge myself and do something to help the rescued animals at Dean Farm Trust,” Youd said. “They do such amazing work to rescue animals in need and they are really struggling at the moment, with many of their funding sources affected by the coronavirus. Running was something I could learn from the safety of my home.”

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2020/6/82-year-o...lVZ-8vU2ADJXsY
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    Coronavirus outbreaks climb at U.S. meatpacking plants despite protections, Trump order


    Coronavirus outbreaks at U.S. meatpacking plants continue to soar as the beleaguered industry ramps up production, scales back plant closures and tries to return to normal in the weeks after President Donald Trump declared it an essential operation.

    Trump’s April 28th executive order followed the industry’s dire warnings of meat shortages and invoked the Defense Production Act to compel slaughterhouses and processing plants to remain open.

    The order had a chilling effect on the steady drumbeat of closures that had come to symbolize the crisis throughout April and early May. Nearly three dozen coronavirus-affected plants temporarily shuttered in the month leading up to Trump’s executive order. In the five weeks since then, just 13 have closed, according to tracking from the Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting.

    Meat production, which had briefly tanked, quickly rebounded after the order to near pre-coronavirus levels and quelled consumer fears of pork, beef and poultry shortages.

    But the number of coronavirus cases tied to meatpacking plants has more than doubled since then, topping 20,400 infections across 216 plants in 33 states, according to tracking from the Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting.

    At least 74 people have died.

    That’s despite widespread implementation of protective measures like temperature checks, plastic barriers and social distancing meant to curb the virus’ spread inside the plants. Some of the recent outbreaks happened at facilities that had taken such steps.

    Tyson Foods, for example, announced in mid-April it was providing face masks to all employees and installing barriers between workers. Since then, 24 of its plants have reported outbreaks, including two in Iowa that sickened more than 800 workers total. The company had just five plants with outbreaks prior to the announcement of safety measures.

    Likewise, Smithfield Foods said it was installing barriers, adding more hand sanitizing stations and "enhancing cleaning and disinfection" at its facilities after an outbreak at Sioux Falls, South Dakota, plant in early April. Since then, 11 of its plants have reported outbreaks, including one in southern California in late May. It had just one plant outbreak prior to the announcement of safety measures.

    Other plants have implemented no protective measures or have failed to enforce them.

    One federal meat inspector in the Midwest told USA TODAY that workers in several plants she visits on the job were not wearing masks and practiced only limited social distancing. Some, she said, had also recently tested positive for COVID-19.

    “I’m thinking, ‘Wow,’ I don’t think I’m safe here,” said the inspector, who agreed to an interview on the condition of anonymity because she was not authorized to speak to the media.

    Even after informing a supervisor at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service about the lax conditions inside the plants, she said, she was told that as long as she had a mask, she had to work. Otherwise, she said, she was told she could use vacation time or take unpaid leave.

    “I shouldn’t be forced to not take pay or use my vacation, or take the chance of losing my life,” she said.

    Across the United States, some of the highest spikes in coronavirus cases recently occurred in counties with one or more meatpacking plants — Buena Vista County, Iowa; Beadle County, South Dakota; Yell County, Arkansas; and Titus County, Texas, for example. All saw their case counts more than double in the past two weeks, a USA TODAY data analysis found.

    'Callous disregard' for health

    Experts say Trump’s executive order prioritized meat production over the lives of plant workers, many of whom are rural, immigrant and undocumented and who face already dangerous conditions for low wages.

    “I think it’s a callous disregard for the health, safety and even lives of the people who work for you,” said Lawrence Gostin, a Georgetown professor and director of the WHO Collaborating Center on National & Global Health Law. "Employers and government, including the president, hold a duty to every American to keep them safe, and there’s a breach of that duty."

    The White House did not respond to requests for comment on the effect of the executive order or the continued rise in COVID-19 cases across slaughterhouses and processing facilities.

    Meatpacking industry officials said they’re working with local and federal health officials to protect workers against the coronavirus and that the plants are safer today than they were at the time of the executive order.

    “We strongly believe the safety measures we’ve put in place are helping to protect our team members and minimize the spread of the virus in the communities where we operate,” said Tyson spokesman Gary Mickelson.

    Without the safety measures in place, the case counts might have been even higher, said KatieRose McCullough, director of regulatory and scientific affairs at the North American Meat Institute, an industry lobbying group.

    The United Food and Commercial Workers Union, many times an adversary to major meatpacking companies, also vouched for the industry’s efforts.

    Mark Lauritsen, the union’s director of food processing, meatpacking and manufacturing, said conditions at plants where the UFCW represents workers have almost “universally improved.” That’s particularly true, he said, in facilities that closed amid outbreaks to fully rework their processes before re-opening.

    “It really gave us the opportunity to push these employers to take that down time to reengineer and increase the safety protocols,” Lauritsen said. “An expansion of (personal protective equipment), enhanced sanitation, all of the other things we were pushing. Those things have all taken place.”

    “But I want to be clear,” Lauristen said. “There’s still a lot of work to be done.”

    Some worker protections, though, have started to roll back.

    The USDA rescinded its policy that all at-risk inspectors can stay home, said Paula Schelling, acting president of the American Federation of Government Employee’s Council 45, citing the workplace improvements that are supposed to take place under the CDC guidance.

    Employees are now being provided masks, face shields and hand sanitizer, a USDA plan obtained by USA TODAY shows.

    And Tyson recently reinstated a policy that effectively penalizes workers for taking sick leave, although the company said workers sick with COVID-19 or displaying symptoms were being asked to stay home and provided with short-term disability pay.

    When asked why the plants continued to have outbreaks, Tyson's Mickelson declined to directly answer but instead said that no one "can say with certainty why COVID-19 affects different communities across the country at different times and in different ways."

    Order stopped a likely shutdown

    Experts argued Trump’s order doesn’t prevent state and local public health officials from shutting down plants, though it might have discouraged them.

    That was certainly the case in St. Joseph, Missouri, where Trump’s order was a “very important” part of the city’s decision to leave a coronavirus-affected meatpacking plant open, the city’s Director of Health Debra Bradley told USA TODAY.

    In late April, Bradley and other city leaders debated whether they could close the local Triumph Foods pork processing plant amid numerous complaints that employees were forced to work while sick and a small but steady rise in coronavirus cases.

    “Shut it down,” St. Joseph Mayor Bill McMurray told city attorney Bryan Carter and others in an April 22 email obtained by USA TODAY. With nine cases at Triumph at the time, he pushed for the state to be notified.

    “Given the other meatpacking plant problems around the country, I was just very concerned that we were going to grow to a huge number of cases,” McMurray said in an interview.

    But Carter said regulations granting local health officials the authority to close “places of public or private assembly” did not apply in a statewide pandemic, according to the emails. Only the state Department of Health and Senior Services could do so.

    The next day, Bradley emailed local officials that the state Department of Health and Senior Services drafted a policy allowing local health authorities to close a business in a pandemic.

    She added that DHSS Director Randall Williams “asked what Triumph’s threshold was for closing and I told him that I don’t think they intend to close.”

    Williams advised waiting on the results of some 2,800 tests the state sent to St. Joseph before deciding. And given the changes Triumph had made — including temperature checks and putting up barriers in the cafeteria — Bradley advised giving the plant time to act.

    Trump’s order on April 28 seemed to have stopped any such discussion, according to Bradley’s emails. That day, Carter sent her a link to a CNN article about Trump’s executive order. The article’s headline: “Trump orders meat processing plants to stay open.”

    “You may have seen this already, but it looks like closing Triumph may not be an option,” Carter wrote.

    Two days later, DHSS announced that 126 Triumph employees had tested positive for coronavirus, including at least 92 who had no symptoms.

    To date, 490 Triumph employees have contracted the virus. One of them, a 40-year-old man, has died. He had tested positive on April 22 — the day local officials began debating whether they could close the plant.

    Triumph Foods has remained opened despite a Change.org petition with more than 7,000 signatures calling for its closure. It has not reported any new cases since May 15. The company did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

    “It wasn’t until we did the mass testing that we realized how widespread it was within the facility,” Bradley told USA TODAY. “At that point, my staff was essentially saying that because it was so widespread that it wouldn’t really necessarily make a difference whether it was closed or not. And because it is identified as a critical infrastructure facility, we just went ahead and left it open.”

    The executive order did not include a specific mandate for plants to remain open. It did, however, suggest some states needlessly closed plants in conflict with recent guidelines jointly issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Those guidelines take priority over any state or local order to close, according to a statement released the same day by OSHA’s lead agency, the U.S. Department of Labor.

    Public health agencies face potential litigation if they try to close the plants, experts said. But many agreed that state and local health officials retain the authority to close them.

    “What I think we can conclude is that the executive order is meant to add weight to the CDC and OSHA guidance, but it is just that — guidance,” said Jill Krueger, Northern Region director for The Network for Public Health Law.

    Working with plants is generally preferable to shutting them down because it lets public health officials put controls in place that they can't in workers’ homes and communities, said Nathaniel Smith, director of the Arkansas Department of Health and president of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials.

    "We didn't close any down at the time because when it was kind of in vogue to close down we weren't really having any cases or not having very many cases," Smith said. "Now we're having lots of cases, but we're still not closing down. ... If we can make the work site safer, that's a major control point."

    Weakened guidelines

    At stake is worker safety. But the joint guidance issued by OSHA and the CDC and cited in Trump’s executive order say plants must make only “good faith” efforts to keep workers safe.

    "Modify the alignment of workstations, including along processing lines, if feasible, so that workers are at least six feet apart in all directions ... when possible,” the guidelines stipulate.

    A month later, it’s unclear what, if any, impact the guidelines have had.

    “They can say, ‘Well we tried but it costs too much money,’ then they’re off the hook,” Lauristen said. The guidelines “are as worthless as the copy paper they’re printed on.”

    It’s also unclear who’s enforcing the joint guidance.

    It’s not federal food inspectors, said Schelling of the American Federation of Government Employee’s Council 45, the union representing USDA inspectors.

    Despite the government’s official position that the joint guidelines should be in place at every plant, Schelling said regional supervisors and frontline employees have no power to ensure compliance.

    “We have no regulation in place that we can hang our hat on that says, ‘Plant, you need to put these controls in place,’” Schelling said. “You can have the conversation, but there’s nothing enforceable that can be taken against the plant.”

    Officials from OSHA have previously said they can enforce the guidelines under a legal provision that employers have a general duty to provide safe working conditions. But it’s unclear how rigorously the USDA follows up with plants to ensure changes have been made.

    While Schelling agreed major companies like Smithfield and Tyson have largely improved their work spaces, smaller plants that employ a few dozen workers and have more limited resources have not.

    “There’s no social distancing,” she said. “There’s no PPE that the company employees are being mandated to wear.”

    The USDA issued letters to governors and major meatpacking companies on May 5 to set clear expectations for the implementation of the executive order, an agency spokesperson said in an email to USA TODAY.

    “Since then,” the spokesperson said, “the USDA has worked with the CDC and OSHA, state and local leaders and public health officials, and meat processing facilities to affirm they will operate in accordance with the CDC/OSHA guidance to keep these critical facilities open while maintaining worker safety.”

    But the industry’s continued inability to prevent the spread of the virus points to an ineffectiveness of those guidelines, said Adam Pulver, an attorney at the watchdog group Public Citizen.

    “It’s certainly not like we’re out of the woods and the problems have stopped — we’re still seeing daily reports of outbreaks in plants," Pulver said. "The recommended precautions are not anywhere sufficient to really prevent transmission. The only real way to prevent transmission would require really significantly slowing down and reconfiguring the way these plants operate, spacing out workers in a way that they’re just not willing to do.”

    sauce https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...sJbebrM3zNf0Mw
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    One has to wonder if it's in the animals themselves.

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  85. #2285
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    ^It's hard to say. Or it could be the inability to provide physical distance during work
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    Tofu sales skyrocket amid covid-19 pandemic

    Sales of tofu in the United States increased significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic according to data by market research firm Neilsen. During the four-week period ending on March 28, sales of tofu increased by 66.7 percent when compared to the same time period last year. As animal meat shortages set in due to slaughterhouse closures and subsequent supply chain disruptions, tofu sales were still up by 32.8 percent in May.

    Several tofu producers confirmed to Bloomberg that sales spiked during the COVID-19 pandemic, including Oakland, CA-based Hodo Foods; Japan-based House Foods, and South Korea-based Pulmuone (maker of Nasoya, Wildwood, and Azumaya brands)–which recently increased production to six days per week at three plants of its US plants to keep up with demand. Supermarkets have also seen tofu sales surge, including Kroger (which reported a 9 percent increase from mid-March to late May) and Wegmans (which nearly doubled its tofu sales during that period when compared to 2019).

    Data released last month by trade group Plant Based Foods Association (PBFA) and market research company SPINS further illustrates changing consumer buying habits amid COVID-19 pandemic. During the peak pandemic food-buying period in mid-March, sales of plant-based foods overall increased by 90 percent when compared to sales during the same time last year. In the four weeks that followed, plant-based food sales spiked by 27 percent, outpacing total retail food sales by 35 percent.

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2020/6/tofu-sale...NWpazcshmik5IE
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  89. #2289
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    It makes me so profoundly sad the way we treat animals. Animals are banding together. Humans better beware.

    Humans don't like to see animals suffer. But we've never stopped the suffering.

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    On Sept. 8, 1827, a group of American hotel entrepreneurs arranged for the Animal Boat, a leaky wooden craft carrying two bears, a bison, a fox, a raccoon, an eagle, a “vicious” dog, a cat and four geese, to go over Niagara Falls in a bizarre life-vs.-the-elements show. The animals, save for the hopeless eagle left chained to the deck, were released from their shackles at the last minute, presumably to give them a fighting chance. Except for the bears, who were spotted swimming safely to the Canadian bank of the Niagara River, none emerged alive as their boat was dashed to splinters.

    The repulsive stunt, almost inconceivable to modern values, was a giant hit in its day, drawing enormous crowds that filled empty off-season restaurants and hotel beds. The overall positive public response of 1827 highlights a key conclusion in Boston University historian Andrew Robichaud’s Animal City: The Domestication of America, one echoed in other recent explorations of the place of animals in the evolution of modern cities. By the 1870s, North Americans would have been just as appalled by the Animal Boat as their 21st-century descendants. Between the first third and the last quarter of the 19th century, a revolution in human-animal affairs unfolded in the continent’s cities.

    It was sweeping in its practical results, banishing from urban centres—and the public gaze—domestic animals and the trades that turn them into consumer products, and more subtle in its effects on social and individual attitudes. Contemporary North Americans remain the heirs of that revolution, and not just in our urban landscapes, which still bear the marks of areas set aside for animal industry—consider Toronto’s Stockyards neighbourhood or San Francisco’s Butcher Town. The great change—“post-domesticity,” as scholars call it—also sank deep into our cultural DNA. It’s still at the base of our concepts of how we should use and relate to animals, even as discoveries in animal science, rising trends in veganism and vegetarianism, and our almost literal adoption of pets into our families all herald a new development in contemporary thought.

    In 1842, Charles Dickens wrote home to London about the sights of New York City’s Broadway: smart shops, brilliantly dressed ladies and “two portly sows”—soon joined by “six gentlemen hogs”—strolling without notice among them. The British novelist went on to fill two pages with New York pig observations, but the porcine garbage cleaners were not the only animals to be found in Manhattan or other cities. Since the dawn of domestication, urban dwellers had reproduced country living as best they could, in order to feed themselves.

    In what York University environmental historian Sean Kheraj calls the pre-industrial “pedestrian city,” food sources needed to be close at hand. Kheraj, who takes his students on walks through the original heart of Toronto to show them “the different places in which animals were central to the political and economic life…in the early 19th century,” begins at the St. Lawrence Market. “It’s been market square in Toronto since before the city was incorporated,” he says, “for decades the only place you could buy fresh produce and meat in a city where there were no automobiles or street railways. All of Toronto was within one-kilometre walking distance of the market—live any further away and you’re a farmer.” Toronto’s first city hall was an outgrowth of the market, Kheraj points out, “because the market was the place where people had to gather … [and] go for food.”

    But an increasingly prosperous Victorian-era middle class began to object to the sights, sounds and smells of the animal world. They winced at the cruelties inflicted before their eyes, and their children’s, on herds driven to slaughterhouses through the streets, at dogs pulling carts and at free-range pigs. They had new ideas about cemeteries and what was allowable in them; with Boston leading the way in 1830, grazing in graveyards—a traditional feedlot for the urban poor—was banned across the continent. Boston Common and other green spaces were also soon cleared of domestic animals, in accord with the emerging ethos of parks as places of refined leisure.

    Meanwhile, working-class citizens, who lived in crowded conditions and increasingly earned their living outside the home, found it hard to care for large animals. Private ownership of pigs and cows plummeted, while urban chicken populations continued to rise into the 20th century. Powerful economic and social factors combined to drive the domestic animal industry to the urban fringes. “It was hard for 19th-century people to really imagine a world completely devoid of animal suffering,” says Robichaud. They viewed their real-world, aesthetic and moral problems with the human-animal relationship “in practical terms, which was to say, they asked how can we minimize suffering.” Getting it out of their faces was the effective answer.

    The change happened in fits and starts, with unexpected twists. City households parted with their cows even as milk consumption began to climb. That meant people bought it from street sellers who obtained milk from the small urban dairies that sprang up before transportation from the countryside was feasible. Those dairies, in turn, made common cause with distilleries. The latter needed a way to dispose of their “swill,” the mash of fibrous slush left over after whiskey was distilled, and the former needed cheap fodder. The thin, blue-tinged milk produced by swill dairies was regularly adulterated with anything from chalk to plaster of Paris to thicken and whiten it. American reformers like Sylvester Graham—who later had a cracker named after him—railed against the swillers. But it was only the development of efficient rail links to rural dairies that finally shut them down.

    When railways completed the exodus of large food animals from the city, they simultaneously sparked an explosion in horse numbers. “People tend to assume that power sources are completely successional,” says Robichaud, meaning the idea that mechanical power replaced muscle power in all fields of activity at the same time. “But there’s a lag from steam to electricity and oil.” Railways were bringing in vast food supplies—200,000 litres of milk daily to New York—but “once you get it into the depot, how do you bring it to the different stores across the city? Horses.” By the start of the 20th century there were tens of thousands of horses in big cities, 100,000 in New York alone; almost all were gone by 1920, made obsolete by automobiles and electric trolleys.

    The intricacies of the horse trade and the animals’ effect on the urban environment is dramatically illustrated by the Great Epizootic of 1872. In September that year, horses in Toronto began coming down with a debilitating, although not fatal, variety of equine influenza. Within a year, as trains moved horses about for breeding or work purposes, the disease had spread from Canada as far as Central America. Horse-drawn public transport was severely disrupted, and city dwellers often had to pull their own carts—even the Apache Wars waged by the U.S. Cavalry saw several clashes take place on foot. “It was like the way the SARS outbreak was spread by air travel,” says Kheraj, “a kind of precursor, even before the Spanish influenza of 1918, that showed how modern transport can connect populations of species across thousands of kilometres.”

    The urban ecology was also upended by the banishment of pigs: their competitors for city garbage, primarily rats and dogs—but in Toronto, which still bears the name Hogtown, raccoons, too—expanded their populations. Dogs were a special case: they were prize possessions for the wealthy, but there were also many strays in cities and consequent rabies outbreaks. In Toronto and Montreal, Kheraj says, “the police had campaigns of dog poisoning, and Winnipeg town records show the mayor complaining about being chased by dogs on his way to council meetings.” But it is an extraordinary legal case in New York that best captures the uncertainties about dogs and, by extension, all animals.

    Humane organizations appeared in both Canada and the U.S. in the wake of the American Civil War; the 1866 establishment of New York’s Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was followed three years later by the Montreal SPCA. Some of the SPCA’s earliest actions were taken against animal pens and slaughterhouses, but as those trades moved to the outskirts, often beyond SPCA jurisdiction—and, as Robichaud notes, beyond the gaze of concerned citizens—their attention turned to creatures still found on city streets. The San Francisco SPCA’s sole salaried employee packed a pistol and spent much of his time shooting suffering horses.

    In 1874, a Manhattan lawyer angered by the sight in a shop window of a visibly distressed dog walking a treadmill that operated a cider press, laid a complaint with the SPCA. The society tried to settle the issue with its tried-and-true solution. Couldn’t the dog and press be moved to the basement, out of sight? No, they couldn’t, replied the owner—the dog was in the window “as a kind of advertising.” In court, an eminent sportsman who later fought with the SPCA over the cruelties inherent in fox hunting testified that this sort of labour was unworthy of man’s best friend. The case turned on what we would now call agency: could the dog stop labouring if he wished? No, he couldn’t, it was decided, and the owner was found guilty of cruelty.

    The agency issue rose to even greater prominence when the owner replaced the dog with a child, a boy of about eight, who looked to onlookers as exhausted as the dog. The SPCA was outraged by the act and even more outraged to learn neither it nor the city had any jurisdiction over “freely” contracted child labour. The first societies formed to combat the abuse and exploitation of children, in fact, postdate SPCAs by a decade. But the former were inspired by the latter: New York SPCA veteran Elbridge Gerry helped co-found the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, he said, because a child deserves “at least the rights of the cur in the street.”

    The cider press case, in all its eye-popping aspects, neatly captures the complexities of 19th-century thought on the rights of living beings. Yes, there was a genuine loathing of gratuitous cruelty to animals, but for city elites, the problem was primarily solved by shoving what was, and still is, seen as necessary exploitation into the shadows. In that regard, it’s worth noting that the most potent weapon wielded by contemporary animal activists has always been imagery, from the bloodstained ice of the seal hunt to video smuggled out of abattoirs. In our evolving post-domestic relationship with animals, this much is certain: we can’t stand to see them suffer.

    Sauce https://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/...the-suffering/
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    ^really interesting article

    It's really uncomfortable but I believe in the power of "show the carnage". Whether it's factory farms/slaughterhouses, police brutality, mass shootings, war casualties etc. Visual information gets an unfiltered connection to your brain - and an emotional response. I found a DVD of PETA's Meet Your Meat in college and never saw animal products the same way again.

    That's the same reason I believe in the power of activist art. It can slip ideas past the mind's defenses in ways intellectual arguments can't.

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    HIDDEN is an unflinching book of photography about our conflict with non-human animals around the globe, as depicted through the lenses of thirty award-winning photojournalists. HIDDEN focuses on the invisible animals in our lives: those with whom we have a close relationship and yet fail to see. They are the animals we eat and wear. The animals we use for research, work, and for entertainment, as well as the animals we sacrifice in the name of tradition and religion. HIDDEN is a historical document, a memorial, and an indictment of what is and should never again be.

    The stories within its pages are revelatory and brutal. They are proof of the emergency confronting animals globally, from industrial farming to climate change, and provide valuable insight into the relevance of animal suffering to human health.

    https://weanimalsmedia.org/2020/05/0...-anthropocene/



  92. #2292
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    Quote Originally Posted by squeakymcgillicuddy View Post
    ^really interesting article

    It's really uncomfortable but I believe in the power of "show the carnage". Whether it's factory farms/slaughterhouses, police brutality, mass shootings, war casualties etc. Visual information gets an unfiltered connection to your brain - and an emotional response. I found a DVD of PETA's Meet Your Meat in college and never saw animal products the same way again.

    That's the same reason I believe in the power of activist art. It can slip ideas past the mind's defenses in ways intellectual arguments can't.
    We share a similar experience that impacted our emotions and lives. As teenager I was impacted by images of the seal hunt and witnessing that act of cruelty on the news. The thought and sight of killing baby seals with a club (often in the presence of the mother) was what turned me against killing any animal for food or sport etc.

    I did this acrylic water colour in 1980 around the time I did some volunteer work for Greenpeace

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    Why you should go animal-free: 18 arguments for eating meat debunked

    Whether you are concerned about your health, the environment or animal welfare, scientific evidence is piling up that meat-free diets are best. Millions of people in wealthy nations are already cutting back on animal products.

    Of course livestock farmers and meat lovers are unsurprisingly fighting back and it can get confusing. Are avocados really worse than beef? What about bee-massacring almond production?

    The coronavirus pandemic has added another ingredient to that mix. The rampant destruction of the natural world is seen as the root cause of diseases leaping into humans and is largely driven by farming expansion. The world’s top biodiversity scientists say even more deadly pandemics will follow unless the ecological devastation is rapidly halted.

    Food is also a vital part of our culture, while the affordability of food is an issue of social justice. So there isn’t a single perfect diet. But the evidence is clear: whichever healthy and sustainable diet you choose, it is going to have much less red meat and dairy than today’s standard western diets, and quite possibly none. That’s for two basic reasons.

    First, the over-consumption of meat is causing an epidemic of disease, with about $285bn spent every year around the world treating illness caused by eating red meat alone. Second, eating plants is simply a far more efficient use of the planet’s stretched resources than feeding the plants to animals and then eating them. The global livestock herd and the grain it consumes takes up 83% of global farmland, but produces just 18% of food calories.

    So what about all those arguments in favour of meat-eating and against vegan diets? Let’s start with the big beef about red meat.

    Meaty matters

    1) Claim:
    Grass-fed beef is low carbon

    This is true only when compared to intensively-reared beef linked to forest destruction. The UK’s National Farmers Union says UK beef has only half the emissions compared to the world average. But a lot of research shows grass-fed beef uses more land and produces more – or at best similar – emissions because grain is easier for cows to digest and intensively reared cows live shorter lives. Both factors mean less methane. Either way, the emissions from even the best beef are still many times that from beans and pulses.

    There’s more. If all the world’s pasture lands were returned to natural vegetation, it would remove greenhouse gases equivalent to about 8 bn tonnes of carbon dioxide per year from the atmosphere, according to Joseph Poore at Oxford University. That’s about 15% of the world’s total greenhouse gas emissions. Only a small fraction of that pasture land would be needed to grow food crops to replace the lost beef. So overall, if tackling the climate crisis is your thing, then beef is not.

    2) Claim:
    Cattle are actually neutral for climate, because methane is relatively short-lived greenhouse gas


    Methane is a very powerful greenhouse gas and ruminants produce a lot of it. But it only remains in the atmosphere for a relatively short time: half is broken down in nine years. This leads some to argue that maintaining the global cattle herd at current levels – about 1 billion animals – is not heating the planet. The burping cows are just replacing the methane that breaks down as time goes by.

    But this is simply “creative accounting”, according to Pete Smith at the University of Aberdeen and Andrew Balmford at the University of Cambridge. We shouldn’t argue that cattle farmers can continue to pollute just because they have done so in the past, they say: “We need to do more than just stand still.” In fact, the short-lived nature of methane actually makes reducing livestock numbers a “particularly attractive target”, given that we desperately need to cut greenhouse gas emissions as soon as possible to avoid the worst impacts of the climate crisis.

    In any case, just focusing on methane doesn’t make the rampant deforestation by cattle ranchers in South America go away. Even if you ignore methane completely, says Poore, animal products still produce more CO2 than plants. Even one proponent of the methane claim says: “I agree that intensive livestock farming is unsustainable.”

    3) Claim:
    In many places the only thing you can grow is grass for cattle and sheep


    NFU president, Minette Batters, says: “Sixty-five percent of British land is only suitable for grazing livestock and we have the right climate to produce high-quality red meat and dairy.”

    “But if everybody were to make the argument that ‘our pastures are the best and should be used for grazing’, then there would be no way to limit global warming,” says Marco Springmann at the University of Oxford. His work shows that a transition to a predominantly plant-based flexitarian diet would free up both pasture and cropland.

    The pasture could instead be used to grow trees and lock up carbon, provide land for rewilding and the restoration of nature, and growing bio-energy crops to displace fossil fuels. The crops no longer being fed to animals could instead become food for people, increasing a nation’s self-sufficiency in grains.

    4) Claim:
    Grazing cattle help store carbon from the atmosphere in the soil


    This is true. The problem is that even in the very best cases, this carbon storage offsets only 20%-60% of the total emissions from grazing cattle. “In other words, grazing livestock – even in a best-case scenario – are net contributors to the climate problem, as are all livestock,” says Tara Garnett, also at the University of Oxford.

    Furthermore, research shows this carbon storage reaches its limit in a few decades, while the problem of methane emissions continue. The stored carbon is also vulnerable - a change in land use or even a drought can see it released again. Proponents of “holistic grazing” to trap carbon are also criticised for unrealistic extrapolation of local results to global levels.

    5) Claim:
    There is much more wildlife in pasture than in monoculture cropland


    That is probably true but misses the real point. A huge driver of the global wildlife crisis is the past and continuing destruction of natural habitat to create pasture for livestock. Herbivores do have an important role in ecosystems, but the high density of farmed herds means pasture is worse for wildlife than natural land. Eating less meat means less destruction of wild places and cutting meat significantly would also free up pasture and cropland that could be returned to nature. Furthermore, a third of all cropland is used to grow animal feed.

    6) Claim:
    We need animals to convert feed into protein humans can eat


    There is no lack of protein, despite the claims. In rich nations, people commonly eat 30-50% more protein than they need. All protein needs can easily be met from plant-based sources, such as beans, lentils, nuts and whole grains.

    But animals can play a role in some parts of Africa and Asia where, in India for example, waste from grain production can feed cattle that produce milk. In the rest of the world, where much of cropland that could be used to feed people is actually used to feed animals, a cut in meat eating is still needed for agriculture to be sustainable.

    7) ‘What about …?’
    Claim:

    What about soya milk and tofu that is destroying the Amazon?


    It’s not. Well over 96% of soy from the Amazon region is fed to cows, pigs and chickens eaten around the world, according to data from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, says Poore. Furthermore, 97% of Brazilian soy is genetically modified, which is banned for human consumption in many countries and is rarely used to make tofu and soya milk in any case.

    Soya milk also has much smaller emissions and land and water use than cow’s milk. If you are worried about the Amazon, not eating meat remains your best bet.

    8) Claim:
    Almond milk production is massacring bees and turning land into desert


    Some almond production may well cause environmental problems. But that is because rising demand has driven rapid intensification in specific places, like California, which could be addressed with proper regulation. It is nothing to do with what almonds need to grow. Traditional almond production in Southern Europe uses no irrigation at all. It is also perhaps worth noting that the bees that die in California are not wild, but raised by farmers like six-legged livestock.

    Like soya milk, almond milk still has lower carbon emissions and land and water use than cow’s milk. But if you are still worried, there are plenty of alternatives, with oat milk usually coming out with the lowest environmental footprint.

    9) Claim:
    Avocados are causing droughts in places


    Again, the problem here is the rapid growth of production in specific regions that lack prudent controls on water use, like Peru and Chile. Avocados generate three times less emissions than chicken, four times less than pork, and 20 times less than beef.

    If you are still worried about avocados, you can of course choose not to eat them. But it’s not a reason to eat meat instead, which has a much bigger water and deforestation footprint.

    The market is likely to solve the problem, as the high demand from consumers for avocados and almonds incentivises farmers elsewhere to grow the crops, thereby alleviating the pressure on current production hotspots.

    10) Claim:
    Quinoa boom is harming poor farmers in Peru and Bolivia


    Quinoa is an amazing food and has seen a boom. But the idea that this took food from the mouths of poor farmers is wrong. “The claim that rising quinoa prices were hurting those who had traditionally produced and consumed it is patently false,” said researchers who studied the issue.

    Quinoa was never a staple food, representing just a few percent of the food budget for these people. The quinoa boom has had no effect on their nutrition. The boom also significantly boosted the farmers’ income.

    There is an issue with falling soil quality, as the land is worked harder. But quinoa is now planted in China, India and Nepal, as well as in the US and Canada, easing the burden. The researchers are more worried now about the loss of income for South American farmers as the quinoa supply rises and the price falls.

    11) Claim:
    What about palm oil destroying rainforests and orangutans?


    Palm oil plantations have indeed led to terrible deforestation. But that is an issue for everybody, not only vegans: it’s in about half of all products on supermarket shelves, both food and toiletries. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature argues that choosing sustainably produced palm oil is actually positive, because other oil crops take up more land.

    But Poore says: “We are abandoning millions of acres a year of oilseed land around the world, including rapeseed and sunflower fields in the former Soviet regions, and traditional olive plantations.” Making better use of this land would be preferable to using palm oil, he says.

    12) Healthy questions
    Claim:
    Vegans don’t get enough B12, making them stupid


    A vegan diet is generally very healthy, but doctors have warned about the potential lack of B12, an important vitamin for brain function that is found in meat, eggs and cows’ milk. This is easily remedied by taking a supplement.

    However, a closer look reveals some surprises. B12 is made by bacteria in soil and the guts of animals, and free-range livestock ingest the B12 as they graze and peck the ground. But most livestock are not free-range, and pesticides and antibiotics widely used on farms kill the B12-producing bugs. The result is that most B12 supplements - 90% according to one source – are fed to livestock, not people.

    So there’s a choice here between taking a B12 supplement yourself, or eating an animal that has been given the supplement. Algae are a plant-based source of B12, although the degree of bio-availability is not settled yet. It is also worth noting that a significant number of non-vegans are B12 deficient, especially older people. Among vegans the figure is only about 10%.

    13) Claim:
    Plant-based alternatives to meat are really unhealthy


    The rapid rise of the plant-based burger has prompted some to criticise them as ultra-processed junk food. A plant-based burger could be unhealthier if the salt levels are very high, says Springmann, but it is most likely to still be healthier than a meat burger when all nutritional factors are considered, particularly fibre. Furthermore, replacing a beef burger with a plant-based alternative is certain to be less damaging to the environment.

    There is certainly a strong argument to be made that overall we eat far too much processed food, but that applies just as much to meat eaters as to vegetarians and vegans. And given that most people are unlikely to give up their burgers and sausages any time, the plant-based options are a useful alternative.

    14) ‘Catching out’ vegans
    Claim:
    Fruit and vegetables aren’t vegan because they rely on animal manure as fertiliser


    Most vegans would say it’s just silly to say fruit and veg are animal products and plenty are produced without animal dung. In any case there is no reason for horticulture to rely on manure at all. Synthetic fertiliser is easily made from the nitrogen in the air and there is plenty of organic fertiliser available if we chose to use it more widely in the form of human faeces. Over application of fertiliser does cause water pollution problems in many parts of the world. But that applies to both synthetic fertiliser and manure and results from bad management.

    15) Claim:
    Vegan diets kill millions of insects


    Piers Morgan is among those railing against “hypocrite” vegans because commercially kept bees die while pollinating almonds and avocados and combine harvesters “create mass murder of bugs” and small mammals while bringing in the grain harvest. But almost everyone eats these foods, not just vegans.

    It is true that insects are in a terrible decline across the planet. But the biggest drivers of this are the destruction of wild habitat, largely for meat production, and widespread pesticide use. If it is insects that you are really worried about, then eating a plant-based organic diet is the option to choose.

    16) Claim:
    Telling people to eat less meat and dairy is denying vital nutrition to the world’s poorest


    A “planetary health diet” published by scientists to meet both global health and environmental needs was criticised by journalist Joanna Blythman: “When ideologues living in affluent countries pressurise poor countries to eschew animal foods and go plant-based, they are displaying crass insensitivity, and a colonial White Saviour mindset.”

    In fact, says Springmann, who was part of the team behind the planetary health diet, it would improve nutritional intake in all regions, including poorer regions where starchy foods currently dominate diets. The big cuts in meat and dairy are needed in rich nations. In other parts of the world, many healthy, traditional diets are already low in animal products.

    17) On the road
    Claim:
    Transport emissions mean that eating plants from all over the world is much worse than local meat and dairy


    “‘Eating local’ is a recommendation you hear often [but] is one of the most misguided pieces of advice,” says Hannah Ritchie, at the University of Oxford. “Greenhouse gas emissions from transportation make up a very small amount of the emissions from food and what you eat is far more important than where your food traveled from.”

    Beef and lamb have many times the carbon footprint of most other foods, she says. So whether the meat is produced locally or shipped from the other side of the world, plants will still have much lower carbon footprints. Transport emissions for beef are about 0.5% of the total and for lamb it’s 2%.

    The reason for this is that almost all food transported long distances is carried by ships, which can accommodate huge loads and are therefore fairly efficient. For example, the shipping emissions for avocados crossing the Atlantic are about 8% of their total footprint. Air freight does of course result in high emissions, but very little food is transported this way; it accounts for just 0.16% of food miles.

    18) Claim:
    All the farmers who raise livestock would be unemployed if the world went meat-fr
    ee

    Livestock farming is massively subsidised with taxpayers money around the world – unlike vegetables and fruit. That money could be used to support more sustainable foods such as beans and nuts instead, and to pay for other valuable services, such as capturing carbon in woodlands and wetlands, restoring wildlife, cleaning water and reducing flood risks. Shouldn’t your taxes be used to provide public goods rather than harms?

    So, food is complicated. But however much we might wish to continue farming and eating as we do today, the evidence is crystal clear that consuming less meat and more plants is very good for both our health and the planet. The fact that some plant crops have problems is not a reason to eat meat instead.

    In the end, you will choose what you eat. If you want to eat healthily and sustainably, you don’t have to stop eating meat and dairy altogether. The planetary health diet allows for a beef burger, some fish and an egg each week, and a glass of milk or some cheese each day.

    Food writer Michael Pollan foreshadowed the planetary health diet in 2008 with a simple seven-word rule: “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” But if you want to have the maximum impact on fighting the climate and wildlife crisis, then it is going to be all plants.

    SAUCE https://www.theguardian.com/environm...o9n1wSJ0DBJR7I
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    I did this acrylic water colour in 1980 around the time I did some volunteer work for Greenpeace

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    Oh cool, thanks for sharing that! Sad but beautiful.

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    Pandemics result from destruction of nature, say UN and WHO

    Pandemics such as coronavirus are the result of humanity’s destruction of nature, according to leaders at the UN, WHO and WWF International, and the world has been ignoring this stark reality for decades.

    The illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade as well as the devastation of forests and other wild places were still the driving forces behind the increasing number of diseases leaping from wildlife to humans, the leaders told the Guardian.

    They are calling for a green and healthy recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic, in particular by reforming destructive farming and unsustainable diets.

    A WWF report, also published on Wednesday, warns: “The risk of a new [wildlife-to-human] disease emerging in the future is higher than ever, with the potential to wreak havoc on health, economies and global security.”

    WWF’s head in the UK said post-Brexit trade deals that fail to protect nature would leave Britain “complicit in increasing the risk of the next pandemic”.

    High-level figures have issued a series of warnings since March, with the world’s leading biodiversity experts saying even more deadly disease outbreaks are likely in future unless the rampant destruction of the natural world is rapidly halted.

    Earlier in June, the UN environment chief and a leading economist said Covid-19 was an “SOS signal for the human enterprise” and that current economic thinking did not recognise that human wealth depends on nature’s health.

    “We have seen many diseases emerge over the years, such as Zika, Aids, Sars and Ebola and they all originated from animal populations under conditions of severe environmental pressures,” said Elizabeth Maruma Mrema, head of the UN convention on biological diversity, Maria Neira, the World Health Organization director for environment and health, and Marco Lambertini, head of WWF International, in the Guardian article.

    With coronavirus, “these outbreaks are manifestations of our dangerously unbalanced relationship with nature”, they said. “They all illustrate that our own destructive behaviour towards nature is endangering our own health – a stark reality we’ve been collectively ignoring for decades.

    “Worryingly, while Covid-19 has given us yet another reason to protect and preserve nature, we have seen the reverse take place. From the Greater Mekong, to the Amazon and Madagascar, alarming reports have emerged of increased poaching, illegal logging and forest fires, while many countries are engaging in hasty environmental rollbacks and cuts in funding for conservation. This all comes at a time when we need it most.

    “We must embrace a just, healthy and green recovery and kickstart a wider transformation towards a model that values nature as the foundation for a healthy society. Not doing so, and instead attempting to save money by neglecting environmental protection, health systems, and social safety nets, has already proven to be a false economy. The bill will be paid many times over.”

    The WWF report concludes the key drivers for diseases that move from wild animals to humans are the destruction of nature, the intensification of agriculture and livestock production, as well as the trading and consumption of high-risk wildlife.

    The report urges all governments to introduce and enforce laws to eliminate the destruction of nature from supply chains of goods and on the public to make their diets more sustainable.

    Beef, palm oil and soy are among the commodities frequently linked to deforestation and scientists have said avoiding meat and dairy products is the single biggest way for people to reduce their environmental impact on the planet.

    Tanya Steele, the head of WWF UK, said the post-Brexit trade deals must protect nature: “We cannot be complicit in increasing the risk of the next pandemic. We need strong legislation and trade deals that stop us importing food that is the result of rampant deforestation or whose production ignores poor welfare and environmental standards in producer countries. The government has a golden opportunity to make transformative, world-leading change happen.”

    The WWF report said 60-70% of the new diseases that have emerged in humans since 1990 came from wildlife. Over the same period, 178m hectares of forest have been cleared, equivalent to more than seven times the area of the UK.

    sauce https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...P0IU_WTcn92qhs
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Vegan Indian Food: A Guide to Cooking & Dining Out

    Finding reliably vegan Indian food is tricky, which is a surprising situation for the world’s most vegetarian-friendly cuisine. But no worries—in this guide we’ll dive deep into Indian cooking to uncover some of the most delicious vegan foods you’ll ever taste.

    Indian Food: One Country, Many Cuisines
    When it comes to diversity, India is unmatched. No other nation features such a dizzying assortment of languages, religions, and cultures. What’s more, profound climate variations cause different foods to dominate each region. Every part of India has consequently evolved its own unique cuisine, based on its dominant cultures and whichever crops thrive locally.

    My favorite Vlogger, Mr. Bald and Bankrupt himself, put it wonderfully: “[India’s] cuisine changes from state to state, even sometimes from city to city. It’s such a varied country. They say In India, every 100 kilometers the food changes and the language changes.”

    But no matter where you travel in India, vegetarianism is often the norm. For thousands of years, the pervasiveness of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism caused most Indians to reject meat, fish, and eggs. No other part of the world has seen so many people eating so much vegetarian food for such a long time. So when it comes to offering up an endless assortment of vegetarian dishes, no cuisine compares to India’s.

    Given the staggering variety of popular vegetarian Indian dishes, we have a lot to cover here. So feel free to use the following links to skip ahead to the sections that particularly interest you. Following this brief introduction to India’s cuisine, I’ll introduce you to the country’s most prominent cooking ingredients, meals, and snacks. After that, I’ll offer advice on how to reliably order vegan meals served at Indian restaurants. Then I’ll try to talk you into visiting the Indian grocery nearest you by telling you about some must-purchase items. Finally, I’ll end with coverage of how to cook vegan Indian meals at home.

    How Dairy Products Took Over Indian Cooking
    Widespread belief in karma and reincarnation helped establish vegetarianism as the default diet throughout much of India. Hindu scripture played a crucial role here by elevating the moral status of cows. Under Hinduism, cows occupy an exalted level of consciousness—a level even more rarified than that attained by ordinary people. To a devout Hindu, slaughtering cows therefore amounts to a sin with grave karmic repercussions.

    Yet, simultaneously, Hinduism regards dairy products as a uniquely valuable food. Why? Primarily because, if cows indeed inhabit sublime realms of consciousness, it’s sensible to presume their milk confers unique benefits. Lord Krishna is famously associated with dairy products, and one of the most widely-remembered passages of the vedas has him, as a mischievous boy, stealing butter from the kitchen.

    Many Indians today take the healthfulness of dairy as a matter of faith, and consider milk an indispensable food. They further assume that India’s cows enjoy a good quality of life (even though they generally don’t.)

    Lest you think I’m exaggerating the importance that Hinduism assigns to dairy products, here’s what the Hare Krishnas have to say about the matter:

    The teachings of Krishna consciousness emphasize the many transcendental benefits of milk. The Vedas say the cow is one of the mothers of mankind; cow’s milk and its many preparations are a key part of the recommended diet for human beings. Milk is considered essential for the proper development of the human brain, enhancing our ability to understand and apply spiritual knowledge.
    These are some pretty strong claims that deserve some pushback and challenge. But no amount of evidence and debate is likely to knock dairy products off its pedestal when it comes to how many Indians think about nutrition.

    Dairy products became further entrenched in Indian cooking by virtue of their being a protein-rich alternative to meat. In a region long plagued by hunger, there’s no disputing that dairy products can provide valuable nutrients to people at risk of malnutrition. Many Indians believe that dairy involves transmuting the blood of the cow into a purer, healthier substance that does not require killing.

    All these factors make dairy-based ingredients widespread in Indian cooking. The stuff appears everywhere and in every form. When eating at Indian restaurants, vegans must watch out for dishes containing milk, cheese, and yogurt sauces. Clarified butter (ghee) may appear in any sort of fried dish. Luckily, vegetable oil is much cheaper than ghee. Many Indian restaurants refuse to cook with ghee because it is remarkably expensive compared to vegetable oil.

    Although no other world cuisine leans so heavily on dairy products, it’s certainly possible to find terrific vegan Indian food. Later in this guide, we’ll look at how to avoid dairy products when dining at vegan restaurants. And of course, when you’re cooking at home, any vegetarian Indian dish can readily be prepared dairy-free.

    Essential Indian Cooking Ingredients
    Let’s now look at some of the most common ingredients in Indian cooking. In just a few pages, we’ll cover the main ingredients in most Indian meals.

    Rice and Beans
    Just as they do in Latin America, rice and beans provide the bulk of the calories in many Indian meals. But the varieties of rice and beans used in Indian cooking are different than those favored in Latin America.

    Popular Rice Varieties
    India is one of the world’s largest producers and consumers of rice, and many Indians eat it daily. The two most common varieties in India are white long grain rice, and a reddish whole grain rice. If you want to know why diabetes rates are off the charts in India, the habit of many Indians to eat white rice with practically every meal is surely a primary factor.

    India is also famous for a fragrant long-grain rice variety called basmati, which is grown in the foothills in the northern part of the country. Basmati is nearly always milled into white rice. This is bad for nutrition, but convenient for home cooking, since the rice cooks almost immediately. You can cook white basmati rice in a pot in barely about twelve minutes, compared to about 40 minutes for brown rice.

    Basmati is among the most expensive rice varieties, and many Indians therefore eat it only on special occasions. In South India it’s rarely eaten at all, and about half of India’s basmati rice crop is exported. Basmati happens to be the only variety of rice that I prefer white. I normally favor whole grain bread and brown rice, but I think brown basmati rice lacks the delicate texture of white basmati. Sure, white basmati is pure carbs, and contains no fiber or other nutrients, but it’s a delicious occasional treat.

    When preparing basmati rice at home, drop a cardamom pod or some cardamom seeds into the water prior to cooking. The way that cardamom’s gentle flavor blends with basmati is one of the world’s great flavor combinations, right up there with chocolate and peanuts.

    Beans
    Beans are a crucial part of Indian cooking, and since they are loaded with protein they play an indispensable role in the country’s nutrition.

    One of my Indian friends insists that, “Indian restaurants give a bad name to Indian cuisine.” By this, she means that many restaurants cook with only a tiny variety of foods. This is especially the case with beans, and most Indian restaurants use just four varieties:

    Lentils
    Split peas
    Garbanzos
    Kidney beans
    Of these beans, lentils and are probably the most important, since they’re used to make both soups and dosas (we’ll cover both these foods later on). Lentils come in several varieties, including black, brown, and red. Yellow split peas are also widely used for soup. Since lentils and split peas are so tiny, they cook much more quickly than larger varieties of beans.

    Garbanzos and kidney beans appear in a variety of curried stews. Of the beans that are widely eaten worldwide, garbanzos and kidney beans are unusual since they both contain significant amounts of fat. This gives them a richer texture and flavor than other beans, most of which are practically fat-free.

    While Indian restaurants cook only a few varieties of beans, there are no such limitations for people cooking at home. The cuisine features all sorts of obscure bean varieties that, while rarely prepared in restaurants, are beloved by home cooks. A serious Indian cook will have a dozen varieties of dried beans in their pantry. And any good Indian grocery will feature nearly an entire aisle devoted to different varieties of lentils.

    Despite its immense popularity throughout most of Asia, tofu never became established in traditional Indian cooking. That’s a shame since this nutritious soybean product could have displaced a great deal of dairy foods, thereby improving the nutrient status of countless millions of people. While it’s certainly not a traditional ingredient of Indian cooking, sliced tofu works remarkably well in most spicy curry stews. So be open to adding tofu to your curries even if the recipe doesn’t call for it.

    While tofu is rarely used in India, textured vegetable protein is a popular meat replacement in Indian cooking. The stuff is cheap, filling, full of protein, and goes wonderfully in any sort of curried dish. One of the most popular such brands is Butler Soy Curls.

    Popular Vegetables in Indian Cooking
    Just as Indian restaurants use only a few types of beans, most are likewise surprisingly limited when it comes to vegetables. Here are by far the eight most common vegetables in Indian cooking.

    Potatoes
    Carrots
    Spinach
    Cauliflower
    Onions
    Peas
    Okra
    Eggplant
    If there’s a vegetable in your Indian restaurant meal, chances are it’s one of these. Luckily, both spinach and cauliflower are remarkably nutritious, and peas are loaded with protein.

    In contrast to Indian restaurants, home chefs make extensive use of vegetables. A nutritious dish based on leafy greens commonly makes up one course of any home-cooked Indian meal. No cuisine makes heavier use of fresh beans than does Indian food, and hard squash and gourds also appear in a wide assortment of meals. Tomatoes are also remarkably common in Indian cooking, which is hardly surprising since tomato plants thrive in hot weather.

    Many Indian cooks sprout mung beans and garbanzo beans in their kitchen. The sprouts are either cooked in curries or added fresh to salads.

    Indian Spices
    Spices are the foundation of Indian cooking. No other cuisine employs such a wide assortment of fragrant and colorful spices.

    In order to wrap their heads around the unfamiliar flavors of this novel cuisine, British colonialists came up with the idea of assembling a spice mix they called “curry powder” as an easy way to capture the most common spices of India. You can think of curry powder as the SparkNotes of Indian cooking—they give you the gist of the experience without having to invest any significant time. But eating a meal made with curry powder is like drinking flat soda—you’re in the right neighborhood but on the wrong side of the tracks.

    You can buy pre-ground curry powder in any grocery. If you are new to Indian cooking, curry powder offers a convenient way to jump in and produce meals with deliver classic Indian flavors. You’ll save a lot of time over buying a bunch of spices separately and grinding them all up together. That said, serious chefs would cringe at the idea of purchasing curry powder. Not only does pre-ground curry powder quickly lose flavor, but by using this stuff you’ll forfeit your ability to adjust your dish’s seasonings to your taste. Instead of using curry powder, Indian chefs use a number of classic Indian spices in the proportions they judge suitable for a given meal.

    Most curry powders feature at least ten varieties of spices, with these being obligatory:

    Cumin
    Coriander
    Turmeric
    Cayenne Chili Pepper
    Fennel
    Mustard
    Pepper

    Of these spices, turmeric deserves a special mention. It’s bright yellow, and has a bitter and not enjoyable flavor on its own. But it somehow meshes perfectly with other Indian spices. Most westerners buy it in powdered form, but if you’re lucky, you’ll be able to find fresh turmeric roots at your grocery. They look like miniature orange ginger roots. Just like ginger, you can skin and mince fresh turmeric and then mix it in with your other seasonings.

    Other common curry spice ingredients are cinnamon, cloves, cardamom, chili powder, and minced or powdered ginger. Garlic and onions are also ubiquitous in Indian food, and go perfectly with the classic Indian spices we just reviewed.

    Another popular pre-mixed Indian spice is called garam masala. Although garam means hot in Hindi, this does not denote the hot spiciness of chili peppers, but rather a bodily warming quality (under ayurvedic health theories, which we’ll briefly cover later on). The only spicy-hot component of garam masala is a tiny amount of black pepper. Most other garam masala spice ingredients are sweet rather than hot, and include, cinnamon, cardamom, bay leaf, star anise, and nutmeg. As with curry powder, every chef will choose a slightly different assortment of spices when preparing garam masala from scratch.

    For both curry powder and garam masala, the spices are toasted together in a dry skillet, and then ground up into powder. Ideally a new spice mix is ground freshly for each meal, so the seasonings don’t lose any flavor.

    North and South Indian Food
    As we dig deeper into Indian cooking, it’s useful to distinguish between the foods cooked in North India and South India. These regions feature completely different dishes, but they do share similar flavors since all rely on curry spices.

    While South Indians rarely cook with paneer (cheese), neither North nor South Indian cooking is reliably dairy-free. The diversity of milk-based offerings complicates finding reliably vegan food at Indian restaurants. No cuisine is more likely to contain undetectable amounts of milk, cream, ghee. Sometimes the presence of dairy is obvious, such as in a yogurt garnish, but mostly the stuff blends undetectably into rice dishes, curries, flatbreads, you name it. When dining out, you must always stay vigilant to avoid squirts of ghee here and dollops of yogurt there.

    Finally, I want to warn you about one incredibly confusing restaurant practice. Thousands and thousands of Indian restaurants, especially those located in India, feature the words “Pure Veg” on their storefront signs. While “Pure Veg” certainly sounds vegan-friendly, it simply means they don’t serve meat. Many of these restaurants put dairy in practically everything.

    Indian Snacks & Appetizers (Chaat)
    We could endlessly debate over which of the world’s cuisines offers the most magnificent meals. The French, the Italians, the Vietnamese, and many other cultures can all lay strong claims to this honor. But there’s no doubt—none whatsoever—about who has the best snacks. It’s Indian cuisine, hands down. Honestly, I’d rather eat a few Indian snack items than an Indian dinner, and I love Indian dinners!

    The Hindi word for snack is chaat, and Indian “chaat houses” are everywhere—not just in India but in virtually every city with a good-sized Indian community. Worldwide, there are thousands of chaat houses devoted to nothing but snacks.

    There’s no clear dividing line between chaat and Indian appetizers. Chaat is often served out of a food cart, and is ideally suited to being eaten while walking. Whatever sort of chaat you get, it’s generally accompanied by yogurt, tamarind sauce, chopped cilantro, and some sort of masala seasoning or chutney. Since the yogurt is served on the side, be sure to ask for no yogurt when ordering. If you’re serving chaat at home, unsweetened vegan yogurt makes an excellent replacement for dairy yogurt.

    Puris and Bhature
    Centuries before the State Fair of Texas came into existence, Indians were eating deep fried bread. The most common form is puris, which are deep fried whole wheat dough, served with chutney.

    A similar but exceedingly eye-catching dish is chole bhature, which looks like ordinary puri but is several times larger. My favorite chaat house aptly describes bhature as, “the big puffy thing.” It’s a deep fried flat bread that inflates like a balloon during frying. You tear off pieces and dip them into whatever spicy sauce accompanies your order.

    Other than size, the main difference between puri and bhature is that the latter is usually made with white flour. Both puri and bhature dough commonly contain curds or yogurt, so vegans must always inquire before ordering.

    Samosas & Pakora
    Two other popular deep fried chaat items are samosas and pakoras. Samosas are triangular vegetable-stuffed pastries, usually served with a mild or spicy chutney, or dunked into a spicy chickpea curry. Pakoras are bite-sized pieces of vegetables dipped into a spicy chickpea flour batter and deep fried. While samosas sometimes contain meat, a vegetarian samosa is reliably vegan. And pakoras are always vegan.

    Aloo Tiki
    Although not as well-known as samosas or pakora, aloo tiki is by far my favorite chaat item. They’re fried potato dumplings that are wonderfully spiced and topped with a savory sauce. They’re commonly garnished with yogurt, which vegans should ask to omit.

    Vadas
    You’ll know vadas when you see them, since they’re the size and shape of donuts. They’re made from a spicy lentil-based dough that’s deep-fried, and accompanied by a chutney. Even though vadas are an indulgent deep-fried snack, the fact that they’re primarily made of beans makes them a rich source of protein and other nutrients. They’re also absurdly filling.

    ****

    There are dozens of other different chaat items, so this brief coverage can’t begin to do justice to all the possibilities. But I do hope what I’ve written here inspires you to seek out your nearest chaat house.

    Admittedly, on your first visit you may feel overwhelmed by all the unfamiliar offerings. I suggest you hang out at the counter for a while before ordering, so you can see what other customers are getting. When you spy something coming out of the kitchen that looks especially appealing, inquire about its name and its vegan status.

    Classic Indian Meals
    Now that we’ve covered Indian snacks, let’s continue on to checking out the most common vegan-friendly Indian meals.

    Curries
    The most well-known sorts of Indian food are the curried stews of Northern India. These stews are made from beans or vegetables, and are usually served over rice, or combined with crushed idlis.

    One of the most popular these stews is called aloo gobi, a curry made from potatoes and cauliflower that’s usually accompanied by cilantro and onions. Equally popular is chana masala—chickpeas in a spicy curried sauce. Your Hindi vocabulary lessons here are:

    aloo = potato
    gobi = cauliflower
    chana = chickpeas
    masala = spice
    Saag Paneer
    Perhaps the most nutrient-dense of all popular Indian entrees is Saag Paneer. Since Saag means spinach and paneer means cheese, this dish, when prepared traditionally, is never vegan. Not only does this meal contain cheese, a little cream is usually mixed into the spinach.

    But when cooking at home you can swap out the cheese for firm tofu or your favorite hard vegan cheese. A bit of cashew cream or other unsweetened vegan milk will substitute nicely for cream. When spiced correctly, it’s such a flavorful dish that you can do away with the dairy products entirely with no discernible loss.

    Think of saag paneer as creamed spinach with Indian spices and a fair bit of oil. Since many Indian dishes aren’t exactly abundant in vegetables, saag paneer is a great dish to pick up the slack. It’s fantastic served over basmati rice.

    Dal
    By far the most popular Indian soup is called dal. Many Indians eat it daily. Dal’s main ingredient is either cooked lentil beans or yellow split peas pureed into a thick and satisfying soup. Dal has loads of flavor since it contains plenty of curry spices and fresh ginger. Thinly-sliced onions and minced or slivered garlic are also commonly included.

    Dal is usually served in a small bowl alongside a meal, sometimes eaten with a soup spoon and other times poured over rice. The lentils or split peas make dal among the most protein-rich dishes in Indian cooking.

    South Indian Dosas
    Dosas are crepes—often gigantic ones—made from a lentil batter that’s fermented for a couple days at room temperature. The fermentation gives the dosas a tangy flavor. Regular dosas are made from rice and lentils, whereas the also-popular rava dosas are made from wheat and lentils.

    Dosas are typically folded around a small amount of filling, most often spiced potatoes and onions. Many South Indian restaurants offer at least ten varieties of dosa, each with different fillings and spices. If you like heavily seasoned food, order a masala dosa.

    Idlis
    One of the most popular foods in India are idlis—oblong balls or disks made from steamed ground-up white rice and urad dal (white lentils with the black husk removed). They range from about the size a peach pit to as big as your palm.

    Idlis have little flavor, and are intended to soak up and thereby counterbalance rich Indian soups and sauces. Indians often order idlis instead of basmati rice, and mash them into their curried stews—this is quite similar to mashed potatoes and gravy, albeit with different starches and proteins. Alternately, they’ll tear off a portion of idli, and dip it into sambar, a delicious and extremely spicy reddish spicy soup. Indian restaurant menus often list idli sambar as a single item to be ordered together.

    Side Dishes (Flatbreads and Rice)
    When dining at Indian restaurants, your waiter will protest if you attempt to order a curried dish or a soup on its own. These dishes are invariably accompanied by either flatbread or rice.

    Flatbreads
    Flatbreads accompany a great many meals in India, and are often used in place of utensils. Typically, you tear off a small piece, and use it to grab a fork-sized portion of whatever curried stew you’re eating. As an aside, this is why most Indians are in the habit of washing their hands right before eating—many restaurants in India even have a hand-washing sink in the main dining area.

    The two most common varieties of flatbread are roti and chapati, the former rolled flat with a rolling pin and the latter patted flat by hand just like a homemade Mexican corn tortilla. Both these breads are commonly made from whole-grain flour, so they’re quite nutritious. There’s so much variation in thickness and cooking styles, that it’s hard to know what you’ll get when you order flatbread. Neither roti nor chapati dough commonly contains dairy products, but these breads are often garnished with some butter or ghee after cooking.

    Another common flatbread is called naan, which is not only less healthful than roti or chapati, it’s also rarely vegan. It’s usually made of white flour, and the dough often contains milk. Naan is Iranian in origin, and similar to the lavash bread served in the Middle East. Even though it’s not terribly healthy, naan is worth seeking out if you can find it vegan. Since it’s cooked in a tandoor (a clay oven), the texture is sensational. Unfortunately, you should assume naan contains milk unless the waiter or ingredient label tells you otherwise.

    When eating out, it’s best to avoid naan and to request either roti or chapati served without butter or ghee.

    Rices
    Indian restaurants commonly serve small bowls of steamed plain white rice to accompany their meals. Fancy restaurants will use basmati rice. There are also two rice dishes, biryani and kitchari, that are served as an entree rather than as a side dish.

    Biryani
    This dish arrived in India via Muslims from the Middle East and elsewhere. Biryani is a bright yellow rice dish similar to Asian fried rice and Spanish paella, but with different seasonings. The Hindu populations emphasized the addition of vegetables, whereas other parts of India added fish and meat. The dominant spices of biryani are cinnamon, star anise, and mace—which together impart a very different flavor than what you’ll get from any other Indian-style dish.

    Biryani is often made from white basmati rice, and can be prepared in any number of ways. Owing to the fact that it’s made largely from basmati rice, it’s regarded as an expensive meal for special occasions. And since it’s ideally suited to preparation in large batches, biryani is one of India’s most popular wedding foods. While it may be tough to find vegan biryani when eating out, this is an easy dish to cook vegan at home, and its unique flavors make it a must-try Indian meal.

    Kitchari

    Kitchari is a widely-consumed but not widely-beloved Indian meal. Yet again, a quick Hindi lesson comes in handy. The word kitchari simply means “mixture,” and when applied to this dish it refers to a mixture of rice and split yellow peas. If that doesn’t sound all that appetizing, you’re correct. Kitchari is often served at ashrams, because most ashram food strives to be blandly wholesome. You go to an ashram primarily to loosen your attachments to sensory gratification, and nothing washes away your lust for enticing flavors like a string of boring meals. When it comes to monotonous food, kitchari is tough to top, but it’s light on the stomach and easily digested.

    Kitchari is also one of the key foods eaten in the ayurvedic tradition. Ayurveda is an ancient approach to health in India, and it is largely based on consuming foods and spices chosen to correct bodily imbalances. Since kitchari accommodates such a wide assortment of spices, this dish can be spiced in whatever way an ayurvedic practitioner believes will help restore balance and overcome particular maladies. When ill, many Indians eat mostly kitchari in hopes that this food will restore their health.

    The best thing about kitchari is that, unlike most vegetarian Indian meals, the stuff is nearly always vegan by default.

    Indian Desserts
    While we’ve just witnessed the abundance of excellent meal and snack possibilities that Indian food offers, I have only bad news when it comes to desserts. One of my vegan Indian friends says dismissively: “There’s nothing to eat.”

    Nearly every popular Indian dessert contains dairy products or honey. If you’re lucky, you might be able to find vegan kaju burfi or jalebi, but even these dishes usually contain milk products.

    So if you want a vegan Indian-style dessert, you’re probably either going to have to make it yourself or dine at a vegan Indian restaurant. Luckily, you won’t have any trouble finding suitable recipes. Vegan Richa’s Indian Kitchen features veganized versions of eighteen traditional Indian desserts. Sahara Rose Ketabi’s Eat Feel Fresh likewise includes an extensive Indian dessert selection.

    Ordering Vegan Indian Food from Restaurants
    When dining at Indian restaurants, your main job as a vegan—in fact your only job—is to avoid hidden dairy products. Since the presence of meat in Indian food is always obvious, and Indian cooking never evolved to include eggs, you just need to make sure your vegetarian meal is dairy-free, and it will be vegan.

    This is a stark contrast to cuisines like Mexican food, which feature a wide assortment of animal ingredients, often present in undetectable amounts. Mexican food forces vegans to contend with lard, chicken stock, and sour cream—all of which are often impossible to see or to taste.

    That said, the milk products used in Indian food take multiple forms and are often especially hard to detect because they’re used in small quantities in meals dominated by brightly-colored seasonings and spicy flavors. So everything depends on clearly labeled dishes, or, failing that, communication with wait-staff who know how their food is prepared.

    As we’ve already seen, vegans must take special care when ordering flat bread since it may contain dairy products. To improve your chances of getting a meal, consider ordering papadams rather than flat bread, and ask that they not be brushed with butter prior to serving. Papadums (sometimes nicknamed “poppers”) are super thin wafers of lentil flour and spices that, when cooked, become covered with blisters and have a satisfying crunch. Restaurants usually prepare papadums by either quickly frying them in oil or heating them over a flame.

    Soups are another hazardous choice for vegans in most Indian restaurants. The most popular Indian soup is called dal, which is made primarily from lentils and spices. Unfortunately, this spice combination (called tadka) is often sauteed in ghee before being added to the soup. Since dal restaurants invariably prepare dal in big batches, it won’t be possible to order yours vegan if its tadka contains ghee. Some restaurants may use vegetable oil to fry the tadka, either to please vegans or to save money on ingredients.

    In addition to ghee, the other common words to watch out for on Indian menus are paneer (cheese) and dahi (yogurt).

    At some Indian restaurants, it’s all but impossible to ascertain the vegan status of a particular dish. Often, the waiter won’t know and then you’ll get hung up on some language issue until somebody (the cook, the waiter, or you) gives up in frustration. I’ve lost count of the number of times this has happened to me.

    So where does all this leave us? There’s never any guarantee, but here are some popular and reliably vegan Indian restaurant foods:

    Chana masala
    Kitchari
    Dosas
    Samosas and Pakoras (as appetizers)
    Basmati rice
    Idlis
    Roti and Chapati (But avoid ghee chapatis, which contain milk, and ask that they be served without butter.) Obviously, your vegan options will be much more extensive at restaurants that strive to accommodate vegans. But it’s comforting to know that even at the most mainstream Indian restaurants, the above choices are sufficient to guarantee you a satisfying and reliably-vegan meal.

    Finally, keep in mind that many vegan restaurants have Indian options on the menu. In my experience, Indian food usually turns out pretty good at places that don’t specialize in the cuisine, even if the flavors aren’t perfectly authentic. This is in stark contrast to Middle Eastern food, which is generally wretched when served by restaurants that also prepare other cuisines.

    Buying Vegan Foods at Indian Grocery Stores
    Just about every city with a sizable Indian population has at least one Indian grocery. These stores are well worth seeking out, as they’ll have some delicious vegan foods you can’t find elsewhere. Better yet, the prices on some of the most popular vegan items are generally excellent.

    If you get a chance to visit an Indian grocery, there are five items in particular—all imported from India—worth stocking up on:

    Mango pickle (and other glass-jarred pickle condiments). Just a teaspoon or two served as a garnish alongside your favorite curry can elevate your meal to a new level. Many Indian groceries carry nearly a full aisle’s worth of these condiments, so bring home a new variety every time you shop.
    Papadams. These are the paper-thin lentil wafers I mentioned earlier. They’re a quick, spicy, protein-rich snack. Each papadam costs only a few pennies, and they’re great at staving off hunger if you’re not ready for a meal. They also make a terrific accompaniment to Indian take out food, or whatever Indian meal you’re cooking at home. While they’re traditionally deep fried, they’re also excellent held with tongs and heated over a flame. Or you can heat them in a microwave for about fifteen seconds apiece until they uniformly blister. Although microwaved papadams won’t develop the delicious char that accompanies flame-cooking, they’re still quite tasty and no snack is quicker to prepare.

    Foil-packed entrees. All these products come in a foil pack that’s put in a cardboard box. Tasty Bite is the most popular brand, and most of the other brands are surprisingly good. The best of these products are comparable to decent Indian take-out food. Although many of these offerings contain dairy, most brands offer a vegan chickpea curry, usually called “chana masala” or “pindi chana.” If you don’t have an Indian grocery in your community, you can also order these products from Amazon. For a cheap meal that could pass for home-cooked, these products are impossible to beat. I especially recommend Tasty Bite’s Channa Masala.
    Lotus seeds. You pop these just like popcorn, with some oil in a covered frying pan. Season with chili powder, turmeric, curry leaves, and salt.
    Tamarind sauce. The perfect accompaniment to samosas and other chaat items. Tamarind paste or sauce should contain only a few ingredients—avoid brands with preservatives and colorings.
    The above items are only the start of your options. Indian groceries also offer great deals on basmati rice and dried beans. And if you check the freezer case, you’ll no doubt find some exciting frozen vegan convenience foods.

    If I still haven’t persuaded you to make a special trip to your nearest Indian grocery, perhaps this next tip will do the trick: most of these groceries sell fresh, locally-made vegan samosas and pakoras. They’re typically delivered each morning and kept warm under heat lamps. Invariably, these items are unbelievably cheap, yet deliver flavors you just can’t get from packaged food items. You can make a simple vegan meal at home, then serve it with some Indian grocery samosas and some mango pickle, and suddenly you have a borderline feast.

    Also look for clamshell-packed prepared foods. These too are locally made, and included everything from dried spicy peas to desserts. Keep a special eye out for dhoklas—savory bright yellow cakes made from a batter of fermented chickpeas and rice. These improbably delicious cakes are India’s counterpart to Mexican corn bread, although they’re far more nutrient-rich owing to their use of chickpeas.

    Cooking Vegan Indian Food at Home
    The best way to get reliably vegan Indian food is to make it yourself. Since you’re in control of your ingredients, this is a surefire way to guarantee that your Indian food will be absolutely, positively vegan. Usually I advise people to cook only from vegan cookbooks, but Indian food tends to be much more veganizable than other cuisines. It’s usually just a matter of using vegetable oil instead of butter. You can also use unsweetened soy yogurt in place of dairy yogurt. The results never suffer from making these easy swaps.

    Unless you’re extraordinarily ambitious, I urge you to start with the simple stuff, like North Indian stews served over basmati rice, and perhaps some flatbreads or pakoras. Fresh chutneys are also easy to prepare if you can get your hands on some tropical fruits like mango or coconut.

    South Indian foods usually require special expertise and equipment. In particular, foods like dosas and chole bhature are way out of reach for the casual non-Indian cook.

    If you’re planning to cook Indian food at home and you have an Indian grocery nearby, definitely head over there to lay in some supplies. Don’t forget to pick up some samosas or pakoras as an appetizer, plus a jar of pickled mangos or limes to garnish your meal.

    There are a few vegan Indian cookbooks in print. I highly recommend Vegan Indian Cooking and Vegan Richa’s Indian Kitchen. Both are impressively comprehensive books crammed with beautiful color photography. They feature extensive introductory text that will acquaint you with the most common spices, ingredients, and cooking methods of Indian cuisine.

    Let Vegan Indian Food into Your Life
    Indian food—especially Indian restaurant food—may not be the world’s healthiest cuisine, but what it lacks in nutrition it more than makes up for in flavor. Some of the most delicious vegan dishes you’ll ever try are from India.

    No matter where you live, you can probably find vegan Indian food locally. Sure, dining at Indian restaurants can pose challenges. But as long as you steer clear of hidden dairy products, you’ll find an unrivaled assortment of vegan possibilities. With just a little effort you can discover some incredible meals. In cases where navigating the menu seems unduly tricky, order the pakoras or a vegetable samosa as an appetizer, and then the chickpea curry (chana masala) with basmati rice for your entree. These items are nearly always vegan and almost every Indian restaurant includes them on the menu.

    When you’re cooking at home, and therefore in total control of the ingredients, your vegan options are unlimited. Vegan Richa’s Indian Kitchen is a superb cookbook that will teach you to make all the classic North and South Indian dishes. Some of the India’s most delicious curry dishes are ideal for beginner cooks, and the cuisine also features more than its share of extravagant gourmet recipes. So if you’re wanting to eat a diverse and delicious vegan diet, Indian food deserves to be among the first cuisines you explore.

    https://www.vegan.com/indian-food/?f...3_Xw8rZRMtSNdc
    Thank you for the article, I largely agree with you. I have a friend who moved to us from India, where Hinduism is closely connected with their cuisine and food. It is essentially a part of religion. Their food and seasonings are amazing, some of which my friend uses for treatment. I learned some principles from him and using https://studydriver.com/hinduism-essay/. It is very exciting to learn a new and unusual culture.
    Last edited by bobokat; 06-29-2020 at 05:50 PM.

  97. #2297
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    Great speaker. Informative presentation re vegan/plant based nutrition and athletes

    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  98. #2298
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    ^ Some supplements are beneficial. Although vitamins and minerals are found in the foods we eat, a little extra helps. Magnesium and curcumin supplements can ease join pain. I take a little magnesium at night, and I find that it helps relax my body too. I also take a B12, D (for bones) and iron (I've had a past issue with low hgb and taking iron has kept my blood counts normal)
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  99. #2299
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    Re Pamela Popper's presentation:

    While I don't disagree with her eat less more often (ELMO) advice, the 5-6 meals she recommends typically doesn't fit many lifestyles. It's important to note that she means well rounded small meals, not snacks. Most people will find it difficult to adhere to this

    There is some advantage in fasting (not for long periods but once in a while), but there is also advantage in eating. Who knows. For weight loss, I think fasting is probably better. For performance, probably ELMO is better.
    F*ck Cancer

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    The Yulin dog meat festival is underway in China.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-dog-meat.jpg  


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    Why meat processing plants have become Covid-19 hotbeds

    In the picturesque market town of Llangefni on the Welsh island of Anglesey, almost all the shops are closed and the town is empty amid the ongoing lockdown.

    The local Aldi and Lidl stores are being avoided by locals due to their proximity to the 2 Sisters poultry processing plant that was forced to close down after an outbreak of coronavirus. Two hundred workers have since tested positive for Covid-19.

    The concern felt by those who know workers at the plant is common. Some told CNN that nobody stayed home when they felt sick in the early days of the outbreak, as they would only receive statutory sick pay worth around 20% of their salary. 2 Sisters denied that their sick pay policy had anything to do with the outbreak.

    This outbreak took place in just one of many factories that have seen serious outbreaks of Covid-19 across the world in recent months. In Cleckheaton, northern England, 165 workers tested positive for Covid-19 at the Kober meat factory. And in Germany, authorities were forced to quarantine 360,000 people this week after an outbreak in a meat plant in Guetersloh in the western state of North-Rhine Westphalia. In the United States, dozens of food processing facilities had to suspend operations over the disease earlier this year.

    There have been so many outbreaks in meat packing factories around the world that scientists are now examining whether the environment inside the plants could be part of the problem.
    "We can all speculate, but I think there are three things that pop up: these people work very, very closely together, it's cold in there and it's humid," said Dr. Thomas Kamradt, an immunologist and professor at the University Hospital at Friedrich-Schiller University in Jena, Germany.

    Cold and wet environment
    A number of scientists have suggested that the cold, humid environment inside the plants could help the virus spread. "These animal cadavers have to be sprayed with water all the time, so you have aerosols, and it's cold ... it is something that definitely deserves very thorough investigation," Kamradt said.
    Without fresh air and direct sunlight, the novel coronavirus can linger for hours, or even days, scientists have said. Studies have shown the virus can survive for up to three days on plastic and stainless steel surfaces, materials that are common in food processing plants. In aerosol form, it can remain viable and infectious for hours.
    Rowland Kao, a professor of veterinary epidemiology and data science at the University of Edinburgh, also pointed out that experiments have show that low temperatures result in higher rates of transmission of influenza and improve the survival of other coronaviruses such as MERS. "While this is not proven for Covid-19, similar mechanisms may apply," he told the Science Media Center.

    Essential workers packed in close quarters
    Most experts say that social distancing and mask wearing are by far the most effective ways to avoid spreading the virus. But keeping a distance is not always possible in a factory setting.
    James Wood, a professor at Cambridge Infectious Diseases, a research center at the University of Cambridge, said the epidemics inside food processing plants are likely caused by a combination of factors "that can make them lethal."

    "People have to stand close to each other and shout to make themselves heard ... you have people working long shifts close to each other, all those things magnify the risk of infection," he said.
    Shouting, singing and speaking loudly is thought to release more virus-laden droplets into the air. Crucially, people can spread the virus unknowingly, without feeling sick.

    Factory floors packed with workers standing shoulder to shoulder aren't unique to the food processing industry. What is unique though, is that unlike car assembly lines and plane factories, these plants remained opened for business, even when social distancing wasn't possible. They play an essential role in the food supply and shutting many of them at the same time would lead to food shortages and force farmers to euthanize their animals. In the US, President Donald Trump even issued an executive order forcing meat plants to open.

    Vulnerable communities
    The outbreaks in meat plants have impacted vulnerable communities, including migrants. Jobs in the food processing plants are notoriously hard and among the lowest paid, which often makes it difficult for employers to find local staff.
    "They're not very popular places to work, so often you end up with migrants or foreign workers living in large communities around the plants and so you've got transmission potential that goes on outside the plant as well as in the plant itself," Wood said.

    A large proportion of workers in the industry are often foreign-born and come from a number of countries. More than two-thirds of the 75,000 workers employed in meat processing in the UK are migrant workers from elsewhere in Europe, according to the British Meat Processing Association. In the US, immigrants make nearly 30% of all meat-packing plants workers. In Germany, it's around a third.

    Paddy McNaught, the regional officer for the labor union Unite in Wales, said workers in the industry often don't receive sick pay, another factor that could lead to outbreaks. "So when you're in a situation like this, when you're on low pay, you have very little spare income, you're more likely to take a risk and go to work when you have a temperature, rather than take the time off and isolate for 14 days," he said. The industry must ensure workers have enough protection to be able to take time off without suffering financially, he added.

    sauce https://www.cnn.com/2020/06/27/healt...CnfMhBBSAQsO84
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  102. #2302
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    A questionable cucumber

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-105924864_10158582676433086_5495393227846586513_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-106309134_2981874558560665_2070184544206812728_o.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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    Ed Winters aka Earthling Ed is a really great communicator on animal rights and I've been listening to his podcast on my commutes lately. This one is an interview with photojournalist Jo-anne McArthur, the woman behind We Animals Media and the upcoming book HIDDEN I posted about above.


  105. #2305
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    We have so many reasons to eliminate meat. “A single live animal market in China— where an infectious coronavirus appears to have passed to humans, sickened millions, killed hundreds of thousands, and wrecked economic havoc not seen since the Great Depression." Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-107377507_3008537229227731_5874525067409877246_o.jpg
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  106. #2306
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    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  107. #2307
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    Interesting theory... still related to animal

    Exclusive: Covid-19 may not have originated in China, Oxford University expert believes

    Senior CEBM tutor Dr Tom Jefferson believes many viruses lie dormant throughout the globe and emerge when conditions are favourable
    Coronavirus may have lain dormant across the world and emerged when the environmental conditions were right for it to thrive rather than starting in China, an Oxford University expert believes.

    Dr Tom Jefferson, senior associate tutor at the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (CEBM), at Oxford and a visiting professor at Newcastle University, argues there is growing evidence that the virus was elsewhere before it emerged in Asia.

    Last week, Spanish virologists announced that they had found traces of the disease in samples of waste water collected in March 2019, nine months before coronavirus was seen in China.

    Italian scientists have also found evidence of coronavirus in sewage samples in Milan and Turin in mid-December, many weeks before the first case was detected, while experts have found evidence of traces in Brazil in November.




    Dr Jefferson believes many viruses lie dormant throughout the globe and emerge when conditions are favourable, which also means they can vanish as quickly as they arrive.

    "Where did Sars 1 go? It's just disappeared," he said. "So we have to think about these things. We need to start researching the ecology of the virus, understanding how it originates and mutates.

    "I think the virus was already here – here meaning everywhere. We may be seeing a dormant virus that has been activated by environmental conditions.

    "There was a case in the Falkland Islands in early February. Now where did that come from? There was a cruise ship that went from South Georgia to Buenos Aires, and the passengers were screened and then on day eight, when they started sailing towards the Weddell Sea, they got the first case. Was it in prepared food that was defrosted and activated?

    "Strange things like this happened with Spanish Flu. In 1918, around 30 per cent of the population of Western Samoa died of Spanish Flu, and they hadn't had any communication with the outside world.

    "The explanation for this could only be that these agents don't come or go anywhere. They are always here and something ignites them, maybe human density or environmental conditions, and this is what we should be looking for."

    Dr Jefferson believes the virus may be transmitted through the sewage system or shared toilet facilities, not just through droplets expelled by talking, coughing and sneezing.

    Writing in The Telegraph, Dr Jefferson and Professor Carl Henegehan, director of the CEBM, call for an in-depth investigation similar to that carried out by John Snow in 1854 to show that cholera was spreading in London from an infected well in Soho.

    Exploring why so many outbreaks happen at food factories and meat-packing plants could uncover major new transmission routes, they believe. It may be shared toilet facilities, coupled with cool conditions, that allow the virus to thrive.

    "We're doing a living review, extracting environmental conditions, the ecology of these viruses which has been grossly understudied," said Dr Jefferson.

    "There is quite a lot of evidence that huge amounts of the virus were in sewage all over the place, and an increasing amount of evidence there is faecal transmission. There is a high concentration where sewage is four degrees, which is the ideal temperature for it to be stabled and presumably activated. And meat-packing plants are often at four degrees.

    "These meat-packing clusters and isolated outbreaks don't fit with respiratory theory, they fit with people who haven't washed their hands properly.

    "These outbreaks need to be investigated properly with people on the ground one by one. You need to do what John Snow did. You question people and you start constructing hypotheses that fit the facts, not the other way around."

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/202...6e7nU5jTGmT65M
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  108. #2308
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    Identical Twins Discuss Their Experiment Comparing Vegan And Omni Diets

    A pair of identical twins who trialed vegan and meat-based diets - revealing some interesting results - discussed their experiment in a recent episode of PCRM's podcast.

    Ross and Hugo Turner - aka 'the adventure guinea pigs' - made headlines earlier this Summer after trialing the diets over 12 weeks between January and March this year. Ross Turner followed the meaty diet, with Hugo going plant-based throughout.

    Experiment
    The twins consumed a very similar number of calories, both eating meals prepared by food delivery service Mindful Chef, and both did five or six sessions of endurance training each week, where they lifted the same weights, for the same number of reps.

    Researchers from King's College monitored the twins, tracking metrics like muscle mass and weight, as well as cholesterol throughout the experiment.

    According to Men's Health, following the experiment, Ross' cholesterol stayed the same at 6.5 (which he described as 'quite high') and Hugo's (vegan diet) went down to 4.9. When it comes to body composition, Hugo lost 1kg of fat and gained 1.2kg of muscle mass, while Ross gained 2.8kg of fat and 4kg of muscle mass.



    Podcast
    The Turners appeared on the Physician's Committee's podcast The Exam Room to share more about the experiment, discussing it with host Chuck Carroll, revealing that they tossed a coin to decide who would try what diet.

    According to Ross Turner, he was disappointed not to be the twin testing out a plant-based diet. He explained: "I was a little gutted that I didn't get the vegan [diet] because you watch all these documentaries on Netflix, in particular, The Game Changers...and so I really wanted to feel the effects of what truly going vegan is - I've never done a truly vegan diet."

    Hugo Turner said his immediate thought was that he would drop a lot of weight, as he believed 'vegans can't get all the calories as they need because they are not eating meat and dairy'. He added that he thought his energy levels would be low and his motivation to work out would be low too - however this was not the case.

    Energy
    The twins went straight from what they described as indulgent diets over the Christmas diet period, with lots of drinking, into their new plans. Hugo described this abrupt transition as 'very difficult' for the first two weeks.

    "But after those two weeks went past and suddenly your body realizes what's happening and it's adjusting, then I suddenly had a load more energy and a hell of a lot more energy all throughout the days.

    "So on my usual diet, I would feel tired in the afternoon - maybe that's my snacking style - but I definitely feel tired and you get a lot more peaks and troughs. But on the vegan diet, my energy levels leveled off and, I'd have a lot more energy going to the gym. I felt a lot more motivated for that...it was really impressive the amount of energy you can get just from plants."

    sauce https://www.plantbasednews.org/lifes...KFVt8vFUJ4aoJ0
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  109. #2309
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    We did a evening urban ride (it was grossly hot and humid ). We stopped by a new local business that sold microgreens, local products like jams, pickles and frozen treats. We wore masks inside. We tried the raspberry sorbet. We ate it curbside. It was delightful!

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  110. #2310
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  111. #2311
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    LEGENDARY PLANT-BASED BOXER MIKE TYSON, 54, RETURNS TO THE RING

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    Boxer Mike Tyson, 54, is returning to the boxing ring for the first time in 15 years. The plant-based athlete will compete in an eight-round exhibition match against 51-year-old former boxing champion Roy Jones Jr. on September 12 at Dignity Health Sports Park in Carson, CA. The event, which will also feature live musical performances, will air on pay-per-view and social media channel Triller.

    At age 20, Tyson became the youngest heavyweight champion in history in 1986 and went on to have a lucrative, albeit controversial, boxing career until 2005 when he retired after losing to Irish boxer Kevin McBride. In 2010, Tyson—who had a habit of eating steak prior to fights—adopted a plant-based diet in an effort to alleviate health issues associated with drug use.

    “Well my life is different today because I have stability in my life. I’m not on drugs. I’m not out on the streets or in clubs and everything I do now is structured around the development of my life and my family,” Tyson told Oprah in 2013. “I lost weight. I dropped over 100 pounds and I just felt like changing my life, doing something different, and I became a vegan.”

    Last year, Tyson reaffirmed his commitment to veganism to GQ Sports. “I don’t eat anything that has a mother and father. If you were created through a mother and father, through any kind of intercourse, I won’t eat you,” Tyson said. “So that means I only eat vegetables and stuff.”

    This week, Tyson launched Legends Only League, a new venture that helps older legendary athletes return to the sports at which they excelled.

    https://vegnews.com/2020/7/legendary...9wz62nkeK3u_tU
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  112. #2312
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    Mushrooms and bone health.

    This will be of interest to mushroom lovers and those seeking bone health. Chris and I love eating, photographing and picking wild mushrooms! And we love the outdoors 🙂

    I understand if you’re confused as to why these two are linked. So bear with me.

    A key factor in bone function, including the risk of bone stress injuries, is vitamin D. It’s integral to bone health and bone remodelling. Approx 10% of Canadian's are vitamin D deficient (https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/.../11727-eng.htm) and the main sources of intervention that are advised are usually sun exposure and supplements. It can also be a conundrum to be both sun smart and get enough vitamin D.

    This is where mushrooms come in. A brand new systematic review by Blumfield et al., which was shared with me and a few others has found that eating just 5 UV exposed mushrooms can give you your daily required dose of vitamin D.
    In order to boost the vitamin D levels in the mushrooms, you need to have them sitting in direct sunlight for 15-60 minutes. If refrigerated, they stay vitamin D boosted for up to 8 days. So once a week, tan your mushrooms for an hour and your bones will thank you for it. UV exposed mushrooms have been shown to be as effective in increasing Vit D levels as taking supplements.

    There are many other health benefits of mushrooms highlighted in the study. I’ve just decided to focus on this one.
    Reference: (https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc..._fK9lag5WRWwKE) Examining the health effects and bioactive components in Agarius bisporus mushrooms: a scoping review.

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  113. #2313
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    What a great concept.




    “Most animal photography has a cloying cuteness or a reflected sense of what humans want animals to be, so the fact that Leshko’s photographs reframe the interaction, in essence giving the animals the opportunity to tell their own stories for once, makes her pictures stand out. By respectfully showing us the beauty and dignity to be found in aging animals of all kinds, she has offered us humans both a measure of guilt at how we have treated them and an encouragement to forward-looking advocacy on their behalf. Her compassionate, gentle, well-crafted portraits remind us that we can do better for these animals, if we only take a moment to see them as sentient, feeling individuals.”

    https://www.isaleshko.com/allowed-to-grow-old-book
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  114. #2314
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    ^ This is beautiful!






    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-img.jpg

    ^ This is sad
    Sauce: https://www.aussiefarms.org.au/kb/48...ls-slaughtered
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  115. #2315
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    Vegan food company provokes with M*** F*** advertising campaign

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    A vegan food company is sparing no blushes with what it calls a “light-hearted” advertising campaign to encourage more Britons to avoid eating meat.

    Meatless Farm says it is targeting people who have cut down on bangers and burgers during lockdown with its provocative slogan M*** F***, launched on Monday with a national campaign.

    The words will appear on TV and radio adverts, electric cars, social media and supermarket packaging.

    The Leeds-based brand, which claims that its meat-free or fake burgers, mince and sausages (made from pea protein) taste and look like the real thing – is seeking to build on huge growth in the UK, and as shoppers’ interest in plant-based alternatives has risen during lockdown.;;

    It says sales have nearly tripled – up by 179% year on year according to the market research company Nielsen – driven by health, environment and welfare reasons, and as more than a third of Britons say they have eaten more plant-based food while confined to their homes. Now it wants to emphasise the versatility of meat alternatives.

    According to Nielsen, Meatless Farm is the fastest growing UK brand in a sector that is seeing annual growth of about 10%. Global demand for plant-based protein – dominated by the US giants Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat – is predicted to be £4.1bn this year, from £2.9bn in 2015.

    Michael Hunter, Meatless Farm’s chief growth officer, said: “Throughout lockdown we’ve seen a surge in sales, with more and more Brits trying or considering making the swap to plant-based, even if it is just once a week.

    “We felt the nation needed a bit of a lift as it’s been a tough time for everyone, so more than ever we wanted to create something light-hearted and fun that consumers would remember when they are looking for
    alternatives to meat.”

    The £1.5m campaign is the biggest advertising yet by the company, which was launched in 2016. Its products are on sale through Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Morrisons and Asda – and online via Ocado – as well as through restaurants and pubs via partnerships with Brakes, Itsu, Woods Foodservice and Wadworth.

    The M*** F*** campaign is a step change for the brand, which has built a following on social media and is now aiming to grow its market share by targeting former meat eaters who made the swap during lockdown. It will be supported by print advertising, branded electric cars driving through London, billboards, bus signs and a radio ad. A TV ad will appear on Channel 4 throughout August and September.

    As well as provoking with its suggestion of offensive language, the move is bound to ruffle the feathers of livestock farmers, whose businesses have been hard hit by Covid-19. The closure of restaurants and pubs in March disrupted the supply chain, leaving many with surplus cuts of steak and roasting joints that they struggled to sell.

    Helen Browning, chief executive of the Soil Association, said: “It’s easy to target all meat with the same brush, but it’s important to recognise that there is a big difference between meat produced to ethical standards and the cheap and nasty stuff that comes from very intensive livestock systems. We urge that people should eat less meat, but eat high-welfare, sustainably produced meat when they do.”

    Stuart Roberts, deputy president of the National Farmers’ Union, commented: “In Britain, our farmers are already leading the way in climate-friendly food production and we have the ambition to be even better, working towards net zero agriculture by 2040. We would never dream of telling anyone what they can and cannot eat. But if you want to eat quality, nutritious red meat as part of a healthy, balanced diet and be confident that it’s been sustainably produced, buying British is a great place to start.”

    The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) said it would investigate complaints about “decency” after the campaign’s launch In August 2004, the clothing chain French Connection dropped the infamous FCUK logo from its advertising after years of complaints and censures from watchdogs.

    Last year, millions of pounds were wiped off the value of the exercise bike firm Peloton after a backlash against a Christmas advert derided as “sexist and dystopian”. In March, the ASA banned a series of “scaremongering” ads for face masks that it said played on fears about the coronavirus.

    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeands...Fj6LcSfYeTCR1I
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  116. #2316
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    Everything at the grocery store is getting more expensive

    New York (CNN Business)Grocery prices have skyrocketed during the coronavirus pandemic. That has Americans spending more at the supermarket than they have in years.

    Prices are spiking — and not just because people are buying more groceries as they spend more time at home.
    The pandemic has had a strong impact on grocery prices this year, according to seasonally adjusted data released Friday by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. The BEA tracks personal consumption expenditures to help measure inflation.

    From February to June, meat and poultry prices rose nearly 11%, with beef and veal prices seeing the highest rise, spiking 20%. For pork the increase was about 8.5%. People are paying more for other staples, too: During the same time period, egg prices shot up 10%, and shoppers shelled out 4% more for cereals and fresh vegetables.

    The pandemic has caused a surge in demand for groceries as millions of Americans stay home and avoid eating out. While there's no significant shortage of food, disruptions in the supply chain have created scarcities and driven up prices.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-200805110452-beef-chicken-us-store-aisle-restricted-exlarge-169.jpg


    The meat supply chain has been hit particularly hard. Major meat processors closed their doors when workers fell ill and have slowed operations to accommodate new safety practices, tightening the country's supply. Things aren't back to normal yet.

    During a recent call with analysts discussing third-quarter financial results, Tyson (TSN) CEO Noel White said that some of the company's facilities "continue to operate at decreased production levels."

    The higher expenditures come at a time when many Americans are struggling financially.

    On Thursday, the Department of Labor will release data that is expected to show that another 1.4 million workers filed for first-time unemployment benefits last week, which is similar to the prior week's statistics. Meanwhile, unemployed Americans are losing a financial lifeline, as the government's weekly $600 boost to regular jobless benefits ran out on July 31.

    Food insecurity in particular is a growing problem. Nearly 30 million out of 249 million respondents told the US Census Bureau they did not have enough to eat at some point in the week before July 21 — the highest number of people reporting insufficient food since the Census started tracking that data in early May.

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/05/busin...NOghBcb1aaxwAg
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  117. #2317
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    Sweet Potatoes


    Sweet Potatoes are an incredibly nutritious food that are packed with antioxidants like beta carotene, vitamins C, E & D, and minerals such as manganese and iron. They are also high in potassium which helps to lower blood pressure by removing excess sodium and regulating fluid balance in the body. Sweet potatoes are an excellent anti-stress food and are known to help relax muscles, steady nerves, and balance cognitive function.

    They are also one of the best anti-cancer foods and can particularly help to prevent breast, colon, lung, skin, and oral cancers. Sweet potatoes are known for being easy to digest and are very good for ulcers, inflamed colons, digestive disorders, and constipation. Sweet potatoes contain compounds called phytochelatins that can bind to heavy metals such as lead, mercury, copper, & cadmium and safely remove them through the body.

    Mothers have even given children who have accidentally swallowed a metallic object such as a coin, plenty of sweet potato so that it will stick to the object and allow it to pass through easier. The health benefits of sweet potatoes are the most bioavailable when eaten raw, steamed, or baked.

    Try making a simple fat-free sweet potato soup by steaming sweet potatoes until soft and then placing in a blender or food processor and blend until creamy smooth. Spices such as cloves, cinnamon, ginger, chili pepper, or curry can be added for a flavor and nutritional boost.

    Baked sweet potatoes can be stored in the refrigerator and later sliced over a fresh green salad for a hearty lunch or dinner. Sweet potatoes are also delicious mashed with a drizzle of olive oil, coconut butter, or avocado. Sweet potatoes are a comforting, satisfying, and very healing food, consider finding more ways to include them into your diet.

    https://www.medicalmedium.com/blog/s...yD_UrQ_25eovDE
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  118. #2318
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    More Than a Pest: 8 Edible Weeds and Their Nutritional Uses

    Weeds have a pretty bad rep; we spray and pull them out of the earth when perhaps we should have been eating and using them for medicine all along.

    It’s hard to see past these invasive pests but it’s all about shifting our perspective, says Ellery Hawkes co-owner of Simon Steeps. “Get curious about the dandelion and understand that it’s medicine and the perfect survival food.”

    Ellery and her partner Simon imbue wild herbs and weeds in their organic tea blends, which creates a bridge between store-bought and venturing into your backyard to pluck something wild. Their goal is to get people examining labels, questioning what’s inside and realizing that it’s the weeds we’ve been picking out that are making us feel this good within.

    This beginner’s mindset is what got me thinking about the flora in my own backyard, and I couldn’t believe how many edible—and often times medicinal—weeds have been rooted right beneath my feet.

    Let’s get curious together and dive into what may be hiding in your lawn, just waiting to be discovered.


    Before getting started

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    Within the limits of curiosity, it’s important be accurate when it comes to harvesting weeds. Many wild plants have dangerous doppelgängers, so it’s best to keep an identifying app or trusty book (like The Wild Wisdom of Weeds) on hand. Or better yet, venture out with a well-versed mentor.

    Another thing to consider? If you’re foraging in a park or wild area, make sure the area hasn’t been sprayed with toxic, weed-ridding pesticides.


    Dandelions
    Most of us have heard of this weed being edible, but did you know that every part of it is? The leaves and flowers are great in soups and salads, whereas the roots can be used in herbal teas or coffees. Dandelion has a history of treating liver problems, kidney disease and is great for heartburn, appendicitis, as a diuretic and appetite stimulant.


    Yarrow
    Alternately known as Soldier’s Wound Wort, yarrow can be used as an ointment for wounds. If you chew on it, it can relieve a toothache. When steeped as a tea, yarrow can reduce the effects of a cold. Be careful with this one as it’s tricky twin is the poison hemlock.


    Wild onion & garlic
    You’ll recognize this one for its familiar fragrant smell. Just like its store-bought counterpart, wild onion and garlic share the same antibacterial, antibiotic, antiseptic and antifungal properties, and have been known to lower blood pressure and cholesterol, as well. They can be found in clumps throughout lawns, standing taller than other weeds or grass.


    Purslane
    This pesky weed grows in all of your empty garden spots, but it turns out it has beautiful benefits of its own. You can find omega-3, fatty acids, magnesium, calcium and potassium packed in this small–but–mighty weed.

    Plantain
    Once known as “white man’s foot” by the Indigenous community, this weed grows almost everywhere. Not only does it make a nice spinach substitute and contain as much Vitamin A as a large carrot, it can be used to treat sore throats, cold symptoms, treat fevers and stimulate cellular growth. Plantain can also heal bug bites, poison ivy or the burn from stinging nettle. All you have to do is chew on it for 10 seconds until the juices are released and rub it directly on the sting or bite.


    Stinging nettle
    Do not pick this one with bare hands! Wear gloves and cover your arms while picking stinging nettle (for obvious reasons) and be sure to cook or dry the plant to neutralize the sting. Once that’s done, it is one of the most nutritious wild edibles, containing Vitamins A, B2, C, D, K, antioxidants, amino acids, chlorophyll, calcium, potassium, iodine, and if you can believe it—more!


    Red clover
    Red clover has a long history as a useful medicinal weed and is popular for its anti-inflammatory properties. It’s a great source of food for bees and insects, and in humans it can regulate hormonal imbalances, anxiety, muscle spasms and coughs.


    Violets

    Not only are they beautiful and mild tasting—making them easy to eat raw or cooked— but violets can treat insomnia, nervousness, urinary problems, digestion issues, and congestion. These pretty purples do have laxative qualities though, so go easy.



    More resources

    Aside from health benefits, there are so many levels to harvesting and using weeds for medicinal purposes. Weeds empower you to nourish and heal yourself, they ground you to the land and connect you with the energy of these resilient plants.

    So, the next time you’re thinking about pulling and tossing that weed, stop to think about which benefits you’re throwing away.

    For more foraging references, visit wildedible.com.

    sauce https://www.environment911.org/More-...HwCG01K7TluqSA
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  119. #2319
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    Plant-based diet: Food Fact Sheet


    People choose a plant-based diet for a variety of reasons including concern about the treatment of animals, health reasons, environmental concerns or because of taste and social pressure. Plant-based diets are becoming more popular and if they are wellplanned, can support healthy living at every age and life-stage.

    Types of plant-based diets include:

    Lacto-ovo vegetarians – eat dairy foods and eggs but not meat, poultry or seafood.

    Ovo-vegetarians – include eggs but avoid all other animal foods, including dairy.

    Lacto-vegetarians – eat dairy foods but exclude eggs, meat, poultry and seafood.

    Vegans – don’t eat any animal products at all, including honey, dairy and eggs. Many shop bought ready-made products may contain animal ingredients so the labels of all manufactured products do need to be read carefully.

    Variations of plant-based diets include:
    Pescetarians – eat fish and/or shellfish.
    Semi-vegetarians (or flexitarians) – occasionally eat meat or poultry.

    Eating for optimum health
    Diets centred on a wide variety of plant foods offer affordable, tasty and nutritious options. Plant-based diets which are rich in beans, nuts, seeds, fruit and vegetables, wholegrains such as oats, rice, and cerealbased foods such as breads, and pasta can provide all the nutrients needed for good health. This includes essential fats, protein, vitamins, minerals and plenty of fibre too.

    Well balanced plant-based diets, that are also low in saturated fat, can help you manage your weight and may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. However, as with any diet, plant-based nutrition needs to be planned.

    Most nutrients are abundantly available in plant-based diets, but if you are avoiding all or minimising your consumption of animal-derived foods there are a few nutrients that you need to pay attention to.

    Calcium
    Calcium is essential for bone health, along with weightbearing exercise and a healthy diet. An adult requires approximately 700mg per day. Dairy foods are rich in calcium but if you are not eating these make sure you obtain calcium from other sources like fortified plantbased dairy alternatives, dried fruit e.g. figs, nuts such as almonds, leafy green vegetables, red kidney beans, sesame seeds, tahini and tofu to lower your risk of bone fractures.

    Omega 3 fatty acids
    These fats have been shown to be important for health and are commonly found in oily fish. However if you are not eating fish, plant sources of omega 3 include walnuts, flax (linseed), hemp seeds, chia seeds and soya beans. Oils such as hemp, rapeseed and flaxseed oil provide essential omega 3 fats and are preferable to corn/sunflower oils.

    Vitamin D
    Vitamin D is needed to keep bones, teeth and muscles healthy and is made in our bodies when our skin is exposed to appropriate sunlight. In the UK this is usually between April and September. During the winter months, we need to get vitamin D from our diet because the sun isn’t strong enough for the body to make it. Plant-based sources of vitamin D include sun-exposed mushrooms and fortified foods such as vegetable spreads, breakfast cereals and plantbased dairy alternatives.

    Since it’s difficult to get enough vitamin D from food alone, everyone should consider taking a daily supplement of 10mcg/ day during the autumn and winter months. Some vitamin D supplements are not suitable for vegans. Vitamin D2 and lichen-derived vitamin D3 are suitable. Find out more about this in our Vitamin D Food Fact Sheet.

    Iodine
    The major sources of iodine in our diet are dairy products and fish. The iodine content of plant foods depends on the iodine content of the soil which is variable. Foods grown closer to the ocean tend to be higher in iodine. Where soils are iodine deficient, iodised salt and seaweed provide iodine which is needed in moderation.

    As the iodine content of seaweed is variable, and sometimes too high, guidance is not to consume sea vegetables more than once a week. An excess of iodine is also unhealthy so if you are taking a supplement, discuss this with your dietitian. Find out more in our Iodine Food Fact Sheet

    Vitamin B12
    We need vitamin B12 for many reasons. Too little can result in fatigue, anaemia and nerve damage and increase homocysteine levels leading to cardiovascular disease. Most people get vitamin B12 by eating animal products. If you are eliminating all animal derived foods, the only reliable sources of vitamin B12 are fortified foods and supplements. Suitable B12-fortified foods include some breakfast cereals, yeast extracts, soya yoghurts and non-dairy milks.

    To make sure you get enough vitamin B12, either eat fortified foods at least twice a day, aiming for 3mcg of vitamin B12 a day, or take a supplement, 10mcg daily or at least 2000mcg weekly. If you are worried whether you are obtaining sufficient vitamin B12, a dietitian can calculate your intake from food/supplements or a doctor can check your blood homocysteine levels.

    Iron

    Plant sources of iron include dried fruits, wholegrains, nuts, green leafy vegetables, seeds and pulses. The form of iron in plant foods is absorbed far less efficiently compared to iron from animal derived sources such as meat and eggs. Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables rich in vitamin C to help the iron to be absorbed e.g. citrus fruits, strawberries, green leafy vegetables and peppers.

    Zinc

    Phytates found in plant foods such as wholegrains and beans reduce zinc absorption, so it’s important to eat good sources of zinc-containing foods. Eat fermented soya such as tempeh and miso; beans (soak dried beans then rinse before cooking to increase zinc absorption); wholegrains; nuts; seeds and some fortified breakfast cereals.

    Selenium
    Plant sources of this mineral include grains, seeds and nuts. Just two brazil nuts daily will provide you with your daily requirement of selenium

    Protein
    Plant-based sources of protein include lentils, beans, chickpeas, seeds, nuts and nut butters (e.g. peanut butter), and tofu. Eggs, and dairy are also good sources if you are eating these. Meat substitutes like vegetarian burgers, soya sausages, and other meat alternatives can be useful for those adapting to a plant-based diet and can provide a source of protein. However as with any processed foods, these can often be high in salt and fat so should be used in moderation. These products may contain animal ingredients such as eggs, milk derivatives and honey so careful label reading is necessary if you wish to follow a vegan diet.

    Sustainable eating

    In the UK, it is estimated that well-planned completely plant-based, or vegan, diets need just one third of the fertile land, fresh water and energy of the typical British ‘meat-and-dairy’ based diet. With meat and dairy being the leading contributor to greenhouse (GHG) emissions, reducing animal based foods and choosing a wide range of plant foods can be beneficial to the planet and our health.

    Summary
    Well-planned plant-based diets can support healthy living at every age and life-stage. Include a wide variety of healthy whole foods to ensure your diet is balanced and sustainable.


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  120. #2320
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    Fresh northern Ontario wild blueberries purchased from the pickers. Awesome good

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  121. #2321
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    And it's vegan

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  122. #2322
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    'We can't blame animals': how human pathogens are making their way into vulnerable wildlife

    For 13 years now, scientist Michelle Power has been grabbing samples of human waste and animal poop from Antarctica to Australia to try and answer a vital question.

    Has the bacteria in humans that has grown resistant to antibiotics – an issue considered to be one of the world’s greatest health challenges – made its way into wildlife?

    The answer, it seems, is a resounding yes.



    “I don’t think there’s been an animal where we haven’t found it,” says Power, an associate professor at Macquarie University in Sydney.

    The sorts of animals Power has chosen to look at most live close to humans or are urbanised – like possums – or animals that spend time with humans either in wildlife care facilities or in conservation breeding programs.

    So far, Power says she has found evidence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in about a dozen animals, including bats, penguins, sea lions and wallabies.

    “You have organisms moving from us, to animals, and then potentially back to us again,” she says. “At the moment it’s hard to track what’s coming back and forth, but we know humans have driven this emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.”

    Power’s work on the issue started in 2007 when she looked at faeces samples of endangered brush-tailed rock wallabies being raised in captivity in New South Wales as part of conservation efforts.

    About half the wallabies had antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their faeces. Those animals were released back into the wild.

    In late 2009, Power fulfilled a romantic 20-year-old dream of travelling to Antarctica to do scientific research. The rather less romantic goal was to sample the human sewage from a research station there, and to “sneak up behind penguins and seals” and take their poo.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-5389.jpg

    But again, her findings revealed that bacteria from humans was making its way into the Antarctic wilderness, including antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Between 2017 and 2019, Power’s scientific colleagues together with wildlife carers have collected 448 poo samples from the little penguins of Philip Island and St Kilda, and from the penguins in zoos (one method to collect samples from wild penguins is to leave a piece of card near the entry to a nesting box because, Power says, they “like to poo out the door”).

    Almost half the little penguins in captivity have antibiotic-resistant bacteria, compared with 3% of the wild population.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-4083.jpg


    Power has also been part of an ongoing citizen science project encouraging others to do the faeces collecting – this time, asking for the secretions of possums.

    After analysing abut 1,800 samples so far, Power says the Scoop a Poop project has shown about 29% of Australia’s brush-tailed possums are carrying antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    In 2019, Power was part of a study that found antibiotic resistance in grey-headed flying foxes – a species listed as vulnerable.

    In research yet to be published, Power says she has found evidence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in wild populations of Tasmanian devils.

    So how did our bacteria get into the animals?

    Power says about three-quarters of the antibiotics that humans take are actually excreted, ending up in wastewater systems. Places where antibiotics are manufactured are also potential avenues for escape of antibiotics.

    And then there are the times when animals are taken into care, or raised in captivity and exposed to humans, and then released into the wild.

    “We are seeing a variation in the prevalence [of antibiotic-resistant bacteria] across different wildlife species but why that is the case, we are not sure,” Power says.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-5979.jpg

    Possums are a species that are highly urbanised, sometimes feed on the ground, and live and eat close to humans – close enough that many find homes in the roof space of Australian houses. But they tend to be solitary.

    Flying foxes on the other hand hang around in trees in tightly packed camps that can run into the thousands. About 5% of wild grey-headed flying foxes had antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their excretions, compared with 40% of those in care facilities.

    Power says: “Maybe the possums are getting closer to our organisms, but also they’re solitary species. Flying foxes on the other hand live up in trees but live in higher densities.”

    According to the World Health Organisation, the emergence of bacteria resistant to antibiotics is one of the world’s greatest health challenges facing humans, making treatment of dangerous diseases ever more challenging.

    But the impact of this bacteria on wildlife, Power says, “is the big unknown” and she says there’s no direct evidence yet that it’s doing harm.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-4478.jpg

    She says: “The gene transfer of endemic bacteria could alter microbial communities and know more and more each day about the significance of friendly microbes to healthy immunity.”

    Dr Wayne Boardman is a wildlife veterinarian at the University of Adelaide and the former head vet at London Zoo who has been collaborating with Power on research.

    One big concern Boardman holds is that the antibiotic resistance could make it harder for vets to care for sick animals.

    But also, he says, the bacteria and the genes associated with them that are being passed from humans to animals could then evolve and come back into the human population.

    “It’s in the bacteria’s interest to try and protect themselves,” he says. “Whilst the risks are relatively small, they could be compounded over the years because we have more of these antimicrobial resistant genes occurring and then we get further and further into the mire.

    “It’s a human induced issue. We can’t blame the animals. It’s only humans using antibiotics.”

    Prof Clare McArthur, a behavioural ecologist at the University of Sydney, says Power has answered the first important question – are human bacteria being passed into our wildlife?

    “The next questions is, does it matter,” she says. “I think of this from a gut perspective. We know that the gut biome is important and we know from humans that if you tweak it then things can go pear shaped in terms of our health.

    “In the back of my mind is the question – if they’re picking up antibiotic-resistant bacteria, is that altering their gut biome? We don’t have an answer for that yet.”

    As for Power, she’s worried that wildlife picking up human pathogens could be another pressure on species already vulnerable.

    “These bacteria are pathogens and they can cause diseases in us. I’m worried about wildlife health and what some of these resistant bacteria might mean for wildlife species, many of which are already vulnerable.”

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  124. #2324
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    What is the best way to cook vegetables to maximize their nutritional value?

    THE QUESTION
    I WANT TO IMPROVE MY DIET. HOW SHOULD I COOK VEGETABLES TO KEEP THEIR VITAMINS?

    It's almost salad season, and this year I have vowed to improve my diet by eating far more vegetables in a variety of salads. But I'd like a variety of raw and roasted or otherwise cooked vegetables for a mix of textures and flavours. Are raw vegetables always healthier? Do all cooking methods destroy vitamins? What is the best way to cook vegetables to maximize their nutritional value?

    THE ANSWER
    STEAM, DON’T BOIL: TO GET THE MAXIMUM NUTRITIONAL BENEFITS, YOU NEED TO COOK VEGETABLES CORRECTLY


    “Eat more vegetables” is long-standing advice for a healthy diet – and for good reason. A diet high in vegetables has been tied to a lower risk of high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, cataracts, macular degeneration, cognitive decline and digestive-tract cancers. Thanks to their protective mix of vitamins, minerals, fibre and phytochemicals, vegetables are thought to help dampen inflammation, fend off harmful free radicals and boost immunity.

    To reap their maximum nutritional benefits, though, you need to cook them right.

    While all cooking methods alter the nutrient composition of vegetables (and fruits), some destroy particular nutrients while others actually enhance nutrient content.

    VULNERABLE VITAMINS

    Vitamin C and many of the B vitamins are the most unstable nutrients when it comes to cooking. Because they're water-soluble, they leach out of vegetables into the cooking water. If you boil your vegetables or microwave using too much water, you'll end up with less thiamine, folate, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 and a lot less vitamin C.

    According to a review by researchers at the University of California, Davis, as much as 55 per cent of the vitamin C in vegetables is lost during home cooking (compared with raw). Vitamin C is also easily degraded by heat.

    Polyphenols – phytochemicals plentiful in kale, spinach and broccoli – are also susceptible to degradation during cooking.

    Fat-soluble nutrients such as vitamins A, E and K are more stable and fare better during cooking. So do carotenoids (e.g., beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lycopene, lutein), antioxidants found in leafy greens, carrots, winter squash, sweet potato and, in the case of lycopene, tomatoes.

    DOES MICROWAVING VEGETABLES DESTROY NUTRIENTS?

    Water is the enemy when it comes to nutrient losses during cooking. That's why steaming is one of the best methods to preserve easily damaged nutrients, such as vitamin C and many B vitamins. Since vegetables don't come in contact with cooking water during steaming, more vitamins are retained.

    Dry cooking methods such as grilling, roasting and stir-frying also retain a greater amount of nutrients than boiling. If you prefer to boil your vegetables, save the nutrient-rich cooking water to add to soups and sauces.

    Contrary to popular belief, microwaving does not kill nutrients in vegetables. In fact, it may outrank steaming when it comes to retaining antioxidants.

    A 2009 report in the Journal of Food Science found that compared with boiling, pressure cooking and baking, microwave cooking helped maintain the highest levels of antioxidants in beans, beets, artichoke, asparagus, garlic, onion and spinach. Microwave cooking increased antioxidant activity in eggplant, corn, peppers and Swiss chard. On the other hand, boiling and pressure cooking led to the greatest antioxidant losses.

    Cornell researchers found that spinach retained nearly all of its folate when microwaved but lost most of the B vitamin when boiled on the stove.

    Microwave ovens use less heat than many other cooking methods and involve shorter cooking times. If you use a minimal amount of water and don't overcook your vegetables, microwave cooking is a nutritional win. (A 2003 study concluded that microwaving destroyed most of the antioxidants in broccoli – but the researchers had added far too much water.)

    ARE RAW VEGETABLES HEALTHIER THAN COOKED?

    Many people think raw vegetables are more nutritious than cooked, but that's not the case. Cooking vegetables breaks down the plants' cell walls, releasing more of the nutrients bound to those cell walls. Cooked vegetables supply more antioxidants, including beta-carotene, lutein and lycopene, than they do when raw.

    Cooked vegetables also deliver more minerals. Spinach, beet greens and Swiss chard are high in calcium, but a compound called oxalic acid binds with calcium. Heating releases bound calcium, making more of the mineral available for the body to absorb. Cooking vegetables also increases the amount of magnesium and iron that are available to the body.

    Even so, in some cases vegetables may be better for you raw than cooked. Cruciferous vegetables – cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, bok choy, Brussels sprouts – contain an enzyme called myrosinase, which, when you chop or chew these vegetables, converts glucosinolates (phytochemicals) to anti-cancer compounds called isothiocyanates.

    The problem: Myrosinase is easily destroyed by heat. Cooking cruciferous vegetables reduces the conversion of glucosinolates to their active isothiocyanates, which may reduce their cancer-fighting potential.

    According to research published in 2009, steaming led to the lowest loss of glucosinolates in broccoli while stir-frying and boiling (both higher-heat cooking methods) caused the greatest loss.

    ARE FROZEN VEGETABLES LESS NUTRITIOUS?


    Cooking isn't the only way vegetables can lose nutrients. Before fresh vegetables reach your steamer basket or microwave, some of their nutritional value can be degraded during the time they're transported to a distribution centre, displayed in the grocery store and stored in your crisper. When possible, buy produce from farmers' markets to reduce the time from harvest to table.

    When vegetables are out of season, consider frozen.

    Frozen vegetables closely match the nutrient content of their freshly picked counterparts because they're flash-frozen at peak ripeness, a time when they're most nutrient-packed. (Vegetables that are shipped to the produce section of grocery stores are usually picked before they are ripe, giving them less time to develop their full nutritional potential.)

    The bottom line: No one cooking method will preserve 100 per cent of the nutrients and protective phytochemicals in vegetables. So don’t limit yourself to one cooking method or eating only salad.

    Eat your vegetables roasted, grilled, steamed, boiled in a soup, microwaved and raw. Enjoy them fresh (locally grown when possible) and frozen. The more variety you have, the more likely you are to eat them. And that's the whole point.


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  125. #2325
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    Judy, you really deserve a trophy or something for all of the quality information that you regularly post here. Always good stuff! Thanks for all of your great efforts!
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  126. #2326
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    Thank you C2L I'll only post the good stuff
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  127. #2327
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    A Gang Of Runaway Cows Just Took Over An Ontario Neighbourhood


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    Officers had a pretty unusual start to the day on Wednesday when a herd of runaway cows in Ontario decided to go on an adventure.

    OPP East Region said that the cattle took off from their home and made their way into the village of Russell, where they made a pit stop on someone's lawn.

    The cops remained in the area until their owner came and got them. Those troublemakers definitely got grounded!

    Cows have caused trouble in Ontario before. Last year, a herd of them got loose and somehow found their way onto Highway 401.

    Last fall, York Regional Police had a field day tweeting puns about runaway farm animals on roadways.

    Leave it to cows to cause udder chaos in Ontario.

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  128. #2328
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    It's been almost 7 years since I went from vegetarian to vegan. I've experienced the benefits of the change. I seen the benefits of plant based foods as fuel and noticed since I've taken up running over the past 4 years I've progressed from 1km runs to finishing my first marathon this year. This is another article that talks about plants for fuel for endurance athletes and a good source of info for those contemplating plant based, those who train hard but need an alternate fuel source , or looking for a change in their body, or mental aspect or are even semi vegan ie flexitarian and the list goes on


    Ultimate Guide for Plant Based Endurance Athletes

    A plant based diet is to be responsible in what you eat--this means choosing your food carefully, and not just opting for junk food. It's very important to do your research and find out which are the key food products that you need to eat regularly if you want to do this correctly and in a healthy way.

    More and more people–regardless of if they’re athletes or not–are choosing to eat a plant based diet. The reasons range widely, and vary from person to person–but the main reasons that people choose a plant-based diet are: the animal suffering and the animal product industry as a whole; the effect that production of animal products has on climate change; for the personal health benefits; or just to try something new.

    Before going deep into the nuances of a plant-based diet, it’s important to mention that not eating anything from animal sources (i.e. being a vegan or vegetarian) doesn’t necessarily mean you’re following a plant-based diet. That’s because nowadays, there are a lot of products out there that label themselves as vegan but are full of chemicals or artificial things that are really not the core of a plant based diet. The idea is to find products that come from a natural source and that are ideally grown with a sustainable approach.

    For the same reasons mentioned above, it’s important to realize that the main focus of starting (or maintaining) a plant based diet is to be responsible in what you eat–this means choosing your food carefully, and not just opting for junk food. It’s very important to do your research and find out which are the key food products that you need to eat regularly if you want to do this correctly and in a healthy way.

    Before we go into the common misconceptions–and concerns–about going full-on into a plant based diet, let’s talk about its benefits and if it makes sense for you as an endurance athlete.

    A plant based diet can help us with:

    Lowering our overall body fat percentage and lowering concentrations of lipids in your blood flood.
    Help oxygenate our tissues.
    Increase our chances of having full glycogen stores in our bodies (in other words, we have more “fuel in the tank.”)
    Overall decrease our general inflammation.
    Create more antioxidants in our bodies

    Let’s break each of these benefits down and go a little more in-depth with each one.

    Fat

    A plant based diet can help us lower our body fat percentage, which is not only good for our cardiovascular system, but also, it can be a direct benefit for our performance as endurance athletes.

    This reduction in body fat comes from the overall lower percentage of fat and high fiber content in all of the vegetables and fruits you eat in a plant based diet. And the good thing is that you don’t need to eat less food overall to achieve this–so there is no actual calorie restriction to see the benefits of this.

    You need to be aware that you may not see this change in body fat by looking at your scale every week. It’s key to remember that more important than your weight itself is the composition and balance of your body in terms of muscle, fat, and everything else.

    Finally, a lower body fat percentage has been shown in studies to increase your aerobic capacity, which as you already know, is one of the most important things for us as endurance athletes.

    When talking about lowering the amount of lipids in our blood, it’s worth mentioning that as plants in general have a very low percentage of fat and no cholesterol, a plant-based diet makes our blood more fluid. In turn, this helps promote good blood flow which is also a key aspect for us as endurance athletes because it promotes faster recovery after our hard workouts or long races.

    Carbs

    I bet if you’ve been doing sports for a while–especially endurance sports–you already know the importance of carbs in our diet, right?

    We know that the popular keto diet was the new big thing for many endurance athletes–but not even Ultra Runners who eat a keto diet can skip carbs completely if they want to perform and run for a long period of time. So that pretty much sums up the importance of carbs in our diet, especially for endurance athletes. Of course being more fat adapted overall can help you reduce the amount of carbs you will need to perform as you want, but there’s no denying that carbs are a key element in any athlete’s diet.

    In that regard, a plant based diet is by nature big on carbs (and we’re talking about the “good” carbs, not the empty calories that you can find in sugar/artificial stuff) so if you do it properly, you can always be confident that you will have your “glycogen reserves” full. As you probably already know, these glycogen reserves are what power you through a normal training–or of course, races or longer challenges when having our reserves at full is a must if you don’t want to hit “the wall” or bonk in the middle.

    Antioxidants

    Nowadays, there’s a lot of talk about antioxidants and why they are important to have in your regular diet. So, what are antioxidants?

    Well first, it’s important to understand that every time that we move, our organism creates a series of chemical reactions that not only generate the components that we need to keep moving, but also generate some metabolic waste that we need to get rid of if we want to continue moving. And one kind of this metabolic waste are the so-called “free radicals” that are generated within our body every time we use our muscles.

    When our body is not able to get rid of this metabolic waste on time, we generate an oxidant stress in our body…which eventually ends up producing fatigue that may directly affect our performance as ultrarunners. Another negative consequence of this oxidant stress is that it can affect our ability to recover after hard workouts or long efforts.

    So those are basically things that we really don’t want to happen as endurance athletes, right?

    Well, the good thing is that one of the easiest ways of fighting this oxidant stress in our bodies is to eat a lot of fruits and vegetables, and guess which diet has tons of that? Yep, that’s right. A plant based diet (done properly) has all the food that we need to increase our levels of Vitamin C, beta carotene, anthocyanins, licopens and more which help us fight these “free radicals” on a daily basis.

    So now that you know that, even if you’re not into going full Plant Based mode, it’s always a good idea to incorporate more fruits and vegetables (of all the colors possible–”eat the rainbow” is a good way to think about it!) into your daily diet..especially if you’re an endurance athlete.

    Inflammation

    It’s already well-known that doing any kind of sport with consistency can help you maintain better health in multiple-ways: fighting things like obesity, diabetes and other metabolic syndromes….but if you’ve been running for a while, you probably also know that running is HARD on our bodies.

    Inflammation of multiple kinds is a very common thing for trail and ultrarunners. Whether you have been doing this for a long time or if you’re new to the sport, chances are you’ve already experienced some sort of injury or overall sensation of body inflammation, especially after hard workouts or longer sustained efforts on the trail. (If you think “nope,” what about: running some long downhills, and then feeling your quads burning for a couple of days afterwards. Ring a bell for you?)

    A plant based diet can be one of the best overall strategies to try to reduce inflammation which result from running and hard training. How? Well, because of the antioxidant properties we find in many of the foods that you eat naturally on this diet–and also because, if done correctly, you should be eating very little “bad fat” which is inflammatory.

    There have been some studies that have shown that some very specific foods can help us deal with post-run inflammation and overall soreness, so take note: eating cherries, pomegranate seeds, blueberries, blackberries and even watermelon are great in fighting running inflammation!

    Myths and overall things to watch out for when switching fully to a plant-based diet

    Ok, so now that you know all the goodness behind a plant based diet, it’s time to address the “protein” elephant in the room and the overall things that you need to be careful of if you want to do this the right way.

    You probably know the big concern surrounding this diet, right? Protein, protein, protein…yep.

    Who here hasn’t heard:

    “You’re not going to be able to have enough protein without animal sources”

    “It’s important to eat a lot of protein if you do sport”

    “Animal protein is not the same quality as plant protein”

    …and so on.

    Well, let’s talk about it.

    Protein.

    So the rule of thumb for sporty people or athletes is to consume between 1-2 grams of protein for every kilo of weight. (This means, if you weigh 70 kilos your daily protein intake should be anywhere between 70 to 140 grams per day).

    And doing that on a plant based diet is super achievable. Really. There’s no secret behind it. It’s that simple…on a plant based diet you can achieve those number easily if you eat the proper foods.

    There have been studies comparing omnivore, vegetarian and vegan diets to see if they can all achieve their required protein intakes for the day…and guess what? All three of them are able to easily meet their requirements. So just to set the record straight and bust the myth: yes, you can achieve your daily intake levels of protein if you’re on a plant based diet. Period.

    If you’re really worried about the amount of protein you feel you need on a daily basis, the recommendation is to incorporate more legumes and overall cereals into your diet. If you do this every day of the week–not just once or twice a week, but every day–it should be easy to bump up your protein levels.

    So you’re probably wondering: which foods are we talking about here? Well, every legume like lentils, chickpeas and beans (red beans should be higher up on your list if you are worried about protein.) You can also try adding in some tofu or tempeh too if you feel like mixing it up.

    After all that, if you’re still worried about meeting your protein intake needs, you can also incorporate one protein shake for after those big, hard days of training. The usual shakes and protein powders for those on a plant based diet are made from: peas, rice or soy…and as long as you check the ingredients of the product (remember, try to avoid artificial preservatives and sweeteners if you want to do the plant based diet right) you should be all set.

    Well, that’s it for protein-related stuff.

    Now, lastly, here are some final things that you may want to read before you decide to try out a plant based diet.

    Micronutrients

    Even though all the foods that you eat on a plant-based diet are full of rich nutrients and good stuff for your body, it’s also important to acknowledge that if you’re into endurance sport, it is always VERY important to go and do a blood test and check with your doctor to track your overall levels and to see if you may need some supplements or not.

    Imbalances may not even be the result of your diet, but can often pop up as a result of lots of hard training, too.

    With that being said, as a plant-based diet athlete myself, I’ve put together here a list for you with a few potential issues and micro-nutrients which may be worth watching or tracking if you want to be on top of your health and your overall nutrition. (Which I definitely recommend doing.)

    B12:

    B12 (or cobalamin) is the main thing you may be missing out if you are consuming 100% plant based food (even though those with omnivore diets have also been found to have low levels of B12.) So, it’s good to know your overall levels and then you can tell if you need to supplement to reach the recommended levels. The good thing is that now there are a lot of plant based products that come with added B12, which makes it a bit easier to keep balanced.

    Vitamin D:

    Vitamin D (which has been getting a lot of news and attention after worldwide Covid lockdowns, and with people not being exposed to the great outdoors) is another of the key micronutrients that you should be looking at closely when following a plant-based diet. While you can obtain this from plant-sourced food (and sun exposure is something that as a trail runner you probably get plenty of), it is still not enough if your body is not able to absorb this vitamin correctly. Mushrooms are something that you want to keep in your regular diet if you are low in Vitamin D. Nowadays, there are also a lot of fortified foods on the market with added Vitamin D. Finally, you can also supplement this with the usual ‘drops’ which are now very popular, too.

    Finally we have Iron.

    Even though you can obtain plenty of Iron on a plant-based diet, it is always worth checking your levels to see where you are and if it’s something you need to supplement. Endurance athletes have been associated with low levels of Iron because of the heavy load of our training, so it’s good to check your Iron levels regardless of whether you eat animal products or not. In general, try to incorporate lots of dark, leafy greens into your diet…and try to have this with some Vitamin C in it to help the body absorb it better. A great example of this: a nice salad with some lemon juice and pepper.

    Final Thoughts

    Eventually, if you try this for a while, you’ll realize that being plant-based is not a diet at all–just like trail running, it becomes a lifestyle that goes way beyond what you put in your mouth every day. In the end, you’ll probably keep at it because you’ll feel the ways it improves your being…both physically and mentally.

    Don’t think that because you’re not eating animal products on your diet all your meals will taste the same. That’s simply not true. Nowadays there are millions of easy recipes you can find online to give yourself a nice, tasty meal with only plant based foods.

    Whether you practice endurance sport or not, adding more plant-based foods into your diet will definitely be good for you. The idea of incorporating more fruits, vegetables and legumes in your life won’t harm you. No matter if you keep consuming animal products or not, the benefits of eating more plant-based foods are clear and loud.

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  129. #2329
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    Thank you for this thread you continue to inspire me!


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  130. #2330
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    Thank you trmn8er!

    We welcome people no matter what their goals are. If they are in it for the weight loss, great! Fiber and antioxidants are good for everyone.

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    Last year I became a vegetarian. At first it was difficult, Ornanism began to react differently to food. At one time I became very ill, did not want to eat anything. I also started to get very sick. On the internet I read that it is all from a lack of nutrients contained in meat and fish. So I bought vitamins (I do not remember their names but I bought them on health store ) which I took for 2 months. They really helped me. I continue to lead a vegetarian lifestyle. If you also have such problems, I recommend taking vitamins
    Last edited by mWttrs2; 3 Weeks Ago at 02:22 AM.

  132. #2332
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    ^I’m sure you ate vegetarian food all the time in the past and you were fine. Vegetarian food doesn’t just mean loads of veggies. I’ve also never heard of someone’s body going into sick mode after eating anything without meat. I’m guessing you have a reaction to a specific ingredient, the meal had something bad in it, or it’s an emotional reaction to your perception of vegetarian food. Eating vegetarian means you are still eating dairy ie eggs, cheese, milk etc.
    Last edited by cyclelicious; 3 Weeks Ago at 04:39 AM.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  133. #2333
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    Study Finds Dairy (Not Soy) Skyrockets Breast Cancer Risk

    If you could reduce your relative risk of breast cancer by 80 percent, wouldn’t you do it? A new study claims that women who drink cows’ milk could increase their risk of developing breast cancer by up to 80 percent compared to women who drink soy milk. Unbiased by either soy or dairy industry funding, this research was commissioned by the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health and the World Cancer Research Fund. Here is what you need to know.

    The Study Basics
    The study was based on 52,795 adult women participants over the course of seven years. Participants were intentionally taken from the Adventist Health Study-2, as many Adventists follow a vegetarian diet and tend to consume significant amounts of soy in comparison to the Standard American Diet. All participants filled out a detailed food questionnaire upon enrollment and a small cohort was selected to provide further 24-hour food recalls and urine samples over the course of the study to ensure accuracy. At the conclusion of the study, 1,057 participants had developed breast cancer.

    How Much Milk Increases Your Risk
    Through further analysis, the researchers found a dramatic increase in risk with as little as a ¼-⅓ cup margin. Women who reported drinking just eight ounces a day increased their risk of breast cancer by 50 percent, and those who consumed two to three glasses of cows’ milk escalated their risk by up to 80 percent (in comparison to the women who did not drink any cows’ milk). To clarify, drinking one cup of cows’ milk per day does not guarantee a woman is 50 percent more likely to get breast cancer. It does, however, suggest that her individual risk increases by 50 percent. So, if a person has an inherent 12 percent risk (the average), she can increase that risk by half simply by sipping one cows’ milk latte or dairy-based smoothie a day. In contrast, participants who completely avoided cows’ milk but consumed soy milk did not show an increased risk of cancer.

    The Takeaways
    While this study does not prove cows’ milk causes cancer, it opens up the field of study and provides a strong indicator of the harmful effects of dairy in comparison to benign foods. Researchers also suggested that the greatest benefits of soy milk in relation to breast cancer may not be in soy itself, but in the exclusion of dairy.

    This is not the first study to demonstrate a positive association between dairy and increased breast cancer risk. In a survey of breast cancer cases across 40 countries and five continents, cows’ milk ranked second (only under meat) on a list of foods most correlated with breast cancer. Cows’ milk has also been associated with other hormone-dependent cancers including ovarian and prostate. Researchers believe the natural hormones found in all cows’ milk—including estrogen and IGF-1—may be the cause for this increased risk of specific cancers. This most recent study by the National Cancer Institute adds a significant contribution to the growing body of evidence that links cows’ milk to cancer. While not absolute, the correlation is strong enough to make anyone rethink their dairy consumption. It’s simply not worth the unnecessary risk.

    No one is invincible, but we all have the power to make very simple life changes to prolong our health. We make these small choices every day when we choose to wear sunscreen, drink water over soda, and wash our hands. We know we still might fall ill, but nonetheless we continue these preventative daily habits. Ditching dairy is a simple yet seminal choice everyone can make to drastically reduce their individual risk for breast cancer. In fact, it could be the most significant choice you make for your health—because we all deserve the best odds when it comes to living cancer-free.

    sauce https://nutritionstudies.org/study-f...mN2bqLakps9Oac
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  134. #2334
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    Quote Originally Posted by mWttrs2 View Post
    Last year I became a vegetarian. At first it was difficult, Ornanism began to react differently to food. At one time I became very ill, did not want to eat anything. I also started to get very sick. On the internet I read that it is all from a lack of nutrients contained in meat and fish. So I bought vitamins (I do not remember their names but I bought them on bla.com) which I took for 2 months. They really helped me. I continue to lead a vegetarian lifestyle. If you also have such problems, I recommend taking vitamins
    This does not sound like a problem caused by a vegetarian diet, but an issue with not eating properly balanced meals. As long as you make sure you get a full spectrum of vitamins and minerals from your meals throughout the week, then you won't need to rely on supplements. Supplements are not bad overall, but they should not be the foundation of proper nutrition. For example, I am currently taking a B Complex vitamin off and on because Covid has altered my normal shopping habits.

  135. #2335
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    This is so sad

    Trump's Post Office Chaos Leads to Deaths of Thousands of Chicks Shipped to Maine Farmers




    Trump administration cuts to the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) have had tragic consequences for Maine farmers and their chicks.

    Since 1918, the USPS has been the only organization that will ship live chicks and other small animals. Maine farmers have long relied on this service to order chicks from hatcheries in other parts of the country, but, this summer, at least 4,800 of those chicks have arrived dead, the Portland Press Herald reported.

    "We could hear a few, very faint peeps," Maine resident Rhiannon Hampson told The New York Times of her experience picking up chicks from the post office. "Out of 500, there were maybe 25 alive. They were staggering. It was terrible."

    In another incident, Pauline Henderson of Pine Tree Poultry in New Sharon, Maine said all 800 chicks she ordered from a hatchery in Pennsylvania arrived dead.

    "We've never had a problem like this before," Henderson told the Portland Press Herald. "Usually they arrive every three weeks like clockwork. And out of 100 birds you may have one or two that die in shipping."

    The post office has been hit by a one-two punch this year, The New York Times explained. First, the coronavirus pandemic both dramatically increased package orders and sickened the staffers who would handle them. Then, newly-appointed Postmaster General Louis DeJoy instituted a series of cuts and service changes beginning in June that have slowed and disrupted deliveries, The Associated Press explained. In Maine, two mail-sorting machines at its distribution hub were dismantled.

    Democratic Maine Rep. Chellie Pingree called out the changes in a letter to DeJoy and U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue.

    "It's one more of the consequences of this disorganization, this sort of chaos they've created at the post office and nobody thought through when they were thinking of slowing down the mail," Pingree told the Portland Press Herald. "And can you imagine, you have young kids and they are getting all excited about having a backyard flock and you go to the post office and that's what you find?"

    DeJoy's changes included the dismantling of sorting equipment, reducing trips by mail carriers and the eradication of overtime.

    DeJoy said Tuesday he would suspend the changes until after the November election following an outcry from Democrats, state attorneys general and civil rights groups, The New York Times reported. The groups were concerned that the changes could disrupt mail-in voting, which is likely to be high because of the pandemic.

    However, it is not clear if DeJoy will also reverse measures already put in place, such as the destruction of mail sorting machines.

    DeJoy was a major donor to President Donald Trump before being put in charge of the post office this spring. Trump has also spoken out against the USPS and blocked $25 billion in emergency aid for the agency, admitting he wanted to curb mail-in voting, according to The Associated Press.

    However, some rural Americans have noted that, by attacking the post office, the administration is actually harming its base. Rural areas disproportionately rely on the USPS in order to send and receive mail.

    "This is an attack on a tried-and-true service that rural America depends on," Ohio farmer and former Trump supporter Chris Gibbs told The New York Times. "It pulls one more piece of stability, predictability and reliability from rural America. People don't like that."

    sauce https://www.ecowatch.com/trump-post-...4#rebelltitem4
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  136. #2336
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    That is sad.


    It is also sad that the government allows "non profits" to exist that manipulate senior citizens using scare tactics into donating millions of dollars into fraudulent organizations all through our glorious US postal service.


    If they cut out half of the junk that is sent perhaps live animals would make it.

  137. #2337
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    WHY DAVID ATTENBOROUGH WANTS YOU TO GO PLANT-BASED FOR THE PLANET