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  1. #2001
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  2. #2002
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    NOVAK DJOKAVIC WINS WIMBLEDON ON PLANT-BASED DIET


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    On Sunday, plant-powered tennis star Novak Djokavic won the Wimbledon Men’s Singles final for the fifth time. Djokavic beat former champion Roger Federer in the four-hour-long match—the longest single’s final game in Wimbledon history. The Serbian-born athlete adopted a plant-based diet for health reasons several years ago and credits his animal-free diet for boosting his performance on the court.

    “I do eat plant-based. I don’t like the labels, to be honest,” Djokavic explained his preference to not call himself vegan during a recent conference. “But because of the misinterpretations of labels and misuse of labels, I just don’t like that kind of name. I do eat plant-based. I think that’s one of the reasons why I recover well. I don’t have allergies that I used to have any more. And I like it.” From world race car champion Lewis Hamilton to NBA star Kyrie Irving, elite athletes across a variety of sports have adopted a plant-based diet to optimize their performances.

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/7/novak-djo...6mOzcMZt_8cRbE
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  3. #2003
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    The Avocado Craze

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    Actually, the avocado is a berry. This million-plus year old tree grew in many regions around the world, but the more modern version (Persea americana) may have been domesticated in Central and South America. The ancient Aztecs believed the fruit to have aphrodisiac qualities. Eating an avocado can sure make you feel good, whether as a meal, snack or even dessert.

    Real superfoods are natural, unprocessed items with very high quality nutritional profiles.

    Here are three more benefits of eating the right kind of avocados:

    The high nutritional value.
    Increased fat-burning (especially with sour cream, salsa and hot peppers).
    The reduction of hunger.
    They’re absolutely delicious.
    Today most avocados are grown in Mexico, with California, Chile, Peru and New Zealand among the many other host countries. However, as demand has increased, you find them growing in all tropical and Mediterranean climates around the world.

    While defining just what is a fruit, vegetable, or berry can be a bit confusing and it’s not precise, they are all clearly and simply plant foods. Typically, plants with a seed are fruits, but we tend to think of some less-sweet fruits like avocados as vegetables. Whatever you call them, I highly recommend eating them regularly.

    While I try to avoid trendiness, often poking fun of the related social quirkiness attached to it, the avocado craze has been fun to watch over the decades. Early on, few would buy these greenish-black bumpy things. After all, inside they were a green blob of fat. With less demand, the price was relatively high. Most people avoided them, occasionally dipping into them with chips when dining out, or nibbling on the tiny bits in a salad. Then, as the trend developed, people started liking them, and as they got more popular, the prices rose. Now, half the restaurants in the U.S. serve avocados.

    Today, people use them as a big part of a meal — or even eat one as a meal. While I also avoid talking about any one perfect food, avocado would be part of an almost perfect healthy meal, which, of course, varies depending on whom is eating it. I like mine plain with sea salt, sometimes having cheese with it for a great, quick, easy and satisfying meal. Sometimes I combine the sour cream spicy salsa option on top of eggs. It’s also great in a smoothie!

    However, health-conscious consumers should beware. Unfortunately, an avocado is not always a real avocado!

    With the new millennium came the popularity of a new breed of genetically modified, low-fat avocado. Thanks to agriculture scientists, it’s a left-over remnant of the low-fat era — and it’s really low-fat! As a result, they don’t taste as good as the real thing. Grown in Florida, with some found in the Caribbean and Central America, they have only been a niche-market product. The nutritional difference is important.

    Two tablespoons of a Hass avocado contain 50 calories including 4.6 grams of fat, while that amount of the low-fat Florida avocado averages 36 calories and 3 grams of fat. Most of the fat is the healthy monounsaturated, about 17 of the 27 grams, and most of the carbohydrate is fiber (about 12 of the 15 grams).

    Fortunately, Florida avocados have not caught on — perhaps 90 percent of the market today wants the real deal, Hass, which is most of the world’s production (other similar versions exist as well).

    When avocado supplies are high, they are scooped out and sold in a tub. But be advised that many of these products have unhealthy ingredients, like sugar, added so read the label.

    The buttery flavor of a Hass avocado is unique, and delicious, and even called “butter fruit” in parts of India. This is due to the high healthy fat content. Along with high fiber and low-carb, this makes it a perfect food for the Two-Week Test, the Keto Two Week Test, and for those keeping carbohydrate foods low and fat high. It even has a few grams of protein.

    Avocados are also relatively high in vitamins (including folate) and minerals (with more potassium than bananas), including antioxidants. They’re also great mashed up for babies just starting to eat solid food at around six months. And, if you want a great green treat, see my recipe for avocado pudding!

    Adding avocados to your menu can reduce cardiovascular disease risk by improving cholesterol balance by raising HDLs and lowering total and LDL cholesterol (and triglycerides), perhaps due to the high monounsaturated fat (a Mediterranean ‘diet’ effect). Another benefit is its great satiating properties. Have a half, or whole avocado, and you feel full. Add more protein, like a slice or two of cheese, and you have a small meal or delicious snack.

    Another plus for avocados is that even the conventional versions are very low in pesticide residues according to The Environmental Working Group. In fact avocado tops their “Clean 15” list.

    Although avocado costs vary with the season, production and demand, prices increased 40 percent between 2015 and 2017, then in 2019 dramatically jumped in the U.S. almost as much, as the U.S. president threatened to close the border with Mexico.

    sauce https://philmaffetone.com/the-avocad...9tekezz-1QRKH8
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  4. #2004
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    Foods You Should Always Buy Organic: The Dirty Dozen Plus

    Nearly all of the data used took into account how people typically wash and prepare produce – for example, apples were washed and bananas peeled before testing. The following “Dirty Dozen Plus” had the highest pesticide load, making them the most important to buy organic versions – or to grow them organically yourself.

    The Dirty Dozen Plus (2019)
    Strawberries
    Spinach
    Kale
    Nectarines
    Apples
    Grapes
    Peaches
    Cherries
    Pears
    Tomatoes
    Celery
    Potatoes
    Hot peppers


    Why should you care about pesticides? The EWG points out that there is a growing consensus in the scientific community that small doses of pesticides and other chemicals can have adverse effects on health, especially during vulnerable periods such as fetal development and childhood. Here’s a video in which I address the importance of avoiding pesticides.

    Also keep in mind that maintaining your family’s health is not the only reason to choose organic food. Pesticide and herbicide use contaminates groundwater, ruins soil structures and promotes erosion, and may be a contributor to “colony collapse disorder,” the sudden and mysterious die-off of pollinating honeybees that threatens the American food supply. Buying or growing organic food is good for the health of the planet.

    sauce https://www.drweil.com/diet-nutritio...s-buy-organic/

    Foods You Don't Have To Buy Organic: The Clean 15

    Nearly all of the data used took into account how people typically wash and prepare produce – for example, apples were washed and bananas peeled before testing. Of the fruit and vegetable categories tested, the following “Clean 15” foods had the lowest pesticide load, and consequently are the safest conventionally grown crops to consume from the standpoint of pesticide contamination:

    The Clean 15 (2019)
    Avocados
    Sweet corn*
    Pineapples
    Sweet peas (frozen)
    Onions
    Papayas*
    Eggplants
    Asparagus
    Kiwis
    Cabbage
    Cauliflower
    Cantaloupes
    Broccoli
    Mushrooms
    Honeydew melons


    * A small amount of sweet corn, papaya and summer squash sold in the United States is produced from genetically modified seeds. Buy organic varieties of these crops if you want to avoid genetically modified produce.

    Why should you care about pesticides in your fruits and vegetables? The EWG points out that there is a growing consensus in the scientific community that small doses of pesticides and other chemicals can have adverse effects on health, especially during vulnerable periods such as fetal development and childhood.

    Here’s a video in which I address the importance of avoiding pesticides.

    To this list, I would add one caveat: When it comes to pesticide use, there is more to consider than just the residues that are ingested by the consumer. Although peeled foods such as mangoes, avocadoes and kiwis may spare the consumer from significant pesticide exposure, it is possible that large amounts of pesticides and herbicides are used on the farms from which these originate, contaminating groundwater, promoting erosion and otherwise damaging local ecosystems. To help promote the health of the planet as well as your own health, it’s best to buy organic whenever possible, including when you are purchasing the foods listed above.

    At the opposite end of the contamination spectrum, check out the list of Foods That You Should Always Buy Organic, also known as the “Dirty Dozen Plus.”

    sauce https://www.drweil.com/diet-nutritio...o-buy-organic/
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  5. #2005
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  6. #2006
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    When farmers go vegan: the science behind changing your mind

    A farmer was recently on the road to the abattoir when he changed direction and drove his trailer full of lambs 200 miles to an animal sanctuary instead. Sivalingam Vasanthakumar, 60, from Devon, now plans to grow vegetables.

    Vasanthakumar is not the only farmer to perform this kind of reversal. In 2017, Jay Wilde, of Bradley Nook farm in Derbyshire, took his cattle to a sanctuary and decided to become a vegan farmer (the film telling this story, 73 Cows, has been nominated for a Bafta). In the US, the Illinois-based charity Free From Harm has gathered tales of many farmers who have had epiphanies and switched to veganism.

    Farmers know the job when they start it – so what brings about such a major turnaround? “What you are looking at is basic cognitive dissonance,” says Fiona Buckland, a life coach. This occurs when “the way you are living your life is no longer fully in line with the way that you feel”, and personal values slip out of alignment with personal performance.

    Cognitive dissonance builds until an individual can no longer sustain the resultant unease and instigates change. “It’s the reason someone sits at their desk and thinks: ‘I can’t do this any more,’ or walks out of a marriage,” Buckland says. “The cognitive dissonance is too great. They have to get themselves into alignment.”

    Even apparently snap decisions – changing destination mid-journey, as Vasanthakumar did – “percolate in our unconscious” for weeks, months or years. “Maybe he had taken himself to the abattoir too many times,” Buckland adds wryly. She describes Vasanthakumar’s rerouting as “a moment of creative problem-solving”: here are some sheep I would like to keep alive, here is a sanctuary that will take them.

    Stephen Palmer, a member of the British Psychological Society, points out that the year is still fairly new, and such decisions may be the result of some January stock-taking. Midlife, he says, is a classic time when people “search out a new purpose and meaning”. But often these reflections don’t come when humans sit and think, but ambush them while they fill the washing machine or queue in the supermarket.

    “Your life perspective can take a sudden leap,” psychologist Mike Hughesman explains. A person who had been inured to what they do suddenly realises they don’t want to do it any more. (Hughesman himself temporarily switched to vegetarianism when he couldn’t face the fact that he was eating something sentient.)

    “People need to think more and not get trammelled into routines. If something doesn’t feel right, give it thought,” he says. “Sometimes you have to ask those pivotal questions.”

    sauce https://www.theguardian.com/environm...Le7wZbvCxPHZxo
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  7. #2007
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    Non dairy passionfruit ice cream (made from oatmilk) on a very hot and humid day 2 thumbs up.

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    Actually, Vegan Ice Cream Is Just as Good as the Dairy Kind


    If you want someone to stare and curse at you like you just kicked a dog, but you (hopefully) don’t want to kick a dog, there’s an easier way to become a recipient of that level of vitriol: Tell them you think non-dairy ice cream is good. My own sister recently called me a “little b***h” when I excitedly told her about a particularly good vegan ice cream. My girlfriend uttered similar words when I mentioned getting a scoop of the stuff from another place. Why does approval of this seemingly benign genre of dessert evoke such a passionate response?

    According to a report from the New York Times last August, consumption of “alternative milks” is rising, to the chagrin of dairy farmers and to the pleasure of people who like to say “nut milk.” Yet despite the growth of this trend, I continue to experience a palpable aversion to my (nut)milquetoast opinion that non-dairy ice cream is fine. There are so many different types; you can find ones that suck, and ones that exceed expectations, just like regular ice cream. Still, many people say, “vegan ice cream wtf.”
    To be clear: I’m not vegan. I’m not approaching this from an ethical perspective, though the consideration of where and how our food is made is increasingly unavoidable. I’m not coming from a professional perspective, either; shockingly, I’m not a doctor.

    My zest for non-dairy ice cream comes from one place: my GI tract. Whenever I eat ice cream, or any large amount of dairy product, I feel like garbage. It’s a sledgehammer to the rest of my day’s bodily activities; to go to the gym, play soccer, ride a bike, or otherwise experience physical turbulence is no longer an option. And in my mind, no ice cream makes the tradeoff worth it.

    I have a theory. Most people don’t have a tremendous gastrointestinal experience after their tasty frozen treat, but I think almost everyone is lactose-intolerant to some degree. It’s just that we all have different standards for what’s normal to go on inside our bodies: We accept that haunted rumblings and standing by a bathroom is sometimes a necessary accompaniment to a tasty dessert. I’m no different; I will still order “insane” heat-level wings because they cause a euphoria-level pain, though the next morning is often decidedly dysphoric. Yet dairy devotees get mad at me, who didn’t do anything wrong, because they’re losing a partner in fart solidarity. (Again, I’m not a doctor.)

    I spoke to gastroenterologist and physician nutrition specialist Dr. Carolyn Newberry at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center about this debacle. As she explains, gastrointestinal distress is the most common symptom for lactose sensitivity.
    “Basically what happens is the lactose sugar can't be broken down. So rather than being absorbed in the small bowel, which is where most of your nutrients are absorbed, it travels down to the colon, where it's processed by bacteria there, and they produce a lot of extra gas. And they can also change your bowel habits. So people tend to get diarrhea, you know, gaseous distension, bloating sensations—they can feel nauseated,” Dr. Newberry explained.

    And if my gripes about ice cream sound like a “me” problem, numbers-wise, it’s unlikely.

    “We think probably more than half the population has difficulty with processing lactose,” Dr. Newberry said.

    She emphasizes an important difference between lactose sensitivity and “a true allergy.” People who are lactose-sensitive might experience GI distress. But those who are truly allergic will have some type of histamine release, she explained; symptoms might include rashes, facial flushing, even difficulty breathing.

    For those lucky enough to remember ice cream as a staple of their childhood diet, this does not insulate you from future —or current— sensitivity. Lactase, the body’s enzyme responsible for breaking down lactose, can decrease over time, for several reasons.

    “There's a lot of things that can alter our lactase levels, everything from things that cause inflammation in the small bowel where where the lactase is made, to it waning over time in certain populations. So it can actually develop that you can't eat products that have lactose anymore, because you can't break down the sugars so then it causes GI distress.”

    For those who are lactose-sensitive but can’t imagine a world without dairy-based ice cream, take solace in that there’s no inherent danger to continue eating the stuff. Though, by my understanding, they are contributing a fractionally larger amount to global warming.
    “If somebody doesn't feel well, when they eat dairy, they can continue to eat dairy. They just may not feel well,” Dr. Newberry told me.

    When I asked her if she’s had non-dairy ice cream, Dr. Newberry said yes, she’d definitely had cashew-based ice cream, and perhaps also almond-milk-based ice cream, though she could not recall specifically.

    “It was very good,” she said. “Certainly, if you have lactose intolerance, there's a lot of options, fortunately.”

    I understand the aversion to vegan/vegetarian replacements in favor of traditional dairy and meat options. Their first iterations were clumsily developed and not likely to trick anyone. But the imitation technologies are improving at a pace with which a real cow could never hope to keep up. See a recent Burger King commercial: A man who claims to eat two Whoppers a week for the last two decades could not tell he was eating a meat-free Whopper made with an Impossible patty.

    Today, there are so, so many different types of vegan ice cream, ranging from the obnoxiously healthy (which proudly contain "just fruit, water, and a touch of cane sugar”) to decidedly decadent options, like Van Leeuwen’s artisanal blending of cashews, coconuts, and cocoa butter to create a product that would dupe anyone besides a lactose-sensing robot.

    Somewhere between “frozen fruit in a generic Popsicle shape” and overpriced boutique offerings are over-the-counter options like Ben and Jerry’s Non-Dairy Pints, made with almond milk. I’ve tried the “PB & cookies” flavor, and in occasional portions of my preferred serving size (roughly two heaping tablespoons directly from the pint), it lasted for nearly two weeks. It’s perfectly fine, although the almond flavor is apparent. At the very least, it will allow the company to avoid getting embroiled in another controversy like the one in 2013, wherein Grimes, taking a brief rumspringa from her vegan lifestyle, was harangued by vegan Tumblr for enjoying a pint of limited batch Scotchy Scotch Scotch, a promotional flavor for Anchorman 2.

    There’s no shortage of fancy ice creameries offering convincingly non-vegan vegan ice creams. It was a scoop of exceptionally good vegan cookie dough ice cream from Salt & Straw that encouraged me to message my ice cream enthusiast sister. She first responded “no comment,” but immediately followed up with “what flavor, and do you hate yourself?"

    sauce https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/q...he-dairy-stuff
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  8. #2008
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    VEGAN GELATIN MAY REPLACE ANIMAL PRODUCTS BY 2020

    Silicon Valley company Geltor is aiming to replace animal-derived gelatin in products such as Jell-O, Yoplait yogurt, and more in the next three years.

    Socal media outlet San Francisco Chronicle about its efforts to replace animal-derived gelatin in common foods. Geltor CEO Alexander Lorestani explained the process of creating animal-free gelatin—likening it to a brewery that makes proteins instead of alcohol—which includes fermenting bacteria that mimics animal proteins in a yeast-based mixture. Traditionally, gelatin is derived from animal bones and is used as a texturizer in products such as gummy bears, Jell-O, and yogurt. Lorestani revealed that Geltor is currently readying to debut its vegan alternative—which provides a better texture than plant-based ingredients such as agar-agar—and plans to send samples to interested manufacturers for testing. “The opportunity to get something that is molecularly and functionally identical (to animal gelatin) is really exciting for them,” Lorestani said. While Geltor’s product does not contain animal cells, companies such as Memphis Meats, Israel-based SuperMeat, and Mosa Meat are working to create cultured meat (made with a small sample of animal cells) in an effort to displace traditional animal agriculture.


    sauce https://vegnews.com/2017/5/vegan-gel...FxsjuuwHj1ziE8
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  9. #2009
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    Looks like Arnold is going plant based!?!?


  10. #2010
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    The bananamobile is making it's rounds around Toronto


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    https://www.yellofruit.com/
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  11. #2011
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  12. #2012
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    F*ck Cancer

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  13. #2013
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    In honour of National Avocado Day!

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    a) Guacamole
    b) Avocado Toast
    c) Avocado Smoothie
    d) Avocado Salad
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  14. #2014
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    We must change food production to save the world, says leaked report

    Attempts to solve the climate crisis by cutting carbon emissions from only cars, factories and power plants are doomed to failure, scientists will warn this week.

    A leaked draft of a report on climate change and land use, which is now being debated in Geneva by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), states that it will be impossible to keep global temperatures at safe levels unless there is also a transformation in the way the world produces food and manages land.

    Humans now exploit 72% of the planet’s ice-free surface to feed, clothe and support Earth’s growing population, the report warns. At the same time, agriculture, forestry and other land use produces almost a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions.

    In addition, about half of all emissions of methane, one of the most potent greenhouse gases, come from cattle and rice fields, while deforestation and the removal of peat lands cause further significant levels of carbon emissions. The impact of intensive agriculture – which has helped the world’s population soar from 1.9 billion a century ago to 7.7 billion – has also increased soil erosion and reduced amounts of organic material in the ground.

    In future these problems are likely to get worse. “Climate change exacerbates land degradation through increases in rainfall intensity, flooding, drought frequency and severity, heat stress, wind, sea-level rise and wave action,” the report states.

    It is a bleak analysis of the dangers ahead and comes when rising greenhouse gas emissions have made news after triggering a range of severe meteorological events. These include news that:

    • Arctic sea-ice coverage reached near record lows for July;

    • The heatwaves that hit Europe last month were between 1.5C and 3C higher because of climate change;

    • Global temperatures for July were 1.2C above pre-industrial levels for the month.

    This last figure is particularly alarming, as the IPCC has warned that rises greater than 1.5C risk triggering climatic destabilisation while those higher than 2C make such events even more likely. “We are now getting very close to some dangerous tipping points in the behaviour of the climate – but as this latest leaked report of the IPCC’s work reveals, it is going to be very difficult to achieve the cuts we need to make to prevent that happening,” said Bob Ward, policy director at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.

    The new IPCC report emphasises that land will have to be managed more sustainably so that it releases much less carbon than at present. Peat lands will need to be restored by halting drainage schemes; meat consumption will have to be cut to reduce methane production; while food waste will have to be reduced.

    Among the measures put forward by the report is the proposal of a major shift towards vegetarian and vegan diets. “The consumption of healthy and sustainable diets, such as those based on coarse grains, pulses and vegetables, and nuts and seeds … presents major opportunities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions,” the report states.

    There also needs to be a big change in how land is used, it adds. Policies need to include “improved access to markets, empowering women farmers, expanding access to agricultural services and strengthening land tenure security”, it states. “Early warning systems for weather, crop yields, and seasonal climate events are also critical.”

    The chances of politicians and scientists achieving these goals are uncertain, however. Nations are scheduled to meet in late 2020, probably in the UK, at a key conference where delegates will plant how to achieve effective zero-carbon emission policies over the next few decades.

    The US, the second largest emitter of greenhouse gases, will have just had its presidential elections. A new Democrat incumbent would likely be sympathetic to moves to control global heating. Re-election of Donald Trump, who has called climate change “a hoax”, would put a very different, far gloomier perspective on hopes of achieving a consensus.

    sauce https://www.theguardian.com/environm...soWPkLSr5zosP8
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  15. #2015
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    Good article: It's one of the best take I've ever seen on why the meat industry is screwed.


    This Is the Beginning of the End of the Beef Industry


    There’s a famous Gandhi aphorism about how movements progress: “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.” That was actually written by the Workshop on Nonviolence Institute as a summary of Gandhi’s philosophy, but regardless, it’s remarkable how often it accurately describes the evolution of causes, from legal cannabis to gay marriage. I’ve been thinking about that quote since I wrote my first piece about plant-based meat (or alt meat, as I like to call it) for Outside in 2014. Back then, we were firmly in the “laugh at you” stage. Beyond Meat, the first of the Silicon Valley startups to use advanced technology to produce extremely meat-like burgers, had been ignored for its first few years, but in 2014, it released its Beast Burger, which was treated by the press and public as a slightly off-putting curiosity. What was this stuff? Would anyone actually eat it? Ewwww.


    That product wasn’t very good—I compared it to Salisbury steak—and when Ethan Brown, Beyond Meat’s founder, announced his intention to end livestock production, you could almost hear the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association laughing in the background.

    But I didn’t laugh. I knew it would keep getting better and beef wouldn’t. And I thought the bar was pretty low. Sure, steak is great, but ground beef makes up 60 percent of beef sales, and most of it is more Salisbury than salutary, a greasy vehicle for the yummy stuff: ketchup, mushrooms, pickles, bacon, sriracha mayo. I knew I wouldn’t object if my central puck came from a plant, as long as it chewed right and tasted right. I suspected others might feel the same.

    In the following years, Beyond Meat was joined by Impossible Foods, a more sophisticated startup with even more venture capital. Its Impossible Burger was way better than Salisbury steak. All the cool cats started serving it, from David Chang in New York to Traci Des Jardins in San Francisco. My conviction grew.

    Part of the appeal of the new burgers is their smaller environmental footprint. Beef is the most wasteful food on the planet. Cows are not optimized to make meat; they’re optimized to be cows. It takes 36,000 calories of feed to produce 1,000 calories of beef. In the process, it uses more than 430 gallons of water and 1,500 square feet of land, and it generates nearly ten kilograms of greenhouse-gas emissions. In comparison, an Impossible Burger uses 87 percent less water, 96 percent less land, and produces 89 percent fewer greenhouse-gas emissions. Beyond Meat’s footprint is similarly svelte.

    Yes, a good argument can be made that small-farm, grass-fed beef production (in places that can grow abundant grass) has a very different ethical and environmental landscape, but unfortunately, that’s just not a significant factor. America gets 97 percent of its beef from feedlots. And feedlots are irredeemable.

    By 2018, sales of both the Beyond Burger and the Impossible Burger were surging, and the companies began to ink deals with restaurant chains. Beyond Meat got Carl’s Jr. and A&W (as well as supermarket chains like Food Lion and Safeway), while Impossible got White Castle.

    I tracked down a White Castle shortly after the Impossible Slider arrived in the spring of 2018. I’d never been to a White Castle, so I ordered an Impossible Slider and a regular slider. The Impossible was...fine. About what you’d expect. White Castle steams all its meat, which is hard to get past, but with plenty of cheese, it went down easy.

    The regular slider, on the other hand, was horrific. I peeled back the pasty bun and stared at the fetid shingle inside. It was appallingly thin and grimy. It made the Impossible Slider look lush and juicy. The bar for fast-food burgers is even lower than I thought. Nobody will miss these shitty little brown things when they’re gone.

    Perhaps this explains why the chains are latching on to plant-based burgers as if they were life rings. White Castle initially tested its Impossible Slider in just a few locations in New York, New Jersey, and Chicago in April 2018. It was such a hit that the company quickly expanded the program to all 380 outlets. “People are coming back for it again and again,” White Castle’s vice president, Jamie Richardson, said with a touch of astonishment.

    They’re coming back at Del Taco, too, which launched a Beyond Meat taco in April. Within two months, it had sold two million, one of the most successful product launches in its history, so it decided to add Beyond Meat burritos as well.

    And then there’s Burger King. The second-largest fast-food chain in the world rattled big beef’s cage by testing an Impossible Whopper in St. Louis in April. Resulting foot traffic was so strong that Burger King decided to serve the Impossible Whopper in all 7,200 restaurants, marking the moment when alt meat stopped being alt.

    That was enough to get the meat industry to snap to attention. “About a year and a half ago, this wasn’t on my radar whatsoever,” said Mark Dopp, head of regulatory affairs for the North American Meat Association, to The New York Times. “All of a sudden, this is getting closer.”

    The strategy, predictably yet pathetically, was to engage in an ontological battle over the term meat itself. Big beef successfully lobbied for a labeling law in Missouri banning any products from identifying themselves as meat unless they are “derived from harvested production livestock or poultry.” (But this is wrong; the word simply meant sustenance for the first thousand years of its existence.) Similar labeling laws have passed or are pending in a dozen more states, most of them big ranching ones.

    Obviously, none of this has stemmed the rise of alt meat. But it did make me think again of Gandhi (a staunch vegetarian, FYI). They ignored, they laughed, and now they were fighting.

    This stuff, I thought, just might win.

    This year is shaping up to be the inflection point when this becomes obvious to everybody else. Beyond Meat’s products are in 15,000 grocery stores in the U.S., and its sales have more than doubled each year. On May 2, it held its IPO, offering stock at $25, which turned out to be a wild underestimation of what investors thought the company was worth. It immediately leaped to $46 and closed the day at $65.75. That one-day pop of 163 percent was one of the best in decades, putting to shame such 2019 IPOs as Lyft (21 percent) and Pinterest (25 percent), to say nothing of Uber (negative 3 percent). In the following days, it kept ripping, climbing above $150, where it has stayed. The market currently estimates Beyond Meat’s worth at close to $10 billion.

    Not to be outdone, that same month, Impossible Foods raised an additional $300 million dollars from private investors (for a running total of $740 million and a valuation of $2 billion) and announced it would be joining Beyond Meat in America’s grocery stores later this year. These companies are no longer little mammals scurrying around the feet of the big-beef dinosaurs. And they are gearing up for an epic head-to-head battle.

    Both Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods recently released new, improved versions of their meat. For the past week, I’ve subsisted on little else. It feels great. Both have the same amount of protein as ground beef (about 20 grams per quarter-pound serving) and less fat. Being plant-based, they also provide a healthy shot of fiber. Both get their unctuousness from coconut oil.

    But the core of each formula is very different. Beyond uses pea protein, while Impossible uses soy. Beyond gets its bloody color from beet juice; Impossible uses heme—the same molecule that makes our blood red—to achieve its meaty color and flavor. This is its killer app. Beef gets its beefiness from heme. When you cook heme, it produces the distinctive savory, metallic flavor of meat. Since heme is normally found in blood, no veggie concoction has ever used it. Soy plants do make microscopic amounts of it, but not enough to ever use. Impossible Foods’ breakthrough was to genetically engineer yeast to produce soy heme in a tank, like beer. This GMO process is a deal breaker for some people, but it makes all the difference. The Impossible Burger is incredible, the Beyond Burger merely passable.

    The Beyond Burger comes as two premade four-ounce patties (packaged in a plastic tray wrapped in more plastic—strike one). They don’t quite pass as hamburgers. They’re too wet and too pink. They almost resemble finely ground salmon burgers. They cook to a satisfying toothiness on either a grill or a griddle, but there’s an inexplicable cellulose quality to the texture. (This is even more pronounced in the Beyond Sausage.) The flavor is also slightly off. There’s a hint of fake smoke and an earthiness I’m guessing comes from the beet juice. (My wife would argue that it’s more than slightly off; she has to leave the room when the Beyond Burger is cooking. But she also hates beets.) It’s not an unpleasant experience, just don’t expect the burgergasm you get from a quarter pound of USDA prime.

    Impossible Foods, on the other hand, has delivered burgergasm after burgergasm. It’s shine-up-the-Nobel-Prize good. Not only does it taste like ground beef, it looks and acts like it, too. It’s truly plug and play.

    That wasn’t true for the previous version. When I first wrote about Impossible Foods three years ago, I had to beg the company to send me one patty. It was hesitant. Back then, the burger was fussy. It didn’t work well on a grill, so you had to pan-fry it just right. The company made me do a Skype tutorial first, and when the micropatty arrived in a refrigerated box, with a special bun and special sauce, it was accompanied by pages of printed instructions. The burger was good, certainly the most meat-like plant patty up to that point, but it still tasted like a lite product—a little cleaner, a little less decadent, a little bit like filler.

    This time, when I asked the company to send me a burger, a five-pound block of meat—clearly what it normally ships to food-service companies—arrived on my doorstep. No instructions, no hand-holding. It looked identical to ground beef, so that’s how I treated it. And that’s how it performed. I made sliders, kebabs, nachos, chili, Bolognese sauce, even a little tartare (note: the company frowns hard on this).

    If I’m being honest, I find that I slightly prefer it to real beef. It’s rich and juicy, more savory, but still somehow cleaner and less cloying. Now when I go back to regular beef, I notice a whiff of the charnel house in it, something musty and gray that I don’t like and don’t need.

    In the coming years, expect a lot of other omnivores to have similar epiphanies. Impossible Foods has performed more than 26,000 blind taste tests on its burger, which is on track to surpass ground beef in those tests in the near future. What happens then? Impossible has been laser focused on creating the perfect simulacrum of ground beef. But why? The cow never had a lock on gastronomic perfection. It was just the best we could do given the limitations of the natural material. Firelight was fine until electricity came along. Then things got really interesting.

    Look for something similar to happen with alt meat. For now, it’s necessary to make people comfortable with the familiar, the way Steve Jobs loaded the early iPhones with faux felt and wood grain. But once people stop expecting burgers to refer to a hunk of flesh, the brakes on deliciousness will be released.

    This will be generational. All change is. Most Baby Boomers are going to stick with their beef, right up to the point where their dentures can’t take it anymore. But Gen Z will find the stuff as embarrassing as Def Leppard and dad jeans.

    As this shift accelerates, the beef industry will lose its last advantage—price. Most offerings made with Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are about a buck a burger more expensive. But it’s inherently cheaper to make a burger directly out of plants than it is to feed those plants to an animal first. Beef is currently cheaper because of scale. Big food companies can negotiate tremendously reduced prices for feed, and gigantic factories and supply chains are much more efficient to run.

    But the playing field is leveling fast. Last week, Dunkin’ announced a new Beyond Sausage breakfast sandwich that will be just 14 cents more than the meat version. But more than anything Beyond Meat or Impossible Foods has accomplished, the true death knell for the cattlemen is how the mainstream food industry has embraced alt meat. Whole Foods just announced it will start selling burgers from the UK-based startup the Meatless Farm in all of its stores. Nestlé is launching its Awesome Burger this fall. Tyson Foods, America’s largest meat producer, just debuted its own plant-based nuggets, with more products to come. Tyson CEO Noel White said he expects Tyson “to be a market leader in alternative protein, which is experiencing double-digit growth and could someday be a billion-dollar business for our company.”

    If that quote isn’t enough to send chills down the spine of any meat producer, try this one from Perdue Farms chairman Jim Perdue: “Our vision is to be the most trusted name in premium protein. It doesn’t say premium meat protein, just premium protein. That’s where consumers are going.”

    And that’s where these companies will go. Beef is a headache. It comes with a lot of baggage to worry about: antibiotic resistance, E. coli outbreaks, animal welfare, climate change. It’s the kind of icky biological variable that corporate America would love to leave behind—and as soon as beef becomes less profitable, it will.

    Recent projections suggest that 60 percent of the meat eaten in 2040 will be alt, a figure I think may actually be too conservative. An estimated 95 percent of the people buying alt burgers are meat-eaters. This is not about making vegetarians happy. It’s not even about climate change. This is a battle for America’s flame-broiled soul. Meat is about to break free from its animal past. As traditional meat companies embrace alt meat with the fervor of the just converted, making it cheap and ubiquitous, it’s unclear if Beyond Meat or Impossible Foods can survive the feeding frenzy (though Impossible’s patents on its core IP may help), but at least they’ll be able to comfort themselves with a modern take on Gandhi’s wisdom:


    First they ignore you.
    Then they laugh at you.
    Then they sue you.
    Then they try to buy you.
    Then they copy you.
    Then they steal your shelf space.
    Then they put you out of business.
    Then you’ve won.

    sauce https://www.outsideonline.com/239973...elFOYuQ92rXCwo
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  16. #2016
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    Good article. "America's flame-broiled soul" cracked me up.

  17. #2017
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-67552905_2431455200476895_453470687290458112_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  18. #2018
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    PLANT-BASED DIET SLASHES RISK OF DYING FROM HEART DISEASE BY 32 PERCENT, STUDY FINDS


    A plant-based diet is linked to a 32-percent decreased chance of dying from cardiovascular related illness, including heart attack and stroke, according to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

    Researchers studied the eating habits of 10,000 middle-aged people in the United States from 1987 to 2016 who did not have cardiovascular disease at the onset of the study. In addition to a greatly decreased chance of dying from heart disease, participants whose diets were proportionally highest in plant-based foods than animal-based foods had a 16-percent lower risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Additionally, participants that consumed the least animal-based foods had a 25-percent lower risk of dying from any health-related cause when compared to those who ate the highest amount of animal products.

    “Our findings underscore the importance of focusing on your diet,” said lead researcher Casey M. Rebholz, PhD, assistant professor of epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. “There might be some variability in terms of individual foods, but to reduce cardiovascular disease risk people should eat more vegetables, nuts, whole grains, fruits, legumes, and fewer animal-based foods.” These findings reinforce a large body of scientific evidence that links the consumption of animal products to an increased risk of heart disease, including a study released in March that found consuming even a small amount of meat can lead to an early death.


    Full Study: https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full...AHA.119.012865

    Plant‐Based Diets Are Associated With a Lower Risk of Incident Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Disease Mortality, and All‐Cause Mortality in a General Population of Middle‐Aged Adults

    In Summary:
    Abstract
    Background

    Previous studies have documented the cardiometabolic health benefits of plant‐based diets; however, these studies were conducted in selected study populations that had narrow generalizability.

    Methods and Results
    We used data from a community‐based cohort of middle‐aged adults (n=12 168) in the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) study who were followed up from 1987 through 2016. Participants’ diet was classified using 4 diet indexes. In the overall plant‐based diet index and provegetarian diet index, higher intakes of all or selected plant foods received higher scores; in the healthy plant‐based diet index, higher intakes of only the healthy plant foods received higher scores; in the less healthy plant‐based diet index, higher intakes of only the less healthy plant foods received higher scores. In all indexes, higher intakes of animal foods received lower scores. Results from Cox proportional hazards models showed that participants in the highest versus lowest quintile for adherence to overall plant‐based diet index or provegetarian diet had a 16%, 31% to 32%, and 18% to 25% lower risk of cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease mortality, and all‐cause mortality, respectively, after adjusting for important confounders (all P<0.05 for trend). Higher adherence to a healthy plant‐based diet index was associated with a 19% and 11% lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality and all‐cause mortality, respectively, but not incident cardiovascular disease (P<0.05 for trend). No associations were observed between the less healthy plant‐based diet index and the outcomes.

    Conclusions
    Diets higher in plant foods and lower in animal foods were associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in a general population.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  19. #2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Good article: It's one of the best take I've ever seen on why the meat industry is screwed.


    This Is the Beginning of the End of the Beef Industry


    There’s a famous Gandhi aphorism about how movements progress: “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.” That was actually written by the Workshop on Nonviolence Institute as a summary of Gandhi’s philosophy, but regardless, it’s remarkable how often it accurately describes the evolution of causes, from legal cannabis to gay marriage. I’ve been thinking about that quote since I wrote my first piece about plant-based meat (or alt meat, as I like to call it) for Outside in 2014. Back then, we were firmly in the “laugh at you” stage. Beyond Meat, the first of the Silicon Valley startups to use advanced technology to produce extremely meat-like burgers, had been ignored for its first few years, but in 2014, it released its Beast Burger, which was treated by the press and public as a slightly off-putting curiosity. What was this stuff? Would anyone actually eat it? Ewwww.


    That product wasn’t very good—I compared it to Salisbury steak—and when Ethan Brown, Beyond Meat’s founder, announced his intention to end livestock production, you could almost hear the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association laughing in the background.

    But I didn’t laugh. I knew it would keep getting better and beef wouldn’t. And I thought the bar was pretty low. Sure, steak is great, but ground beef makes up 60 percent of beef sales, and most of it is more Salisbury than salutary, a greasy vehicle for the yummy stuff: ketchup, mushrooms, pickles, bacon, sriracha mayo. I knew I wouldn’t object if my central puck came from a plant, as long as it chewed right and tasted right. I suspected others might feel the same.

    In the following years, Beyond Meat was joined by Impossible Foods, a more sophisticated startup with even more venture capital. Its Impossible Burger was way better than Salisbury steak. All the cool cats started serving it, from David Chang in New York to Traci Des Jardins in San Francisco. My conviction grew.

    Part of the appeal of the new burgers is their smaller environmental footprint. Beef is the most wasteful food on the planet. Cows are not optimized to make meat; they’re optimized to be cows. It takes 36,000 calories of feed to produce 1,000 calories of beef. In the process, it uses more than 430 gallons of water and 1,500 square feet of land, and it generates nearly ten kilograms of greenhouse-gas emissions. In comparison, an Impossible Burger uses 87 percent less water, 96 percent less land, and produces 89 percent fewer greenhouse-gas emissions. Beyond Meat’s footprint is similarly svelte.

    Yes, a good argument can be made that small-farm, grass-fed beef production (in places that can grow abundant grass) has a very different ethical and environmental landscape, but unfortunately, that’s just not a significant factor. America gets 97 percent of its beef from feedlots. And feedlots are irredeemable.

    By 2018, sales of both the Beyond Burger and the Impossible Burger were surging, and the companies began to ink deals with restaurant chains. Beyond Meat got Carl’s Jr. and A&W (as well as supermarket chains like Food Lion and Safeway), while Impossible got White Castle.

    I tracked down a White Castle shortly after the Impossible Slider arrived in the spring of 2018. I’d never been to a White Castle, so I ordered an Impossible Slider and a regular slider. The Impossible was...fine. About what you’d expect. White Castle steams all its meat, which is hard to get past, but with plenty of cheese, it went down easy.

    The regular slider, on the other hand, was horrific. I peeled back the pasty bun and stared at the fetid shingle inside. It was appallingly thin and grimy. It made the Impossible Slider look lush and juicy. The bar for fast-food burgers is even lower than I thought. Nobody will miss these shitty little brown things when they’re gone.

    Perhaps this explains why the chains are latching on to plant-based burgers as if they were life rings. White Castle initially tested its Impossible Slider in just a few locations in New York, New Jersey, and Chicago in April 2018. It was such a hit that the company quickly expanded the program to all 380 outlets. “People are coming back for it again and again,” White Castle’s vice president, Jamie Richardson, said with a touch of astonishment.

    They’re coming back at Del Taco, too, which launched a Beyond Meat taco in April. Within two months, it had sold two million, one of the most successful product launches in its history, so it decided to add Beyond Meat burritos as well.

    And then there’s Burger King. The second-largest fast-food chain in the world rattled big beef’s cage by testing an Impossible Whopper in St. Louis in April. Resulting foot traffic was so strong that Burger King decided to serve the Impossible Whopper in all 7,200 restaurants, marking the moment when alt meat stopped being alt.

    That was enough to get the meat industry to snap to attention. “About a year and a half ago, this wasn’t on my radar whatsoever,” said Mark Dopp, head of regulatory affairs for the North American Meat Association, to The New York Times. “All of a sudden, this is getting closer.”

    The strategy, predictably yet pathetically, was to engage in an ontological battle over the term meat itself. Big beef successfully lobbied for a labeling law in Missouri banning any products from identifying themselves as meat unless they are “derived from harvested production livestock or poultry.” (But this is wrong; the word simply meant sustenance for the first thousand years of its existence.) Similar labeling laws have passed or are pending in a dozen more states, most of them big ranching ones.

    Obviously, none of this has stemmed the rise of alt meat. But it did make me think again of Gandhi (a staunch vegetarian, FYI). They ignored, they laughed, and now they were fighting.

    This stuff, I thought, just might win.

    This year is shaping up to be the inflection point when this becomes obvious to everybody else. Beyond Meat’s products are in 15,000 grocery stores in the U.S., and its sales have more than doubled each year. On May 2, it held its IPO, offering stock at $25, which turned out to be a wild underestimation of what investors thought the company was worth. It immediately leaped to $46 and closed the day at $65.75. That one-day pop of 163 percent was one of the best in decades, putting to shame such 2019 IPOs as Lyft (21 percent) and Pinterest (25 percent), to say nothing of Uber (negative 3 percent). In the following days, it kept ripping, climbing above $150, where it has stayed. The market currently estimates Beyond Meat’s worth at close to $10 billion.

    Not to be outdone, that same month, Impossible Foods raised an additional $300 million dollars from private investors (for a running total of $740 million and a valuation of $2 billion) and announced it would be joining Beyond Meat in America’s grocery stores later this year. These companies are no longer little mammals scurrying around the feet of the big-beef dinosaurs. And they are gearing up for an epic head-to-head battle.

    Both Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods recently released new, improved versions of their meat. For the past week, I’ve subsisted on little else. It feels great. Both have the same amount of protein as ground beef (about 20 grams per quarter-pound serving) and less fat. Being plant-based, they also provide a healthy shot of fiber. Both get their unctuousness from coconut oil.

    But the core of each formula is very different. Beyond uses pea protein, while Impossible uses soy. Beyond gets its bloody color from beet juice; Impossible uses heme—the same molecule that makes our blood red—to achieve its meaty color and flavor. This is its killer app. Beef gets its beefiness from heme. When you cook heme, it produces the distinctive savory, metallic flavor of meat. Since heme is normally found in blood, no veggie concoction has ever used it. Soy plants do make microscopic amounts of it, but not enough to ever use. Impossible Foods’ breakthrough was to genetically engineer yeast to produce soy heme in a tank, like beer. This GMO process is a deal breaker for some people, but it makes all the difference. The Impossible Burger is incredible, the Beyond Burger merely passable.

    The Beyond Burger comes as two premade four-ounce patties (packaged in a plastic tray wrapped in more plastic—strike one). They don’t quite pass as hamburgers. They’re too wet and too pink. They almost resemble finely ground salmon burgers. They cook to a satisfying toothiness on either a grill or a griddle, but there’s an inexplicable cellulose quality to the texture. (This is even more pronounced in the Beyond Sausage.) The flavor is also slightly off. There’s a hint of fake smoke and an earthiness I’m guessing comes from the beet juice. (My wife would argue that it’s more than slightly off; she has to leave the room when the Beyond Burger is cooking. But she also hates beets.) It’s not an unpleasant experience, just don’t expect the burgergasm you get from a quarter pound of USDA prime.

    Impossible Foods, on the other hand, has delivered burgergasm after burgergasm. It’s shine-up-the-Nobel-Prize good. Not only does it taste like ground beef, it looks and acts like it, too. It’s truly plug and play.

    That wasn’t true for the previous version. When I first wrote about Impossible Foods three years ago, I had to beg the company to send me one patty. It was hesitant. Back then, the burger was fussy. It didn’t work well on a grill, so you had to pan-fry it just right. The company made me do a Skype tutorial first, and when the micropatty arrived in a refrigerated box, with a special bun and special sauce, it was accompanied by pages of printed instructions. The burger was good, certainly the most meat-like plant patty up to that point, but it still tasted like a lite product—a little cleaner, a little less decadent, a little bit like filler.

    This time, when I asked the company to send me a burger, a five-pound block of meat—clearly what it normally ships to food-service companies—arrived on my doorstep. No instructions, no hand-holding. It looked identical to ground beef, so that’s how I treated it. And that’s how it performed. I made sliders, kebabs, nachos, chili, Bolognese sauce, even a little tartare (note: the company frowns hard on this).

    If I’m being honest, I find that I slightly prefer it to real beef. It’s rich and juicy, more savory, but still somehow cleaner and less cloying. Now when I go back to regular beef, I notice a whiff of the charnel house in it, something musty and gray that I don’t like and don’t need.

    In the coming years, expect a lot of other omnivores to have similar epiphanies. Impossible Foods has performed more than 26,000 blind taste tests on its burger, which is on track to surpass ground beef in those tests in the near future. What happens then? Impossible has been laser focused on creating the perfect simulacrum of ground beef. But why? The cow never had a lock on gastronomic perfection. It was just the best we could do given the limitations of the natural material. Firelight was fine until electricity came along. Then things got really interesting.

    Look for something similar to happen with alt meat. For now, it’s necessary to make people comfortable with the familiar, the way Steve Jobs loaded the early iPhones with faux felt and wood grain. But once people stop expecting burgers to refer to a hunk of flesh, the brakes on deliciousness will be released.

    This will be generational. All change is. Most Baby Boomers are going to stick with their beef, right up to the point where their dentures can’t take it anymore. But Gen Z will find the stuff as embarrassing as Def Leppard and dad jeans.

    As this shift accelerates, the beef industry will lose its last advantage—price. Most offerings made with Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are about a buck a burger more expensive. But it’s inherently cheaper to make a burger directly out of plants than it is to feed those plants to an animal first. Beef is currently cheaper because of scale. Big food companies can negotiate tremendously reduced prices for feed, and gigantic factories and supply chains are much more efficient to run.

    But the playing field is leveling fast. Last week, Dunkin’ announced a new Beyond Sausage breakfast sandwich that will be just 14 cents more than the meat version. But more than anything Beyond Meat or Impossible Foods has accomplished, the true death knell for the cattlemen is how the mainstream food industry has embraced alt meat. Whole Foods just announced it will start selling burgers from the UK-based startup the Meatless Farm in all of its stores. Nestlé is launching its Awesome Burger this fall. Tyson Foods, America’s largest meat producer, just debuted its own plant-based nuggets, with more products to come. Tyson CEO Noel White said he expects Tyson “to be a market leader in alternative protein, which is experiencing double-digit growth and could someday be a billion-dollar business for our company.”

    If that quote isn’t enough to send chills down the spine of any meat producer, try this one from Perdue Farms chairman Jim Perdue: “Our vision is to be the most trusted name in premium protein. It doesn’t say premium meat protein, just premium protein. That’s where consumers are going.”

    And that’s where these companies will go. Beef is a headache. It comes with a lot of baggage to worry about: antibiotic resistance, E. coli outbreaks, animal welfare, climate change. It’s the kind of icky biological variable that corporate America would love to leave behind—and as soon as beef becomes less profitable, it will.

    Recent projections suggest that 60 percent of the meat eaten in 2040 will be alt, a figure I think may actually be too conservative. An estimated 95 percent of the people buying alt burgers are meat-eaters. This is not about making vegetarians happy. It’s not even about climate change. This is a battle for America’s flame-broiled soul. Meat is about to break free from its animal past. As traditional meat companies embrace alt meat with the fervor of the just converted, making it cheap and ubiquitous, it’s unclear if Beyond Meat or Impossible Foods can survive the feeding frenzy (though Impossible’s patents on its core IP may help), but at least they’ll be able to comfort themselves with a modern take on Gandhi’s wisdom:


    First they ignore you.
    Then they laugh at you.
    Then they sue you.
    Then they try to buy you.
    Then they copy you.
    Then they steal your shelf space.
    Then they put you out of business.
    Then you’ve won.

    sauce https://www.outsideonline.com/239973...elFOYuQ92rXCwo

    I think the Impossible Burger is a game changer. Here in California it is turning up everywhere. A few nights ago we ordered a pizza with vegan cheese and impossible burger crumbles from a popular pizza restaurant, and last night we went to a burger joint and nearly everyone in the restaurant was eating Impossible Burgers instead of regular meat. A new fast food vegan restaurant (Plant Power) now has 5 locations in So Ca. and you can everything from 'big macs' to shakes.

  20. #2020
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    an old vegan wives tale ...

    Woman with freezer full of overripe bananas dies never having made banana bread

    Name:  overripe-bananas.jpg
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    UXBRIDGE, ON – Maureen Gibson, passed away at the age of 87 this Monday surrounded by loved ones and a freezer full of bananas she had been meaning to make into banana bread.

    “I’ve lived a beautiful life of love and adventure,” Gibson wrote in a final letter, “If only I had more time to spend with my family, I could have finally made that banana bread I kept promising. Not doing so might be my biggest regret.”

    Gibson was an esteemed elementary teacher and active member of her community. She loved friendly tennis matches, embroidered pillows, and bookmarking banana bread recipes she would never come to use.

    Gibson had devised an ingenious system wherein she’d buy a bunch of bananas and eat only one or two. A few days later she’d notice that all her bananas had gone black. Instead of panicking at the sight of her rotting produce, Gibson would instead chuck the remaining bunch into her freezer.

    She repeated this cycle once a month for the past 63 years.

    “It saves you money!” Gibson would often repeat when anyone questioned her about her refusal to simply throw away her bananas, “Why do that when I can and eventually will just make it into banana bread? The sturdiest of the loaves!”

    Over her 87 years, Gibson had reportedly devoted most of her savings to the utilities company responsible for powering the electricity to her 24 chest deep freezers.

    “This is a burden, I mean gift that I hope to bestow on all my grandchildren. They will become the rightful heirs to my 3,402 over-ripe bananas,” she dedicated in her will. “There might be a few bags of walnuts in the freezer too, now that I think of it.”

    sauce https://www.thebeaverton.com/2017/06...-banana-bread/
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  21. #2021
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    ^ They need to correct the headline:

    Woman with 24 chest deep freezers full of overripe bananas dies never having made banana bread

    I guess if you're going to be crazy, that may be one of the better ways to go about it?
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  22. #2022
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    Lol
    F*ck Cancer

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    BEEF INDUSTRY IS TO BLAME FOR AMAZON FIRES, ENVIRONMENTALISTS SAY

    The record-breaking fires that are currently blazing in the Brazilian rainforest were likely set by farmers who want to clear the land for cattle ranching, environmental organizations say. The human-made fires happen every year in specific areas, and are a common last stage of the deforestation process in the Amazon region.

    “The fire that we’re seeing today is a fire that’s directly related to deforestation,” Ane Alencar, scientific director of the Amazon Environmental Research Institute, told environmental news outlet Mongabay. “They cut the trees, leave the wood to dry and later put fire to it, so that the ashes can fertilize the soil.”

    This year, the number of active fires amounted to 74,155 between January 1 and August 20, a spike of 85 percent compared to the same period in 2018, according to data from the Brazilian National Institute of Space Research. This region contains the largest rainforest in the world, which produces approximately 20 percent of the world’s oxygen and is often called “the planet’s lungs.”

    Cattle ranching is responsible for as much as 80 percent of the ongoing deforestation of the Amazon, and a significant portion of the global beef supply originates on land that was once rainforest. Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro pledged to further develop the region for farming and mining—intentionally displacing indigenous people—when he took office in January, despite warnings by environmentalists about the impact of deforestation. In response, Bolsonaro is blaming environmentalists for starting the fires in a bid to embarrass the government.

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/8/beef-indu...ElrWXuFCjKSP8s
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    You And Meat Can Save The Planet

    The Amazon rainforest is on fire. Last month was the hottest on record. The first glacier has disappeared due to human activity. In India, a city the size of Manhattan just ran out of water.

    By the end of the summer, scientists estimate about 440 billion tons of ice will have melted or calved off Greenland’s giant ice sheet. That’s enough water to flood Pennsylvania about a foot deep.

    Every year, we learn that our scientific assumptions underestimate just how bad things are, and that the amount of time left to address this crisis is rapidly shrinking.

    Are you depressed yet? Well, perk up. There’s something each of us can do about it. And it begins at breakfast.

    Readers are likely to be surprised by a statistic very few of us know, nor fully absorb. It’s a statistic that is so huge, it’s kind of hard to believe it’s not on the tips of all our tongues every waking moment. Here it is:

    Livestock production accounts for at least 51% of all greenhouse gases (GHG). Said another way, eating animals accounts for over half of all the climate carnage that we’re witnessing across the world.

    In many respects, that’s good news. Bare with me.

    Most of the challenges we face around the world are difficult to solve through individual action. It’s hard to do much about the humanitarian crisis in Syria, or the detention centers at the border.

    And yes, it's nice to buy an electric car (depending on the energy source), but in order to transition away from fossil fuels, it’s estimated that we’d need north of $50 trillion dollars over a twenty year period. That is neither financially feasible nor immediate enough to address the fact that our house is burning right now. Meanwhile, we get closer and closer to our climate tipping point, whereby no amount of action will fix what we have broken.

    Our diets, on the other hand, can change today. You and me can collectively eat a plant-based diet two times a day or more, and effectively solve our entire climate crisis, one bite at a time.

    Here are some stats to drive the point home:

    26% of our land globally is used to raise livestock, and 33% for growing feed. If we allowed this land to generate back into forest, we could offset up to half of all GHGs, and possibly all of them.
    Animal agriculture is responsible for 90% of deforestation in the Amazon. It’s also the leading cause of methane and nitrous oxide emissions.
    Methane has 34 times the ability to trap heat in our atmosphere compared to CO2. Nitrous oxide has over 300 times that amount.
    Forests have more carbon stored in them than all of the known / discovered fossil fuels in the world. If we keep burning them down to grow cows/feed, it’ll be like burning all the oil/gas/coal in the ground, burning the planet up in the process.
    If cows were a country, they’d be the 3rd largest carbon emitter behind China and the US.
    Livestock also requires more refrigeration, which releases more fluorocarbons (thousands of times more global warming potential than CO2) into the air.
    Rainforests normally store 200 tons of carbon per hectare. When you convert it to grassland to graze cows, its drops to 8. In contrast, when these forests are burned, they can release 200 tons of carbon per hectare.
    In a 19-page report, Robert Goodland, a former lead environmental adviser to the World Bank, and Jeff Anhang, a current adviser, suggest that domesticated animals cause 32 billion tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e), more than the combined impact of industry and energy.

    "If this argument is right," write Goodland and Anhang, "it implies that replacing livestock products with better alternatives would be the best strategy for reversing climate change. In fact, this approach would have far more rapid effects on greenhouse gas emissions and their atmospheric concentrations than actions to replace fossil fuels with renewable energy."

    The Chairman of the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Dr Rajendra Pachauri, has described eating less meat as "the most attractive opportunity" for making immediate changes to climate change.

    The Solutions

    It’s not rocket science. We need to eat fewer animal products. And by fewer, I mean a lot less. A great start, as recommended by Jonathan Safran Foer in his new book, would be to eat a plant-based diet for breakfast and lunch every day. Others preach for vegan weekdays or Meatless Mondays. Whatever your method, there is no room for inaction. As the President of France Emanuel Macron declared yesterday, “Our house is burning.”

    Here are some helpful tips for anyone looking to cut down on their animal consumption, but not quite ready to eat kale and quinoa for breakfast and lunch:

    Beef: Impossible Burger, Beyond Burger
    Chicken: Nuggs, Gardein
    Fish: Ocean Hugger, Good Catch
    Cheese (fun fact: cheese is more carbon intensive than pork and chicken): Violife, Follow Your Heart, Miyokos, NUMU
    Eggs: JUST Egg
    Eating Out: Copper Branch, Veggie Grill, Le Pain Quotidien, Pret A Manger
    Meal plans: 22 Days Nutrition, Purple Carrot
    Finding options near you: Happy Cow, A Billion Veg

    Ideally, you’ll also be able to source products grown organically, but that’s not always easy. If you do plan on eating animal protein, buy it from producers that raise them in a pasture using regenerative practices. It produces a lot less GHGs and it’s way better for the animals.




    It’s not enough to believe that climate change is real. You have to act on that belief, otherwise it’s not much different than those who deny it. Will future generations care if you believed, or took action to stop it?

    Changing your diet can feel intimidating. It certainly was for me. My advice is, don’t think about changing your diet forever. Just focus on eating sustainably for your next meal. And then try it again. And don’t stop trying every meal. That’s it.


    sauce and links https://www.forbes.com/sites/michael...Q#39766e124c6d

    soft vegan tacos from Tacofino Cantina in Tofino BC

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    Boom she comin'

    Huge drugs bust’ at Gatwick Airport turns out to be vegan cake ingredients

    BTP Sussex (British Transport Police) said on twitter: “Huge drugs bust at Gatwick airport. In collaboration with @ukhomeoffice powders tested and discovered to be vegan cake ingredients.”
    The BTP urged passengers to label foods and to ‘bring samples of cakes’ on their next visit.

    A spokesman for the British Transport Police said: “We received a report at 1.34pm.

    “Cleaners found a bag contained many bags [of what appeared to be drugs] in the first class compartment of a train.

    “Obviously it was tested and found to be exactly what it says in the tweet. We spoke with the owner and there was no concerns.”

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-edepacgwkbgdrdl.jpg

    sauce https://www.wscountytimes.co.uk/news...QUrJgPb-jv5sUM
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    NEW YORK TIMES: “STOP MOCKING VEGANS”

    In a recent op-ed, New York Times columnist Farhad Manjoo urged readers to stop mocking vegans, who he explained were right about the ethics of abstaining from animal products all along. “Many of us, myself included, engage in painless, performative environmentalism,” Majoo writes. “We’ll give up plastic straws and tweet passionately that someone should do something about the Amazon, yet few of us make space in our worldview to acknowledge the carcass in the room: the irrefutable evidence that our addiction to meat is killing the planet right before our eyes.”

    Manjoo points to the hypocrisy of Popeye’s launching its new chicken sandwich during a time when Amazon rainforest is burning due to animal agriculture, acknowledging the “squalid, overcrowded, constantly-lit, 40-day life span of the typical factory-farmed, fast-food chicken.” While admitting that he struggles with eschewing animal products himself, Manjoo asks readers to stop making fun of vegans. “I want to urge you to give vegans a chance—to love and to celebrate them instead of ridiculing them,” Majoo writes. “We need more vegan voices, because on the big issues—the criminal cruelty of industrial farming; the sentience and emotional depth of food animals; the environmental toll of meat and the unsustainable of its global rise—vegans are irrefutably on the right side of history.”

    Manjoo explains that omnivores classify vegans as “preachy” only because their mere existence exposes the cognitive dissonance people experience when continuing to support animal cruelty and environmental destruction by eating animal products. “The vegans are right. The vegans were always right,” Manjoo writes. “The least you can do is shower them with respect and our gratitude, because they deserve it.” Today at 1 pm EST, Manjoo will answer questions about his column on Twitter and urges readers to contact him for a phone discussion via a submission form beneath his article, titled “Stop Mocking Vegans.”

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/8/new-york-...wiPkXP_68niwKQ
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    A Plant-Based Diet Fuels This Punk-Rock Ironman

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    John Joseph probably should have died a long time ago. Born into an abusive family, he lived on the streets as a teenager, eventually falling into drug addiction and doing time in prison in the 1970s. Things were going south for the front man of the punk band Cro-Mags. After relapsing in 1988, Joseph took a two-year break from the band and started cycling. “People talk about rock bottom, but I was under the rock,” Joseph says. “I started working as a bike messenger ’cause that was the only job I could get. I was good at it, I could ride all day. Then I started doing pack rides with other messengers at night and taking long-ass rides out to the Hamptons to swim in the ocean.” He got sober in 1990 and soon returned to the Cro-Mags.

    Now the 57-year-old New York City native is an Ironman finisher and the author of three books, including an autobiography and a self-help guide. Not only has he been sober for 29 years, he’s also arguably the healthiest person in the room. “The whole sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll thing is bullshit,” Joseph says from his home, fresh off a tour in Europe. “It’s a fantasy life. It’s not sustainable.”

    Juggling an intense Ironman training routine and a jet-setting job has given Joseph the stamina he needs to perform in high-energy punk-rock shows. A typical Cro-Mags performance is exhausting: screaming fast-paced lyrics over guitar and drums, stage diving, mosh pits. But Joseph’s life on the road sounds more like the regimented routine of a professional athlete. After each show, he retreats to his hotel room for an Epsom-salt bath, some foam rolling, and a dose of CBD oil. He sleeps for five hours, then wakes early for a run, typically 10 to 15 miles. “I have to train when I travel, because when you’re competing in Ironman, you can’t just take a month off when you’re building up to a race,” Joseph says. “You have to stay at it.”

    Joseph tells me that his plant-based diet is key to this healthy lifestyle and has helped him reconcile his traumatic past. In 1980, H.R., the lead singer of the seminal punk band Bad Brains, convinced him to give up eating meat. “Since the moment of conception, I’ve been in a violent world, and I had a lot of anger from it,” Joseph says. “As soon as I eliminated meat, something clicked. This huge weight was lifted off of me. This violent nature that I had was gone. The diet was the first step. That’s when I started caring about what was going into my body.” Since then, Joseph has followed a strict plant-based diet for 39 years, even writing a how-to guide on the subject in 2014.

    While Joseph is happy to discuss the environmental and moral implications of a meat-based diet (catch his appearance on Joe Rogan’s podcast for a primer), he’s just as passionate about optimizing plant-based diets for athletic performance. He didn’t start competing in Ironman-distance triathlons until he was 50, when a friend scored him an entry into the New York City Ironman. Even though Joseph says his training was off for that first race, he was hooked. “I was crying as I crossed the finish line, thinking about all the people in my life who said I wouldn’t amount to anything,” Joseph says. “It was an emotional experience. Doing an Ironman reveals your true character.” Since then, Joseph has knocked out ten more Ironman-distance races, including two Kona World Championships.

    A typical day for Joseph starts with fresh juice: usually a mix of pineapple, turmeric, ginger, and spinach, which he says helps fight inflammation. He follows this with a breakfast of acai berries topped with almond butter. After breakfast he’ll tackle a brick workout, which includes a lengthy bike ride followed by a long run. On the bike, he’ll eat Clif Bloks and plant-based raw bars, followed by watermelon, water with amino acids, and a banana before he runs. His postworkout drink of choice is fresh beet juice, which he says helps increase the oxygen in his blood. Dinner is a bowl of brown rice, beans, avocado, broccoli, and a tahini sauce.

    Joseph says he’s seeing more athletes in the Ironman community switch to a plant-based diet, and he’s on a mission to help others understand that this approach can fuel serious athletes. Joseph hosts his own YouTube cooking show, Hard Truth, which has him cooking vegan meals with special guests, whipping up classics like lasagna and pasta Alfredo with fresh, organic ingredients. “You give me one day, I’ll feed you three meals, and you tell me how good it tastes and how good you feel after you eat it,” Joseph says. “You’ll get energized by the food. Every single nutrient can be obtained from a whole-food, plant-based diet. And it gives you the fiber you can’t get from those meat-based diets.” (While ditching meat is certainly working for Joseph, there’s an ongoing debate about the merits of a plant-based diet for athletes.)

    He’s training for the Ironman Cozumel in Mexico in November and is working on a cookbook that is scheduled for release in 2020. For Joseph, the diet feeds the racing, and the racing keeps him on a healthy path. “You have to stay very regulated and disciplined when you’re racing Ironman,” Joseph says. “Your eating has to be regulated. Your sleeping. Your training. Living that lifestyle keeps me focused. It keeps my mind engaged in positive things and keeps me around positive people.”

    sauce https://www.outsideonline.com/240117...NcB4tx_U-zxX2s
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  29. #2029
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  30. #2030
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    I'll jump in ...

    I rarely eat red meat - maybe once or twice every other year or so.

    So, when I feel like a burger, I'll have one of these veggie patties, or something like it. Dress em' up with mustard, red onion, tomato, pickles and avocado.

    Tasty!

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
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    Where's mashed?
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  32. #2032
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodchips View Post
    I'll jump in ...

    I rarely eat red meat - maybe once or twice every other year or so.

    So, when I feel like a burger, I'll have one of these veggie patties, or something like it. Dress em' up with mustard, red onion, tomato, pickles and avocado.

    Tasty!
    Curious, how does your body handle it when you do eat red meat? I think it would really make my stomach ache.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  33. #2033
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    I'm curious too. What caused you to switch back to an omni diet? And would you try the beyond meat instead of red meat?
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    We attended the 35th Annual Veg Fest here in Toronto. We sampled an awesome variety of food

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    Joaquin Phoenix is here in at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) for the premier of his film Joker.




    Three-time Oscar nominee, TIFF Tribute award winner, and star of the highly-anticipated new Joker film Joaquin Phoenix just took time out of his wildly-busy schedule to show support for animal rights at a Toronto subway station.

    In town for the 44th annual Toronto International Film Festival, Phoenix appeared at St. George Station shortly before 4 p.m. on Monday afternoon — just hours before he was set to receive TIFF's inaugural Tribute Actor Award alongside Meryl Streep at a gala thrown in their honour.

    While there, the actor posed for photos alongside a provocative ad campaign from the animal justice advocacy group BeFairBeVegan.

    "A vegan since the age of three, Phoenix has frequently lent his celebrity to support the cause of animal rights, expressing his support for BeFairBeVegan as early as 2016, when the campaign first launched in New York City," wrote the organization in a press release.

    "BeFairBeVegan's message focuses on the inner experiences of the animals we use for food, fabric, research, entertainment, and other exploitative purposes," the release continues.

    "The ads are intended to remind viewers that our fellow animals are much more similar to us than we usually acknowledge, and that it is the consumer choices of each individual that keeps these sentient beings in bondage."

    Truth be told, the ads at St. George Station would likely be getting attention even without the aid of an international superstar.

    The campaign, which will run for eight weeks throughout Toronto, is gripping and almost painful to take in.

    Photos of frightened animals are interspersed with true, horrific facts about the industries that exploit them, as well as powerful phrases such as "Imagine being born to be destroyed" and "Imagine losing every one of your babies"

    Phoenix wasn't able to comment on the campaign at St. George station on Monday, though he did thank event organizers for their hard work and spoke to local animal rights activists.

    You can catch him on the red carpet this evening outside Roy Thomson Hall for Joker, if you're lucky enough to score a space.

    You can catch the BeFairBeVegan ads Phoenix champions, however, in the form of streetcars, bus murals and transit shelter posters between now and November.

    https://www.blogto.com/city/2019/09/...grKhHkJHZ7ezC4
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    Veg fest looks cool!

    Joaquin seems pretty rad, looking forward to catching his new movie.

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    ^ Joaquin does seem rad...and a very good actor! We popped in at TIFF on Saturday after VegFest. We did not see any celebrities. We did see long lineups for free popcorn though

    People were lined up to get their pic taken in front of the TIFF sign. So I went behind.... no line up
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-70641080_2466030226974747_4977507109085118464_n.jpg

    Photoshop flip the sign ...voila
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-70641080_2466030226974747_4977507109085118464_n-2-.jpg

    Line up for free popcorn
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    Where the celebrities were hiding
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    We've long known the role B12 played in stroke prevention and the need for plant based diets to take supplements.

    Is vitamin B12 deficiency a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in vegetarians?

    Everyone vegan takes B12 and deficiency is common amongst omnivores as well.

    Vitamin B12
    There are three options for people age 14–65 who aren’t pregnant or breastfeeding—see chart below for others:

    Fortified foods of 2.0-3.5 µg per serving, twice a day.
    Daily supplement of 25–100 µg per day.
    Supplement of 1,000 µg, twice per week.
    People over 65 can also follow the above recommendations, but some research has suggested that those with low levels of B12 need a 500-1,000 µg supplement per day. For older adults who have been supplementing and have recent labs confirming their markers of B12 status (MMA and homocysteine) are normal, supplementation of 50 to 100 µg per day or 1,000 µg at least twice per week should be sufficient. Talk to your health care provider for personalized supplementation recommendations.

    age: 14–64 yrs
    Option 1: Twice Daily 2.0-3.5
    Option 2: Daily 25-100
    Option 3: Twice Weekly 1000


    Notes on vitamin B12:

    If you haven’t had a regular source of B12 for more than a few months, take 2,000 µg once a day for 2 weeks to replenish your stores.
    The Daily Value for B12 found on food labels is based on 6 µg, which was the RDA in 1968. If a label says a food has, for example, 25% of the Daily Value of B12, it has 1.5 µg (25% of 6 µg = 1.5 µg).
    These recommendations are for the cyanocobalamin form of B12 only—the form in fortified foods and most supplements.
    For other forms of vitamin B12, see Methylcobalamin and Adenosylcobalamin.
    µg = mcg = microgram = 1/1,000 of a milligram (mg)
    There is a large difference between amounts taken twice daily and once daily because beyond 3 µg (for adults), absorption drops significantly.
    Amounts much larger than these are considered safe, but it’s probably best not to take more than twice the recommended amounts.
    Large doses of B12 can trigger acne-like symptoms in a small percentage of people.

    link https://veganhealth.org/daily-needs/#Vitamin-B12

    * For clarity The table is found in the link
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    Which Plant-Based Foods Make You A Better Athlete?

    Based on a study of over 2,000 adolescents, higher fruit and vegetable consumption was found to be positively associated with muscle power in teens, but that’s not who really needs it. What about the consumption of fruit and vegetables and risk by adults and athletes?

    Well, as you can see in my video Foods to Improve Athletic Performance & Recovery, higher fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with stronger elders as well, “in a dose-response manner” — meaning more fruits and veggies was correlated with less weakness and more energy. But these were observational studies, which can’t alone prove cause and effect.

    What happens when you put foods to the test?

    Well, according to a study published in the journal Nutrients, there was no positive impact when runners ingested chia-seed oil. But according to The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, an effect was found for “spinach supplementation on exercise-induced oxidative stress.”

    And, by spinach supplementation, they meant they just gave guys some fresh raw spinach leaves — one gram per kilo. So, like a quarter of a bunch a day for two weeks, and then they had them run a half-marathon. And, they found that “chronic daily oral supplementation of spinach” — uh, meaning like eating a salad — “has alleviating effects on known markers of oxidative stress and muscle damage.”

    What happens when you run a half-marathon without spinach?

    A big spike in oxidative stress, blood malondialdehyde levels (one of the markers of oxidative stress) stay up hours or even days later. In the spinach-eating group, the before and after bloodwork looks pretty similar. But, put the body under pressure, and then you can really see the spinach effect! With dark leafy greens on board, our bodies are better able to deal with the stress of physical activity.

    And, if you look at the resulting muscle damage, as measured by creatine kinase (CK) leakage from your muscles (an enzyme that should be in your muscles, not leaking out into your blood), the participants started out with baseline CK at about 100 U/L, and were at double that level after the half-marathon: 200 just two hours later.

    But it’s the next day where they really felt it — that delayed-onset muscle soreness, with CK levels reaching 600 before coming back down. That’s without spinach, though.

    On spinach, you get a similar immediate post-race bump, but it’s that next day where spinach really shines, with levels back down in the 200’s. On spinach, there’s no next-day CK spike. So, for a competitive athlete, that quicker recovery may get you back training harder sooner. The researchers who published this article attribute this to “the anti-inflammatory effects of spinach.”

    A study in 2016 found potentially similar protective benefits in black currant juice. After some hardcore weight training, muscle damage indicators go up and stay up, whereas the same lifting and then drinking berries, muscle damage indicators went up, but came right back down.

    But this study was just measures of a biomarker of muscle soreness. What about actual soreness?

    Well, a study published in the journal Nutrients looked at that. If you look at the effects of tart cherry juice on recovery following prolonged, intermittent sprints in soccer players, you see the same kind of reduction in biomarkers of inflammation — but, more importantly, less resulting muscle soreness.

    The group drinking tart cherry juice reported half the soreness as the control group. Interestingly, they also measured maximum voluntary isometric contractions of the leg muscles, which understandably took a hit in the days after the intense workout, but not in the cherry group. They concluded that participants who supplemented with a tart cherry concentrate were able to maintain greater functional performance. But, that was testing like how high can you vertically jump. They didn’t actually see if they played soccer any better.

    However, a study published in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism did just this. This study on purple grape juice showed “an ergogenic effect in recreational runners by promoting increased time-to-exhaustion,” where you ramp people up on a treadmill and see how long they can go before collapsing.

    After a month of drinking a grape Kool-Aid type placebo control drink, no real change in performance, but a whopping 15% improvement in the real grape group, who hung on for another 12 minutes.

    These studies used juice, so that the researchers could make a matched placebo control drink.

    But you can buy Concord grapes fresh, or tart cherries fresh, frozen, or water-packed in a can. That way you skip all of the added sugar that are common in prepared juice drinks and you get all of the added benefits of fiber in the whole fruit form.

    I mix them frozen cherries with oatmeal, cocoa, and mint leaves for a chocolate-covered-cherry type sensation. You may want to try that for a few days before participating in your next lifting event.
    sauce
    https://www.nomeatathlete.com/athlet...64cbe5zz5G1zWg
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    When you reach vegan level 1,000 and lettuce becomes your God.

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    Lettuce pray
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    Climate change drives restaurants to reduce use of meat to lower environmental impact

    If you feel guilty about your meat consumption and how it’s hurting the environment, multiply that by thousands. That’s the position of any meat-serving restaurateur looking at the climate-change impact of their business. Because that’s how much more meat they go through than the average household.

    That’s why the owners of Grand Electric have chosen to turn one of their popular taquerias into a vegetarian restaurant as they transition the business away from rabid meat consumption.

    Meat and dairy production are responsible for 14.5 per cent of our greenhouse gas emissions, beef being the worst offender by far. The average Canadian consumes about 18.5 kilos of beef a year. Each of Grand Electric’s three locations goes through double that amount in a day.

    “It’s undeniable that climate change, amongst other considerations, is directly linked to the consumption of meat and fish,” co-owner Ian McGrenaghan says. “In that way, serving the volume of animal product that we do, we are undeniably negatively affecting the environment.”

    Lately, Mr. McGrenaghan and his partner, chef Colin Tooke, have realized that this is a problem. Launched in 2011, the wildly popular Parkdale taqueria has expanded with two outposts; one across from Trinity Bellwoods Park and another in the cottage region of Muskoka. A barbecue offshoot, Electric Mud, forced them to take a second look at what they were doing.

    “The success of that restaurant started triggering questions in my head – seeing the volume of product we were going through,” Mr. McGrenaghan said. Proud of the organic and antibiotic-free meats they sourced, the owners arranged for their staff to take a tour of a slaughterhouse. Mr. McGrenaghan had seen animals killed before and wasn’t upset by that. But witnessing so much of it at once, connecting meat production with climate change and realizing their role in this supply chain, it suddenly wasn’t acceptable.

    “Even if you’re okay with killing animals, the sheer volume of that was disconcerting.”

    Also, the two were getting older, and not wanting to feel the sluggishness of a meat-heavy diet, or to own a restaurant where they didn’t feel comfortable eating more than once a month. So they closed Electric Mud.

    Around the same time, they were planning to expand Grand Electric, the three locations of which serve about 650 meals a day, comprised overwhelmingly of meat.

    “We were actually in discussion with an investor and close to inking it,” Mr. McGrenaghan says. “But we just couldn’t do it: all that meat and fish and grease and oil.”

    Instead, they have decided to close their Bellwoods location, which does about half the sales of the flagship despite having 10 seats to Parkdale’s 80. It will reopen as Tacos Rico, serving vegetarian guisado, a style of taco filled with stewed ingredients. After that, they plan to overhaul the Parkdale menu to reduce its volume of meat.

    Grand Electric’s owners are not the first Toronto restaurateurs to drive into this moral cul-de-sac. In 2016, Chase Hospitality Group chief executive Steven Salm came to the same awakening about selling meat. Mr. Salm’s strategy was to transition all his businesses, which include steak and seafood restaurants, to 25 per cent vegan menus.

    “Straight vegetarian items have always sold well,” Mr. Salm says from Florida, where he is seeking to expand his Planta brand, a vegan restaurant he opened with chef David Lee.

    “Today, the summer pea agnolotti on the menu at The Chase, that’s replacing the previous duck or lamb dish. So ultimately, every guest that’s ordering that is ordering a dish that previously was an animal protein.”

    Most restaurateurs, however, own very small businesses, and do not have the resources for the kind of large-scale overhaul made by a group like Chase Hospitality.

    Canadian comfort food restaurant Woodlot has offered a separate vegetarian menu since opening in 2010, and the Bloor Street restaurant Sabai Sabai features an alternate vegan menu of Thai favourites.

    When the Soo family reached an impasse on how to serve less meat at their 49-seat Malaysian restaurant, they had to be more creative. Since 2013, Soos on Ossington Avenue has served a lot of red chili chicken wings, pork belly pancakes and rendang beef short ribs. A few years ago, partner Lauren Soo and her husband transitioned to a plant-based diet. As their vegan cooking migrated from dinner at home into staff meals, they questioned how their business could adapt.

    They came up with a novel compromise.

    On Tuesday and Wednesday nights, Soos operates under the name Fat Choi, which allows the family to experiment with a vegan Malaysian concept without additional investment while building an audience for a potential second business.

    When we think of switching to vegan cooking, we first picture how we’re going to replace the heavy, expensive proteins at the centre of dishes. Malaysian cuisine, an intersection of Southeast Asian cooking traditions, frequently depends on nam pla (fish sauce) and belacan (shrimp paste) as building blocks of flavour, posing an additional creative challenge in going animal-free.

    “You have to give it a lot more love and thought when you’re doing vegan cooking,” says chef Tricia Soo, Lauren’s mother. “Because I can’t just put fish sauce and belacan or oyster sauce when I want.” Freshness, cooking in small batches, strong spices and an abundance of good produce – lemongrass, shallot, fresh turmeric, garlic, ginger, galangal – are built to shine, rather than understudy those big fishy flavours.

    “So when you eat it, you don’t miss the shrimp paste. And then for umami, sometimes you can use bean sauce and miso.”

    Sabai Sabai’s chef/owner Nuit Regular uses Healthy Boy brand tao jiew, a fermented soy bean paste, for that umami flavour.

    “It can seem a little challenging to create dishes using more vegetables and less meat products, but once you know what to use, you will see it is very easy,” says Ms. Regular, who is planning a vegan menu for her restaurant Pai. “You can find these products fairly easily in Asian markets.”

    For talented chefs, it’s not challenging to lean on the use of salt, sugar and fat to make food delicious.

    When planning the original menu for Grand Electric, Mr. Tooke had wanted to make food that was addictive. Developing the dishes for Taco Rico, experimenting with rice and beans, Swiss chard and carrot mole tacos, his stomach is in a different place.

    “When I was 25, I craved mayonnaise, spicy stuff and fat,” Mr. Tooke recalls. “I like beef. I like fried chicken. But do I need to eat this seven times a week? Or even once a week or month?” Having moved toward a more balanced diet, focused on vegetables, Mr. Tooke says he no longer craves that kind of rich eating. “The more I eat and cook this way, the more I find that vegetables can be enticing. That this stuff can be addicting. I find that now I crave this.”

    Real change to our environment won’t come from individual consumer choices. Only policy can move the dial that much. But Mr. McGrenaghan understands that this reality doesn’t let restaurateurs off the hook.

    “On a practical level, we will be directly impacting the food our customers consume. On a moral level, we hope to contribute to the idea that food businesses can be both positive forces for environmental change and successful,” Mr. McGrenaghan says. “Hopefully, other restaurateurs might say, okay, well, the guys from Grand Electric actually changed their entire menu and brand to make a positive change, so this is something that might be doable.”

    sauce https://www.theglobeandmail.com/cana...9pPzY#comments
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    mmmmm! Thanksgiving is October 14 (Canada)

    WHOLE FOODS MARKET LAUNCHES VEGAN HOLIDAY MENU IN CANADA


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-vegnews.wholefoodsthanksgiving.jpg


    Supermarket chain Whole Foods Market recently introduced new vegan holiday meals across its Canadian locations in time for the country’s Thanksgiving holiday on October 14.

    In Ontario, the holiday menu was developed by New York-based vegan chef and cookbook author Jenné Claiborne and will include Southern style dishes such as a mushroom étouffée, braised collard greens with tomatoes, spicy cornbread dressing, black eyed pea fritters, mashed potatoes, pumpkin curry soup, and pumpkin pie. The meal is offered as separate dishes or as a “Vegan Meal for 2” which includes two servings of each dish along with half of an apple pie.

    In British Columbia, Whole Foods offers a different “Vegan Meal for 4” which features a ready-to-eat vegan sausage and hazelnut roast wrapped in flaky puff pastry, green beans with shallots, wild rice stuffing with pearl onions and cranberries, baked winter squash, olive oil smashed potatoes, mushroom gravy, and classic cranberry sauce. A sampling of items is already in the chef cases and prepared foods department of some stores and the side dishes will be expanded to all stores beginning on October 9. The dishes and full meals can also be ordered online now through October 12.

    Sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/9/whole-foo...CsiJKhHLScW7mw
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  47. #2047
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    Our fresh produce doesn't need throwaway plastic packaging.

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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-71371714_2405983099438121_950321781221097472_n.jpg

    Some of these may not be vegan
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    I haven't eaten anything from McDonald's in over 20 years. They once had a veggie burger but stopped selling them. Looks like they are getting on the Beyond Meat band wagon now

    McDonald's to offer Beyond Meat burger in Ontario pilot project starting next week

    Beyond Meat may have lost Tim Hortons, but it has partnered with another popular fast-food chain in Canada: McDonald's.
    The iconic burger chain announced Wednesday it will test a new plant-based burger known as the P.L.T. — plant, lettuce and tomato — in 28 McDonald's locations in southwestern Ontario starting Monday.
    The patty would be made of Beyond Meat, the plant-based protein that entered the scene this year on grocery store shelves and in various fast-food chains. Canadian coffee and doughnut chain Tim Hortons launched several versions of the product earlier this summer, but has since scaled back availability from across the country to just Ontario and British Columbia.
    It's not immediately clear why McDonald's has selected Canada alone to be the test market for its first plant-based sandwich for the North American market. Of the 28 locations, 18 will be in London, Ont., while the rest will be in other communities elsewhere in southwestern Ontario.


    California-based Beyond Meat Inc. went public earlier this year, and it quickly became one of the fastest-rising new stocks of the year, although it has pulled back from its recent highs over concerns its growth may be unsustainable, and some criticism over how healthy the patties are.
    Shares in Beyond Meat jumped 13 per cent in premarket trading on the stock market when news of the McDonald's partnership came out.
    The promotion, a pilot project set to last to the end of the year, represents the burger chain's biggest push into plant-based eating. The chain previously offered a soy-based veggie burger at the turn of the century but soon halted production due to slow sales.
    If successful, it could become a permanent offering at some of the chains 38,000 locations in more than 100 countries around the world.
    The burger will be priced at $6.49 Cdn.
    The launch also comes a few months after McDonald's fierce rival Burger King launched its own meatless burger, in partnership with Beyond Meat's biggest competitor to launch the Impossible Whopper last spring.
    Beyond Meat is the core ingredient in a number of fast-food offerings, including meatballs, chicken and other forms at various other fast-food chains including A&W, Subway and KFC.

    McDonald's says its version won't taste the way Beyond Meat burgers at other chains and grocery stores do, because the chain says it has been "working on its recipe" for a while.
    "We know we're not first," Michaela Charette, the company's head of consumer insights, told The Canadian Press. "We've been taking our time to get it right."

    sauce https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/bey...xjTNdtTqumF08k
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-beyond-meat-mcdonalds-plt.jpg  

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    Remember that McDonald's fries are flavored with beef...not even vegetarian!

    Great to see alt-meat continue to rise. I'm pretty optimistic that we'll see slaughter counts trend downwards before long, maybe even hit a tipping point of rapid, permanent decline. What a day that will be.

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    ^ I like that there are alternate choices. I think the only valid complaint I've seen is it has quite a bit more sodium, which can have some health implications. Thanks for the tip re the fries

    Re nut allergies Beyond uses lentils, not pea protein. It's Impossible burgers that use pea protein.
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    So do vegans get lost in the woods and talk to themselves?


  54. #2054
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    Quote Originally Posted by OzarkFathom View Post
    So do vegans get lost in the woods and talk to themselves?

    No, they just listen for the voice of the lost Cross Fitter first.

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    I have an Omega masticator that makes great banana ice cream. No cream or ice, just frozen ripe bananas run through make the best creamiest ice cream you’ll ever have without dairy or added sugar.

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    Bananas are also great cooked on the grill!
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  57. #2057
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    Quote Originally Posted by OzarkFathom View Post
    I have an Omega masticator that makes great banana ice cream. No cream or ice, just frozen ripe bananas run through make the best creamiest ice cream you’ll ever have without dairy or added sugar.
    That would be yummy
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  58. #2058
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    impossible burger contains gmo's, where beyond does not. just an fyi for those that care

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  60. #2060
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    Plant based for the win (again). Harvey is 43 yrs old

    VEGAN ULTRARUNNER WINS 24-HOUR RACE FOR THE THIRD TIME

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    Vegan ultrarunner Harvey Lewis recently won the 24-Hour National Championship for the third time. With just over 130 miles, Lewis conquered the NorthCoast 24-Hour Endurance Run in Cleveland, OH. He previously won the championship in 2015 and 2017.

    Lewis went vegan three years ago after being vegetarian since 1996, and he attributes proper plant-based nourishment for his running success and quick recovery.“It’s the single most important ingredient to my longevity in the sport,” Lewis told VegNews. “My health, energy, and performance as a runner changed dramatically when I became vegetarian [and, more recently, vegan]. I truly believe it’s possible that I could win 24-hour races for many years to come.

    One of my friends, Marco Olmo of Italy, won the famed UTMB at age 57 eating plant-based and another friend, Mike Fremont, is still setting records in the half marathon at age 97 eating all vegan.” As a member of the US National 24-Hour Running Team, Lewis has competed internationally, and has also won the Badwater 135 ultramarathon in 2014—a gruelling, 135-mile course through Death Valley in California.


    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/9/vegan-ult...12nF3CArJ7NUNA
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    Follow the money on that study. Response from Harvard School of Public Health: "the public could be put at risk" by such "dangerously misguided" research.

    New “guidelines” say continue red meat consumption habits, but recommendations contradict evidence

    A controversial “dietary guidelines recommendation” published in Annals of Internal Medicine suggests that adults can continue to consume red meat and processed meat at current levels of intake.

    This recommendation runs contradictory to the large body of evidence indicating higher consumption of red meat—especially processed red meat—is associated with higher risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, certain types of cancers, and premature death. However, according to the Annals authors, their guidelines were based on a series of “rigorous” systematic reviews (published simultaneously ) that would presumably account for all this available evidence.

    Confused? We asked our experts to take a closer look at the research behind these guidelines. You can find the in-depth analysis below, but here are their key takeaways:

    The new guidelines are not justified as they contradict the evidence generated from their own meta-analyses. Among the five published systematic reviews, three meta-analyses basically confirmed previous findings on red meat and negative health effects.

    The publication of these studies and the meat guidelines in a major medical journal is unfortunate because following the new guidelines may potentially harm individuals’ health, public health, and planetary health. It may also harm the credibility of nutrition science and erode public trust in scientific research. In addition, it may lead to further misuse of systematic reviews and meta-analyses, which could ultimately result in further confusion among the general public and health professionals.

    This is a prime example where one must look beyond the headlines and abstract conclusions. It is important for journalists, health professionals, and researchers to look beyond the sensational headlines and even the abstracts of the papers to verify the evidence behind the claims. It’s also crucial to understand that nutrition research is a long and evolving process, and therefore critical to look at the totality of the evidence.

    These studies should not change current recommendations on healthy and balanced eating patterns for the prevention of chronic diseases. Existing recommendations are based on solid evidence from randomized controlled studies with cardiovascular risk factors as the outcomes, as well as long-term epidemiologic studies with cardiovascular disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and mortality as outcomes. To improve both human health and environmental sustainability, it is important to adopt dietary patterns that are high in healthy plant-based foods and relatively low in red and processed meats.


    In summary, what are the major problems with these new guidelines concerning red and processed meat?

    1) These guidelines are inconsistent with the principle of “first do no harm.” In clinical practice, it would be irresponsible if a patient who reports eating two servings of red/processed meat daily is told by their doctor not to worry and continue the habit.

    2)These guidelines are inconsistent with the precautionary principle in public health. From a public health point of view, it is irresponsible and unethical to issue dietary guidelines that are tantamount to promoting meat consumption, even if there is still some uncertainty about the strength of the evidence.

    3)The panel declared “considerations of environmental impact” out of the scope of their recommendations. This is a missed opportunity because climate change and environmental degradation have serious effects on human health, and thus is important to consider when making recommendations on diet, even if this is addressed separately from direct effects on individual health.

    Link and more info: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutriti...anaZ3lTHxVv_kY
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    NEW STUDY SAYS CUTTING DOWN ON MEAT IS POINTLESS, AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY AND 12,000 DOCTORS DISAGREE

    A new study published this week in the Annals of Internal Medicine (AIM) that recommends continuing the consumption of all meat, including processed meat, has stirred controversy among the medical community. The analysis in question was carried out by a panel of 14 international researchers who determined that reducing meat consumption does not produce measurable health benefits and recommended that people “continue their current consumption of both unprocessed red meat and processed meat.” The study goes against current research, including work conducted by the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) which classified processed meats as potential carcinogens in 2015. In response, several organizations, including the American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), along with other researchers, have publicly objected to the study and its ill-informed recommendations.

    PCRM—a 12,000 doctor-member group that advocates for plant-based nutrition—filed a petition this week with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) against AIM for disseminating publically harmful information. “AIM’s message is not only an inaccurate statement of the findings, it is a major disservice to public health,” PCRM president Neal Barnard, MD, FACC, said. “These misrepresentations are directly at odds with abundant scientific evidence demonstrating the potential ill health effects of red and processed meat and the benefits of reducing consumption of red and processed meat.” PCRM’s petition calls upon the FTC to “permanently prohibit AIM from disseminating, or causing the dissemination of the advertisement at issue and require AIM to issue a public retraction of and corrective statement regarding the advertisement.”

    To support the claims in its petition, PCRM cited several studies that point to the health dangers of consuming meat, including a Harvard School of Public Health study that linked the consumption of red meat to a 12-percent higher risk of premature death; a study published in the International Journal of Cancer that shows a diet high in red meat increases the risk of colon cancer in women; and a University of Oxford study that links the consumption of just one piece of bacon per day to an increased risk of colorectal cancer.


    Sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/10/new-stud...EXvt1GPcYQEOF4
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    Cardiologist to Bernie Sanders:

    https://youtu.be/iCPaY-VIyt0

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    ^ so true!
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    6 TIPS FOR LOSING WEIGHT ON A VEGAN DIET

    According to a study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, individuals who follow a vegan diet for approximately 18 weeks shed, on average, four pounds more than those who follow animal-based diets. While this fact is great for anyone looking to lose weight, conversion to a plant-based regimen and weight loss are not always synonymous.

    Many who switch to a vegan diet for weight-loss reasons often find themselves filling the meatless void with an array of plant-based processed food. Luckily, a veg diet is so much more than packaged food that just happens to be animal-free, especially for those looking to lose weight. By following these six tips, you’ll fit into your favorite pair of jeans in no time, all while doing good for animals and the environment.

    1. Review the vegan food pyramid
    The foundation of the vegan food pyramid is greens and vegetables followed by fruit and whole grains. This is an updated version of MyPyramid—the food guide that replaced the Food Guide Pyramid in 2005—which emphasized grains, bread, cereal, and pasta as the foundation of a good nutritional regimen. Although the vegan food pyramid serves as a guide, caloric intake and portion control are key factors for any healthy weight-loss program.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-vegan-food-pyramid.jpg

    2. Eat greens
    The versatility of spinach, broccoli, Swiss chard, bok choy, Brussels sprouts, and zucchini makes dark leafy greens a wonderful addition to any meal. These foods are ideal for weight loss because they are the “most nutrient-dense healthy items” and “are extremely low in calorie and high in fiber,” says Lisa Odenweller, CEO of Santa Monica-based superfood café Beaming. The high-fiber content keeps you satiated throughout the day while helping you avoid unhealthy snacking. Other high-fiber options include fruit (be mindful of the sugar content) and raw tree nuts (almonds, walnuts, and cashews), which are packed with protein and fiber and can help lower cholesterol.

    3. Up your protein
    Consumption of protein-rich food is vital in many weight-loss programs because protein fills you up faster; thus, you need less food to be satisfied. According to Stephanie Goldfinger of vegetarian website Cooking for Luv, proteins are available in many forms, which makes them convenient to incorporate into meals because they can be eaten raw or cooked quickly. Protein powders are ideal for a grab-and-go breakfast or mid-day smoothie, while other plant-based proteins such as tempeh, beans, lentils, quinoa, and oats are versatile and can serve as the main component of a veggie burrito, salad, or stir-fry.

    4. Limit processed soy
    Soy products can be the easiest and most convenient “go-to” items when transitioning to a vegan diet. Soy isn’t necessarily unhealthy, but it is imperative that attention be paid to the amount of processed products in a meal plan. For instance, a tofu scramble for breakfast, soy veggie burger for lunch, and pad Thai with tofu for dinner is excessive. Instead, choose vegan cheese made with nuts, a black bean burger, or a pad Thai with vegetables and tempeh for whole-food versions of your favorite foods.

    5. Prepare healthy meals
    Meal planning is a vital component to ensure proper nutrition and weight loss, and, thankfully, supermarkets now sell pre-packaged vegetables that are table-ready in minutes. Examples of fast-and-easy dishes include quinoa bowls with tempeh; a mixed stir-fry blend of broccoli, carrots, and mushrooms; eggplant cutlets with marinara sauce, vegan cheese, and basil; and soba noodles with greens. If these meals are beyond your scope, meal delivery services such as Purple Carrot and meal-planning services such as Forks Meal Planner provide easy-to-follow recipes that are pre-measured and dietitian-approved.

    6. Get exercise and stay hydrated
    Healthy meals, water, and exercise are key components for any successful weight-loss program. People should engage in 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity weekly in order to burn calories and lose weight. High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) is a form of cardiovascular interval training focusing on alternating short periods of intense anaerobic exercise with less-intense recovery periods. To achieve maximum results, HIIT should be practiced three times a week and supplemented with jogging or hiking, says Jorge Cruise, trainer and author of Tiny and Full. And don’t forget to stay hydrated! Drinking a minimum of 64 ounces of water daily keeps your body cleansed, which improves fitness and overall health.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-71176943_2485171365060633_5899279194717683712_n.jpg

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2018/6/6-tips-fo...tq0btW3fHc8cGo
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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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    The Executive Editor of Science Based Medicine (https://sciencebasedmedicine.org) says the Annals red meat paper is good science: https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/the...t-controversy/

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    The Secret Lives of Cows https://www.animalsaustralia.org/iss...es-of-cows.php

    Have you ever seen a cow put her problem solving skills to the test? Or heard of cows who like jazz? No? Then prepare to be amazed! Behind the doe-eyed gaze of these unique individuals lies a hidden depth that might surprise you.

    They’re individuals.

    No two cows are alike — some are bold, some timid, some curious, some affectionate. Research has shown that from a young age, calves each react very differently to stimuli in their surroundings — reflecting their individual likes, dislikes and personality.

    They’re smart.

    Cows can solve puzzles. What's more, they enjoy it! When they work out the solution to a problem, one study found that young heifers would get excited, some even jumping into the air — seemingly in celebration of their Eureka moment. Researchers are finding that cattle are far more intelligent than people give them credit for – and may actually possess heightened brain function and decision-making abilities.

    "These are highly developed mammals that have been solving problems for a long, long time. If anything, it reflects poorly on us that we're surprised that these animals are smart. Of course these animals are smart." - Dr. Daniel Weary, Animal Welfare Program, University of British Columbia

    They have best friends.

    In fact, they're quite the socialites. They seek out and nurture relationships with other individuals in the herd — often forming cooperative grooming partnerships. When separated from their best buddy, they become stressed.

    They have leaders.

    What do cows look for in a leader? Much the same things as us. Studies have suggested that intelligence, inquisitiveness, confidence, experience and good social skills all help to determine who will become the leader within a herd.

    They are loving and protective mums.

    Like humans, a mother cow and her calf share a strong and special bond — one that can form within minutes of birth. When mother cows and their calves are left to live a natural life, the calf will suckle from his mother for several months, even up to a year. Research has shown that adult cows remain deeply affected by the emotional pain of being separated as calves from their mothers, which is standard practice in the dairy industry.
    Their kids are kind of like ours.

    In all the best ways, calves are a lot like kids! They’re cheeky, and super playful. When they want to play, they will signal to each other with their tails and a special call — so that it's clear they mean no harm when mimicking the behaviour of adult cattle.

    They enjoy music.

    Researchers now believe that music with a slow tempo reduces cows' stress levels. It seems that jazz isn't off the playlist just yet either though...

    Stand up for cows!

    Make your choices count: Cows are intelligent, social and emotional animals, but these aren't the only reasons they deserve to be treated with kindness and respect. The fact that they are living, feeling beings capable of experiencing joy, pain and fear is reason enough.

    The most effective way to help these gentle and affectionate animals is by choosing not to eat them. With so many delicious animal-free alternatives now available, it’s no wonder that more people are choosing to incorporate more plant-based food into their lives. Why not give it a try?

  71. #2071
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    ^ I love cows
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-72219494_1153475534841177_4653100906298998784_n.png

    You know who the biggest consumers of soy in the world are? Certainly, not us vegans. But the animals raised for food.


    "Did you know that 90 percent of the soybeans grown worldwide, 50 percent of the grain, and 40 percent of the fish caught are fed to livestock?" https://www.simply-live-consciously....on-of-animals/ ; https://www.ucsusa.org/

    So, if you really are worried about soy then all the more reason you should stop consuming meat & other animal products because everything you are scared of about soy, you end up consuming anyway by eating them.

    there are plenty of vegan meat alternatives and vegan protein sources.There's seitan, mushrooms, jackfruit, banana blossom, other types of beans, legumes and many more.

    You literally dont have to eat soy ever, if you dont want to!

    Also, dont take anti-soy propaganda at face value. A lot of them were funded by the meat, eggs & dairy industries, out of desperation.
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    Seven sympathy gifts for anyone who just learned the truth about canned pumpkin

    Sorry to break the news, but that pumpkin pie you've been looking forward to this fall? It's really a squash pie. Take a close look at that canned pumpkin and you'll see that the tasty orange puree consists of one or more types of winter squash, including butternut, Hubbard, and golden delicious. (Libby's by Nestle is an exception: It's made of Cucurbita moschata, a Central American vegetable that looks like a squash but is deemed a pumpkin.) The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lets all this slide, citing the lack of a clear scientific divide between squash and pumpkins.

    This may be little comfort for pumpkin purists—but thankfully, you can pay homage with our list of eight pumpkin-related gifts for anyone who needs to forget the pain.

    Pumpkin-scented home bundle

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-2477cmlbztjys6eyzeyrg7rspm.jpg

    Channel the powers of the pumpkin to fight bacteria with the ultimate cleaning set, consisting of dish soap, hand soap, multi-surface solution, and a soy candle. If your household smells like pie, you can continue to live in ignorance?

    Pumpkin spice toilet paper

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-z4yf6lje5eov566q55to5ntysy.jpg

    Use this on-theme toilet paper to wipe away the tears. The cardboard roll (not the absorbent itself) is coated in essential oils that are approved for general skincare products.

    Pumpkin eye gel patch

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-yyli5fc64pcmqtmj75acipwuvu.jpg

    Try an eye mask that's formulated with pumpkin-ferment extract to help de-puff the bags from all the sleep you've lost over the squash conspiracy. The two-step treatment starts with a cream and ends with an easy gel-patch application.

    Pumpkin-shaped pie plate
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-gxz6lrmpwdh3tj7gujwgpa6xk4.jpg

    Split the difference by serving your squash pie on a pumpkin-shaped dish. The stoneware is a little under 11 inches across, which measures out to about eight slices for you, yourself, and maybe two other loved ones.

    Pumpkin pie Kit Kats
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-2yzp6jcfzdzatfla7t2dl6h2qu.jpg

    They only come around once a year, so stock up for your home and the trick-or-treaters. Pumpkin-flavored Kit Kats are the perfect blend between everyone's wafer-y, crunchy chocolate and seasonal flavor.

    Pumpkin spice cocktail mix

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-s6eka2hxrrgg5nr6wtbcsuymdq.jpg

    Learning the truth about canned pumpkin is a tough pill to swallow, but this alcoholic accessory might help wash it down. The cinnamon, clove, and cardamom mix goes well with tequila or citrus-flavored liquors.

    Pumpkin and squash print
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-irpqqqnwf5veaavuijzx6ci6re.jpg

    A handmade chart that displays the Cucurbita family's variety is the next best thing to a full-on field guide. Get some help sifting through the varieties at your local farmers' market—or making your own puree at home.

    sauce https://www.popsci.com/pumpkin-theme...I2Hpqgb4tdzEVs
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-72714763_2739981446020550_5425061981436510208_n.jpg
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