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  1. #1801
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    Vegan Diets 'Lead To Better Health', Says Major New Study

    A meta-analysis analyzed 40 studies from more than a dozen countries, comparing outcomes for those on vegan and omnivorous diets


    People following a vegan diet are less likely to have cardiometabolic risk factors compared with those who eat animal products, according to a new meta-analysis.

    Researchers behind the new paper, Cardiometabolic risk factors in vegans; A meta-analysis of observational studies, analyzed 40 studies from more than a dozen countries to compare outcomes for people consuming vegan diets with those consuming omnivorous diets.

    "In most countries a vegan diet is associated with a more favourable cardio- metabolic profile compared to an omnivorous diet," the authors concluded.

    Vegan diet health benefits
    "Researchers found that people following vegan diets consumed fewer calories and less saturated fat and had lower body mass, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and fasting blood glucose, compared with controls," said the Physicians Committee, a pro-plant-based health organization led by acclaimed physician Dr. Neal Barnard.

    "In Taiwan, there were fewer differences between the vegan and non-vegan groups.

    "The authors suspect those defined as vegans in Taiwan adhere less strictly to a vegan diet while the omnivores there consume fewer animal products, compared with populations in other countries."

    sauce https://www.plantbasednews.org/post/...Y8ITCEJHIswjlQ
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  2. #1802
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    So true!

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    Healthy Weight Loss = 80% Nutrition + 20% Exercise

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  3. #1803
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    Do you have a resolution for 2019? Consider Veganuary

    Year of the vegan? Record numbers sign up for Veganuary

    As the hangovers kick in and promises are made at the end of the festive season, more and more people are committing to making a lifestyle change that may require stronger willpower than, say, going to the gym more than once in the first month of the year.

    Record numbers have signed up to “Veganuary” and will try living on a plant-based diet, at least for a few weeks. With vegan options becoming cheaper, and more widespread and convenient, organisers of the initiative believe 2019 will be the year of the vegan.

    Since the movement started five years ago, participant numbers have more than doubled each year and a total of more than 250,000 people in 193 countries have signed up. Rich Hardy, head of campaigns at Veganuary, said that on Sunday alone 14,000 people pledged to go vegan for the first month of 2019 – a rate of one every six seconds

    In 2018 there hasn’t been a week that has gone by without veganism hitting the headlines, whether it is a magazine editor being fired or Waitrose launching a new range of products,” Hardy said. “Vegan products are getting a lot better and it is becoming a lot more convenient to have a tasty plant-based diet.”

    He suggested stark warnings from scientists about the environmental cost of meat had persuaded many people who would not previously have considered veganism to give it a try.

    In May, scientists behind the most comprehensive analysis to date of the damage farming does to the planet declared that avoiding meat and dairy products was the single biggest thing an individual could do for the environment.

    Joseph Poore, of Oxford University, who led the research, said: “A vegan diet is probably the single biggest way to reduce your impact on planet Earth – not just greenhouse gases but global acidification, eutrophication, land use and water use. It is far bigger than cutting down on your flights or buying an electric car.”

    According to the supermarket chain Waitrose, a third of UK consumers say they have deliberately reduced the amount of meat they eat or removed it from their diet entirely. One in eight Britons are now vegetarian or vegan, and a further 21% say they are flexitarian – where a largely vegetable-based diet is supplemented occasionally with meat.

    Chris Packham is among the celebrities to sign up to this year’s Veganuary, while the Tory MP Andrea Jenkyns and Green party peer Jenny Jones have joined the ranks and the Labour MP Kerry McCarthy, a committed vegan, has called on other parliamentarians to take the pledge.

    Many regard 2018 as the year that veganism moved out of the realms of counter-culture and into the mainstream. Hardy said that while vegans and veganism were sometimes portrayed as judgmental and exclusive, movements like Veganuary aimed to be as fun and inclusive as possible.

    Like all New Year resolutions, sticking to veganism can be tricky, but Hardy urged those who try it not to worry unduly. “If you fall off the wagon, you fall off the wagon,” he said. “Just pick yourself up, remind yourself why you signed up to the pledge in the first place and start afresh. It is meant to be fun and enjoyable.”
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  4. #1804
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  5. #1805
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  6. #1806
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    RANKING VEGETABLES BY HOW HEALTHY THEY ARE


    I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: Everyone should eat more vegetables. But if navigating the produce section gives you anxiety, don’t worry: I asked nutritionist David Friedman, author of Food Sanity: How to Eat in a World of Fads and Fiction, to help me rank popular vegetables — from superfood to just plain really healthy.

    Before plunging into our ranking, though, Friedman feels the need to debunk some carnivorous propaganda. “The one misconception I hear a lot is that vegetables don’t provide us with enough protein, and therefore, we need to eat meat,” Friedman says. “The truth is that a vegetarian diet can provide sufficient protein requirements for humans. For example, 100 calories of ground beef contain 10 grams of protein, whereas 100 calories of baby spinach contain 12 grams of protein.” Friedman also mentions that beans and nuts — both of which fit into a vegetarian diet — are high in protein.

    “This doesn’t only apply to the average person: It also goes for athletes and bodybuilders who are intent on building lean muscle,” Friedman continues. “If this sounds counterintuitive — that bodybuilders can gain enough muscle to compete professionally by eating a diet of only plant-based protein — I ask, ‘How does an elephant grow to 10,000 pounds by eating nothing except plants?’ They couldn’t grow that big if plants weren’t loaded with protein.”

    With that, let’s rank some veggies…
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-veg6.jpg

    1. Asparagus: “This tasty green stalk comes in first place on my vegetable ranking,” Friedman says. “Asparagus is a great source of vitamin K, which helps with blood clotting and building strong bones.” Friedman also mentions that asparagus provides vitamin A (which prevents heart disease), vitamin C (which supports the immune system), vitamin E (which acts as an antioxidant) and vitamin B6 (which, like vitamin A, also prevents heart disease).

    Asparagus is also loaded with minerals, including iron (which supports oxygen-carrying red blood cells), copper (which improves energy production) and calcium (which improves bone health). “Asparagus increases your energy levels, protects your skin from sun damage and helps with weight loss,” Friedman continues. “It’s also an excellent source of inulin, a type of carbohydrate that acts as a prebiotic, supporting the growth of health-promoting bacteria in the colon.”

    Lastly, Friedman suggests that asparagus might be something of a natural aphrodisiac. “If you’re on a dinner date, you may want to consider ordering asparagus,” he says, adding that the vitamin B6 and folate it contains can boost feelings of arousal. “It’s high vitamin E content also stimulates sex hormones, including estrogen in women and testosterone in men.” Just be sure to close the bathroom door if you pee afterwards.

    2. Sweet Potatoes: “These sweet, starchy tubers are rich in beta-carotene, which helps maintain healthy skin, vision and organ function,” says Friedman. “Beta-carotene consumption has been linked to a decrease in the risk of lung and breast cancer.”

    “If you suffer from neck or back pain, sweet potatoes are my top ‘food-is-medicine’ prescription,” Friedman continues. “That’s because one large sweet potato contains more than 850 milligrams of potassium, a nutrient that helps relieve muscle spasms and reduces inflammation.”

    Friedman also mentions that one cup of baked sweet potatoes contains approximately 50 percent of your daily vitamin C requirement and lots of manganese, a mineral that “helps produce collagen and promotes skin as well as bone health.” On top of that, Friedman says that sweet potatoes contain anti-inflammatory compounds called anthocyanins.

    3. Brussels Sprouts: “These low-calorie miniature cabbages are rich in vitamins and minerals, including vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin A, folate, iron and manganese,” Friedman explains. “Their high fiber content also helps support bowel regularity and gut health.”

    Friedman also emphasizes that Brussels sprouts contain kaempferol, “an antioxidant that may reduce cancer growth, decrease inflammation and promote a healthy heart.” Additionally, Brussels sprouts keep your blood sugar in check. “Research has linked an increased intake of cruciferous vegetables, including Brussels sprouts, to a decreased risk of diabetes,” Friedman says.

    “Brussels sprouts also contain alpha-lipoic acid, an antioxidant that’s been researched extensively for its brain health and anti-aging properties,” Friedman continues. “Lastly, eating Brussels sprouts can also supply the antioxidants your body needs to protect it from cellular damage and promote general good health.”

    4. Spinach: “Popeye was right: Spinach is one of the most nutrient-rich foods on the planet,” Friedman emphasizes. “It’s loaded with vitamin C, vitamin K, folic acid [which helps the body produce new cells], iron and calcium. Spinach also contains potassium and magnesium, both of which helps keep blood pressure under control.”

    Friedman also mentions that spinach is full of carotenoids, “antioxidants that promote healthy eyes and help prevent macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in older adults.”

    “Spinach is one of the richest dietary sources of quercetin, a powerful antioxidant that helps ward off infection and inflammation,” Friedman continues. “The antioxidants found in spinach may help fight aging and reduce the risk of cancer as well as diabetes — spinach contains two components, MGDG and SQDG, which have been shown to slow the progression of cancer growth.” Lastly, Friedman says that spinach contains sulforaphane — a compound found in many cruciferous vegetables — which also protects against cancer.

    5. Broccoli: “Many people think about orange juice or citrus fruits when it comes to getting their required daily vitamin C, but one cup of broccoli provides more vitamin C than you need in an entire day without causing the blood sugar spike that happens with citrus juice,” Friedman says. “Many health experts consider broccoli to be the healthiest of all the cruciferous vegetables because of its ability to help lower the risk of lung, colorectal, breast, bladder, stomach and prostate cancer.”

    Friedman also says that broccoli is a solid source of vitamin K, which again, promotes bone health. Additionally, Friedman points to several studies showing that broccoli consumption lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease.

    6. Lettuce: You can see our separate ranking of every type of lettuce here, but, “As a general rule of thumb, the nutritional value of lettuce increases as the leafs get darker,” Friedman explains. “Iceberg lettuce is the most widely eaten but has the least nutritional value — the reason being that iceberg lettuce grows in a tighter head, so the inner leaves get less sunlight, remain lighter green and have fewer nutrients. My top pick is Romaine lettuce: It’s the most nutrient-rich of all lettuce varieties and excels in the vitamin and mineral departments. It’s an excellent source of calcium, folate and vitamin K. It also provides 10 times more beta-carotene than iceberg lettuce and almost as much as spinach, making romaine the healthiest of all the lettuces.”

    7. Beets: Friedman first explains that beets lower your blood pressure. “Researchers attribute the blood-pressure lowering effects of beets to their high concentration of nitrates,” he says. “When you eat beets, your body converts nitrates to nitric oxide, a molecule that dilates blood vessels, causing your blood pressure to drop.” This increase in circulation, Friedman says, also increases blood flow to the frontal lobe of the cerebrum, “an area associated with higher-level thinking, such as decision making and memory.”

    Friedman mentions, too, that beets contain lutein, which protects your eyes, and pigments called betalains, “which may possess numerous anti-inflammatory properties that help combat obesity, heart disease, liver disease and cancer.”

    “Beets are often referred to as ‘nature’s Viagra’ due to their high nitrate content,” Friedman continues, adding that the same dilation of blood vessels mentioned above also boosts circulation to the penis. “This leads to better erections for men during sexual intercourse and helps them last longer in bed.”

    8. Mushrooms: “These delicious fungi are one of the few natural dietary sources of vitamin D [which helps the body absorb calcium, promoting bone health],” Friedman says. “Countless scientific studies have revealed numerous ways that mushrooms can be useful in preventing and treating many health conditions: Research conducted at the University of Florida’s Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, for instance, found that eating shiitake mushrooms daily improves immunity better than any pharmaceutical drug currently on the market.”

    “If your New Year’s resolution includes losing weight, it’s ‘shrooms to the rescue: They have lots of nutritional value with few calories and very little fat,” Friedman continues. “They also contain two types of dietary fiber, beta-glucans and chitin, which increase satiety and reduce appetite.”

    Lastly, Friedman says, “Mushrooms are great for cardiovascular health thanks to their high fiber, potassium and vitamin C content. If you have high cholesterol, eat more shiitake mushrooms: The stem of the shiitake mushroom is a great source of beta-glucans, which have been shown to lower blood cholesterol levels.”

    9. Bell Peppers: “Bell Peppers are very high in vitamin C: Just one provides 170 percent of the recommended daily allowance,” Friedman says. “Other vitamins and minerals found in bell peppers include vitamin E, vitamin A, vitamin K, folate and potassium.”

    Some bell peppers are healthier than others, though. “Yellow bell peppers contain several phytochemicals and carotenoids, particularly beta-carotene, which has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits,” Friedman explains. “Red bell peppers are chock-full of many healthy antioxidants, including violaxanthin, lutein, quercetin and luteolin. These plant compounds are associated with many health benefits, including the prevention of chronic diseases, such as heart disease and cancer. Green peppers, meanwhile, are harvested sooner; they’re cheaper to grow, and not quite as nutritious as their colorful counterparts.”

    10. Tomatoes: Okay, okay: Tomatoes are technically a fruit, but since basically everyone considers them at least vegetable-adjacent, we decided to include them in this ranking anyway. “They contain a high amount of lycopene, an antioxidant that’s been linked to many health benefits, including reduced risk of heart disease and cancer,” Friedman says, adding that cooked tomatoes contain four times more lycopene than uncooked tomatoes. “Tomatoes are also a rich source of vitamin C, vitamin K, potassium and folate. Plus, the skin of a tomato contains naringenin, a flavonoid that has been shown to decrease inflammation, and chlorogenic acid, a powerful antioxidant compound that may help lower blood pressure.”

    11. Carrots: “One serving [one cup] of carrots supplies 400 percent of the daily value for vitamin A, and a plethora of nutrients, including vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin B3, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin K, potassium and lots of fiber,” Friedman says. B vitamins basically help the body in every way imaginable: “If you want to fight the sands of time, add carrots to your diet — the high levels of beta-carotene in carrots acts as an antioxidant that slows down cellular aging.”

    12. Onions: “Onions will make you cry when you cut them, but they make your body smile when you eat them: They supply vital nutrients, including calcium, folate, iron, magnesium, phosphorus [which supports bones and teeth] and potassium,” Friedman says. “They’re also a rich source of quercetin, a plant-based phytochemical with anti-inflammatory properties.” Quercetin, Friedman explains, may help onions combat arthritis, asthma and heart disease. “Research also shows that those who consume onions and other allium vegetables, such as scallions, garlic, leeks, shallots and chives, have a lower risk of stomach, colon and prostate cancers,” he emphasizes.

    Onions also contain prebiotic fiber, according to Friedman, which is necessary for a healthy gut and improved digestion.

    13. Green Beans (and Snap Peas): “Green beans contain antioxidants similar to those found in green tea, also known as catechins, which can improve heart health and help prevent cancer,” Friedman explains. “Green beans also help to reduce the risk of heart disease due to their high levels of polyphenolic antioxidants, which are flavonoids that have anti-inflammatory properties. Test subjects with high flavonoid levels have shown anti-thrombotic results, meaning they prevent blood clots. They’ve also been shown to reduce the risk of birth defects for pregnant women. Finally, green beans provide calcium, a vital mineral that helps protect the bones from deterioration and osteoporosis.”

    14. Cucumber: Similar to tomatoes, cucumbers are actually a fruit, but also like tomatoes, they’re often thought to be a vegetable, which is why we included them in this ranking. “The ‘cuke’ is low in calories and contains a lot of water (96 percent) as well as soluble fiber, making it ideal for promoting hydration and aiding in weight loss,” Friedman says. “It’s also a good source of vitamin K, which may reduce bone loss and decrease risk of bone fractures.”

    “Cucumbers contain antioxidants, including flavonoids and tannins, which prevent the accumulation of harmful free radicals and may reduce the risk of chronic disease,” Friedman continues. “Animal studies show that cucumbers may help lower blood sugar and prevent diabetes-related complications.”

    Hot tip: “To get their full nutrient content, cucumbers should be eaten unpeeled,” Friedman says. “Peeling cukes reduces the amount of fiber as well as certain vitamins and minerals they contain.”

    15. White Potatoes: “White potatoes aren’t as healthy as sweet potatoes, but they still offer a great source of complex carbohydrates, which promote energy and keep you full,” Friedman says. “Studies have shown that white potatoes are among the most filling foods, which is great if you’re trying to lose weight (of course, adding sour cream and butter negates these benefits).”

    On a related note, how you prepare your potato seriously affects the health benefits that come with it. “Frying potatoes to make French fries adds more calories and fat than baking them,” Friedman says. “It’s also important to note that the skin of the potatoes contains a great amount of their vitamins and minerals, so peeling potatoes can significantly reduce their nutritional content.” Friedman goes on to mention that a whopping 60 percent of white potatoes in the U.S. are made into French fries.

    But when they aren’t fried, white potatoes are fairly healthy, especially for your gut. “White potatoes contain resistant starch, which is a form of starch that isn’t broken down and fully absorbed by the body,” Friedman says. “Instead, it reaches the large intestine, where it becomes a source of nutrients for the beneficial bacteria in your gut. While there, it converts into short-chain fatty acid butyrate, which has been linked to reduced inflammation in the colon, and a lower risk of colorectal cancer.”

    16. Celery: “Celery is 95 percent water, which makes it very hydrating,” Friedman says. “It has zero fat and is virtually calorie-free with lots of fiber. While the nutritional content of celery isn’t as plentiful as the other veggies on the list, it still contains vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K and folate.”

    “Celery is also loaded with polysaccharides and antioxidants, which have the ability to remove free radical damage that contributes to inflammation,” Friedman continues, adding that these can reduce the risk of heart disease, cancer and arthritis. “Try adding some almond butter for a little healthy protein and fat to make you stay fuller longer.”

    17. Corn: “Corn is the number one grown crop in the U.S. and currently the second most genetically modified ingredient in the world (second to soy) — approximately 90 percent of all corn grown in the U.S is genetically modified,” Friedman says. “When it comes to the most fattening on the list, corn leads the pack: These starchy grains have a high glycemic load, meaning they cause an intense blood sugar spike after they’re eaten, which can ultimately increase appetite and weight gain.”

    “Corn has very little nutritional value and contains a protein called prolamin, which is very difficult for the body to break down (and the reason you often see undigested corn in your poop),” Friedman continues. “This can also lead to a leaky gut and the growth of bad gut bacteria.”

    18. Blooming Onions: Bad news, Outback Steakhouse fans: Blooming Onions are terrible for you. “If you dip onions into a flour-based batter and fry them in greasy, fattening oil to make Blooming Onions, the bad outweighs the good and onions fall to the bottom of this ranking list,” Friedman says. I mean… yeah, I guess I asked for this one. But still, booo.

    On a final note, remember that variety is important when it comes to food, which means only eating asparagus — the absolute healthiest vegetable, according to Friedman — is a bad idea. Your best bet is to include every single one of the above-mentioned veggies in your diet. Er, except the Blooming Onion.
    sauce https://melmagazine.com/en-us/story/...BQcf_Vl6s_yg10
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  7. #1807
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    F*ck Cancer

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  8. #1808
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    This Is What Happens to Your Body When You Give Up Meat

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    Many esteemed evolutionary anthropologists point to a growing body of evidence showing that our earlier ancestors weren’t the skilled and canny hunters of popular imagination. Increasingly, they posit that we got our taste for the flesh of other beasts from scavenging from animals that really are natural born killers. A 2015 study measured how much meat lions and leopards left on a kill and concluded that they’d be plenty left to meet the total daily caloric requirements of at least one male **** erectus, possibly more.

    There’s a broad consensus among scientists that the frequent consumption of meat enabled our brain volume and mental capacity to grow far beyond that of the other hominidae—the taxonomic family that includes all the extant species of gorillas, orangutans, chimpanzees, and bonobos. Though many of us might blanch at the thought, eating meat has made us who we are as a species. (As a side note, we are now on the cusp of consuming meat that comes without all the death that, until now, has been part and parcel of every delicious, nutritious mouthful.)

    Given how important meat has been to the human story, and how vegetarianism and veganism has done a takeover of your Instagram feed, you might wonder what happens to the human body if you walk away from it completely. Well, wonder no more.

    Inflammation decreases
    The complex biological response of body tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants is commonly known as inflammation. In essence, it's a protective response—considered a mechanism of “innate immunity” and in many circumstances, it’s your friend. Still, you don’t want inflammation to come to your "rescue" when you have been chowing down on a ribeye, yet that’s what can happen.

    “Animal products contain inflammatory compounds such as saturated fats and endotoxins,” says Virginia Beach-based dietician Jim White. He adds that by contrast, plant-based diets are naturally anti-inflammatory due to their high fiber and antioxidant content. White points us to a study which demonstrated that plant-based diets result in a decrease of the C-reactive protein, an indicator of inflammation within the body.

    You may run low on certain vitamins and minerals
    Most of us are well aware that meat packs a lot of protein and, depending on the animal, cut and preparation method, a fair amount of fat, too. What we don’t talk about as much is the vitamins and minerals present in things we eat that once mooed, clucked, baaaed, or oinked. Going without some of these vitamins and minerals for extended periods of time can have health consequences. That’s why vegetarians and especially vegans often need to seek them elsewhere.

    “Not eating meat does require you to pay more attention to certain nutrients,” says Atlanta-based nutritionist Marisa Moore. Moore explains that B12, omega-3 fatty acids, and iron are a few of the top ones you’d need to keep an eye on. They can be found in places other than flesh: B12 is abundant in nutritional yeast and fortified foods, for instance, and “you can get vegetarian sources of iron in beans and leafy greens"—enhanced when combined with a source of vitamin C. Omega-3s, found in fish, come in an algae supplement or foods like chia or hemp seeds.

    Your microbiome changes
    Your microbiome is the word used to describe the the trillions of microorganisms living in your body. Long overlooked, these microorganisms are increasingly recognized as being crucial to our overall health. They produce important nutrients, train our immune systems, turn genes on and off, help protect us from cancer, and keep the tissue in our gut healthy. Studies have demonstrated they play a role in obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, autoimmune disease and liver disease.

    The bad news for meat lovers is that meat and other animal products can a create something called trimethylamine oxide, or TMAO, in the gut that frankly, you don't want in there. “Meat consumption triggers bacteria within the gut to produce a substance that the liver converts to the toxic product TMAO, which [at high levels] increases cholesterol, which could up your risk of cardiovascular disease,” White says, explaining that plant-based diets produce little to no TMAO and their high fiber content promotes growth of healthy bacteria within the gut.

    What’s more, research suggests that people who have been sticking to a plant-based diet for some time make little or no TMAO after a meal containing meat, because they have a different gut microbiome. It only takes only a few days of cutting out animal products for our gut bacteria to change.

    Living longer is not out of the question

    Seventh Day Adventists are a protestant Christian denomination whose American members, on average, live several years longer than the national average. The fact that their church discourages them from smoking and drinking alcohol is likely responsible for some of that difference, as are their tight-knit communities. They are also non-meat eaters. Given that the regular consumption of meat is associated with a slew of chronic diseases including cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, infections, kidney disease, liver disease or lung disease, the significance of this particular behavior on longevity can’t be ignored.

    At the DNA level, there’s evidence showing that plant-based diets are better at stopping people from fraying at the ends—literally. “A plant-based diet has been shown to lengthen telomeres, or the caps at the end of chromosomes that keep DNA stable, resulting in cells and tissue to age more slowly,” says White, adding that shortened telomeres are associated with earlier death and aging. “Additionally, the nutrients in plant-based diets optimize how cells repair damaged DNA.”

    sauce https://tonic.vice.com/en_us/article...Rjk-SbG9-bU-lQ
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    Eat your veggies

  9. #1809
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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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    Iowa ag-gag law struck down

    Iowa is the biggest pig farming state in the US, killing 50 million of these sentient individuals per year. The ag-gag law criminalized undercover investigations of animal agriculture, shielding the animal agriculture industry from accountability. The law was struck down by a federal judge on first amendment grounds, which would seemingly apply to all other states' ag-gag laws. Hopefully the judges overseeing those legal challenges agree.

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    ^ Imagine a factory farm with poodles instead of pigs. Most people would be rightly upset at the conditions and treatment of the dogs and demand an investigation and change. Why should we not hold the same or even a similar standard towards pigs, cows, etc.?
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    Taco Bell Is Testing Out Its First Dedicated Vegetarian Menu in 2019

    As meat-free stoners and cheese-centric vegetarians nationwide can have long known, Taco Bell is a legitimately good spot to find cheap, veg-friendly junk food. With its beans, potatoes, rice, guac, and tortillas all prepared vegan already, Taco Bell has earned not only the approval of hard-to-please PETA but also the American Vegetarian Association.

    In 2019, however, the chain will be making eating meatless even easier. Taco Bell announced in a press release yesterday that it will be testing a dedicated vegetarian menu later this year. For Taco Bell, those options are meant to make ordering “easier and better for vegetarians and flexitarians” and fit into a push towards better quality and sustainability. Currently, it’s not totally clear what this new menu might look like, but some fans are hoping for meat alternatives like Beyond Meat.

    These changes come in addition to Taco Bell’s many vegetarian options already. Considering that you can mix and match from the rest of the menu by replacing meat with beans or potatoes, Taco Bell says they currently offer 8 million potential vegetarian combinations. That’s apparently “enough to customize a new meal every day for nearly 20,000 years.” (As my talents lie more in eating and less in math, I’ll take them at their word that one could make that many different treats.)

    The very online world of Taco Bell fans on Reddit seems mostly nonplussed by the announcement, but for them, the chain’s friendliness to vegetarians isn’t a surprise. Just last month, one Redditor wrote, “I am a vegan thankful for Taco Bell every day.” The 92 comments, as of this writing, include lots of tips for making the Mexican-inspired mall food meatless—like ordering anything “Fresco-style,” which replaces all dairy with pico de gallo; or getting the Mexican Pizza with black beans instead of meat, a swap that one person calls “actually spectacular.”

    Worldwide, it’s becoming easier and easier to get your fill of vegan and vegetarian fast food. A recent Vox article called 2018 “the year of vegan junk food,” mostly because of the growing popularity of Impossible Foods and Beyond Burger. As MUNCHIES UK recently explored, more and more chains are incorporating “chicken” cutlets, non-dairy cheese, barbecue jackfruit, and veggie “sausage” rolls onto their menus as initiatives like Veganuary help animal-free diets grow increasingly more mainstream.

    While meatless eaters wait for the new menu’s rollout, I offer this piece of advice: Order everything with potatoes instead of meat—that’s the key to living más and meat-free. Plenty of people will tell you that beans are the best veg swap, but that’s a rookie move.


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  13. #1813
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    ^^^^
    I saw the Taco Bell article the other day. It's a great step in the right direction. I'm not a fast food guy, but I do love me some Taco Bell every once and awhile. My go to is the Power Break burrito without the meat, sour cream, and ranch.

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  15. #1815
    Rent this space for $
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    Surprising myself again!

    Butler Soy Curls. Made them for the first time last night as a topper on organic edamame spaghetti noodles with parmesan.

    Tried them yet?

    Discuss.....

  16. #1816
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post

    Butler Soy Curls.

    Discuss.....
    I've never seen them. How did they taste?

  17. #1817
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    I've never seen them. How did they taste?
    Me neither, or even heard of them. So how was it?
    Change begins by doing something different.

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    https://www.butlerfoods.com/index.html

    ^ Looks good! I'm going to pick some up and try it.

    Thank you OMS!
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    Eat your veggies

  19. #1819
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    It has a consistency similar to meat. It's pretty much tasteless, just like I was told by a friend that gave me a bag to try. It takes on the flavor of whatever flavoring you add to the hydration and/or cooking process. I just hydrated mine in water and then fried it up with just a small amount of butter, crushed garlic, and a dash of salt. I'm going to buy their Chik season product to try with it. You could hydrate it with a beef or chicken bouillon or anything of that sort to makebit what you want.

    It makes a whole lot so you can have it on standby in the reefer and use it for many different things. Today, I threw a big handful into a skillet on medium high heat to get it sizzlin' and browned then squirted an adequate amount of Sweet Baby Rays BBQ sauce into it then put it on a wheat burger bun and it was just like eating bbq pork/chicken sammich.

    It's easy on the gut where I'm experiencing some lengthy issue lately after a bout of Diverticulitis that turned into a double dose of C.Diff infection which I am battling with antibiotics for the second time. So much fun!

  20. #1820
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    How to build muscle on a vegan diet

    When articles proclaim that “veganism is growing in popularity,” it’s not just because Instagram and Youtube makes it feel that way. It’s because veganism is, in fact, growing in popularity.

    Some fast facts:

    On Dec. 30, 2018 more than 14,000 people formally promised (by signing up through this website) to not eat animal products in January. Participation in Veganuary has more than doubled every year since the campaign began in 2014.

    Last year, restaurant consulting group Baum + Whitman identified plant-based food as a major trend for 2018. “That’s still true” for 2019, the copywriter(s) note [PDF], adding that this year lab-grown meats “look like profound long-range game changers.” (The brief writer also describes cows as “prolific poopers,” so BRB going to hire them to write for Popular Science.)

    In 2017, Nestle—whose brands range from Hot Pockets to Coffeemate to Haagen-Dazs to Digiorno—also identified plant-based foods a trend the company, in the words of its Executive Vice President of Strategic Business Units, “believe[s] is here to stay and amplify."

    6 percent of U.S. consumers now claim to be vegan, up from 1 percent in 2014. That’s a 500 percent increase, or a difference of 1.6 million people.

    Ariana Grande is vegan.

    If you are one of the millions of folks who now call themselves vegan (or plant-based or whatever) and you have divulged this fact to anybody, you have probably been asked about your protein intake. People may have wondered about your muscle mass, or your strength. And it’s not a totally unreasonable concern. Generous protein intake is essential for maintaining and building muscle. Eggs, meat, and dairy make up roughly 62 percent of the protein consumed by U.S. adults—and that number may actually be greater when you consider that 8 percent of the protein consumed “could not be classified” (hot dogs??). The remaining 30 percent is plant protein, the largest dietary source of which is bread, which doesn’t exactly have a reputation for being protein-rich.

    When I transitioned out of animal products a year ago—there are many science-backed reasons to reduce your animal product intake—the move seemed to run counter to my goals for athleticism and overall beefcakiness (pun intended). I’ve drained hours researching what humans need to build muscle optimally. When I tried to find research on how people who don’t eat egg whites, whey protein powder, or 93-percent-lean ground beef can optimize their gains, the Google Scholar well ran dry.

    But even without recent or replicated peer-reviews papers, we have proof enough that getting buff with plants is, in fact, possible. There are enough vegan bodybuilders and Olympic athletes to show us it can be done. But how? I asked four experts and compiled their knowledge below.

    Our panel: (1) Dr. Anastasia Zinchenko, a vegan bodybuilder, powerlifter, and coach with a PhD in biochemistry and books full of high-protein bake recipes. (2) Jordan David, a vegan bodybuilder, health coach, and founder of Conscious Muscle, which sells coaching, apparel, and supplements. (3) Dr. Rachele Pojednic, an assistant professor of nutrition at Simmons University. (4) Kendrick Farris, a vegan weightlifter who represented the U.S.A. in the 2008, 2012, and 2016 Olympic Games.

    It’s worth noting that you don’t need to follow their guidelines to get adequate nutrition. These people are experts on gaining maximum strength and/or muscle mass, so they're giving advice on getting jacked—not on simply being healthy. Humans actually do not need very much protein to stay well. But if you want to get buff with plants, read on.

    How much protein the aspiring buff vegan should eat?
    As previously mentioned, the survival of our species does not require as much protein as many Westerners are led to believe. Adequacy, according to the United States’ recommended dietary allowance, is just 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. So, for example, a person who weighs 170 pounds (or 77 kilograms) should eat about 62 grams of protein (that’s 77 x 0.8). Most people (especially meat eaters) get that without even really trying. A peanut butter sandwich on wheat bread, for example, has about 18 grams of protein.

    But how much protein should people eat if they want to get ripped? “It depends on the training stage,” Zinchenko says. “Usually people who are new to lifting can build muscle faster than those who are already advanced. So a beginner lifter should eat more protein. But I usually recommend the same for all stages of training, because more protein doesn’t hurt anything.”

    Zinchenko, who shares tips on her website Science Strength, recommends vegans eat 2.4 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight (or about 1.1 grams per pound). That’s a lot higher than what governmental organizations recommend, but her clients want to bulk up, not simply be healthy. And muscle gain requires the amino acids in protein. (More on that below.)

    People who go to David for coaching are prescribed 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight, which shakes out to just a bit less protein than Zinchenko prescribes. Pojednic, a nutritionist, recommends training athletes get anywhere from 1.6 to 2.2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight.

    For context, a 170-pound individual would consume 185 grams of protein on Zinchenko’s plan, 170 grams of protein on David’s plan, and 123-169 grams of protein on Pojednic’s plan. That difference in protein consumption equates to roughly two protein shakes, or a block and a half of tofu.

    The difference between vegan proteins and proteins that come from animal products
    If you aren’t vegan, Zinchenko says, you can get away with eating 2.1 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight, because the amino acid profiles in animal products are slightly better for making muscle. Pojednic notes that amino acid composition is “one of the key distinctions” between a vegan and an omnivorous diet.

    Both Zinchenko and Pojednic call out amino acids leucine and lysine, in particular. Animal proteins generally have more of these amino acids than plant proteins (here’s a graph), which is significant because these building blocks seem to be particularly good drivers of muscle protein synthesis. You can boost your levels by incorporating a supplement, which Zinchenko recommends, though Pojednic notes that there are plenty of vegan sources of leucine: soy isolates (like soy protein powder), seaweed and spirulina, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, and tofu.

    It’s not just about getting enough protein,” Zinchenko says, “The distribution of amino acid types is also important. It’s like building a house. It must have windows, bricks, and doors. You can have all the bricks in the world, but without a door, it’s not going to be a house.”

    That doesn’t mean you need to make sure each serving of protein includes a mix of all the necessary amino acids, Pojednic says. If you’re eating a variety of foods throughout the day, there’s no need to pair up rice and beans for every meal. Your body can still put all the pieces together.

    Fiber and protein bioavailability
    Even if your lunchtime salad has all the nutrients you want, your body may not be absorbing them. Some foods are harder for the human digestive system to turn into nutrients. Compared to meats, eggs, and dairy, vegetal proteins are not as bioavailable, meaning your body might not actually get to use all the protein contained in the raw spinach you scarfed.

    Whole (also known as unprocessed) foods, which are recommended by the USDA, contain fiber and other substances that can limit absorption in the small intestine. “If you eat a raw vegan diet, you may need to aim for 2.7 grams per kilogram of body weight, which is just an insane amount of broccoli and beans,” Zinchenko says.

    Whole foods generally take longer to digest, which is why serious muscle-builders may want to chug a protein shake on a relatively empty stomach—and why both David and Zinchenko recommend some sort of protein supplementation. Pojednic suggests it too, particularly if your stomach can’t handle a full meal after lifting.

    Do vegans need to supplement?
    Vegans need to take a B12 supplement. Most of the B12 humans get in their diet comes from animal products, as a result of microorganisms being processed in the guts of cattle and sheep. Without foods from those critters, it’s a lot harder to get adequate B12, which means vegans rely on fortified plant milks and cereals or supplementation. (Unless they are really into eating seaweeds like spirulina or dried nori, which contain B12.)

    Otherwise, no, you don’t need to use a protein shake or branched chain amino acid powder—but they can make it a whole lot easier to get your protein in. Otherwise, 150 grams of protein a day (without just oodles of carbs) can be overwhelming.

    The ideal ratio of vegan protein sources
    David was a bodybuilder before he went vegan. In fact, he was “a total meathead.” His transition to vegan bodybuilding was simple: replace meat with meat substitutes. He is a “big proponent of tempeh” and usually advises his clients to eat two whole foods meals (like black beans and veggies or lentil soup), one meat substitute meal (like tacos with beefless ground), and one or two shakes.

    Zinchenko encourages vegan lifters to “err on the side of caution” and eat about 50 percent of your protein from legumes (beans, peas, soy, etc.), 25 percent from grains, and 25 percent from nuts and seeds to make sure you’re getting adequate amounts of the necessary amino acids.

    Meal timing
    “The most recent recommendations clarify not just how many grams of protein you should eat, but also how those grams are pulsed throughout the day,” Pojednic says. “Scientists are thinking now that there’s only a certain amount of protein your muscles can uptake and utilize in one sitting. If you flood your system with amino acids, at some point they’re a little bit wasted.”

    Aim to get 0.25 and 0.4 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per meal. Or, to put it way simpler, space out your protein over 3 or 4 meals a day, not just all at once in a mega smoothie.

    The other science-backed tip is to make sure you’re eating 20-30 grams of protein within 30 minutes (up to an hour is probably fine) of training. “The literature shows that ingesting both protein and carbs in that window promotes muscle growth and recovery, which helps you stay up on your training regimen.” Yes, that can be a protein shake—but it can also be a peanut butter sandwich.

    The science is a little bit muddier for eating before and during training. Pojednic says to go with your preference, and how much food you want in your digestive tract while you’re doing heavy squats. Overloading your G.I. system is particularly easy for vegans, whose foods contain so much fiber. You can definitely get a tummy ache from eating a salad before training, because all the blood is “shunted away” from your digestive organs in favor of, say, your quads. If you don’t want to eat before training, but want to make sure you’ve got enough sugar in your system to get the most out of your workout, Pojednic recommends fruit juice.

    But the most crucial aspects of gaining muscle have nothing to do with being vegan.
    It’s not all about getting enough amino acids. You’ve got to eat enough calories to gain mass, and you’ve got to train hard. Farris, who went plant-based in November 2014 (between Olympics appearances), is a world-class athlete who happens to be vegan—and he doesn’t track his protein at all. Still, he was able to “make some gains and, more importantly, stay healthy.” He says a vegan diet has let him recover faster. “If you can do that, you can do more work. You can beat your body up more. Simply, just train.”

    (It’s worth noting that part of the reason Farris had no qualms about changing his diet while in a high point of his career was because he spent his prime lifting years (19-22) gaining strength without reliable access to any type of food at all. “If I could lift and do it all when I didn’t have access to regular meals, how was I going to get weaker eating enough food but switching out the ingredients?”)

    In case that doesn’t drive the point home, know that every single person I spoke to for this article mentioned the importance of simply eating enough food.

    “A big problem for vegans is that they can easily under eat,” Zinchenko says. “Especially active people who eat a lot of whole foods. Without calories, your body can’t make muscle.”

    “The main thing is high-volume weight training and getting adequate nutrients,” David says. “That’s it. There are no shortcuts. The harder you hit it, the more you feed it, the more it will grow.” (I believe we were talking about butts at this point in the conversation.)

    “Obviously diet is going to give you that tiny push at the end, but the training and the dedication is really what’s going matter in the long term for high-level athletes,” Polojic says.

    Oh, and for what it’s worth, we sorely need more research on vegans. “Even the studies that examine vegan protein powders are not done on vegans,” Zinchenko says. “If there is somebody who would like to donate money to study vegan muscle growth, I would be happy to run the study.”

    sauce https://www.popsci.com/vegan-diet-we...QaOafXU#page-3
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    4 Spices That Enhance Your Workout Recovery!

    Consistency is crucial in the weight room and the kitchen. For example, to get bigger and stronger, you'll probably need to perform some of the same exercises over and over again. In your diet, eating variations on the same dishes can help you keep your nutritional plan airtight and your meal prep straightforward.

    Sticking to the same monotonous flavors can leave you dreading the meal to come, however. Adding spice is the easiest way to breathe new life into the same old food! And not only are these spices delicious and calorie-free, they've been shown to have a beneficial impact on body composition and performance.

    Is your spice rack up to date? If not, add these four to your grocery list!

    1. Turmeric
    Turmeric is a plant native to Southeast Asia, and it's a staple in many Indian dishes. Beyond the unique savory flavor it provides, this golden spice has a rich history of providing many health benefits, which is why it's been used in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-4-spices-you-need-buy-today-1b-700xh.jpg

    One possible benefit that has gotten a lot of press in recent years is turmeric's anti-inflammatory properties. It's purported that turmeric can help to alleviate muscle soreness and also lessen the stress response to exercise. A study published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition provided turmeric to cyclists undergoing exhaustive exercise and found that those taking the turmeric had significantly lower levels of stress and inflammatory markers upon completion of the exhaustive bouts.

    Furthermore, a study done in rats found that those supplementing with turmeric showed significantly less muscle damage following a muscle-damaging exercise protocol.

    Spice it up: Try adding ground turmeric powder to curry dishes or stews, frittatas or scrambles, and all things grains and veggies.

    2. Cinnamon
    Cinnamon is one of the world's great spices, not only for its flavor, but also its ability to turn up the flavor in both sweet and savory dishes. But this potent brown powder also delivers a slew of benefits that may just help you present your best beach body yet.

    For one, cinnamon has a profound impact on glucose control. This is related to high levels of the bioactive compound methylhydroxychalcone polymer (MHCP), which provides an insulin-mimicking effect. When you eat cinnamon, several enzymatic reactions are triggered that ultimately lead to prolonged digestion and slower entry of glucose into the blood

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-4-spices-you-need-buy-today-2-700xh.jpg

    Ingesting 3-6 grams of cinnamon has been shown to have a positive impact on blood glucose levels following a meal, as well as significantly delaying gastric emptying rates. Although it hasn't been shown to directly influence satiety, a slower digestion rate may keep you from snacking in between meals.

    Spice it up: Cinnamon tastes great on just about anything. Throw it in your morning smoothie, protein shake, or oats, sprinkle it atop Greek yogurt, or even mix it into your ground turkey.

    3. Cayenne Pepper
    Cayenne pepper is part of the Capsicum annuum family, which makes it a relative of paprika, bell peppers, and jalapenos. You may know that this bright red powder provides intense flavor, but it can kick up your fat-loss efforts.

    The active ingredient in cayenne pepper is capsaicin. Capsaicin has been shown to increase energy expenditure and fat oxidation via increase in sympathetic (nervous system) activity. No wonder it's a staple ingredient in plenty of contemporary fat-burning supplements!

    The capsaicin content of cayenne pepper varies greatly, but it's thought to be between 0.1-60.0 milligrams per gram of capsaicin. Based on these numbers, it's estimated that a single tablespoon may contain between 0.8-480 milligrams of capsaicin. Most studies examining the impact of capsaicin have used a teaspoon or less.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-4-spices-you-need-buy-today-3-700xh.jpg

    A study published in the Public Library of Science (PLOS) found favorable and significant changes in the rate of fat oxidation and total calorie balance in subjects supplementing with just 2.56 milligrams of capsaicin at each meal during a one-day period.

    Furthermore, supplementing with capsaicin has been shown to maintain a higher rate of reliance on fat as fuel coming out of a diet. In a study published in the British Journal of Nutrition, 91 individuals underwent a four-week very-low-calorie diet, followed by a three-month maintenance period. During the maintenance period, half of the subjects took 135 milligrams of supplemental capsaicin per day. Subjects taking the capsaicin maintained higher levels of fat oxidation throughout the three-month maintenance period compared to those not taking capsaicin.

    Spice it up: Add cayenne to any cooked protein, stew, soup, or egg dish you make, but be warned that the heat is strong and can vary by brand or age. Start with a little, and assess your tolerance before piling it on.

    4. Ginger
    Ginger is a pungent spice that has a distinctive and instantly recognizable flavor. In root form, it comes shaped like a tree trunk, with a pale brown exterior and fibrous, slightly yellow interior. Native to many Asian countries, its culinary use spans the continent, but this root has been used in folk medicine for decades—and for good reason! One of its many health benefits is its anti-inflammatory effect.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-4-spices-you-need-buy-today-4-700xh.jpg

    In a study published in The Journal of Pain, researchers looked at the impact of consuming 2 grams of ginger daily on reducing muscle soreness following a bout of 18 eccentric-focused exercises. The supplementation group reported less muscle soreness compared to the placebo group throughout the next 24 hours.

    If you're new to training, or starting a new exercise routine, experiencing delayed-onset muscle soreness will be inevitable. But adding ginger to your nutritional routine may help you get back into the gym sooner rather than later.

    Spice it up: Ginger is available both in its fresh root form or powdered form. When working with the root version, it can be stored peeled in the fridge, wrapped in a wet paper towel, for up to three weeks.

    Powdered ginger can be stored in your spice cabinet, but many people find the flavor of the fresh item superior. Try blending fresh ginger in your stir-fry, soup, or if you're feeling spicy, a smoothie or protein shake!

    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...tent_nutrition
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    What is the true cost of eating meat?

    What are the economics of meat?


    Food and farming is one of the biggest economic sectors in the world. We are no longer in the 14th century, when as much as 76% of the population worked in agriculture – but farming still employs more than 26% of all workers globally. And that does not include the people who work along the meat supply chain: the slaughterers, packagers, retailers and chefs.

    In 2016, the world’s meat production was estimated at 317m metric tons, and that is expected to continue to grow. Figures for the value of the global meat industry vary wildly from $90bn to as much as $741bn.

    Although the number of people directly employed by farming is currently less than 2% in the UK, the food chain now includes the agribusiness companies, the retailers, and the entertainment sector. According to the UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, in 2014 the food and drink manufacturing sector contributed £27bn to the economy, and employed 3.8 million people.

    It is not simple to separate out the contribution that meat production makes to this – particularly globally. The UN Food and Agriculture Organisation states that livestock is about 40% of the global value of agricultural output and supports the livelihoods and food security of almost a 1.3 billion people.

    What about animal welfare?
    In Britain we’ve been regulating animal welfare since the slightly unfortunately named “Humanity Dick” (real name Richard Martin) got the Cruel and Improper treatment of cattle bill passed in 1822.

    But the idea of animal welfare and animal rights remains a hugely controversial one. In 1975 philosopher Peter Singer argued in Animal Liberation that the boundary between humans and animals is completely arbitrary. Although campaign groups such as the RSPCA (founded in the 19th century) had long been trying to improve animal welfare, Singer’s book arguably kicked off the modern animal rights movement.

    The result of much campaigning and pressure has been a number of regulations. In 1998 the European commission passed a directive which stated that all animals kept for farming purposes must reflect the “five freedoms” - freedom from hunger and thirst; discomfort; pain; injury and disease; fear and distress, and freedom to express normal behaviour. In 2009 the Lisbon treaty recognised animals as sentient beings.

    In 2012 an international group of scientists met at Cambridge University to sign (in the presences of Stephen Hawking) the Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness, which declared that “the weight of evidence indicates that humans are not unique in possessing the neurological substrates that generate consciousness. Non-human animals, including all mammals and birds, and many other creatures including octopuses, also possess these neurological substrates”.

    Globally OIE, the World Organisation for Animal Health, has a number of standards.
    What about its cultural and social importance?

    Cooked meat may have been partially responsible for the large brains that characterise **** sapiens and have put humans where we are now. Cooking made calories from meat (and from vegetables) easier to consume and absorb than in a raw form.

    And the domestication of certain animals – along with the domestication of wild grains and vegetables – marked the beginning of human agricultural history in the “fertile crescent”. Throughout human history the hunting and farming of meat has been part of our stories and mythologies and some of our legal and religious systems; the fatted calf for the prodigal son; the medieval forest laws that created areas where no one but English royalty could hunt; the sacrifical sheep to mark the beginning of Eid Al-Adha; even the roasted wild boars consumed at the end of every adventure by Asterix and Obelix.

    But is meat still crucial to human life? Some argue that, just because we’ve always eaten meat, that doesn’t mean we always have to. If we can get all the dietary nutrients and protein that we need elsewhere, should we?

    How has meat production changed?

    The old-fashioned vision of a mixed farm with wheat and chickens and pigs still exists. More than half of the farms in the US, for example, were small enough in 2012 to have sales of less than $10,000 dollars. But the 20th century saw the application of the principles of the industrial revolution to agriculture - how could inputs be minimised and profits be maximised?

    The result was the factory farm, first for chickens, then pigs, and more recently cattle. Producers discovered that animals could be kept inside, and fed grain, and could be bred to grow more quickly and get fatter in the right places. Since 1925, the average days to market for a US chicken has been reduced from 112 to 48, while its weight has ballooned from a market weight of 2.5 pounds to 6.2.

    Pig and cattle farming has followed suit. Sows are held in gestation crates for up to four weeks once they are pregnant, and then put into farrowing crates once they’ve had their piglets to prevent them accidentally crushing their young. Industrially reared pigs spend their lives in indoor pens. Cattle farming is now being similarly streamlined, with cows in the last few months of their lives being fattened in feedlots with no access to grass and sometimes no shelter.

    What impact does meat have on human health?
    There are a number of concerns about the impacts of industrial meat production on our own health, beyond the environmental issues. Bacterial infections that can be transmitted to humans, such as salmonella and campylobacter, can spread through large farms. The ability of these pathogens to enter the environment around farms and slaughterhouses, and to make humans ill, is a major modern worry.

    Although there is a problematic shortage of research into the link between antibiotic use in animals and the growing problem of antibiotic resistance in humans, scientists and policymakers agree that it is a significant part of the problem. The volumes here are large: in the US it’s been estimated that 80% of all antibiotics go to farm animals. When Jim O’Neill, the chair of a UK independent review on antimicrobial resistance, published his recommendations for action, reducing unnecessary use of antimicrobials in agriculture was the third item on his list.
    What is the environmental impact of our current farming model?

    It is extremely difficult to separate out the different impacts of different farming models and types. Many measurements look at agricultural impact without making a distinction between arable v livestock, or industrial v small farms. However, the following information begins to indicate the scale of the problem.

    Water use
    An influential study in 2010 of the water footprints for meat estimated that while vegetables had a footprint of about 322 litres per kg, and fruits drank up 962, meat was far more thirsty: chicken came in at 4,325l/kg, pork at 5,988l/kg, sheep/goat meat at 8,763l/kg, and beef at a stupendous 15,415l/kg. Some non-meat products were also pretty eye-watering: nuts came in at 9,063l/kg.

    To put these figures into context: the planet faces growing water constraints as our freshwater reservoirs and aquifers dry up. On some estimates farming accounts for about 70% of water used in the world today, but a 2013 study found that it uses up to 92% of our freshwater, with nearly one-third of that related to animal products.

    Water pollution
    Farms contribute to water pollution in a range of ways: some of those are associated more closely with arable farming, and some with livestock, but it’s worth remembering that one-third of the world’s grain is now fed to animals. The FAO believes that the livestock sector, which is growing and intensifying faster than crop production, has “serious implications” for water quality.

    The types of water pollution include: nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus from fertilisers and animal excreta); pesticides; sediment; organic matter (oxygen demanding substances such as plant matter and livestock excreta); pathogens (E coli etc); metals (selenium etc) and emerging pollutants (drug residues, hormones and feed additives).

    The impacts are wide-reaching. Eutrophication is caused by excesses of nutrients and organic matter (animal faeces, leftover feed and crop residues) – which cause algae and plants to grow excessively and use up all the oxygen in the body of wate at the expense of other species. A review in 2015 identified 415 coastal bodies already suffering these problems. Pesticide pollution can kill weeds and insects away from the agricultural area, with impacts that may be felt all the way up the food chain. And although scientists do not yet have full data on the connection between antibiotic use in animals and rising levels of antibiotic resistance in the human population, water pollution by antibiotics (which continue to have an active life even after going through the animal and into the water) is definitely in the frame.

    Land use and deforestation
    Livestock is the world’s largest user of land resources, says the FAO, “with grazing land and cropland dedicated to the production of feed representing almost 80% of all agricultural land. Feed crops are grown in one-third of total cropland, while the total land area occupied by pasture is equivalent to 26% of the ice-free terrestrial surface”.

    Climate change
    It’s hard to work out exactly what quantity of greenhouse gases (GHG) is emitted by the meat industry from farm to fork; carbon emissions are not officially counted along entire chains in that way, and so a number of complicated studies and calculations have attempted to fill the gap.

    According to the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, agriculture, forestry and other land use accounts for 24% of greenhouse gases. Attempts to pick out the role of animal farming within that have come up with a huge range of numbers, from 6-32%: the difference, according to the Meat Atlas, “depends on the basis of measurement”. Should it just be livestock, or should it include a whole lot of other factors? Different models of farming have different levels of emissions: this has generated an energetic discussion around extensive versus intensive farming, and regenerative farming – a model that aims to combine technologies and techniques to regenerate soils and biodiversity levels while also sequestrating carbon.

    What about the giant companies that dominate the sector? A 2017 landmark studyfound that the top three meat firms – JBS, Cargill and Tyson – emitted more greenhouse gases in 2016 than all of France.

    What next?

    Some argue that veganism is the only sane way forward. A study last year showed, for example, that if all Americans substituted beans for beef, the country would be close to meeting the greenhouse gas goals agreed by Barack Obama.

    But there are some alternatives. Reducing the amount of meat you eat while improving its quality is advocated by many environmental groups. But where do you find this meat? The organic movement was founded on the pioneering work of Sir Alfred Howard. It is still relatively small - in Europe 5.7% of agricultural land is - but influential. There are other agricultural models, such as biodynamic farming and permaculture. More recently some innovators have been fusing technology with environmental principles in the form of agroforestry, silvopasture, , or regenerative agriculture to create farming methods which all encompass carbon sequestration, high biodiversity and good animal welfare. A recent study showed that managed grazing (a technique which involves moving cows around to graze) is an . However, while organic and biodynamic meats have labels, regenerative farming, as yet, does not - so you need to investigate your farmer yourself.

    Further reading

    The UN Food and Agricultural Organisation has a huge collection of data, and has also published some crucial reports on this issue, including the groundbreaking Livestock’s long shadow.

    sauce and links in the article https://www.theguardian.com/news/201...unzNJ1e4bb_gnU
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  25. #1825
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    One of the most influential and powerful endorsements for plant-based diets by the Lancelot Medical Journal to save the planet and feed the earth’s population. Yes, we’re on the right track!



    Seven dietary changes to protect your health – and the planet

    Consider a diet that can prolong your life and, at the same time, feed a growing global population without causing further damage to the environment.

    That’s just what 37 scientists from 16 countries (the EAT-Lancet Commission) did for two years. Their findings resulted in recommendations for a healthy diet that can feed the world’s population from sustainable food systems and were published on Thursday in the medical journal The Lancet.

    They recognize that food production needs to nourish human health and support environmental sustainability; currently, our food systems are threatening both. Strong evidence indicates that livestock farming is one of the biggest drivers of climate change, biodiversity loss, land degradation, water use and chemical pollution.

    The “planetary-health diet,” largely plant-based and low in red meat and sugar, is estimated to feed 10 billion people by 2050 from sustainable food systems. The researchers also believe it will prevent 11 million premature deaths a year caused by an unhealthy diet.

    WHAT’S IN THE DIET?
    Daily protein comes mostly from plants including beans, lentils, soy and nuts. Whole grains, not refined, are included, and fruits and vegetables fill half of your plate at meals.

    The recommended 2,500-calorie diet doesn’t completely eliminate animal foods. It can include, each day, one half-ounce of red meat, one ounce each of fish and poultry and one cup of milk or yogurt. One to five eggs can be eaten a week.

    Plant-based oils are substituted for animal fats and added sugars are limited to 31 g a day, in line with the WHO recommendation for sweeteners.

    IS IT FEASIBLE?
    The planetary-health diet is a huge shift from the way we eat. But eating this way isn’t completely foreign.

    The traditional Mediterranean diet of the early 1960s was largely plant-based and contained only 35 g of red meat and poultry combined each day. Many traditional diets (e.g., West Africa, India, Mexico and parts of Asia) contain lots of plant protein and little meat or dairy.

    Some people, though, feel that achieving this global diet isn’t feasible.

    Not today; that’s for sure. Reaching these dietary targets by 2050, the EAT-Lancet Commission points out, will require policies that encourage healthier food choices, agriculture sustainability, stricter rules around governing of land and oceans and reducing food waste.

    TRANSITIONING TO A SUSTAINABLE DIET AT HOME
    In the meantime, there are small steps you can take on an individual level to move toward the planetary-health diet.

    Replace meat with pulses. Substitute cooked brown or green lentils for half of the ground meat in meatloaf, meatballs, burgers, shepherd’s pie, stuffed peppers and marinara sauces.

    Replace some of the meat in tacos and burritos with black beans or pinto beans. Reduce the amount of meat in chili and add extra kidney beans or chickpeas. Eventually, replace all of the meat with beans or lentils.

    Replace cheese in sandwiches with hummus.

    Use nuts to replace meat. Add almonds or cashews to a vegetable stir-fry instead of beef or chicken. For lunch, have a nut-butter sandwich instead of ham or turkey.

    Boost plant protein at meals by tossing toasted nuts or pumpkins seeds into greens salads.

    Set a target. Determine how many meatless meals you’ll eat each week and then build on that. Vegetarian chili, tofu stir-fry, salad with edamame, bean burgers, chickpea curry and lentil soup are protein- and nutrient-packed lunches and dinners.

    Include plant-based breakfasts, too. Try a smoothie made with fruit, greens and soy or pea milk, whole grain toast with almond butter, oatmeal topped with nuts and berries, quinoa or millet porridge or scrambled tofu.

    Pack in produce. Eat a mix of fruits and vegetables, at least five servings a day (one serving is one-half cup of cooked or raw vegetables, a half-cup of berries or one medium fruit). One-half of each meal should consist of these foods.

    Consider your snacks. Making snacks 100-per-cent plant-based is an easy step to take. Choose fruit and nuts, homemade trail mix, vegetables and hummus, whole grain crackers with nut butter, soy/pea milk smoothies or soy lattes.

    Rethink restaurants. You’ll find a variety of plant-based options at restaurants that specialize in ethnic cuisines such as Indian, Middle Eastern, Mexican, Japanese and Chinese.

    Or, pick a plant-based restaurant near you and when travelling.

    Reduce food waste. Shop for, store and repurpose foods to minimize waste at home. Avoid buying in bulk; purchase only what you need whenever possible.

    Buy “ugly produce,” misshapen fruits and vegetables often thrown away by farmers and grocery stores. Use vegetable scraps to make soup stock.

    Store leftovers at the front of the fridge so you don’t forget them; eat within three or four days.


    sauce https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life..._Ppz3dDaAe3buE
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  26. #1826
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    Deadly meat recalls spiked by 83 percent since 2013

    Factory farms continue to poison the American food supply, including romaine lettuce and spinach which are tainted with pathogens by animal waste.

    Government recalls of Class 1 meat products has increased by 83 percent from 2013 to 2018, according to a new report by consumer watchdog organization Public Interest Research Group (PIRG). The report link , which is based on USDA and FDA data, describes this category of animal products as “a health hazard situation in which there is a reasonable probability that eating the food will cause health problems or death.” The report also revealed that recalls of all meat products have increased by 67 percent, with beef recalls up by 55 percent, pork recalls by 67 percent, and poultry recalls up by 70 percent since 2013. PIRG also identified that recalls of certain vegetable crops, such as romaine lettuce and spinach, are on the rise due to poor sanitation standards at factory farms, also known as concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). “These [contaminants] can spread beyond the CAFO to nearby produce farms as runoff from animal waste from cattle operations can contaminate irrigation water for clean crops and cause contamination,” the report stated.

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/1/deadly-me...OYHAUmPx324Gs0
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  27. #1827
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    I recently tried the Ikea vegan hotdog. The new plant-based frank costs 75 cents and is served with mustard, red cabbage and fried onions. It was pretty good... almost as good as their chickpea-based version of the iconic Swedish meatball, dubbed veggie balls. I'll give it


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-13244689_10153455663227554_1283001653016843365_n.jpg


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-50323426_2302117413366030_7063652830187356160_n.jpg


    It's been a year since our last Ikea visit. I swear that there are real people actually living in those condo displays.
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  28. #1828
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    Canada’s revamped Food Guide has finally caught up with scientific evidence

    Three years ago, when the federal government asked Canadians about their needs and expectations for their national food guide, I offered a wish list of changes in my column. Turns out, my wishes were granted this week when Health Canada revealed its overhauled Canada’s Food Guide.

    This version has caught up with scientific evidence on diet and health. Here’s why.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-dw951i9.jpg

    Easy to understand. The guide’s dietary recommendations aren’t complicated. Eat a variety of healthy foods each day. Have plenty of fruits and vegetables. Eat protein foods. Choose whole-grain foods. Make water your drink of choice.

    The picture on the front of the guide, a photograph of real food on a plate (not illustrated foods on a rainbow) is also effective. The message is pretty simple: Fill half of your plate with vegetables and fruits, one-quarter with protein and one-quarter with whole grains.

    Whole foods, not nutrients. The Food Guide now directs people to whole foods, and has done away with recommending a certain number of daily food-group servings to meet nutrient needs (e.g., calcium from dairy, iron from meat).

    Eating the right foods instead of fussing over individual nutrients is the way to go, because if you base your diet on whole foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans and lentils, fish, lean meat, yogurt and so on, you’re going to be consuming plenty of nutrients.

    Since 2007, nutrition research has taught us that it’s the overall pattern of our diet that matters when it comes to health.

    No more focus on meat. The decision to replace nutrient-based food groups with groupings of foods (e.g., protein foods versus “Meat and Alternatives”) has removed the emphasis on meat.

    Lean meat is included as one of the guide’s protein foods (along with fish, eggs, dairy, beans, lentils and nuts), but it’s no longer the main attraction. And that’s a good thing.

    High intakes of red meat have been tied to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and colorectal cancer. Eating more protein from plants compared to meat, on the other hand, has been associated with a lower risk of premature death from cardiovascular disease.

    Downsizing the importance of meat in the diet also reflects findings from environmental research on optimal food choices.

    Advice on highly processed foods. The revised guide recommends that we don’t eat processed or prepared foods and beverages on a regular basis, to avoid consuming too much added sugar, sodium and saturated fat.

    That’s important advice since our increasing reliance on ready-to-eat, ready-to-drink and ready-to-heat highly processed foods has been correlated with higher obesity rates, metabolic syndrome and unhealthy blood-cholesterol levels.

    Thanks to their high content of unhealthy fats, sugars, salt and other additives, highly processed foods are intensely palatable, which can make them habit-forming. Plus, they’re low in or lacking fibre, protective phytochemicals and vitamins and minerals that whole foods contain.

    Includes advice on how to eat. Over the past several decades, the way we purchase and prepare foods has dramatically changed. We eat more meals away from home, we spend less time cooking and we eat too many processed, packaged foods.

    The implications: unhealthy diets, missed opportunities for kids to gain cooking skills and knowledge, and the decline of family meals, which have been associated with nutritional and psychosocial benefits for children.

    For the first time, Canada’s Food Guide strongly makes the important point that “healthy eating is more than the foods you eat.” It’s also about the context in which we eat.

    Advice to “be mindful of your eating habits,” “cook more often,” “enjoy your food,” “eat meals with others,” “use food labels” and “be aware of food marketing” encourage food skills that support healthy eating.

    Health Canada has committed to stay on top of the evidence to ensure that our food guidance is continually relevant. We shouldn’t have to wait another 12 years for an update.

    sauce https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life...FfFHAepPVKyWu0
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  29. #1829
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    Gluten Is Perfectly Fine for the Vast Majority of People
    There’s almost no proof that going gluten-free will do the average person any favors.


    By some estimates, roughly one in three Americans is actively trying to cut back on gluten, and gluten-free foods are now a $5-billion industry. Those are pretty stupefying figures when you consider there’s almost no proof that going gluten-free will do the average person any favors. In fact, most of the research to date suggests gluten-free diets are unhealthy.

    “The low-gluten fad can cause harm, and there is no evidence of a benefit unless someone has evidence of an allergy to gluten, as in celiac disease,” says Walter Willett, a professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health.

    Celiac disease is an inherited autoimmune disorder that affects less than one percent of the population—a rate that seems to be holding steady, not climbing, according to a 2016 study in JAMA Internal Medicine. For celiac patients, eating gluten can cause symptoms ranging from abdominal pain and vomiting to seizures. A blood test can confirm if you have the disease.

    A small percentage of people—perhaps up to five percent of the population—may have a condition known as non-Celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), says Alessio Fasano, director of the Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General Hospital. For these people, gluten seems to cause some of the same symptoms that turn up among celiac patients. But NCGS is controversial; not all gut experts are convinced it’s a real condition, and there’s currently no test to confirm whether a person has it.

    Whether or not NCGS is legit, nutrition researchers agree that the vast majority of Americans don’t have any gluten-related issues. For these people, cutting out gluten is more likely to do harm than good. “We have seen that people who do not have celiac disease, but who [do] have low gluten intake tend to have higher risk of type 2 diabetes,” Willett says, citing some of his own research. Another recent study concluded that avoiding gluten could raise a healthy adult’s risk for heart disease. Gluten-free diets may cause these and other issues because they steer people away from nutrient- and fiber-rich whole grains and toward less-healthy alternatives, Willett says.

    “Gluten-free foods are not inherently healthy, and a lot of these commercially-produced gluten-free foods are not good for you by and large,” adds Joseph Murray, a gastroenterologist and professor of medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Murray says that, even for patients with celiac, he advises caution when it comes to buying gluten-free packaged products. And like Willett, he says missing out on whole grains is a big concern associated with gluten avoidance.

    While it may come as a surprise to those who buy the current low-carb hype, whole grain foods have established health benefits. Two large long-term 2015 studies found people who eat heavy amounts of whole grains enjoy significantly lower rates of heart disease and mortality. More evidence suggests eating whole grains lowers your risk for diabetes and some forms of cancer. There’s also a wealth of data backing the benefits of Mediterranean-style diets. While olive oil and fish draw most of the focus when it comes to healthy Mediterranean eating, these plans are traditionally high in whole grains.

    Apart from being packed with vitamins, whole grains are great sources of fiber—a type of carbohydrate that feeds healthy gut bacteria and supports digestion. “There’s just this huge spectrum of health benefits associated with high fiber intakes, and whole grains are one of the best and most-affordable sources of fiber,” says Wendy Dahl, an associate professor of food science and human nutrition at the University of Florida. Research shows the average American is already woefully deficient when it comes to fiber. And gluten-free eating is likely contributing to this issue. “People on these anti gluten or anti grain diets—they’re cutting off the largest source of fiber from their diets,” Dahl says.

    On the other hand, there’s no doubt that many gluten-packed foods are crappy for you. Cookies, crackers, baked goods, and other heavily processed grain-based snack foods are on every dietician’s list of foods to avoid. If you tend to eat a lot of this junk, going gluten-free could steer you toward some healthier eating patterns.

    There’s also evidence that people with irritable bowel syndrome and some other gut conditions can reduce their symptoms by cutting out some short-chain carbohydrates known as FODMAPs. Since many gluten-containing foods also contain these short-chain carbs, it’s a certainty that some people who cut out gluten are going to feel a bit better. “They benefit, but not from life without gluten,” says Peter Gibson, a professor of gastroenterology at Monash University in Australia. Some of Gibson’s research has shown that people with non-Celiac gluten sensitivity who cut out FODMAPs felt a lot better, while removing gluten from their diets—without their knowing it—didn’t make much difference. He says a low-FODMAP diet would benefit these people more and would not be as restrictive as a gluten-free diet.

    But let’s not muddy the waters. The case for or against eating gluten is pretty straight-forward: If you’re dealing with chronic gut pain, diarrhea, unexplained weight loss, or other symptoms that suggest a GI disorder, talk with your doctor. He or she may determine that a gluten-free diet is for you. If you’re not experiencing those symptoms, there is no reason to avoid gluten.

    sauce https://tonic.vice.com/en_us/article...d8FKmgNeaQvuSU
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  30. #1830
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    ... the Super Bowl



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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-51041705_2479004065447607_4590165307401699328_n.jpg
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    Name:  50663790_1225674370931540_802873114407993344_n.jpg
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  34. #1834
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    Things are changing! Canada's revised food guide emphasizes eating plants, drinking water and cooking at home. When picking proteins, the food guide suggests eating plant-based proteins, like legumes, beans, and tofu more often than those from animal sources, like dairy, eggs, meat and fish.


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  35. #1835
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  36. #1836
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    When We Eat, or Don’t Eat, May Be Critical for Health

    A growing body of research suggests that our bodies function optimally when we align our eating patterns with our circadian rhythms.

    Nutrition scientists have long debated the best diet for optimal health. But now some experts believe that it’s not just what we eat that’s critical for good health, but when we eat it.

    A growing body of research suggests that our bodies function optimally when we align our eating patterns with our circadian rhythms, the innate 24-hour cycles that tell our bodies when to wake up, when to eat and when to fall asleep. Studies show that chronically disrupting this rhythm — by eating late meals or nibbling on midnight snacks, for example — could be a recipe for weight gain and metabolic trouble.

    That is the premise of a new book, “The Circadian Code,” by Satchin Panda, a professor at the Salk Institute and an expert on circadian rhythms research. Dr. Panda argues that people improve their metabolic health when they eat their meals in a daily 8- to 10-hour window, taking their first bite of food in the morning and their last bite early in the evening.

    This approach, known as early time-restricted feeding, stems from the idea that human metabolism follows a daily rhythm, with our hormones, enzymes and digestive systems primed for food intake in the morning and afternoon. Many people, however, snack and graze from roughly the time they wake up until shortly before they go to bed. Dr. Panda has found in his research that the average person eats over a 15-hour or longer period each day, starting with something like milk and coffee shortly after rising and ending with a glass of wine, a late night meal or a handful of chips, nuts or some other snack shortly before bed.

    That pattern of eating, he says, conflicts with our biological rhythms.

    Scientists have long known that the human body has a master clock in the brain, located in the hypothalamus, that governs our sleep-wake cycles in response to bright light exposure. A couple of decades ago, researchers discovered that there is not just one clock in the body but a collection of them. Every organ has an internal clock that governs its daily cycle of activity.

    During the day, the pancreas increases its production of the hormone insulin, which controls blood sugar levels, and then slows it down at night. The gut has a clock that regulates the daily ebb and flow of enzymes, the absorption of nutrients and the removal of waste. The communities of trillions of bacteria that comprise the microbiomes in our guts operate on a daily rhythm as well. These daily rhythms are so ingrained that they are programmed in our DNA: Studies show that in every organ, thousands of genes switch on and switch off at roughly the same time every day.

    “We’ve inhabited this planet for thousands of years, and while many things have changed, there has always been one constant: Every single day the sun rises and at night it falls,” Dr. Panda said. “We’re designed to have 24-hour rhythms in our physiology and metabolism. These rhythms exist because, just like our brains need to go to sleep each night to repair, reset and rejuvenate, every organ needs to have down time to repair and reset as well.”

    Most of the evidence in humans suggests that consuming the bulk of your food earlier in the day is better for your health, said Dr. Courtney Peterson, an assistant professor in the department of nutrition sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Dozens of studies demonstrate that blood sugar control is best in the morning and at its worst in the evening. We burn more calories and digest food more efficiently in the morning as well.

    At night, the lack of sunlight prompts the brain to release melatonin, which prepares us for sleep. Eating late in the evening sends a conflicting signal to the clocks in the rest of the body that it’s still daytime, said Dr. Peterson.

    “If you’re constantly eating at a time of day when you’re not getting bright light exposure, then the different clock systems become out of sync,” she said. “It’s like one clock is in the time zone of Japan and the other is in the U.S. It gives your metabolism conflicting signals about whether to rev up or rev down.”

    Most people know what happens when we disrupt the central clock in our brains by flying across multiple time zones or burning the midnight oil: Fatigue, jet lag and brain fog set in. Eating at the wrong time of day places similar strain on the organs involved in digestion, forcing them to work when they are programmed to be dormant, which can increase the risk of disease, said Paolo Sassone-Corsi, the director of the Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism at the University of California, Irvine.

    “It’s well known that by changing or disrupting our normal daily cycles, you increase your risk of many pathologies,” said Dr. Sassone-Corsi, who recently published a paper on the interplay between nutrition, metabolism and circadian rhythms.

    A classic example of this is shift workers, who account for about 20 percent of the country’s work force. Many frequently work overnight shifts, forcing them to eat and sleep at odd times. Nighttime shift work is linked to obesity, diabetes, some cancers and heart disease. While socioeconomic factors are likely to play a role, studies suggest that circadian disruption can directly lead to poor health.

    In one experiment, scientists found that assigning healthy adults to delay their bedtimes and wake up later than normal for 10 days — throwing their circadian rhythms and their eating patterns out of sync — raised their blood pressure and impaired their insulin and blood sugar control. Another study found that forcing people to stay up late just a few nights in a row resulted in quick weight gain and reduced insulin sensitivity, changes linked to diabetes.

    In 2012, Dr. Panda and his colleagues at the Salk Institute took genetically identical mice and split them into two groups. One had round-the-clock access to high-fat, high-sugar foods. The other ate the same foods but in an eight-hour daily window. Despite both groups consuming the same amount of calories, the mice that ate whenever they wanted got fat and sick while the mice on the time-restricted regimen did not: They were protected from obesity, fatty liver and metabolic disease.

    Inspired by this research, Dr. Peterson conducted a tightly controlled experiment in a small group of prediabetic men. In one phase of the study, the subjects ate their meals in a 12-hour daily window for five weeks. In the other phase, they were fed the same meals in a six-hour window beginning each morning. The researchers had the subjects eat enough food to maintain their weight so they could assess whether the time-restricted regimen had any health benefits unrelated to weight loss.

    It did. On the time-restricted regimen, the men had lower insulin, reduced levels of oxidative stress, less nighttime hunger and significantly lower blood pressure. Their systolic pressure, the top number, fell by roughly 11 points, and their diastolic pressure dropped by 10 points.

    “It was a pretty large effect,” Dr. Peterson said. “It was exciting but also shocking.”

    While studies suggest that eating earlier in the day is optimal for metabolic health, it does not necessarily mean that you should skip dinner. It might, however, make sense to make your dinners relatively light. One group of researchers in Israel found in studies that overweight adults lost more weight and had greater improvements in blood sugar, insulin and cardiovascular risk factors when they ate a large breakfast, modest lunch and small dinner compared to the opposite: A small breakfast and a large dinner. Dr. Peterson said it confirms an age-old adage: Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince and dinner like a pauper.
    sauce: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/24/w...mentsContainer

    I’m wondering how the study would have resulted had women been studied as well?

    I also wonder if it applies to people that work shift work? I spent the first several years of my career working shifts and 12hr shifts... it affected my sleep and weight.

    An interesting article though
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  37. #1837
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    GREAT GUT HEALTH, NO BONES ABOUT IT

    As the gut health obsession takes the health and wellness arena by storm, many seekers of the next miracle food have turned to bone broth. But the broth, typically produced using sawed-open cow bones, is more of a horror story than the miracle medicine consumers hoped for. Great gut health is important in supporting your entire body, from your skin to your immune system. Here are 10 vegan ingredients that will help you achieve that sought-after balance in your belly.

    1. Drinking vinegars
    Drinking vinegars have exploded in popularity, but these trending beverages have health benefits, to boot. Reported to aid in digestion and help keep stomach acid levels balanced, you can count on more drinking vinegar companies like Bauman’s Best Botanicals popping up as demand grows.

    2. Sauerkraut
    Fermented foods are a key ingredient in achieving great gut health. That zesty sauerkraut that you pile on your Beyond Sausage can also offer probiotics that support healthy digestion. To be sure that your sauerkraut is the kind that contains those helpful microorganisms, look for jars with “naturally fermented” on the label.

    3. Avocado
    An important component of gut health is balancing the bacteria in our bellies. While fermented edibles such as sauerkraut deliver probiotics, one of the world’s most perfect foods—avocados—offer us the prebiotic fibers we also need for balance. So, go ahead: toss more slices on that salad, and indulge in the avo toast for breakfast. It’s for your own good health, after all!

    4. Miso
    Miso, a fermented soybean paste, has a funny way of popping up in recipes when we least expect it. It can make vegan mac and cheese magical, and has even made appearances in savory waffles. A staple of Japanese and Chinese cuisines, as a probiotic-containing fermented food, miso also provides health benefits for the gut.

    5. Blueberries
    Simple. Perfect. Bluerries. We can eat them straight from the plant or blend them into delicious icy-cold smoothies. Not only are these sweet finger foods as great raw as they are in desserts, but they are full of healthful antioxidants and phytoflavinoids, while also high in Vitamin C and potassium. And, they’re great for our gut health. A study led by University of Maine scientists provided evidence that blueberries help keep our digestive systems in great shape.

    6. Tempeh
    Another fermented soy food that offers great benefits for the gut is the protein-packed and super-versatile vegan favorite: tempeh. Whether served as smoky plant-based bacon or tossed in a salad, tempeh seems able to adjust to just about any culinary context. A 2013 study showed that this flexible food also boosts healthy bacteria in the belly.

    7. Seaweed
    About 71 percent of the Earth’s surface is water, so why should we limit ourselves to the food that grows on less than a third of the planet. Mysterious, dark, and rich tasting seaweed adds an element of the unusual to our savory dishes, while delivering a variety of health benefits. It provides vitamins and minerals, contains antioxidants, and is an excellent source of fiber, helping to keep our guts healthy. Seaweed also contains sulfated polysaccharides which are known to boost good gut bacteria. So dive in and indulge in this surprising sea food.

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2018/10/great-gu...6KQvoGWPtSWmTc
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  38. #1838
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    Good luck finding tofu on Canada's east coast


    Tofu shortages have been spreading across parts of Eastern Canada as demand for plant-based diets surge.

    At one Montreal supermarket, interest appeared to jump after the release of Health Canada’s latest Food Guide, which emphasized plant-based proteins such as beans, nuts and pulses.

    “A lot of people are getting more educated,” said Supermarché PA manager Nick Lup.

    Quebec might be the hardest hit of all provinces by a shortage, according to Nielsen market research data. The province has long been one of the biggest consumers of tofu products, with some 26 per cent of Quebecers eating it on a regular basis. Just 16 per cent enjoy tofu elsewhere in the country.

    Sales data suggests those numbers could be on the rise too. “Sales of tofu have increased by almost 20 per cent every year for the last five, six years,” said Sylvain Charlebois, Dalhousie University professor of food distribution and policy. “We don’t see how this will slow down anytime soon.”

    Quebec’s largest tofu producers are struggling to meet demand. Unisoya and Soyarie are working on increasing production by expanding factories, but Unisoya told CTV Montreal that they won’t be selling to big chains like Costco and Provigo until that process is complete. Smaller stores like Lup’s may continue to be more well-stocked during a shortage than some of Quebec’s bigger stores.

    “Grocery chains tend to demand a lot of product,” said Charlebois. “When there are back orders it will affect several stores at once.”

    sauce https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/good-l...oast-1.4278680


    Great stuff. Canada's new Food Guide says to eat more plant-based proteins, there's more demand for tofu, and the main tofu companies in Quebec are increasing their production capacity to meet demands The market is changing, this is beautiful
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    SUPER BOWL RUNS ITS FIRST PLANT-BASED BURGER COMMERCIAL

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    Carl’s Jr.’s commercial for the Beyond Famous Star will air during the Super Bowl on Sunday—marking the first time that a plant-based burger advertisement has been featured during the big game. The 30-second commercial depicts a Wild West cowboy character doing yoga on the beach while eating a Beyond Famous Star. “Yeah. I’ve seen a lot out here in the West. But a juicy charbroiled burger with a patty made from plants … Only the folks at Carl’s Jr. can pull off something that bold.” the cowboy says. “All the legendary flavor; none of the meat. When the wagon of change comes, you ride along with it.” On January 2, Carl’s Jr. added the Beyond Famous Star (which can be ordered vegan by omitting cheese and mayonnaise) to more than 1,000 locations nationwide, making it the largest fast-food chain to offer the vegan Beyond Meat patty. Marketing tactics for the Beyond Famous Star are a major pivot for the company as Carl’s Jr.’s previous Super Bowl commercials featured scantily clad women eating meat-based burgers. Last month, Carl’s Jr. became one of the first restaurants to use the Beyond Burger 2.0—a “meatier” version of Beyond Meat’s original patty.

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/2/super-bow...xRmVUuIBPhzjLs
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  40. #1840
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    Go vegan!

    Mississauga cashier stops robbery by striking suspect with banana
    Published Saturday, February 2, 2019 9:24PM EST

    A convenience store cashier in Mississauga foiled an attempted robbery Saturday night by striking the suspect with a banana, Peel Regional Police say.

    Const. Akhil Mooken says officers were called to a shop at Hurontario and John streets on Saturday night for an attempted robbery.

    Police said the cashier at the store told them that a suspect entered the store and approached the cash register.


    The employee then grabbed one of several bananas on display nearby and struck the suspect with it.

    The suspect then fled the scene on foot.

    Mooken said the employee was not injured in the encounter but was “a little shaken up.”

    Officers remained at the scene to conduct a search.

    Police often urge retail employees not to resist during robberies but this is not always followed.

    Last November, three employees of a jewelry store in Mississauga repelled armed robbers by brandishing swords.

    sauce https://www.cp24.com/mobile/news/mis...nana-1.4280548

    Yesterday on my walk downtown Toronto (Spadina & St Andrew) I found a busted up cash register... obviously stolen in a robbery. No banana peels were seen

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    Fresh is one of my favorite restaurant's in Toronto. It's vegetarian /vegan and I have only had vegan dishes so it's great they are going the full vegan!

    TORONTO EATERY GOES VEGAN BEFORE EXPANDING TO US

    opular Toronto-based eatery Fresh Restaurant recently announced the opening of a new location in Los Angeles along with plans to make all of its established locations fully vegan by June 2019. The restaurant, while currently offering all-vegan dishes, still provides dairy milk for coffee and tea, and cheese as a topping option for salads, burritos, and burgers. Fresh’s new LA location will offer a fully vegan menu of signature dishes such as Quinoa Onion Rings, Dragon Fries, Tiger Bowls, BBQ Burgers, and Poutine, vegan cashew cheese, and a few new additions that will be unique to that location. The eatery will also offer raw, cold-pressed juices, power shakes, botanical lattes, and green smoothies. Owner Ruth Tal plans to evoke a luxe California atmosphere with private velvet curved booths, two craft cocktail bars, a greenhouse dining room, and a balcony with a view overlooking West Hollywood. “Being a vegan ‘pioneer’ in Toronto for over two decades was lonely at times,” Tal told VegNews. “I’ve taken so much inspiration from LA over the years, so it’s pretty special to finally be opening a restaurant there.” Tal’s decision to update the restaurant menus to be fully vegan came from the knowledge that guests are no longer intimated to eat at vegan establishments compared to 20 years ago. “It’s a different world now,” Tal said. “People have the information, and we don’t have to work as hard to help people come to us and to not feel intimidated. It’s a pretty easy transition since none of our recipes have ever had any dairy in them, so we don’t actually need to remake any of our recipes.” Tal plans to further expand the restaurant brand across both Canada and LA.


    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/2/toronto-e...yDiEQ8oG70aJTo


    Soup of the day with corn bread and a little salad at Fresh

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    The 9 Healthiest Fruits To Beat Inflammation, Lose Weight & Boost Brain Health

    In a strict sense, it's impossible to rank the healthiest fruits. They're all good, and most of us don't eat as many servings as we should. In fact, one large survey found that a poor diet was the leading cause of death and disability in the United States—worse even than smoking—and one of the most damaging aspects of that crummy diet was not eating enough fruit.

    But of all the choices out there, from fiber-rich apples to antioxidant-packed blueberries and everything in between, which fruits pack the most powerful punch for overall health and weight loss?

    Knowing which fruits to prioritize can go a long way in boosting your health while eliminating that all too common choice paralysis you experience in the produce section of Whole Foods Market. So we tapped some of our favorite nutrition experts for their top picks

    What makes a fruit extra healthy?
    Before we dive into our list of healthiest fruits, it's important to have a rough understanding of what makes a particular fruit a standout choice. So we asked nutrition experts for some perspective.

    "I tend to encourage high-fiber, lower-sugar fruits and to watch portion sizes. Ideally, you also should consume fruit in the context of a balanced meal or snack that also provides protein and/or fat," says Jessica Cording, M.S., R.D., CDN, registered dietitian and health coach.

    Here are some other good tips to keep in mind:

    Colorful is good, the deeper the better. The fruit's immune system lies in its skin in the form of dark phytonutrient pigments. These phytonutrients (e.g., anthocyanins in blueberries and carotenoids in apricots) protect the fruit from environmental stressors like the sun's UV rays and insects, and they're also what impart many of fruits' powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. "These phytochemicals stress our own cells in small, healthy ways that stimulate our immune system's antioxidant defenses against threats like inflammation, cancer, and premature aging," says Maya Shetreat, M.D., integrative pediatric neurologist, author of The Dirt Cure, and an all-around plant food expert.

    Tart is good, the tarter the better. Some plants also evolved to contain phytonutrient compounds that impart a sharp taste to their fruit in order to ward off predators (e.g., the tanginess of raspberries or the pucker of pomegranates). Much like phytonutrient pigments, these tart compounds often indicate a richer storehouse of micronutrients and phytonutrients that function as powerful antioxidants.

    Organic means more antioxidants. Organic fruits and vegetables have also been shown to contain, on average, 20 to 40 percent more antioxidants than their conventionally grown counterparts—so if you do opt for organic, any of the choices below will be even healthier. Plus, you'll be steering clear of literally hundreds of pesticides.

    Both fresh and frozen are good options. All fruits lose nutrients over time, too, so it's important to eat them while they're fresh. Buying locally grown vegetables from a farmers market or food co-op is great for this reason but not essential. Buying organic frozen fruits is great, too, as they're frozen at peak freshness.

    All that said, don't get stuck on just one fruit being healthy or the healthiest, says Dr. Shetreat. Develop your palate and go for variety. The broadest range of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients is what you're after. Use this list simply as a guide to help you narrow down your choices when you're feeling indecisive.

    9 of the healthiest fruits on the planet.
    Even with the guidelines above, we wanted the experts to help us identify which fruits really go above and beyond, based on their nutrient profile and the latest research. So we asked Cording and Dr. Shetreat to share some top picks that would make it onto their healthiest fruits list:

    1. Raspberries

    With a quick scan of this list, it's safe to say berries are the equivalent of leafy greens in the vegetable world. They're packed with fiber (8 grams per cup—that's about a third of your daily needs!), contain a variety of phytonutrients, and their net antioxidant effect is, gram for gram, second only to herbs and spices.

    Raspberries and black raspberries may be one of the most potent berry picks of all. A 2011 study showed that consuming 60 grams of black raspberry powder slowed the growth rate of colorectal cancer cells and the blood vessels that supply them in two to four weeks. Researchers believe that the fruit phytochemicals stimulate

    our own enzyme defenses that neutralize cellular waste products known as free radicals, which, left unchecked, promote cellular deterioration and lead to cancerous mutations.

    Admittedly, most of the berry/cancer research has measured the effect of a berry extract on human cancer cells in a test tube. But Dr. Shetreat believes that berries as a complementary therapy for cancers of the colon, prostate, and breast looks promising. The colon cancer connection makes especially good intuitive sense, she adds, since the fiber in the fruit feeds good bacteria in the gut, which then produce organic acids, which then feed the cells that protect the colon's lining. Bonus: Raspberries are also a great source of vitamin C.

    Try it: This beet, apple, and raspberry salad with herbed millet is loaded with filling, digestion-friendly fiber.

    2. Cranberries
    These little red berries pack a similar phytochemical punch as their berry brethren but with an added bonus. They're a potent antimicrobial and have been well-studied for their ability to protect against the strains of bacteria that cause urinary tract infections (UTIs). They’re not an antibiotic and may not do much for a full-blown UTI but rather a prophylactic, "preventing bacteria from latching on to the epithelial cells that line the urinary tract," says Dr. Shetreat.

    Try it: This cranberry thyme spritz lets you imbibe without the guilt.

    3. Blueberries
    Smaller, tarter wild blueberries are phytonutrient powerhouses. But even the plump blueberries at your local grocery store or farmers market are remarkable. They have a pleasingly sweet taste but are fairly low in calories and low on the glycemic index, says Dr. Shetreat. In fact, the best research suggests that berries are positively good for blood sugar control. The fiber in the fruit forms a gel in the gut that can slow down the release of glucose into the bloodstream, and certain phytonutrients in the fruit may actually block sugar from being absorbed through the gut wall and into the bloodstream.

    Additionally, research suggests that blueberries help protect the heart, lowering "bad" LDL cholesterol and slowing plaque buildup, thanks in part to their soluble pectin fibers. While other research suggests blueberries help protect the brain from oxidative stress and may be protective against dementia. "They’re also included in the MIND diet, which was designed to protect against Alzheimer's disease," says Cording.

    Try it: This brain-boosting blueberry smoothie will keep you focused all morning long.

    4. Tart cherries
    All cherries are loaded with the usual polyphenolic phytonutrient suspects as well as a good dose of heart-healthy potassium. But tart cherries, especially in the form of tart cherry juice, have been the best studied for their anti-inflammatory effects, including their ability to reduce joint pain and muscle soreness after exercise. A 2018 review of the health benefits also found some evidence for a reduction in hemoglobin A1C, which indicates improved blood sugar control.

    Try it:
    This beet and cherry smoothie is the ideal post-workout drink.

    5. Elderberry
    Elderberries are a special case, says Dr. Shetreat, who grows them in her backyard in the Bronx. They're not meant to be eaten raw—they'll cause stomach upset—but when they're cooked and reduced into a syrup or a jam, they're remarkably effective against the flu. In Dr. Shetreat's family, a daily teaspoon of the syrup usually wards off that unwelcome wintertime visitor when taken at the first signs of illness. Research also suggests that the syrup may fight back against MRSA (methicillin-resistant staph aureus) and reduce inflammation in the brain.

    Try it: Here's how to make an elderberry syrup shot at home—which our health editor recommends taking before every flight!

    6. Pomegranates
    Pomegranate seeds and their juice-filled compartments are phytonutrient giants, with two to three times as much antioxidant activity as green tea or red wine, according to the U.C.–Berkeley School of Nutrition. Not surprisingly, there is tantalizing preliminary research that suggests pomegranates can help protect against cancer, lower blood pressure, improve cholesterol levels, and improve cognitive function. In one small study, a group of older subjects who drank 8 ounces of pomegranate juice daily for four weeks scored higher on memory tests than a control group. One downside: They're not the easiest fruit to eat. If you opt for a pomegranate juice, mix it with seltzer to keep the sugar content under control.

    Try it: This Turkish-spiced wild rice salad contains whole pomegranate seeds and is the perfect sweet-savory combo.

    7. Red grapes
    Red grapes, like the red wine they produce, may be beneficial thanks to one of their polyphenolic compounds. Resveratrol became a media darling when a Harvard researcher produced some preliminary animal studies suggesting that the compound was a cellular fountain of youth. The jury is still out on that one, but there's a large pool of literature suggesting that resveratrol is important for heart health, Dr. Shetreat says, reducing arterial plaque buildup and lowering blood pressure.

    Try it: This ultimate kale salad is absolutely packed with fruits and veggies, including red grapes and a number of our healthiest vegetable picks.

    8. Citrus fruits
    Citrus fruits like oranges, grapefruit, and lemons have traditionally been touted as great sources of vitamin C, which is important for maintaining immune defenses during the winter cold and flu season. They're packed with folate, too, "which is important for supporting stable levels of the pleasure-inducing brain chemical dopamine," says Cording.

    Citrus is also a double-threat, Dr. Shetreat says: The pulpy fruit contains most of the vitamins and minerals, while the skin, with its characteristically bitter flavor, contains loads of phytonutrients. While most of us don't eat orange or lemon rind, you can shave some off with a zester and add it to smoothies, or you can buy kumquats and eat the fruit and the skin.

    Try it: These warm dates with orange zest and olive oil are what Mediterranean dessert dreams are made of.

    9. Apples
    Sure, apples aren't the most glamorous fruit—you're not likely to find them on many superfood roundups—but they have plenty of virtues, not the least of which is that they store and travel well. Apples are also an excellent source of the phytonutrient quercetin (so are red onions, one of the healthiest vegetables), which, in a number of studies has been shown to reduce inflammation and counteract asthma and allergy symptoms. Because apples are so packed with fiber, both soluble and insoluble, they are also much more filling than their modest number of calories would suggest. A number of studies have shown that apples can provide a helpful assist in a weight-loss program.

    Try it: This apple-raspberry crisp combines two super-fruits in one!

    sauce https://www.mindbodygreen.com/articl...7iT3mL3ot8HdFM
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    “I hit him hard with the bananas and he ran away."


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    Lucky the robber hadn't trained for that sort of situation.

    https://youtu.be/4JgbOkLdRaE

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    Wait...so Peel Regional Police wasn't part of the joke and that actually happened?

  47. #1847
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    The real victim in all of this is the banana and the Peel Regional police are on the case
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    US academics feel the invisible hand of politicians and big agriculture

    In a windowless conference room epidemiologist Steve Wing was frantically blacking out chunks of his own research.

    Wing had been working on a study looking into the impacts of industrial-scale hog operations on health for the University of North Carolina. But the state’s Pork Council had caught wind of the research, and filed a Freedom of Information Act Request (FOIA) to gain access to his findings. “They went after Steve, asking him to turn over any documentation. They went directly to the university and got the lawyers to try and make him hand it over,” says Naeema Muhammad, one of Wing’s community partners.

    Wing had promised the community members who had spoken to him that he’d protect their privacy. Revealing even a few basic details could have compromised their identities. “Because … if their occupation was a nurse, they lived in a household with three other people, they were aged 35-39 … there’s only one person like that in a rural area,” Wing said in a 2015 interview.

    The university warned Wing that if he failed to hand over the documents, he could be arrested for theft of state property and even sent to jail. The data didn’t belong to him, it belonged to the state. But handing over the identities put his subjects in jeopardy. It wasn’t unheard of for people to lose their jobs for taking a public stand against the politically powerful pork industry.

    Wing’s lawyer negotiated heavy redactions in response to the FOIA request. “We did give over the records, and I actually to this day remain regretful that I didn’t resist more,” Wing said in the 2015 interview. In November 2016 Wing died. “He went to his deathbed with them still harassing him to turn over his information,” says Muhammad.

    Industry pressure

    Work like Wing’s is exactly the kind research institutions are meant to carry out. And academia writ large is supposed to be independent. Scientists at public universities work for the taxpayers. Their research is supposed to advance the public interest.

    But over the past 30 years, as public funding for university research has dried up, private industry money has poured in. And with industry money comes industry priorities. Agribusiness has funded research that has advanced its interests and suppressed research that undermines its ability to chase unfettered growth. The levers of power at play can seem anecdotal – a late-night phone call here, a missed professional opportunity there. But interviews with researchers across the US revealed stories of industry pressure on individuals, university deans and state legislatures to follow an agenda that prioritises business over human health and the environment.

    Take Iowa, a state that is, in both identity and capacity, American farm country. According to data released by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) in October 2018, the state produces more commodity corn and hogs – and in many years, soybeans – than any other US state. In Iowa, pigs outnumber people by nearly eight to one.

    For decades, deep relationships have existed between the agriculture industry and the state’s politicians – and increasingly those alliances are catching the state’s universities in their crosshairs. In 1980, when the federal government passed the Bayh-Dole Act, encouraging universities to partner with the private sector on agricultural research, leaders at academic institutions were incentivised to seek money from agribusiness. Two of the state’s universities in particular seem to have felt the reach of this policy: Iowa State, which is a land-grant institution, and the University of Iowa, which doesn’t have an agriculture school but feels the pressure of agribusiness influence. Researchers at both institutions told us they had felt the direct impact of agribusiness dollars on their work.

    So who’s pulling the strings? Take, for example, the looming presence of the Iowa Farm Bureau – 100 years old, with more than 150,000 members, and sitting on $1.4bn (£1bn) in total assets, having taken in nearly $88 million in revenue in 2015 alone. While the public can’t see the specifics of private-sector funding for universities, we do know that the Iowa Farm Bureau has contributed more than $3m to Iowa State University over the past 30 years.

    Other industry-specific lobbies – the Iowa Pork Council and other commodity groups – also contribute directly to universities. The Pork Council, for instance, provides scholarship opportunities to Iowa State University students majoring in agriculture-related fields. Additionally, it contributed $200,000 directly to the university, according to tax filings from 2016.

    And then there are the politically influential businessmen Charles and David Koch, intensely pro-free market billionaires who line the coffers of far-right politicians, and who owe their immense fortunes in part to manufacturing fertiliser. In 2017, the Koch Foundation announced a donation of nearly $1.7m to Iowa State University for an economics programme.

    That makes the agribusiness industry a powerful special interest in Iowa’s universities.

    Of course, this money has helped to create world-class courses and opportunities for many students and academics. Nevertheless, some would argue that it has also created an atmosphere in which research that is not directly helpful to the industry can appear to bite the hand that fed it.

    In 2017, for example, after 30 years of research into alternative methods of agriculture, the Aldo Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture at Iowa State was deprived of funds in the state budget in a bill signed off by former governor Terry Branstad (whose own campaign received $88,000 from the Iowa Farm Bureau, coincidentally). It left the institution alive in name only.

    Or back a little further, when Jim Merchant, the founding dean of the University of Iowa College of Public Health, retired, he planned to continue analysing an existing data set, the Keokuk County Rural Health Study. (Professors are often allowed to conduct research after they retire.) He’d already published work using the same data set to link industrial-scale hog farms with asthma rates in local children. Still, he thought there were more insights to be gleaned from the information that had been collected.

    Money wasn’t a problem. Merchant had secured funding to carry out his work. Yet, he says, the administration of the School of Public Health stalled the project in 2014. He was told he couldn’t do research as an emeritus professor, even though it had been permitted in the past.

    He suspected that the school’s concerns about potential blowback from Iowa’s $7bn livestock agriculture industry had something to do with it. His work was a threat: establishing a link between hog farming and childhood asthma rates could prompt the state legislature to regulate emissions – an expensive proposition for the industry. If Merchant was right, it wouldn’t have been his first encounter with the industry’s invisible reach. In 2002, an entire school of agriculture distanced itself from a seemingly rock-solid, collaborative study – of which he was a part – on air emissions from animal operations. Some two dozen scientists and researchers from the state’s two major universities were involved.

    Then-governor of Iowa Tom Vilsack had asked them to collaborate on a study of CAFO (concentrated animal feeding operations) impact on air quality. The researchers submitted a 221-page response. At the time, Merchant says the collaborators had reached a consensus on the executive summary. “We agreed on every word,” he says.

    David Osterberg, professor emeritus in the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health at the University of Iowa, and a fellow member of the study group, remembers it the same way. “After the report came out – immediately afterwards – the Farm Bureau demanded that Iowa State professors come to their headquarters to get beat up,” he says. “It was like, the next morning: ‘You be here tomorrow.’ They were livid.”

    Shortly after, the public distancing started. A story in National Hog Farmer, an industry-backed publication, quoted several anonymous sources who undermined Merchant’s claim of academic consensus. Then, at a meeting with state legislators, Wendy Wintersteen, the current university president who was then associate dean of the College of Agriculture at Iowa State, said her university was backing away from the report. She declined to comment for this story.

    “This is individual work of 12 Iowa State faculty members – not a report of Iowa State University – the work of 12 faculty members, of their individual research,” Merchant says, still indignant years later.

    The danger that Merchant was highlighting – compromised academic integrity by way of industry-related golden handcuffs – isn’t limited to Iowa. In the mid-2000s, the Pew Charitable Trusts commissioned a large study on animal agriculture and antibiotics. Bob Martin, director of food system policy at the Johns Hopkins University’s Center for a Livable Future in Baltimore, Maryland, led the project. By most measures, it was unique in its scope and scale. It was one of the first to critically examine the role of antibiotics in meat production, and friends told Martin the findings had a major impact on the Obama administration’s agricultural agenda.

    But as he got deeper into the work, Martin says he noticed that researchers were afraid to be associated with it. “We were approached every time we went near a land-grant school – Iowa State, NC State, University of Arkansas. Professors would pull us aside and say they’re under enormous pressure when they get industry funding to kind of cater their research to that.”

    Martin estimates that about half a dozen contributing researchers asked for their names to be withheld from the list of authors in the final draft for fear of retribution.

    Academic freedom

    A number of researchers we spoke to across the country echoed similar concerns. Their experiences range from seeing their published work undermined in industry magazines to being discouraged from conducting certain research or feeling undermined by their own deans, and one person was even driven out of the field entirely. Another researcher, who agreed to testify in a lawsuit that threatened to hold industry accountable for pollution, saw his position eliminated just before the court battle began. As soon as the plaintiffs lost, he was re-hired.

    Of course, it’s not all fear and loathing in academia. Marty Strange, who teaches agriculture history and policy at Green Mountain College in Vermont, says the private sector offers tantalising incentives, too. Industry-backed groups host conferences, pay high speaker fees, and hire academics for lucrative consulting jobs. “Any time you have people who work in the public trust who can freelance and get private-sector money for doing private-sector things, you’re going to get intellectual corruption,” says Strange.

    And for a university administrator, balancing industry priorities and academic freedom may be more complex than it appears. Incentive structures for school leaders in agriculture states are entirely different from those for independent researchers. Administrators’ success is measured in part by the money they bring in, and the Pew Commission found that they’ve been forced to rely more on industry money to keep their institutions afloat.

    But the change has not gone unnoticed. In 2013, former Iowa senator Tom Harkin revoked plans to donate his papers from 40 years in the House and Senate to a namesake public policy institute at Iowa State, his alma mater. As Politico reported at the time, Harkin’s reason was startling: “He said he was backing out after it became clear he could not trust university leaders to allow unrestricted academic freedom at the institute.”

    Academic freedom appears increasingly conditional. But that’s not the premise on which public research universities were founded. They are supposed to prioritise the public interest. Arguably, ag-friendly universities have left that behind in favour of research that benefits their agribusiness benefactors. And for researchers in certain fields, life can be made easier by just sticking to the script.

    “If you wish to get ahead in academia – particularly in a land-grant university, and we saw this again and again through our Pew Report – Big Ag has a stranglehold over land grant universities,” says Jim Merchant, the former dean of Iowa University’s School of Public Health, who was barred from completing his funded research as an emeritus professor.

    Ultimately, he says, “agribusiness has tremendous influence on their research … as a result of that, the administrators and the faculty at these land-grant universities are heavily influenced, if not beholden, to agricultural interests.”

    sauce https://www.theguardian.com/environm...QjHnlQTxtGEluI
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    Happy Hump day

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    TOFU SHORTAGES SPREAD ACROSS CANADA AFTER RELEASE OF NEW FOOD GUIDE

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    Tofu shortages have been reported in parts of Canada after the country’s new 2019 Food Guide was released earlier this month. The food guide was given a major overhaul that included omitting dairy as a food group and emphasizing the consumption of fruit, vegetables, and plant-based proteins such as beans, nuts, and tofu. Now, a surge of interest in plant-based foods, particularly in tofu, has been reported. The biggest tofu shortage is in Quebec, where the province’s largest tofu producers, Unisoya and Soyarie, are struggling to meet demand. Both companies are working on increasing production by expanding factories but won’t be able to sell to big chains such as Costco and Provigo until the expansion is complete. According to Nielsen market research data, Quebec has long been one of the biggest consumers of tofu products, with 26 percent of Quebecers eating the vegan bean curd on a regular basis.


    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/2/tofu-shor...Lg4OpxhyOEJfxU
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    More food for thought; American Pharmaceutical companies have been getting a huge payday selling their drugs to dairy and pig farmers. 80% of all the drugs that they produce is sold to these farmers as antibiotics. There are as many as 20 different drugs being given to cows and pigs at any given time. "Many researchers worry that the abundant use of antibiotics on farms is unraveling our ability to cure bacterial infections. This latest research, scientists now say, shows resistance to drugs can spread more widely than previously thought and firms up links in the resistance chain leading from animal farm to human table."


    How Drug-Resistant Bacteria Travel from the Farm to Your Table

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    IN BRIEF
    Antibiotics are used more heavily in farm animals than in people. This may be the largest source of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Drug-resistance genes spread more widely and rapidly on farms than scientists ever thought, new discoveries show.

    The agriculture industry says fears are exaggerated, whereas researchers say companies are endangering public health.
    It wasn't until a pig nosed me in the backside, in a friendly way, that I mustered the courage to touch one. I had seen thousands of hogs over the past 18 hours, but I had been nervously keeping my hands to myself. This particular pig seemed to disapprove of my restraint. I scratched him on the crown of his pink, wiry-haired head. He snorted loudly.

    I was in a pungent, crowded barn on a farm that raises 30,000 pigs a year in Frankfort, Ind., a sleepy farming town 45 miles northwest of Indianapolis. The farm belonged to Mike Beard, who was standing next to me. The pigs belonged not to Beard but to TDM Farms, a hog production company. Beard has a contract to raise TDM's pigs from when they are 14 days old, just weaned from their mother's milk, until the age of six months, when they are trucked to a processing plant and made into pork chops, sausages and tenderloins. The 40-by-200-foot barn housed 1,100 pigs. Because Beard is paid for the space he provides rather than by the number of pigs, “it's to the company's advantage to keep the buildings as full as they can,” he explained. At 7:30 that evening, a tractor-trailer would deliver 400 more piglets, and as soon as they got settled, Beard planned to give them TDM-approved feed containing antibiotics—a necessity if they were to stay healthy in their crowded, manure-gilded home. Antibiotics also help farm animals grow faster on less food, so their use has long been a staple of industrial farming.

    But there is a terrifying downside to this practice, which was one reason I had been hesitant to touch my porcine pal. Antibiotics seem to be transforming innocent farm animals into disease factories. The animals become sources of deadly microorganisms, such as the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacterium, which is resistant to several major classes of antibiotics and has become a real problem in hospitals. The drugs may work on farms at first, but a few microbes with the genes to resist them can survive and pass this ability to fight off the drugs to a larger group. Recent research shows that segments of DNA conferring drug resistance can jump between different species and strains of bacteria with disturbing ease, an alarming discovery. By simply driving behind chicken transport trucks, scientists collected drug-resistant microbes from the air within their cars. Early this year scientists discovered that a gene coding for resistance to a last-resort antibiotic has been circulating in the U.S. and was in bacteria infecting a woman in Pennsylvania.

    Many researchers worry—and the new findings add fresh urgency to their concerns—that the abundant use of antibiotics on farms is unraveling our ability to cure bacterial infections. This latest research, scientists now say, shows resistance to drugs can spread more widely than previously thought and firms up links in the resistance chain leading from animal farm to human table. In 2014 pharmaceutical companies sold nearly 21 million pounds of medically important antibiotics for use in food animals, more than three times the amount sold for use in people. Stripped of the power of protective drugs, today's pedestrian health nuisances—ear infections, cuts, bronchitis—will become tomorrow's potential death sentences.

    Yet the farm industry argues these worries have been wildly overblown. The idea that antibiotics “in animals directly relates to a risk to human health, we believe, has been greatly exaggerated,” says Richard Carnevale, vice president of regulatory, scientific and international affairs at the Animal Health Institute, a trade group that represents veterinary pharmaceutical companies. Researchers have not directly shown that farm antibiotic use is sparking more resistant infections in people, he and other industry representatives point out. Many of the drug-resistant infections circulating in today's hospitals have never been linked to farms or animal meat.

    Scientists now counter that the farm industry is the one exaggerating—even engineering—scientific uncertainty to protect their interests. “Frankly, it reminds me of the tobacco industry, the asbestos industry and the oil industry,” says James Johnson, an infectious disease physician at the University of Minnesota who studies antibiotic-resistant pathogens. “We have a long history of industries subverting public health.” He and other researchers admit that it is difficult to connect all the dots, but the farm industry, they say, deliberately makes it harder. Some big meat companies instruct their farmers to keep researchers away, arguing they need to keep animals free of outsiders and their diseases, which makes it impossible for scientists to solidify the science. As Tara Smith, an epidemiologist who studies emerging infections at Kent State University, tells me, the companies “want us to prove all these steps, but they're really tying our hands.”

    I traveled to Beard's farm, as well as two others, in an attempt to find the truth. I decided to follow in the footsteps of scientists who have been trying to trace antibiotic resistance down the long road from farm to food plate to understand whether pigs, cows, chickens or turkeys raised with antibiotics really could bring on the apocalypse—or whether these innocent-looking animals, and the billions of bacteria teeming inside them, are nothing to fear.

    PROTECTED PIGS
    Eighteen hours earlier I had pulled into the driveway of Schoettmer Prime Pork in Tipton, Ind. The first thing that greeted me was not the sight of pigs or the pungent smell of manure. It was a menacing yellow sign: “WARNING: DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM. DO NOT ENTER.”

    Because I was there by invitation, I drove in anyway and parked two cars behind a Ford Taurus with the license plate “EATPORK.” Keith Schoettmer, the farm's owner and my tour guide, waved me over from a doorway on my right.

    The intimidating sign, Schoettmer explained, was among his careful efforts to prevent pathogens from sickening the 22,000 pigs he raises every year. “The old adage ‘an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure’ is never more true than on a pig farm,” said Schoettmer, whose receding white hair and broad smile reminded me of John McCain, although his accent—“manure,” a frequent utterance, was “min-URR”—placed him firmly in the Midwest. Schoettmer asked me to don protective coveralls and plastic shoe covers while we walked around, too, to protect his hogs from any microbes I might be harboring.

    Bacteria are everywhere, but they are more everywhere on livestock farms because everybody is literally walking around in poop. (Even though I was covered in plastic the whole time I toured Schoettmer's farm, I reeked when I checked into my hotel room hours later.) And like germs in an elementary school, the bacteria in this excrement get shared widely—they get burrowed under the fingernails of visitors who scratch the animals' heads, and they contaminate the hands of farm employees. (I never saw anyone wearing gloves.)

    In 2005 researchers in the Netherlands, which has a large pig industry, determined that livestock-associated strains of MRSA were ailing Dutch pig farmers and their families. MRSA can cause deadly skin, blood and lung infections; it has circulated in hospitals for decades and, more recently, has been affecting people outside of medical settings. By 2007 one fifth of the Netherlands' human MRSA infections were identical to bacteria that had come from Dutch livestock. After this discovery, in 2008, the Dutch government announced strict policies to reduce farm antibiotic use, which then dropped by 59 percent between 2009 and 2011. Denmark, another major pork exporter, had already banned the use of antibiotics in healthy pigs in 1999; in general, Europe has taken a harder line against animal antibiotics than has the U.S.

    Now scientists know that this livestock-associated MRSA is spreading throughout the U.S., too. When Tara Smith, then at the University of Iowa, heard what was going on in the Netherlands, she decided to test pigs for MRSA at a few Iowa farms where one of her colleagues, a veterinarian, had connections. “We ended up sampling 270 pigs in the first round—we just went out and swabbed a lot of pig noses and had no idea what we'd find,” Smith recalls. “About 70 percent of them were positive for MRSA.”

    Smith and her colleagues have continued to publish a series of disturbing studies showing that MRSA is all over American hog farms. They found MRSA growing in the nostrils of 64 percent of workers at one large farm and found that feed on another farm harbored MRSA even before it got unloaded from the delivery truck. Two hundred thirty-five yards downwind of another farm, Smith found MRSA floating in the air. Other resistant bacteria have been found around poultry farms: after researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health drove cars, windows down, behind trucks that were transporting chickens in Maryland and Virginia, along the Delmarva Peninsula, they found antibiotic-resistant enterococci—a group of bacteria that causes 20,000 infections in the U.S. every year—in the air inside the cars, as well as resting on the top of soda cans in the cars' cup holder.

    Animal poop is used to fertilize crop fields, too, which means that its bacteria are literally spread on the soil used to grow our food. A 2016 study reported that after manure from hog and dairy farms was applied to soil, the relative abundance of antibiotic-resistance genes in the dirt shot up by a factor of four. In a study conducted in Pennsylvania, people who were the most heavily exposed to crop fields treated with pig manure—for instance, because they lived near to them—had more than 30 percent increased odds of developing MRSA infections compared with people who were the least exposed. Beard runs a second business as a manure applicator—he loads 6,500 gallons of his hog manure into a single tanker truck and applies it to nearby fields—and as he noted, the process is tightly regulated. He has to perform soil tests to ensure that fields can absorb the manure nutrients, and he has to apply the manure at a slow enough rate to prevent runoff. But problems can still occur. A 2006 Escherichia coli outbreak in spinach was traced back to crop irrigation water that, investigators believe, had been contaminated by pig and cow manure from a nearby farm. The outbreak killed three people.

    SPREADING RESISTANCE
    Clearly, antibiotic resistance is a problem both for people and for livestock. But how can we be sure that the two are connected and that resistance is exacerbated by on-farm antibiotic use? In 1975 the Animal Health Institute asked this very question and recruited Tufts University biologist Stuart Levy to find out. Levy and his colleagues fed low doses of the antibiotic tetracycline to a group of 150 chickens on a nearby farm that had never gotten antibiotics in their feed and monitored them to see what happened. Within a week, almost all the E. coli bacteria in their intestines were tetracycline-resistant. Three months in, the bacteria growing inside the chickens were also resistant to four other types of antibiotics. After four months, the bacteria growing inside chickens on the farm that had not been fed tetracycline also harbored resistance to the drug. When Levy and his colleagues analyzed the bacteria growing inside the farm owners, they found that 36 percent were tetracycline-resistant, compared with only 6 percent of bacteria from their neighbors. At the time, the findings came as a shock. “The idea that you would be able to give animals antibiotics at low levels and not have them develop resistance was the word of the day, and that made our study that much more interesting and unexpected,” Levy recalls. (The Animal Health Institute has not funded any additional studies to confirm his findings.)

    One study reported that more than 90 percent of E. coli in pigs raised on conventional farms are resistant to tetracycline, whereas a whopping 71 percent of E. coli in pigs raised on farms without antibiotics are also resistant. That is because resistance genes spread so well. In a landmark 2012 study, microbiologist Lance Price, now director of the Antibiotic Resistance Action Center at George Washington University's Milken Institute School of Public Health, and his colleagues traced the evolutionary origins of the livestock-associated MRSA that was being shared among pigs and their farmers in Europe and the U.S. by sequencing the whole genomes of 88 diverse MRSA samples. Their findings showed that this MRSA strain started out in people as a methicillin-susceptible form of S. aureus. Then the bacteria jumped into livestock, where they swiftly acquired resistance to methicillin and tetracycline and spread further.

    At first, antibiotic resistance spreads slowly and through parent-offspring relationships—the descendants of resistant bacteria are born resistant, too. But emerging research shows that over time, resistance genes find their way onto nimble pieces of DNA that dance around the bacterial genome, and many end up on small circles of DNA called plasmids—copies of which can easily be shared among bacteria of different species. In a 2014 study, a group of international researchers collected samples of antibiotic-resistant E. coli from both people and chickens. Although the bacteria were genetically different, many contained nearly identical plasmids with the same antibiotic-resistance genes. It was the organism-jumping plasmids, rather than the bacteria themselves, that spread resistance.

    The fact that resistance can be spread in this way—microbiologists call it “horizontally”—changes everything. It is as if doctors suddenly discovered that Huntington's disease was not just passed down from parent to child but could also infect people who touch one another in passing. It also means that exposing one type of bacteria to one antibiotic in one place has the potential to change how other types of bacteria respond to other antibiotics in other places.

    Resistance typically comes at a cost: The mutations draw down the cellular energy a microbe uses to reproduce. Individuals survive, but the whole population grows more slowly. So when bacteria stop being exposed to antibiotics, they ditch their resistance genes over multiple generations. Yet new research suggests that when bacteria are repeatedly exposed to antibiotics, they evolve resistance mutations that let them maintain higher reproductive rates—and then they stay resistant even if antibiotics are taken away. “What's really scary is that we've seen these examples in the gut where sometimes plasmids will transfer from one bacterium to another in a patient, and then they'll rearrange,” says Tim Johnson, a microbiologist at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine. “It's like it's evolving in real time in the host to become more efficient.”

    Multiple resistance genes also may end up on the same plasmid, so when one gene gives bacteria a survival advantage, other resistance genes come along for the ride. The extent of this co-selection, as it is called, is still a mystery; there is likely to be a lot “that we're not yet even aware of,” Tim Johnson says. Yet figuring it out will be crucial for understanding how resistance spreads and how it could threaten us. Some of the antibiotics used by the farm industry are rarely or never used in humans, and the assumption—often touted by industry—is that resistance that develops to these nonhuman drugs will not pose a risk to people. But co-selection means that the use of one antibiotic could “select for resistance in another,” according to Scott McEwen, an epidemiologist who studies antibiotic resistance at the University of Guelph's Ontario Veterinary College. Growing levels of resistance to a farm antibiotic may also increase levels of resistance to, say, penicillin.

    Making matters worse, new research suggests that when bacteria get exposed to antibiotics, they share their resistance plasmids at a faster rate. It is as if the microbes band together in the face of a common enemy, sharing their strongest weapons with their comrades. And once bacteria become resistant, the presence of antibiotics only makes them more successful. One reason that resistant infections are so common in hospitals is because antibiotic use there is so common: the drugs kill off susceptible bacteria yet allow the resistant bugs, suddenly devoid of competition, to thrive—making it easier for them to contaminate medical equipment, staff and other patients.

    GOVERNMENT COUNTERATTACK
    In the face of these terrifying observations, one might think the U.S. government is cracking down on agricultural antibiotic use. It is—kind of. The Food and Drug Administration released two voluntary recommendations in 2012 and 2013—the agency calls them “guidances”—that will be phased in by January 2017. In them, the agency has asked veterinary pharmaceutical companies to change the labels of their medically important antibiotics to say they should no longer be given to animals just to help them grow larger on less feed. The guidances also ask companies to stop selling feed- or water-grade antibiotics over the counter, requiring prescriptions from veterinarians instead.

    Most companies have agreed to comply with the suggested rules. The problem is that a lot of livestock farms, including Schoettmer's and Beard's, say they stopped using antibiotics for growth promotion a long time ago. Their main reason for using antibiotics now, they say, is for “disease prevention and control,” a purpose that will not be affected by the new rules. As long as their vets agree, farmers will still be able to mass-treat their animals with antibiotics when they fear that they may be vulnerable to infection. “I think you'll find [this use] relatively normal in the industry,” says Schoettmer, who in 2015 was crowned America's Pig Farmer of the Year by the National Pork Board. (The board was created by Congress to promote the industry and is overseen by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.) He notes that the goal is “to make sure any of these very common pathogens don't get a toehold and start to make these pigs suffer.”

    According to 2012 USDA data, almost 70 percent of American hog farms mass-feed antibiotics to their animals to prevent or control the spread of disease; nearly all give their pigs antibiotic-laced feed at some point in their lives. Likewise, more than 70 percent of cattle raised on large U.S. feedlots are fed medically important antibiotics, and between 20 and 52 percent of healthy chickens get antibiotics at some time as well. Yet farmers who contract with big companies may not even know when they are giving antibiotics, because they are provided with pretreated feed. When I asked Beard at what ages his pigs were given antibiotics, he said he had to contact TDM to find out.

    It makes sense that animals on crowded industrial farms need antibiotics; the conditions of their lives leave them vulnerable to disease. “Density makes it more difficult to eliminate pathogens, and the risk of infection is greater,” says Steve Dritz, a veterinarian at Kansas State University. The pigs I saw were crawling and lying on one another; some were snoozing in or nosing around in feces. U.S. livestock farms have been exploding in size in recent decades: in 1992 only 30 percent of farms raised more than 2,000 hogs at a time, but by 2009 farms this large accounted for 86 percent of the country's hog industry—in large part because so many small farms went out of business. There is a lot of economic pressure on these farmers. Hog prices have dropped. Companies that contract with poultry farmers insist the farms regularly upgrade their already expensive equipment and bear the cost. In 2014 only 56 percent of intermediate-sized farms reported any actual income from their farming work.

    With this setup, “farmers basically have to have perfect management and perfect environments—perfect everything to keep disease out. Otherwise, they lose their flocks,” Tim Johnson says. “It's not the farmer's fault, because the industry has pushed them toward this.”

    LINKS IN THE SAUSAGE CHAIN
    The morning after I toured Schoettmer's farm, before leaving for Beard's, I went down to the buffet breakfast at my hotel. I paused in front of the sausage: Had any of it come from Schoettmer's pigs? He sells most of his hogs to Indiana Packers Corporation, which processes and sells the pork to local retailers. It was possible that the patties in front of me were made from some of his animals.

    I took one, albeit reluctantly. What were the chances, I wondered, that this meat would give me a resistant infection? When livestock are slaughtered, their meat can get splashed with bacteria from their intestines. In a 2012 study, FDA scientists analyzed raw retail meats sold around the country and found that 84 percent of chicken breasts, 82 percent of ground turkey, 69 percent of ground beef and 44 percent of pork chops were contaminated with intestinal E. coli. More than half of the bacteria in the ground turkey were resistant to at least three classes of antibiotics. These microbes can cause food poisoning if meat is not cooked properly before it is eaten or if a person handling the raw meat does not wash his or her hands properly afterward.

    But new research suggests that foodborne pathogens can make us sick in other ways, too. Price and his colleagues study strains of E. coli that he calls COPs—colonizing opportunistic pathogens. As he outlined in a 2013 paper, these bacteria most likely get inside people via food but do not, at first, cause illness; they simply colonize the gut, joining the billions of other “good” bacteria there. Later, they can infect other parts of the body, such as the urinary tract, and cause serious illness. Urinary tract infections among women at the University of California, Berkeley, between 1999 and 2000 were found to be caused by identical strains of E. coli, which, the authors wrote, could have arisen after the women ate contaminated food.

    In recent years the CDC has successfully identified the source of contamination in large foodborne disease outbreaks only about half the time. But the origins of slow-brewing infections are far more challenging to pinpoint. Even if the sausage I ate that morning was contaminated with drug-resistant COPs, I would never know it. If I got a serious infection months later, I could never prove that it came from this breakfast. I would probably never even think about this breakfast.

    This is the crux of the problem: it is difficult, if not impossible, to trace resistant infections back in time to their microbial ground zeros. “It is a long way—geographically, temporally and in other ways—from the farm to the fork,” McEwen says. A hamburger can be made of meat from 100 different cows, so it is hard to pinpoint the one contributor that was contaminated. And scientists not only need to do that but also need to find out whether the way the animals were raised—whether or not they received antibiotics, for how long, at what dose and for what purpose—affected their bacteria in ways that could have spurred or worsened the outbreak. Industries also argue that farm bacteria only pose a risk to those working and living nearby, not the general public—which is why scientists try to get onto farms, to compare bacteria there with what ails the larger population.

    Yet no one is gathering this kind of information. “There are very limited data collected at the farm level,” concedes Bill Flynn, deputy director for science policy at the FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine. In September 2015 the FDA, the USDA and the CDC held a meeting in which they devised a plan to start collecting more on-farm data, but they did not receive the funding they requested to actually start doing it. In fact, for fiscal year 2016, the FDA received none of the $7.1 million it requested to study antibiotic resistance in animals.

    Academic scientists are desperate to go on farms and study farm animals, too, but they are rarely granted access unless they have connections. When Smith hoped to collect samples from industrial turkey farms, she contacted every single registered turkey farm in Iowa. “None of them let us on,” she recalls. To study hog bacteria, Price and his colleagues have resorted to buying pig snouts at North Carolina butchers and swabbing them for bacteria because they cannot get to live animals. And remember that study in which Johns Hopkins researchers tailed chicken delivery trucks in cars? They had to conduct the study like that because they had no other way of getting close to the chickens—the researchers were not allowed on the farms.

    It is not that livestock farmers are antiscience; it is that their employers, the meat companies, instruct them to keep outsiders away. A whopping 90 to 95 percent of U.S. poultry farmers and 48 percent of hog farmers (Beard being one) are contract growers—they sign contracts to raise animals for large companies like Tyson Foods, Smithfield Foods or Perdue Farms. Farmers are beholden to these companies because they undertake a huge amount of debt to start their business—a new poultry or hog farm costs a farmer about $1 million—yet they do not earn any money without a company contract; often farmers have only one choice of employer because a single company operates in their area.

    Yet these company contracts—SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN obtained a recent contract from a former grower for Pilgrim's Pride, the largest chicken producer in the U.S.—contain clauses about animal protection, instructing farmers to “limit the movement of non-essential people, vehicles and equipment” around the farms. My visit to Beard's and Schoettmer's farms was preapproved by the National Pork Board. But when West Virginia poultry grower Mike Weaver invited a journalist onto his farm several years ago and his employer found out, “I was forced to attend ‘biosecurity retraining’ and was delayed receiving a new flock an extra two weeks, which amounts to a loss of revenue of around $5,000 for me,” he says. Price, as a scientist, convinced a handful of farmers to grant him farm access years ago, but then, he recalls, they “lost their contracts.”

    Despite repeated requests, the American Farm Bureau Federation, the farm industry trade group, and Smithfield Foods, the world's largest hog producer and pork processor, declined to comment for this article and address the issue of whether industries were keeping scientists off farms.

    Whatever the reason, the lack of data has made it easier for industry to fight regulations. In 1977, soon after Levy's study was published, the FDA announced that it was considering banning several antibiotics from animal feed over safety concerns. In the 39 years since, the industry has fought hard against these plans by arguing there was no definitive proof of harm. These arguments ultimately caused the FDA to change tactics, Flynn says, and to pursue the voluntary guidances instead.

    But the disease-control exemption is a gaping hole in the guidances, many complain. “Do I think the total volume of antibiotic use will go down? I absolutely do not,” says H. Morgan Scott, a veterinary epidemiologist at Texas A & M University. In fact, antibiotic sales to farms have increased each year since the draft guidances were announced. In 2014 the nonprofit Pew Charitable Trusts analyzed the drug labels of all 287 antibiotic products that will be affected by the guidances and found that farmers will still be able to administer one quarter of the drugs at the same dosages and with no limits on treatment duration—as long as they say they are using them to prevent or control disease. Even the Animal Health Institute's Carnevale says the FDA guidances “could change the overall picture of how [antibiotics] are used, but whether [they're] going to affect total quantities of antibiotics remains to be seen.”

    The requirement for veterinary prescriptions may not put a dent in antibiotic use, either. Many veterinarians prescribe and sell antibiotics for a profit or work closely with the food or pharmaceutical industries. A 2014 Reuters news investigation reported that half of all the veterinarians who advised the FDA on antibiotic use in food animals in recent years had received money from drug companies. “There are a lot of veterinarians who are attached to industry, who have a conflict of interest and who are beholden to the large producers—so they are inclined to go along with the status quo,” James Johnson says.

    Several members of the U.S. Congress, including New York State Representative and microbiologist Louise Slaughter, have introduced bills to more tightly regulate antibiotic use on farms. Slaughter has pushed for her Preservation of Antibiotics for Medical Treatment Act for more than a decade. It has been supported by 454 organizations, including the American Medical Association. But after being referred to the Health subcommittee of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, the bill never reaches a vote.

    One committee member who does not support the bill at this point, Representative Tim Murphy of Pennsylvania, has gone on record warning against the continued low-level use of antibiotics in food animals and the dangers that resistant bacteria pose to our food supply, says his press secretary, Carly Atchison. But he does not think the bill “strikes the appropriate balance needed in the use of medically important antibiotics in agriculture and farming,” Atchison says. There is also significant opposition to the bill from industry. The National Chicken Council spent $640,000 in 2015 to lobby, in part, against antibiotic-related legislation, and the Animal Health Institute spent $130,000, according to records from the nonprofit Center for Responsive Politics. Center data also show that veterinary pharmaceutical companies or livestock farming organizations have made campaign donations of more than $15,000 to more than half of the members of the Health subcommittee. “The trade organizations have been down there saying, ‘You can't show it's us—that we're causing the resistance,’” says Patty Lovera, assistant director of the nonprofit Washington, D.C.–based Food and Water Watch. “That has really gummed up the works for a long time.”

    A SMALL SOLUTION
    After I left Beard's farm, I drove two hours to my final destination: Seven Sons Farms in Roanoke, Ind., which raises pigs on pastures and woodlands without antibiotics. A decade ago Seven Sons was a lot like the two farms I had just seen—it raised 2,300 hogs a year for Tyson Foods, regularly using drugs. But the family was worried about health effects, so it made some changes. In 2000 Seven Sons became what it calls a regenerative diversified farm, and today it raises about 400 pigs, 2,500 egg-laying hens and 120 forage-fed cattle on 550 acres of pasture.

    Blaine Hitzfield, the second of the farm's seven namesake sons, took me on a short tour. I saw fewer than a dozen hogs lounging around a half-acre expanse of dirt and grass. Hitzfield did not ask me to wear coveralls, and he was not concerned that I had come directly from another hog farm. The animals on his farm, he explained, are hardier than those raised in confinement: not only do they have more space and mobility, but they are also weaned later so that they develop stronger immune systems. Nature helps as well. “The sun is a wonderful sanitizer, and the mud does wonders for keeping the parasites off,” he said. (If a pig does get sick, Seven Sons treats it with antibiotics but then sells it at auction rather than with their label.) His claims have research behind them. In a 2007 study, Texas Tech University researchers reported that pigs that had been raised outside had enhanced activity of bacteria-fighting immune cells called neutrophils when compared with animals raised inside.

    Hitzfield conceded that Seven Sons' approach could be hard to envision as the future of industrial farming. “Conventional-minded farmers would say, ‘This is ridiculous; it would never work; it's not scalable’—and to a certain extent they're right,” he said. Seven Sons is just a small prototype, but Hitzfield said that with time and more research, much bigger versions would be possible. “On a per-acre basis, we're much more productive than we've ever been,” he added.

    Some industrial farms are making changes, thanks in large part to consumer demand. They are not becoming small, diversified operations. But in February 2016 Perdue Farms announced that two thirds of its chickens would be raised without medically important antibiotics; Tyson Foods has pledged to stop using human antibiotics to raise its U.S. chickens by September 2017. Broiler chickens are far easier to industrially raise without antibiotics than pigs, cows or turkeys because they are slaughtered at younger ages.

    But demand is driving some large-scale pork producers to scale back, too. “It is not an easy thing to do,” says Bart Vittori, vice president and general manager for pork at Perdue Farms' food division, which has an arm called Coleman Natural Foods. Coleman raises pigs on a vegetarian, antibiotic-free diet. “The demand is out there. Our consumers are smarter than ever, more informed than ever, asking more questions than ever,” Vittori says. The meat that comes out of Niman Ranch, a network of more than 725 family-run hog, lamb, cow and egg-laying hen farms throughout the U.S., has also been raised without drugs.

    Products from Coleman, as well those from niche farms such as Seven Sons and Niman Ranch, are out of the financial reach of many Americans today. But the more that consumers demand antibiotic-free meat, the more supply there will be and—if basic economics holds true—the less it will cost.

    Scientists still have many, many questions about antibiotic resistance—questions that may never get answered if food companies continue to ban outsiders from their farms. Even so, the weight of the evidence points strongly toward reducing antibiotic use on farms, relying instead on novel infection-control regimens or age-old strategies such as providing animals with ample space. Until some of those changes occur, researchers and the rest of us will continue to worry about the growing strength of foodborne bacteria and the increasing weakness of our medicine against them.

    sauce https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...to-your-table/
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    Eat your veggies

  52. #1852
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    This is a long but interesting read about the unstoppable rise of milk alternatives (and plant based diets)

    White gold: the unstoppable rise of alternative milks
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    Eat your veggies

  53. #1853
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    VEGAN FILM NOMINATED FOR A BRITISH ACADEMY AWARD

    Documentary short film 73 Cows is a contender for the 15-Minute Best Short Film at the 2019 BAFTA Awards, which will be held in the United Kingdom tomorrow. The film, directed and produced by Alex Lockwood with no budget, first premiered at the UK’s 2018 Raindance Film Festival and has been watched worldwide online nearly 130,000 times. The documentary tells the story of Derbyshire farmer Jay Wilde, who inherited his father’s animal farm but not his father’s stomach for sending the cows to slaughter. The film follows Wilde as he realizes something has to change, and finds a sanctuary willing to take the herd while he transitions his farm from animals to vegetables—which is expensive and practically unheard of in the small farming communities of England. So far, the film has won the grand prize for Best Film at the Ottawa International Vegan Film Festival, the “Short of the Week,” and selected as a Vimeo Staff Pick.

    Here's a snippet



    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/2/vegan-fil...7-800fJ-BvD6ms
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-52590372_1200174050141284_993463052672172032_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  55. #1855
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    Great lunch downtown Toronto ... at Little Khao

    Vegan red curry tofu for me

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-52033986_2314822912095480_8618294480098820096_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-51865995_2314822618762176_2890261300829487104_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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    Vegan film wins British Academy Award

    Vegan film 73 Cows won the 15-Minute Best Short Film category during the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) awards this weekend. Directed by Alex Lockwood, the film follows former cattle farmer Jay Wilde as he decides to send his entire herd to a local sanctuary instead of sending them to slaughter. Wilde was vegetarian when he inherited the farm from his father and went vegan after realizing that cows have emotions. The film depicts Wilde’s transition from cattle ranger to a vegetable farmer, and points out the difficult decisions the Englishman had to make along the way. “It’s very surreal because I’ve led an isolated life on this farm,” Wilde, who watched the awards ceremony with two dog companions from his home, told BBC. “Alex [Lockwood] filmed this isolation and the desperation I was feeling and to some extent still do. It’s true to life, unfortunately. I almost forgot it was me [on the screen] because Alex told the story so well. It’s a brilliant piece of work. He reflected reality.” Wilde is currently building necessary infrastructure on his land to produce organic vegetables and hopes to open a vegan bed and breakfast on the property in the future.

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/2/vegan-fil...CiQXCR9ZzQcfwe
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    Largest Meat Producer in the U.S. (Tyson Foods) to Launch Vegan Protein

    Resistance is futile. You will be assimilated.

  58. #1858
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    ^ Yes it's happening
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  59. #1859
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    Tomorrow is valentine's day!

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    ^^^^

    The perfect gift!

  61. #1861
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    SUPER BOWL RUNS ITS FIRST PLANT-BASED BURGER COMMERCIAL

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    Carl’s Jr.’s commercial for the Beyond Famous Star will air during the Super Bowl on Sunday—marking the first time that a plant-based burger advertisement has been featured during the big game. The 30-second commercial depicts a Wild West cowboy character doing yoga on the beach while eating a Beyond Famous Star. “Yeah. I’ve seen a lot out here in the West. But a juicy charbroiled burger with a patty made from plants … Only the folks at Carl’s Jr. can pull off something that bold.” the cowboy says. “All the legendary flavor; none of the meat. When the wagon of change comes, you ride along with it.” On January 2, Carl’s Jr. added the Beyond Famous Star (which can be ordered vegan by omitting cheese and mayonnaise) to more than 1,000 locations nationwide, making it the largest fast-food chain to offer the vegan Beyond Meat patty. Marketing tactics for the Beyond Famous Star are a major pivot for the company as Carl’s Jr.’s previous Super Bowl commercials featured scantily clad women eating meat-based burgers. Last month, Carl’s Jr. became one of the first restaurants to use the Beyond Burger 2.0—a “meatier” version of Beyond Meat’s original patty.

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/2/super-bow...xRmVUuIBPhzjLs
    Has anyone had a chance to try this Burger out? Pretty good?

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    Quote Originally Posted by joshtee View Post
    Has anyone had a chance to try this Burger out? Pretty good?
    I haven't tried it. I pretty much never eat fast food.

    But as vegan food goes mainstream I feel like it poses a dilemma. Should I go out of my way to buy it, to show companies vegan food is profitable? While I'm not particularly interested in vegan junk food I think having those options available is good for increasing awareness of veganism and lowering barriers to transitioning to vegan, and that's something I'd like to encourage. Yet besides health, a lot of these companies (Tyson in particular!) have profited off inconceivable levels of cruelty and suffering.

    For now I've decided that the example I can set for non-vegans is more influential than the small amount of money I can give to or withhold from billion dollar corporations. So if I'm out with friends and vegan junk food is on the menu I'll buy it, even though it isn't very healthy and it profits companies I'd like to see go bankrupt, just to set an example that veganism doesn't mean missing out.

    So I won't be going out of my way to try the Carls Jr. vegan burger, but maybe I'll have it at some point. If you try it out let us know what you think!

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    Quote Originally Posted by joshtee View Post
    Has anyone had a chance to try this Burger out? Pretty good?
    I have not tried it, but I have had Beyond before. It is not my favorite since it is quite meaty tasting. I found the flavor off putting.

    Quote Originally Posted by squeakymcgillicuddy View Post
    I haven't tried it. I pretty much never eat fast food.

    But as vegan food goes mainstream I feel like it poses a dilemma. Should I go out of my way to buy it, to show companies vegan food is profitable?
    I'm not a huge fast food fan either, but I do enjoy Taco Bell every once and awhile. Their menu is super easy to make vegetarian/vegan, and they are actively trying to make healthier options so I don't mind running for the border.

  65. #1865
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    I share both your perspectives squeakymcgillicuddy and dubthang.

    Here in Canada A&W burger shops has offered the Beyond Meat burger on its menu for a couple years. I haven't had an A&W burger since I was a child. I have heard from some people (meat eaters) that have tried the Beyond Meat burger and they say it's very difficult to tell the difference between this and actual meat burgers. Texture, taste is almost a near replica. Maybe that's a good thing for some people.

    I have eaten some very tasty veggie burgers and veggie dogs, in restaurants and I've tried plant -based patties sold in grocery store or made my own but those aren't fast food.

    More fast food chains will follow suit. Plant based is becoming more available and a subsitute for meat. I remember (way back in the 80's) going to a Dairy Queen when they used to make "Brazier Burgers", asking for a no-patty veggie burger and get a bun with lettuce and onions. Plant based/vegan food has come a long way and that makes me happy
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  66. #1866
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    Dates Are The Healthiest Fruit And Also A Natural Cure


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    Dates are undoubtedly one of the healthiest and most nutritious fruits known to mankind. Their nutritional profile is indeed impressive, as a 100-gram serving provides:

    Calories: 277
    Carbs: 75 grams
    Fiber: 7 grams
    Protein: 2 grams
    Potassium: 20% of the RDI
    Magnesium: 14% of the RDI
    Iron: 5% of the RDI
    Vitamin B6: 12% of the RDI
    Manganese: 15% of the RDI
    Copper: 18% of the RDI

    Additionally, dates are an excellent source of antioxidants. Specifically, these are the most powerful, according to Healthline,

    “Flavonoids: Flavonoids are powerful antioxidants that may help reduce inflammation and have been studied for their potential to reduce the risk of diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease and certain types of cancer.

    Carotenoids: Carotenoids are proven to promote heart health and may also reduce the risk of eye-related disorders, such as macular degeneration.

    Phenolic acid: Known for its anti-inflammatory properties, phenolic acid may help lower the risk of cancer and heart disease”

    Top Health Benefits of Dates

    Dates are packed with potassium, a nutrient which lowers the risk of stroke by up to 40 percent and improves overall function of the nervous system.
    The high phosphorus content improves brain function.
    Dates are high in calcium, a mineral which treats diarrhea.
    Dates contain zeaxanthin and lutein which improve vision and prevent age-related macular damage.
    Dates support weight loss by creating a feeling of fullness.
    Soak dates in goat milk, add honey and cardamom, and consume on daily basis to improve libido and sex life.
    Dates are extremely beneficial during pregnancy, relieve pain during the process of delivery, reduce bleeding, and prevent postpartum depression.
    Soak dates overnight and blend them in the morning. Use daily to improve heart health!
    Thanks to their high fiber content, dates improve digestive health and suppress appetite.
    As one of the best iron sources, dates are great in treating anemia.
    Dates are rich in magnesium, a mineral which lowers blood pressure levels.
    Last but not least, dates detoxify the body, boost the metabolism, treat constipation and improve function of the intestinal tract.

    Five Ways to Eat Dates


    Stuff ‘em: fills them with the “ideal mixture” of crushed walnuts, almonds and pistachios with a pinch of cinnamon and nutmeg.
    Drink ‘em: Yvonne Maffei, founder of the My Halal Kitchen blog, combines dates and whole milk (or dairy-free) to produce a thick, creamy milkshake. Her two suggestions: use a strong blender, and serve it fresh. “It’s an interesting and fun way to incorporate dates,” she says.
    Bake ‘em: In cookies, cakes, bread, pies, and cupcakes.
    Chop ‘em: Chop or slice pitted dates and throw them into salads, on sandwiches or as garnish on pasta.

    sauce https://www.globalremedyhouse.com/da...jw2BnZiL8sxxsQ
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  67. #1867
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  68. #1868
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    Nuts are full of fat and calories—and you should probably eat more of them

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    Nuts are full of fat—it’s what makes peanut butter tastes so good. Heck, it’s why you can even turn a hard nut into a butter-like paste in the first place. All that fat means they pack a caloric punch, yet nutritionists the world over recommend you eat them daily. What gives?

    For years now, researchers have found that the much-maligned food is far healthier than you might think. Year after year, studies find correlations between nut-eaters and good overall health, including this one, published this week in the journal Circulation Research, tying nut consumption to heart health in people with diabetes. Here's why these fatty morsels are so good for you.

    First of all, let’s drill down on what nuts even are. You probably already know the ol’ “peanuts are actually legumes bit,” but did you know that almonds, pecans, and walnuts aren’t true nuts either? A true nut is something with a hard shell that contains both the fruit and the seed of a plant (seeds are how a plant reproduces, and the fruit is what supports the seed). Generally a nut pod only contains one seed. Drupes are more like what you think of as stone fruits: They’re fleshy bits with a seed buried inside. Almonds, pecans, and walnuts are drupes, they’re just drupes where we eat the seed instead of the fruit. Peaches and plums are also drupes, we simply prefer their fruit to their seeds.

    Legumes are a whole other deal. Their pods also contain both the fruit and the seed, but legume pods contain multiple fruits and split open when ready to harvest. Peas are also legumes, so think of a pea pod and that's what makes all legumes so legume-y.

    Of course, none of this is what we really mean when we say “nuts.” We mean everything from almonds to hazelnuts to peanuts. And though it’s not as pedantically satisfying, it’s actually a decent catchall term when it comes to tallying the nutritional punch and profile of the foods. Nuts as a culinary category group a bunch of hard seed-like things that we roast and often salt, tend to be very high in unsaturated fats, and are packed with vitamins and nutrients.

    Four of the biggest cohort studies in the U.S. have found consistent evidence that people who eat nuts are healthier, especially when it comes to their hearts. An analysis of those findings in 2009 noted that “epidemiologic studies have been remarkably consistent in showing a cardioprotective effect associated with increased nut intake.” Across these studies, researchers find that the more nuts you eat, the healthier you tend to be. Some of this is due to associations, of course. People who eat a handful of walnuts every day tend to be people who eat something closer to the Mediterranean diet (and indeed studies show the closer nut-eaters get to that diet, the healthier they are). (They also have the money to buy nuts—have you purchased pecans lately?? So, they are more likely to have money for other healthy, expensive foods, too.). But even after controlling for other factors, eating more nuts seems to have a protective effect.

    Yet for years, as several experts noted in the British Journal of Nutrition, nuts were largely ignored or even cautioned against. They attribute this to nuts’ high fat levels and caloric density. If you’re counting calories, nuts are costly. Even a small handful generally contains upwards of 150 or 200 calories. Ironically, though, it’s their calorie-packed fat that seems to be part of why they’re so healthy.

    You also may have heard of so-called “good fats.” These are the poly- and monounsaturated fats, which stand in stark contrast to saturated fats (and trans fats, the worst of them all, which are now largely banned from food production). Animal fats like meat and dairy contain mostly saturated fat. These solid-at-room-temperature fats tend to shift your cholesterol balance towards harmful LDL cholesterol, the kind that blocks up your arteries. Unsaturated fats are those that push your cholesterol towards beneficial HDL and lower triglyceride levels, and they’re why fatty foods like avocados and salmon—and, yes, nuts—are actually healthy. In fact, polyunsaturated fats are considered essential in the nutritionist sense, meaning your body can’t produce them on its own and so you must get them from your diet. (If you’ve ever heard of omega-3 fatty acids, you were actually hearing about a type of polyunsaturated fat, the other being omega-6.)

    Nuts are chock full of unsaturated fats of various kinds. Macadamia nuts, perhaps one of the most calorically dense of them all, has a whopping 22 grams of fat for every 12 nuts, according to the USDA National Nutrient Database. But 17 of those grams are monounsaturated, while only 3 are saturated, plus they contain 55 milligrams of omega-3s. Walnuts have upwards of 2.5 grams of omega-3s since 13 of their 18 total grams of fat are polyunsaturated. Good or bad, though, fat packs in more than twice the number of calories per gram as either protein or carbohydrates—nine calories per gram compared to their measly four—which is why they’re so caloric.

    On top of all their healthy fats, nuts also tend to be high in other nutrients. Many of them are packed with protein, contain fiber, and pack in some vitamin E to boot.

    Substituting in nuts for some of the protein and fat in your diet can genuinely help you to be healthier. Though their calorie count might scare you, plenty of research shows that claims they’ll boost weight gain are unfounded—people don’t gain weight from eating more nuts. But you can negate the health benefits if all you do is add some peanut butter to your snack list. As the Mayo Clinic notes, “just eating nuts and not cutting back on saturated fats found in many dairy and meat products won't do your heart any good.” Try just eating your toast (whole grain, of course!) with almond butter instead of slathering it in real butter. Eat a handful of walnuts instead of that full-fat yogurt. Because they’re packed with protein and fat, nuts will make you feel full for longer than carb-dense snacks, so they’ll also help you stave off hunger between meals. Go nuts. (Sorry, we had to!).
    sauce https://www.popsci.com/nuts-fats-hea...mZCT6gs#page-3
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  69. #1869
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    I share both your perspectives squeakymcgillicuddy and dubthang.
    Ditto. Gimme a black bean burger, please.
    By continuing to browse my posts, you agree to send me cookies.

  70. #1870
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    Know the signs...


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    Avoiding meat and dairy is ‘single biggest way’ to reduce your impact on Earth

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    Avoiding meat and dairy products is the single biggest way to reduce your environmental impact on the planet, according to the scientists behind the most comprehensive analysis to date of the damage farming does to the planet.

    The new research shows that without meat and dairy consumption, global farmland use could be reduced by more than 75% – an area equivalent to the US, China, European Union and Australia combined – and still feed the world. Loss of wild areas to agriculture is the leading cause of the current mass extinction of wildlife.

    The new analysis shows that while meat and dairy provide just 18% of calories and 37% of protein, it uses the vast majority – 83% – of farmland and produces 60% of agriculture’s greenhouse gas emissions. Other recent research shows 86% of all land mammals are now livestock or humans. The scientists also found that even the very lowest impact meat and dairy products still cause much more environmental harm than the least sustainable vegetable and cereal growing.

    The study, published in the journal Science, created a huge dataset based on almost 40,000 farms in 119 countries and covering 40 food products that represent 90% of all that is eaten. It assessed the full impact of these foods, from farm to fork, on land use, climate change emissions, freshwater use and water pollution (eutrophication) and air pollution (acidification).

    “A vegan diet is probably the single biggest way to reduce your impact on planet Earth, not just greenhouse gases, but global acidification, eutrophication, land use and water use,” said Joseph Poore, at the University of Oxford, UK, who led the research. “It is far bigger than cutting down on your flights or buying an electric car,” he said, as these only cut greenhouse gas emissions.

    “Agriculture is a sector that spans all the multitude of environmental problems,” he said. “Really it is animal products that are responsible for so much of this. Avoiding consumption of animal products delivers far better environmental benefits than trying to purchase sustainable meat and dairy.”

    The analysis also revealed a huge variability between different ways of producing the same food. For example, beef cattle raised on deforested land result in 12 times more greenhouse gases and use 50 times more land than those grazing rich natural pasture. But the comparison of beef with plant protein such as peas is stark, with even the lowest impact beef responsible for six times more greenhouse gases and 36 times more land.

    The large variability in environmental impact from different farms does present an opportunity for reducing the harm, Poore said, without needing the global population to become vegan. If the most harmful half of meat and dairy production was replaced by plant-based food, this still delivers about two-thirds of the benefits of getting rid of all meat and dairy production.

    Cutting the environmental impact of farming is not easy, Poore warned: “There are over 570m farms all of which need slightly different ways to reduce their impact. It is an [environmental] challenge like no other sector of the economy.” But he said at least $500bn is spent every year on agricultural subsidies, and probably much more: “There is a lot of money there to do something really good with.”

    Labels that reveal the impact of products would be a good start, so consumers could choose the least damaging options, he said, but subsidies for sustainable and healthy foods and taxes on meat and dairy will probably also be necessary.

    One surprise from the work was the large impact of freshwater fish farming, which provides two-thirds of such fish in Asia and 96% in Europe, and was thought to be relatively environmentally friendly. “You get all these fish depositing excreta and unconsumed feed down to the bottom of the pond, where there is barely any oxygen, making it the perfect environment for methane production,” a potent greenhouse gas, Poore said.

    The research also found grass-fed beef, thought to be relatively low impact, was still responsible for much higher impacts than plant-based food. “Converting grass into [meat] is like converting coal to energy. It comes with an immense cost in emissions,” Poore said.

    The new research has received strong praise from other food experts. Prof Gidon Eshel, at Bard College, US, said: “I was awestruck. It is really important, sound, ambitious, revealing and beautifully done.”

    He said previous work on quantifying farming’s impacts, including his own, had taken a top-down approach using national level data, but the new work used a bottom-up approach, with farm-by-farm data. “It is very reassuring to see they yield essentially the same results. But the new work has very many important details that are profoundly revealing.”

    Prof Tim Benton, at the University of Leeds, UK, said: “This is an immensely useful study. It brings together a huge amount of data and that makes its conclusions much more robust. The way we produce food, consume and waste food is unsustainable from a planetary perspective. Given the global obesity crisis, changing diets – eating less livestock produce and more vegetables and fruit – has the potential to make both us and the planet healthier.”

    Dr Peter Alexander, at the University of Edinburgh, UK, was also impressed but noted: “There may be environmental benefits, eg for biodiversity, from sustainably managed grazing and increasing animal product consumption may improve nutrition for some of the poorest globally. My personal opinion is we should interpret these results not as the need to become vegan overnight, but rather to moderate our [meat] consumption.”

    Poore said: “The reason I started this project was to understand if there were sustainable animal producers out there. But I have stopped consuming animal products over the last four years of this project. These impacts are not necessary to sustain our current way of life. The question is how much can we reduce them and the answer is a lot.”

    sauce https://www.theguardian.com/environm...249at_zOolab9I
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  72. #1872
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    Bananas would have less bruises if they stopped getting in so many fights. They think they are so tough when they are in a bunch, but get one alone by itself... instant bruises.

  74. #1874
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    I recently tried the Ikea vegan hotdog. The new plant-based frank costs 75 cents and is served with mustard, red cabbage and fried onions. It was pretty good... almost as good as their chickpea-based version of the iconic Swedish meatball, dubbed veggie balls. I'll give it


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    It's been a year since our last Ikea visit. I swear that there are real people actually living in those condo displays.


    update


    IKEA NOW SELLS 10-PACKS OF VEGAN HOT DOGS SO YOU CAN MAKE THEM AT HOME
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  75. #1875
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    Should You Go Vegan for the Sake of Your Gut?


    Around 10 years ago, Neil Potts, co-founder of vegan diner The Vurger Co, was working long hours in a stressful job when he started getting stomach pains.

    They came on once every few weeks, and lasted around 12 hours each time, for the next five years, but tests didn’t find anything more than a “slightly inflamed stomach”.

    Then Potts went on holiday to LA for a few weeks, and found himself eating healthier. He didn’t have much meat or dairy, either, which had previously made up a large part of his diet. His stomach pains disappeared, and when he returned to the UK, Potts embarked on a vegan diet, avoiding all foods animal-derived food, including meat, fish, eggs, dairy and honey.

    “Aside from my stomach pain going away, I also noticed a massive difference in my overall fitness,” Potts says on the first few months of going vegan.

    “I’d never felt healthier, I had more energy and better skin, and I couldn’t put the changes down to anything else. And I’m really not a miracle-cure kind of guy.”

    Potts says the trip made him realise how much the food we eat can affect our guts. Of course, not everyone is intolerant to meat or dairy, but most of us have felt the effects our diet can have on our general wellbeing.

    But our diet doesn’t just affect our guts in ways we can feel, as was the case with Potts. There is growing evidence it can also influence the structure and function of our microbiota, the trillions of bacteria living inside our guts, which can also impact our health. And some studies have found the vegan diet to be the healthiest.

    The vegan diet is typically classified as being lower in protein, calcium, saturated fat and salt. Since vegans have a more limited diet, it’s largely assumed what they eat is higher in dietary fibres, found in foods such as legumes, vegetables, nuts, seeds, fruits, and cereals, than an omnivore diet.

    These foods are undoubtedly among the healthiest we can eat – and the emerging consensus is that, as a general rule, foods that are well established as good for our general health are also thought to also be the best for our microbiomes, too. But the effects of a vegan diet on our guts isn’t that straightforward.

    Danilo Ercolini, professor of microbiology at the University of Naples, conducted a study which found most vegans and vegetarians, but only 30% of omnivores, had a diet comparable to the Mediterranean diet. That’s a diet high in legumes, vegetables and fruit foods, as well as exclusively using extra virgin olive oil, and low in cheese and sugar.

    He found that closely following the Mediterranean diet was linked to higher levels of short chain fatty acids in a persons faeces. These molecules are widely regarded as being important for the health of the colon, and the rest of the body.

    In follow-up research, Ercoloni found that polyphenols, the micronutrients found in some plant-based foods, are also useful for gut health, and have anti-inflammatory properties.

    Many health issues, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and obesity, stem from inflammation, Ercolini says. Having anti-inflammatory activity going on in the gut can help prevent the onset and development of certain diseases.

    Luca Cocolin, professor of agricultural microbiology at the University of Turin, Italy, has found in his research that vegetarians and vegans both had a set of metabolic pathways, which are reactions in cells, responsible for the function of the gut that omnivores didn’t.

    Omnivores had functions addressing the metabolism of components of meat, but vegans had functions related to the mobility of microorganisms including flagellin, which he says may protect against diseases including cancer.

    “I’m speculating, but a diet much more plant-based could help the development of functions that may protect from some disease, although I have no data yet to support this hypothesis,” he says.

    The vagueness of veganism

    Some researchers argue that it’s misleading to assume the vegan diet is always predominantly plant-based.

    Ricci Antonia, director of science at the Italian animal health organisation Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezi, recently analysed the guts of long-term vegans and found no differences between them and people who ate non-vegan diets.

    Antonia recruited more than 100 healthy people, a third of whom were vegetarian, a third vegan and a third omnivores, asked them to record what they’d eaten for two weeks, and took faecal samples from each of them to examine the diversity of their microbiome community.

    She was surprised to find no differences in the number or variety of gut bacteria between the three groups. But when she looked at the different proportions of nutrients in their diets, she found that all three groups were consuming far more than their recommended daily intake of fats, and not enough protein or carbohydrates. She says this is typical for a Western diet, whether vegan, vegetarian or omnivore, and that this is probably why their gut microbiomes were so similar.

    Ercolini argues that the vegan diet isn’t necessarily the healthiest. He also found in his study that many of the omnivores who had high adherence to the Mediterranean diet consumed fewer than three servings of animal protein per week. These omnivores had similar potential benefits for gut health in terms of microbiota and short chain fatty acids than the vegetarians and vegans whose diet resembled the Mediterranean diet.

    “For those who are vegan for health reasons, in my view they should rethink this, because it’s never good to be extreme in dietary choices,” he says.

    “The more diverse our diets, the better. That way, you get all different types of fibre. You can still be an omnivore and eat plenty of vegetables and avoid unhealthy foods such as processed foods, especially of animal origin.”

    Into the meat of it

    Researchers break down our diets into three categories: vegan, vegetarian and omnivore. But while several studies have shown differences in the gut between the vegan and omnivore diet, fewer have found many differences between the vegan and vegetarian diet. One reason for this may come down to their shared exclusion of meat.

    Wendy Dahl, assistant professor in of food science and human nutrition at the University of Florida, has found that a high-protein diet containing red meat is associated with increased production of TMAO, a metabolite associated with heart disease that is produced by gut microbes and absorbed into the body. Some studies have found that people who consume a vegan diet have lower levels of TMAO.

    The way a vegan diet can be particularly beneficial is if it contains large amounts of dietary fibre, argues Dahl. Dietary fibre isn’t digestible. Once it gets to the large intestine, it’s broken down by bacteria, and the products of this fermentation process can then be absorbed. The fermentation of carbohydrates, a source of fibre, produces short chain fatty acids.

    “For people who eat a high-protein, low-fibre diet, the lack of fibre available for bacteria means they ferment whatever’s there, including protein,” Dahl says. “This produces other compounds that are inflammatory. You want to feed the bacteria fibre rather than protein.”

    Gary Wu, professor of gastroenterology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has also found no differences between the microbiota of vegans and omnivores, but higher amounts of metabolites in vegans’ blood.

    He says that, while this could be because vegans tend to have a more plant-based diet, and are less likely to develop heart disease, it isn’t clear yet if any links between health and the gut microbiota are cause and effect.

    Research shortfalls

    “It’s a chicken-and-egg situation,” says Cocolin. “Researchers need to switch from observational to correlational studies. It’s complicated, but we need to reach a point where we demonstrate that a kind of activity in the gut is correlated with human health.”

    One issue comparing the health of long-term vegans with those following an omnivore diet is that a large number of vegans choose their diet for health reasons.

    This means they’re more likely to engage on other healthy behaviours too, such as regular exercise and eating more fruits and vegetables, and less likely to smoke and drink, according to research, and the gut microbiome is also affected by these lifestyle factors.

    There is also bad news for those omnivores and vegetarians who took part in Veganuary: if a vegan diet does cause any changes in the gut, these changes may only last as long as the person keeps up the diet.

    Researchers began studying the vegan diet’s effect on gut health back in the 1980s, but veganism wasn’t as popular then, so it was more difficult to study the effects of a long-term vegan diet. And researchers say it still isn’t yet clear if adopting a vegan diet can lead to any changes in the gut similar to that of a long-term vegan.

    Switching to a vegan diet has been found to change the composition of our guts within 24 hours, but these changes could be reversed after just 48 hours of reintroducing the previous diet.

    “Diet is a major component of our gut microbiota, but more by modulating gut bacteria than determining it,” Cocolin says.

    “You can change the modulation of the microbiota in matter of days, which will impact the way microbiota work and behave, but when you go back to original diet, the microbiota go back to how they were originally,” he says.
    sauce BBC - Future - Should you go vegan for the sake of your gut?
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  76. #1876
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    Last night's SNL had an interesting take on how meat producers can respond to veganism's growth:



    "Smokery Farms will only serve meat from animals that are individually stupid and bad"

  78. #1878
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    ^I watched it last night! Thanks for posting.

    The hypocrisy of loving animals and eating them... brilliant
    Last edited by cyclelicious; 03-05-2019 at 06:06 AM.
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    Ultimate Guide to Different Types of Kale and How to Use Them

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    Longtime health food staple kale became a trend at some point (thanks, Brooklyn), but it’s stayed so popular that now it’s just a fact of life. No longer destined just for juicers, it still gets the royal treatment on menus and even at home—including massages. Oh yeah. Those of us unafraid to get intimate with our food give the dark, bitter green a vigorous rubdown before chopping it up for a raw salad. This extensive guide returns the favor for your extra efforts, revealing the details of seven different types of kale and what to do with them, so you never get bored. And you always leave the table satisfied.

    An ancient member of the Brassica family, kale is the sometimes spicy, other times a bit sweet, usually slightly bitter ancestor of broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, and kohlrabi. “Kale has roots deep in the horticultural soul,” says Suzanne DeJohn in her report for the Gardening Association of America.

    The most common variety is deep green, but other kales are yellow-green, white, red, or purple, with either flat or ruffled leaves, according to Berkeley Wellness at University of California, Berkeley’s School of Public Health. The colored varieties — sometimes called salad Savoy — are most often grown for ornamental purposes, but they’re edible.

    You’ve probably heard (for some, ad nauseam) that kale is a superfood. Yes, this green is packed with protein, calcium, iron, vitamin A, fiber, and anti-cancer properties. And it has more vitamin C than any other leafy green. But “besides its good looks, flavor, and benefits to garden ecology, kale is good food,” DeJohn says.

    Kale is one of the few leafy greens that doesn’t shrink much when you cook it, and it’s great sautéed, baked, roasted, and stewed. Just don’t over-cook it, because it can get more bitter than it was when raw.

    Even better than a dry massage, us Kale University grads like to drizzle olive oil, salt, and lemon juice while rubbing the leaves together in our hands to quicken the massage’s process of breaking up the cellulose structure. That way, you’ll get a slightly sweeter, much silkier kale. Also, you can just cut it in thin, confetti-like ribbons. But always, always remove the ribs, whether you go raw or turn up the heat. You can trash those ribs or chop them up and throw them into a soup or broth later.

    Check out these seven kale varieties and how to eat them:

    Common Curly Kale

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    This is the type of kale you usually see in the grocery store. It’s a pale to deep green with large, frilly-edged leaves and long stems. It’s often sold as loose leaves bound together, even though it grows as a loose head. Put it in salad (using our softening tips), sauté, toss it in a hearty bean soup, or blend it in a fruit smoothie.

    Lacinato Kale (Dinosaur Kale, Tuscan Kale, Cavolo Nero)

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    his Italian variety of kale was grown by Thomas Jefferson in his garden at Monticello, according to Berkley Wellness. The dark blue-green, slender, long leaves have none of the curls and frills common in kales. Rather, the leaves are rumpled and puckered like savoy cabbage and curled under along the entire margin, DeJohn says. The leaf texture also looks a bit reptilian, so the coolest nickname for this kind of kale goes to the dinosaur. Lacinato is used for Tuscan soups and stews, but you could use it in salad too.

    Ornamental (Salad Savoy)

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    Frilly and fluffy, ranging in color from white to pink and to purple to magenta, this colorful variety is used on buffet tables for displays. It forms a rosette, which looks like an opened-up flower. While its leaves are somewhat coarse, it is edible. Try it as a way to add color and texture to your plate. Or a garnish, if you’re entertaining.

    Red Russian (Ragged Jack)

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    This kale heirloom looks like overgrown oak leaves in colors ranging from blue-green to purple-red. It’s essentially a rutabaga developed for its top growth rather than its root, DeJohn says. Among its major advantages, it tastes good (semi-sweet) raw in salads, and looks pretty too. Cold weather intensifies its color. It’s sweeter and more tender than common kale.

    Chinese Kale (Chinese Broccoli, Kailaan, or Gai Lan)


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    Chinese kale can be substituted for regular broccoli in many recipes. High in calcium, iron, vitamins A and C, it’s very popular for stir-fry dishes; you can also steam or boil it.

    Siberian Kale

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    One of the most cold-hardy varieties available (go figure), Siberian kale has enormous leaves and can take quite a beating from cold or pests, according to One Green Planet. It has gray-green ruffled leaves and is grown as a winter crop in the southern United States. This kale is better when cooked. Sauté it with some onions or shallots and bacon, then steam it with a bit of cider vinegar.

    Redbor Kale


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    The stunning 3-foot-tall hybrid can be both ornamental and edible. Its mass of well-curled reddish leaves with deep purple veins turns a solid, deep violet in cool weather, DeJohn says. Redbor is a great plant for an ornamental garden, where you occasionally pluck off few leaves to use as edible plate decor.

    sauce https://www.chowhound.com/food-news/...AZ1cOJ5AtFEA7M
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  80. #1880
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    Timely Kale post.
    My house is surrounded by prime ag land and one of the predominant crops is Kale. A very close colleague/trail builder that I am working with on a new trail design just last night, owns a seed development company and just took me through his greenhouses the other day to show me his kale seed production and his test plot fields where he's growing hordes of different varietys and cross pollinating for different characteristics in kale and it's all done under organic conditions. Really interesting stuff.

    Kale has really been off my food radar until very recently thanks to Costco. They have a packaged, pre washed kale pack that has many different varieties all chopped up in bits and they include a poppy seed dressing along with packages of pepita seeds and cranberries. The mix in a wrap, of course I'll add some chicken breast sometimes, is absolutely the shiznit! I went from never eating the stuff to eating it every day! I'm actually craving it! The textures are awesome and the flavors from all the different varieties really play off of each other.

    I don't know that we're the capital of Kale here but my region is big vegetable production and Kale is one of the predominant crops of our area. Good stuff!

  81. #1881
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    ^ love kale especially steamed
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    Vegan Powerlifter Becomes the “Strongest Man in California”

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    Vegan powerlifter and animal rights activist Nick Squires joined the United States Powerlifting Association (USPA) weight-lifting competition this week, snatching a gold medal.

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    Squires — who lives in Sacramento, California with his vegan wife, child, and 2 rescue dogs — started powerlifting in late 2013 then became vegan for ethics in May 2014.

    “At the time, I wasn’t even sure if the two were compatible, but I knew I couldn’t continue to eat animals,” he said.

    Since then, he has competed in various open powerlifting competitions, placing first in 3 of them, second at the 2018 USPA Drug Tested California State Championships, then qualifying and competing at the 2018 IPL Drug Tested Powerlifting World Championships in Las Vegas.

    Now, he has been able to win a gold medal in the 242 lb open raw division and join the top 10% of the whole open raw class.

    “Sharing my story on Twitter has inevitably lead to hundreds of questions from the skeptical to those who want to make similar steps in their own life,” Squires shared.

    “I’m hoping to put as much knowledge as I can to help more people than I’m able to on a one-on-one basis.”

    Squires continues to speak up for the animals and educate the public regarding the benefits of veganism for the health, environment, and the animals.

    sauce https://vegannews.co/vegan-powerlift...Sz3AXlXAKIAf1c

    He posted his win on Reddit too : https://www.reddit.com/r/vegan/comme..._class_at_the/
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  83. #1883
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    No spelling errors and it wasn't written in Comic Sans... looks good to me


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  84. #1884
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    Women warriors of Zimbabwe. Plant-based powered too. A group of women is helping to protect one of the largest remaining elephant populations in Africa.

    Happy International Women's Day!



    Zimbabwe women's anti-poaching group protecting elephants: Hunt my animals and I will catch you
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  85. #1885
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    I think the milk board is dazed and confused

    Maybe the dairy industry needs to illustrate it's product containers with images of factory farms with rows of sad cows hooked up to milk machines... just so there's no confusion . The non dairy products can continue to use almonds, oats, rice, hemp, soy etc


    Don't blame dairy's decline on consumer confusion

    The National Milk Producers Federation is petitioning the FDA to prohibit dairy-free products from being labeled with terms like milk or yogurt. Such government action would be costly for plant-based producers and it would also be bad for consumers.

    Industrialized meat, milk and egg production is an affront to our humanity. It undermines our health and destroys the environment, while most citizens unwittingly support it with their daily food choices and tax dollar subsidies. But as consumers learn more about the negative consequences of factory farming and how it violates their values and interests, more people are seeking alternatives.

    Animal agriculture is facing increasing competition from more humane, sustainable and healthful products in the marketplace. The industry resorting to heavy-handed measures to maintain their preferential status and profitability. They’ve lobbied for anti-whistleblower “ag-gag” laws to prevent consumers from witnessing the cruelty of factory farming because when citizens are informed, they don’t want to support it. Agribusiness’ latest tactic is trying to undermine the increasing sales of plant-based products by regulating and preventing commonly used food labels. They’re going to court and lobbying to ban products like almond milk or soy milk, from being labeled as “milk,” spuriously arguing that these descriptions are confusing to consumers. In fact, these labels are more clear and truthful than labels used on cartons of cows’ milk, and consumers are not confused.

    Last year, a federal appeals court dismissed a lawsuit brought by dairy interests against Blue Diamond, an almond milk producer, stating “[no] reasonable consumer could be misled by [Blue Diamond’s] unambiguous labeling or factually accurate nutritional statements.” And, a survey of 1000 adults by Lincoln Park Strategies found that fewer than one in ten respondents believed that branded versions of soy milk, almond milk, cashew milk, and rice milk contained milk from cows. The authors reported that “…a significant majority of people understand correctly which products contain and which do not contain milk from cows when shopping for various types of products labeled using the word ‘milk’.” Consumers are knowingly and increasingly purchasing alternatives to cows’ milk.

    All milks, whether from plants or animals, should be labeled accurately and descriptively, including milk from cows, which should be labeled “cows’ milk.” A Zogby poll of more than 1,000 adults in the U.S. conducted in January 2019, found that 82 percent agree that the source of cows’ milk should be disclosed on labels, just like other milks. Zogby reported, “Many more adults these days are health conscious, and care about how their food is being sourced. It’s not surprising more than four in five adults support cow’s milk being required to label the source of its milk, if soy and almond milk are required to.” Makers of plant-based milks and other alternatives to animal products should be allowed to continue labeling their products in a clear and truthful manner, using everyday terminology that consumers understand.

    Replacements for cows’ milk are commonly described with terms like “vegan,” “dairy-free,” or “non-dairy,” and consumers are increasingly seeking them out. According to the agribusiness journal Feedstuffs, “Per capita consumption of fluid milk beverages decreased by close to 22% from 2000 to 2016, yet during the same period, consumption of non-dairy plant-based milk alternatives increased by triple digits.” This trend is expected to continue, and it’s not because people are confused. It’s because people are informed.

    Meanwhile, plant-based “meats” are also gaining ground with consumers. As in the case of dairy, the slaughter industry has attempted to quash competition by controlling how the word “meat” can be used and making a bogus argument that citizens are confused. In fact, companies selling veggie burgers and other plant-based alternatives to animal flesh want people to know their products are vegan, and they describe them accurately with labels like “made from plants” or “plant-based.” More and more consumers are trying them. The plant-based movement is gaining traction, which led The Economist to declare 2019, “The Year of the Vegan.” This lifestyle is soaring, especially among millennials, with a quarter of 25- to 34-year-olds saying they are vegans or vegetarians.

    Animal agriculture depends on secrecy and euphemisms because its conduct is disturbing and outside the bounds of acceptable conduct in our society. If dairy and meat marketers really wanted consumers to know what they are buying, they would be transparent, and they would use descriptions like “bovine mammary secretion” for cows’ milk and “carcass” for meat from slaughtered animals, but they don’t. The good news is that consumers are becoming more aware, and they are acting on ethical, environmental, and health concerns, which means that the days of factory farming are numbered.

    sauce https://thehill.com/opinion/energy-e...1YOfM1hZvTrJVg
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    If something seems to be too good to be true... it probably is

    Does apple cider vinegar actually do anything?


    If something claims to be a miracle cure—for cancer, for overeating, for run-of-the-mill acne—you should start by assuming it isn’t. Life is hard and long and there are no easy shortcuts, especially when it comes to your health. That includes the internet darling that is apple cider vinegar.

    Proponents of the fermented liquid seem to think it can cure just about any ailment, and sometimes advise taking shots of it to stave off illness. Cider vinegar is just one in a sea of trendy superfoods that plague the web, but it’s a great example of how easy it is to ascribe unfounded health benefits to generally innocuous ingredients. Apple cider vinegar won’t magically make your problems go away, no matter how much you believe in it. Most of the “evidence” in support of its benefits comes from shoddy journals and pseudo-doctors.

    In fact, there seems to be just one thing it could theoretically be good for. Well, actually, two. Apple cider vinegar is a great way to catch flies. Way better than honey.

    So here’s a round-up of some of the most common suggested uses for what is essentially just half of an excellent salad dressing—and the reasons that the remedies (mostly) don’t work

    Weight loss/heart disease
    A handful of mouse and rat studies (mostly in subpar “scientific” journals that don’t require the same rigor as legitimate journals do) seem to have convinced the internet that taking shots of vinegar can stave off diabetes. But human studies have shown such small weight-loss benefits as to be considered insignificant.

    It’s possible that vinegar is somewhat helpful to your metabolism, but the results so far suggest it won’t be a miracle treatment. According to a couple of small studies, the acetic acid in vinegar could stave off blood sugar spikes that otherwise prompt your body to store fat, but that mechanism hasn’t been thoroughly proven yet. If you’re trying to improve your cardiovascular health or shed some pounds, you’re far better off doing high-intensity interval training combined with some type of strength training, plus eating a balanced diet with plenty of fiber and whole foods. Those interventions have much better evidence supporting them.

    Microbiome
    In general, it’s true that fermented foods are good for your gut health. The bacteria doing the fermenting stick around in vinegar like they do in yogurt, and consuming those microbes can help seed your gut’s microbiome. But while apple cider vinegar could theoretically be microbiome-friendly, there isn’t really evidence to support that idea. A far more assured path is to just eat more fiber. Garlic, onions, and bananas all taste much better than a dose of vinegar, and are excellent sources of dietary fiber. Fiber helps create an environment your gut bugs will love. And if you’re still hankering for a probiotic food, go for fermented solids like pickled veggies, sauerkraut, or kimchi.

    Cancer
    Just...no. Please do not try to treat your cancer by drinking vinegar of any kind. Even if Japanese scientists really did kill cancer cells by exposing them to apple cider vinegar, that does not prove that vinegar will treat cancer inside your body. If you just leave cancer cells in a petri dish for too long they will die, but that doesn’t mean we can treat cancer by telling patients to wait it out. Please please please see a doctor if you have cancer. The treatments are scary and certainly far from perfect, but they’re still your best shot.

    Teeth whitening
    No, no, no, no. Do not try to whiten your teeth with vinegar. Acid, whether it be in lemons or soda or apple cider vinegar, destroys your protective layer of enamel permanently. Please try any of the widely available whitening kits, or see your dentist, if you’re that concerned about yellowing teeth.

    Sore throat
    Again, there are no studies on this because, frankly, sore throats aren’t of the utmost concern to most researchers. That being said, drinking acid will probably not help your sore throat feel better.

    Your pain is caused by swollen glands in your neck, plus inflammation produced by your body as it tries to fight off an infection. It’s not like the bacteria or viruses are sitting inside your throat and you can just kill them with vinegar. The problem is in your blood vessels. Anti-inflammatory drugs will be much more likely to give you relief, plus cough drops for that tickling sensation. The actual consumption of the vinegar won’t hurt you (though the strong smell might make you a bit nauseated), but as we said before, the acid isn’t good for your teeth. Drinking it or even just swishing it around in your mouth is generally inadvisable.

    Warts
    Warts are caused by human papillomavirus, and apple cider vinegar cannot kill a virus inside of your body. If you’ve got a wart, you should freeze it off yourself or go to a dermatologist to get them to do it for you. All you’ll do with vinegar is give yourself a minor chemical burn.

    Pimples
    It’s true that the acid in vinegar could help kill the bacteria and remove the dead skin that cause zits, but it’s also really irritating to your skin. If you feel compelled to use vinegar instead of an over-the-counter remedy, at least dilute it down so you don’t give yourself a chemical burn. And again, if your acne is stubborn, go see a doctor.

    Anything to do with your vagina
    DO NOT PUT VINEGAR IN OR ANYWHERE NEAR YOUR VAGINA OR VULVA. Your vagina is self-cleaning, and all your vulva (that’s the outer bit) needs is a gentle soap cleanse. The pH balance inside your vagina is delicate, and messing with it is likely to give you bacterial or yeast problems.

    And now, presenting the only thing apple cider vinegar might maybe be okay for: Dandruff
    There is a chance that vinegar might actually help with your dandruff. Depending on what’s causing the flakes on your scalp, apple cider’s antimicrobial properties could help treat any fungi growing up there, or possibly help loose skin slough off so it washes away with the vinegar rinse.

    That being said, there are lots of shampoos specifically formulated to treat dandruff, and if those aren’t giving you relief you should really just head to a dermatologist. There are [multiple causes of dandruff] that they can identify for you, along with medications they can prescribe. Plus, it might not be dandruff. Several conditions cause flaky skin and other scalp problems that look like dandruff, but aren’t. A dermatologist will be able to figure that out and can help you treat whatever it is. And as an added bonus, any medication they prescribe you won’t make your head smell like salad dressing.

    sauce https://www.popsci.com/does-apple-ci...v5f8Amw#page-7
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  89. #1889
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    A&W Canada Just Released A Brand New "Beyond Meat" Breakfast Sandwich And Twitter Is Freaking Out

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    Last year A&W became the first major fast-food restaurant chain in Canada to introduce a Beyond Meat burger. The burger became iconic for "bleeding" just like real meat while still maintaining its vegan status. Needless to say, the burger has been a massive hit, prompting A&W Canada to introduce their next big vegan meal option: the Beyond Meat breakfast sandwich.

    Imagine a traditional sausage and egg breakfast sandwich topped with a slice of cheddar cheese. It's the classic breakfast meal with a vegan twist! The new sandwich was released this morning, with thousands of Canadians rushing to their nearest A&W for a chance to try the new meatless product. So far, its been a massive hit.

    sauce https://www.mtlblog.com/news/canada/...zDd5yNBPYnGuQ0


    I'm excited about new plant based options but like most fast food, probably high in sodium. If you're on a reduced sodium diet, it's probably not good for you. (the beyond meat 4oz patty is approx 380mg sodium) If you're high risk for cardiovascular disease, sure. If you're not, less than 1000mg sodium per meal is not so bad considering the average daily consumption in Canada is 3400mg.

    It's still processed
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    Here in the states Carls Jr. recently added a beyond meat burger to their menu. I haven't stepped foot in a fast food place since i became a vegetarian over 15 years ago. Having the beyond meat burger with cheese and fries definitely does not qualify as a healthy meal, but it was pretty cool to be able to go through a drive-through burger joint and grab a quick bite.

  91. #1891
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    Happy Ides of March!

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    I'll have spinach with avocado... hold the dressing and stab it gently
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    Interesting combo


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    Ramsay is prickly and maybe opportunistic but his message does support more plant-based choices and alternatives


    GORDON RAMSAY’S ADVICE TO CHEFS: ADAPT TO VEGANISM


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    Gordon Ramsay no longer hates vegan food. And he doesn’t think anyone else should, either.

    The chef told self-confessed vegan food-hater, television personality Piers Morgan to “go [expletive] himself” in a recent interview with James Corden on “The Late Late Show.”

    Ramsay made the comments after Corden informed him of Morgan’s response to Ramsay’s latest Tweet. Ramsay posted on Twitter about adding a vegan roast to the menu in his London restaurant “Bread Street Kitchen.”

    Alongside a video of the new dish, he wrote, “It’s happened. The vegan roast has landed at [Bread Street Kitchen].” Morgan Tweeted back, “Oh FFS Ramsay…no, you as well? This looks utterly revolting,” he then added several throwing-up emojis.

    Morgan’s disdain for vegan food is widely publicized. At the beginning of the year, he made his feelings about Greggs new vegan sausage roll explicitly clear after he tried the pastry on “Good Morning Britain,” which he co-hosts with presenter Susannah Reid. Reid praised the sausage roll, but Morgan wasn’t so taken, proceeding to spit it out after a few bites.

    The general public doesn’t seem to share Morgan’s views on vegan food; Greggs’ vegan sausage roll pushed sales at the bakery chain through the roof, helping it to top £1 billion for the first time ever in the first quarter of 2019. And a recent study — conducted by supermarket chain Sainsbury’s — revealed that 91 percent of Brits are now actively cutting back on their meat consumption.

    Despite previous negative comments he has made about veganism, Ramsay also agrees that Morgan should move with the times. He told Corden, “So Piers Morgan is now a food critic?! Go and f*ck yourself! Seriously? Really?” He added, “Veganism is on the rise, we’ve got to adapt and eat a slice of humble pie.”

    The celebrity chef has added a number of plant-based options to his restaurant’s menus. In Singapore’s location of Bread Street Kitchen, he recently launched the “bleeding” vegan Impossible Burger. In London, he offers a number of vegan roast options in his restaurants, as part of his “Roast Revolution” campaign.

    A blog post on the Bread Street Kitchen, titled “The rise of the vegan roast,” says, “If the roast is going to survive, it needs to evolve to meet the expectations and diets of our generation. Hence the rise of the vegan and vegetarian roast.”
    sauce https://www.livekindly.co/gordon-ram...r75jLntDP66qF4
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  95. #1895
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    This is worth repeating


    Sugary Drinks Linked to Heart Disease

    A new studyadds confirmation to what we have already been seeing in the data – drinking a lot of sugar-sweetened drinks, like soda, is linked to an increased risk of heart disease and death in men and women. This may seem obvious, but it is worth repeating precisely because it is a pretty straightforward bit of health advice that tends to get lost in the noise of bad health advice.

    For example, during my visit a few years ago to Google I noted that the company tries to offer a healthy environment for its workers, providing the space and time to exercise, and a freely available snack room filled with healthful snacks. However, their refrigerator was filled with drinks that were sweetened with “all natural cane sugar” and none with artificial sweetener. This is backwards, falling for recent health fads and the appeal-to-nature fallacy. It doesn’t matter if sugar comes from sugar canes, sugar beets, is raw, natural, non-GMO, organic, or whatever. In the end it is all crystalized sucrose. And it’s really no different than high fructose corn syrup.

    What matters is how many calories you are consuming from concentrated simple sugars. We evolved to like the taste of sweetness because simple carbohydrates provide much needed calories and glucose. We evolved in a calorie-limited environment, and so seek out high-calorie food. But we then used technology to hack our love of sweet foods. It didn’t take modern technology either. Native Americans figured out how to get syrup from maple trees, and that innovation is linked to a spike in various diseases, such as tooth decay, obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. Honey is another low-tech source of concentrated sugar.

    But nothing beats table sugar or similar sources of concentrated calories and sweetness. We have also become accustomed to certain foods being sweet, such as our beverages. Sugar-sweetened beverages are now a significant course of empty calories and excess carbohydrates. One 12 oz can of Coke or similar soda is 140 calories. If you drink 72 oz per day, which is a typical amount to drink, that’s 840 calories – every day. That’s massive. An average daily caloric need is about 2,000 calories, so you are already almost half way there. Even if you have just one can per day, that’s enough calories to equal 14.6 pounds in one year.

    You could, of course, decrease your food consumption to compensate, but then you are decreasing food with actual nutritional benefit.

    So, it’s no surprise that regular consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks is associated with increased risk of heart disease and death. It contributes to obesity and diabetes, which are huge risk factors. But the data shows it is an independent risk factor even if you control for things like obesity. I doubt this is due to a direct effect of the sugar, but is likely due to all the secondary metabolic and nutritional effects that come from consuming regular calories through concentrated sugar.

    The new study is not actually new, in that it is taking an updated look at databases that have existed for years and already have produced studies with similar results. For example, here is a study from 2012 looking at the same data set in men, the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. For women they used data from the Nurses’ Health Study. So the new study is confirming what we already new from the same data.

    The data also shows that if you replace sugar-sweetened drinks with ones that use artificial sweeteners (are you paying attention, Google?) then the risk of heart disease and death is decreased. Of course it is. An yet people will prefer “all natural” sugar cane to artificial sweeteners because they have been confused by the heavily marketed health halo around anything arbitrarily labeled as “natural”.

    Artificial sweeteners have also been demonized by the usual suspects pushing conspiracy theories and raging against anything establishment. I recently reviewed the published evidence regarding artificial sweeteners and the bottom line is that they are safe and a healthy option for weight management. So listen to the evidence, not the marketing hype.

    In the current study, for men, there was an association with greater health and consumption of drinks with artificial sweeteners. In the women half of the study, having one drink per day with artificial sweeteners was associated with lower risk of heart disease, but more than one with a slightly increased risk. Although this correlation was very weak, and the authors say it needs to be confirmed with additional data. Such weak correlations are likely to be found in large data sets, and do not mean much by themselves – especially in the face of many other studies showing the opposite. Further, this is correlational only and even if you try to account for confounding factors, it’s very difficult to account for them all.

    That’s why we have to look at all the scientific evidence – and when you do that, it’s pretty clear that there is a net health advantage to consuming drinks with artificial sweeteners because it helps people limit their sugar intake. But, if you have any lingering concerns, there is always straight water.

    So yet again, it is better to listen to the consensus of scientific evidence, rather than marketing hype and fears. Avoid sugar-sweetened drinks. They are empty calories that overwhelms your body’s ability to safely metabolize the sugar-load. We did not evolve to consume large amounts of refined sugar. That is best left for an occasional treat. Meanwhile, low-calorie sweeteners are a perfectly safe alternative. They are among the most studied food ingredients in the world, and every country and health organization that has reviewed the mountain of evidence agrees that they are safe. Don’t listen to the conspiracy theories.


    sauce https://theness.com/neurologicablog/...4DoU5e-_ziTYI0
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  96. #1896
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  97. #1897
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    MORGAN FREEMAN TURNS HIS 124-ACRE RANCH INTO BEE SANCTUARY

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    Iconic actor Morgan Freeman recently converted his 124-acre ranch in Mississippi into a bee sanctuary. The actor first began caring for bees in 2014 and recently imported 26 beehives from an Arkansas farm to expand his insect sanctuary. At the ranch, Freeman feeds the bees and allows them to engage in their activities as pollinators without harvesting their honey.

    “There is a concerted effort for bringing bees back onto the planet,” Freeman said during an interview on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon Show. “We do not realize that they are the foundation, I think, of the growth of the planet, the vegetation …” The actor is planting bee-friendly vegetation such as magnolia trees, clover, and lavender to help the bees thrive. “I have not ever used the beekeeping hat with my bees,” Freeman said. “They haven’t stung me yet, as right now I am not trying to harvest honey or anything, but I just feed them … I also think that they understand, ‘Hey, don’t bother this guy, he’s got sugar water here.’”

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/3/morgan-fr...X7ueGRp_eqRW9c
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  98. #1898
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    MORGAN FREEMAN TURNS HIS 124-ACRE RANCH INTO BEE SANCTUARY

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    Iconic actor Morgan Freeman recently converted his 124-acre ranch in Mississippi into a bee sanctuary. The actor first began caring for bees in 2014 and recently imported 26 beehives from an Arkansas farm to expand his insect sanctuary. At the ranch, Freeman feeds the bees and allows them to engage in their activities as pollinators without harvesting their honey.

    “There is a concerted effort for bringing bees back onto the planet,” Freeman said during an interview on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon Show. “We do not realize that they are the foundation, I think, of the growth of the planet, the vegetation …” The actor is planting bee-friendly vegetation such as magnolia trees, clover, and lavender to help the bees thrive. “I have not ever used the beekeeping hat with my bees,” Freeman said. “They haven’t stung me yet, as right now I am not trying to harvest honey or anything, but I just feed them … I also think that they understand, ‘Hey, don’t bother this guy, he’s got sugar water here.’”

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/3/morgan-fr...X7ueGRp_eqRW9c
    Some say that the beehives with "tame" or domesticated bees are out-competing the wild bees and that will eventually lead to no more bees (plus maybe no more plants).
    get fresh air and stay fit :thumbsup:

  99. #1899
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  100. #1900
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    VEGAN DIET DECREASES COLON CANCER RISK BUT PALEO AND KETO SHOW INCREASE

    Following a vegan diet can reduce the risk of colon cancer, according to a new study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

    The study, which evaluated 77,000 adults, found that on average eating a vegan diet heavy in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, and nuts, may lower the risk of colon cancer by 16 percent. For rectal cancer, a meat-free diet lowers the risk by 29 percent. For flexitarians or meat-reducers, or those who ate meat less than once a week, the colon cancer risk was lowered by eight percent.

    However, medical professionals have found that diets high in animal products, like keto and paleo, often do not decrease the risk. In fact, one recent study linked the regular consumption of red meat with colon cancer in women. For 17 years, researchers tracked 32,000 women; those who regularly ate red meat increased their risk of developing colon cancer, compared to those who consumed a smaller amount or no meat at all.

    The ketogenic diet, or the “keto” diet, according to dietician Tamara Deuker Freuman, is also a high-risk diet in terms of serious disease. The diet is high-fat, meaning 70 to 80 percent of calories come from fat, and only 10 to 20 percent of calories are derived from protein, and 5 to 10 percent from carbohydrates. The diet has soared in popularity over the last few years, hailed for its weight-loss benefits; however, Freuman is holding up “a giant red flag” to the lifestyle.

    The dietician wrote in an article for U.S. News & World Report at the beginning of the year, “The ketogenic diet is a textbook example of a high cancer-risk dietary pattern,” she noted. “[It’s] very high in animal fat in general and red meat in particular, and very low in fiber-rich fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains.”

    She warned that everyone, not only older people, need to take the health risks of following these kinds of diets more seriously. “Colon cancer is not just something that happens to grandparents; it increasingly affects their millennial grandchildren as well,” she noted.

    Freuman isn’t the only one warning people away from keto and paleo diets; earlier this year, new research suggested that low-carbohydrate and high-meat diets may shorten a person’s life expectancy in general. Out of 432,000 people, those who consumed a moderate amount of carbohydrates (around 50 percent of their daily calorie intake) showed lower mortality rates than those who followed low carbohydrate diets.


    sauce https://www.livekindly.co/vegan-diet...PzJNseiHnjjioA
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  101. #1901
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  102. #1902
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    Happy Easter, in advance! You can send a Fudgeina—vegan fudge in the shape of a vagina—to anyone worldwide, including yourself. Yeet!

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-vegnews.fudgeina.jpg


    United Kingdom-based Fudgeina recently developed an innovative gift : a vagina-shaped vegan fudge that can be delivered anonymously in a discreet box. “The internet is full of services to send your friends (or enemies) dicks, poop, or potatoes; but I couldn’t find a way to send a vagina, so I thought why not start it myself,” Fudgeina founder Matt Garbutt told Metro UK. “While searching for what I could make the vaginas out of, I stumbled upon fudge, and then the name really made itself. The fudge is made by our artisan fudge maker, and then hand poured into our one of a kind mold.” Garbutt’s vegan fudge vaginas (technically vulvas) are available in strawberry, vanilla, and a special crème egg-inspired (à la Cadbury) Easter flavor, along with a solid chocolate vagina variety. Fudgeina offers free shipping across the United Kingdom and can deliver its vegan vaginas, with an optional hand-written note, to customers worldwide.
    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/3/cadbury-c...YQYqRjZW5XQ_9I
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  103. #1903
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    The centers of these vegan (cookies and cream) donuts are 100% calorie free

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    A nice caturday treat. Raining all day during our long adventure walk in Toronto.
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  104. #1904
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    IKEA DEBUTS CBD-INFUSED VEGAN SWEDISH MEATBALLS


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    The furniture giant aims to make navigating its stores a far more pleasurable, and tasty, experience.

    International furniture company IKEA is introducing another vegan menu option to its in-store bistros. In line with current trends, IKEA has developed CBD-infused vegan Swedish meatballs which will debut at select stores beginning on April 20 of this year. The chickpea and vegetable-based balls are seared with a proprietary food-grade CBD oil then covered in CBD-infused vegan gravy. IKEA test kitchen recipe developers claim that consuming CBD with food allows the diner to slow down while eating and fully appreciate and savor each bite. Due to the relaxing and anxiety-reducing benefits of CBD, IKEA purports that these meatballs may also relieve some of the stress of furniture shopping and assembly. The company stresses that CBD does not contain marijuana (THC), and the meatballs do not contain any psychoactive ingredients. The CBD oil used is safe for all ages and legal in all 50 states.

    For now, stores in Washington, Oregon, California, Nevada, Colorado, and Sweden will serve this new vegan item, though the company plans to add it to the menus of all cafés by the end of 2020. A serving of six meatballs with gravy will cost $4.20, or 38.98 krona in Sweden. Catering and take-home trays which feed a family of four will roll out one week after the initial launch. The IKEA kitchen is also working on a frozen product which will include the vegan meatballs, CBD-infused gravy, and a packet of CBD oil for sautéeing and drizzling.

    This may be IKEA’s first venture into CBD products, but pending its success, the company said it is looking to expand the line with other food products. IKEA representative Hinga Dinga Durgen told VegNews that a CBD lingonberry juice is near the end of its consumer testing stage, as well as a frozen take-home CBD lingonberry pie. Further down the line, the company is hoping to partner with a startup Lithuanian hand sanitizer brand, TidyWipe, and install complementary CBD hand wipe dispensers throughout every store. IKEA executives claim that this new CBD initiative will not only create an overall more enjoyable shopping experience, it will also benefit employees and the company’s bottom line. Based on scientific trials, customers were far less likely to get lost in the store due to CBD’s calming abilities. After ingesting 5 mg of CBD, customers reported feeling “more present” and being able to recall their steps to find their way out of the store unaided. During these trials, shoppers also purchased higher-dollar items and spent time eating and socializing in the café afterward, driving sales in both furniture and food departments. The only downside, according to researchers, was that several customers were inclined to take prolonged naps in the bedroom displays.

    In addition to these new vegan Swedish meatballs, other plant-based options in IKEA cafés include vegan hot dogs, oat smoothies, and non-dairy soft-serve—the latter set to debut in the United States this summer.
    Sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/4/ikea-debu...1LdCDmKY8MFxqk

    April 1
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  105. #1905
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    If there was hummus dip I'd be allover that

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  106. #1906
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  107. #1907
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    Sadly, that cover is a photoshop.

  108. #1908
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    If there was hummus dip I'd be allover that

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    Gotta remember this one for next year!
    By continuing to browse my posts, you agree to send me cookies.

  109. #1909
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Sadly, that cover is a photoshop.
    Darn!
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  110. #1910
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    We celebrated Chris' birthday with an awesome vegan lunch at Planta on Queen West


    SHANGHAI SLAW- green papaya, cabbage, lemongrass, coriander, shaved onion rings
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-56236292_2348786878699083_8943950698756702208_n.jpg

    SEAWEED SALAD- soya, sesame dressing, cucumber
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-56527879_2348745342036570_581220971931762688_n.jpg

    RAINBOW ROLL- ahi watermelon, avocado, crispy mushroom, gochujang
    SPICY TUNA ROLL- ahi watermelon, tempura, spicy aïoli, pickled watermelon

    POTATO TRUFFLE- cabbage, coconut milk lemongrass broth
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  111. #1911
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    Bad Diets Are Responsible For More Deaths Than Smoking, Global Study Finds

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    About 11 million deaths a year are linked to poor diets around the globe.

    And what's driving this? As a planet we don't eat enough healthy foods including whole grains, nuts, seeds, fruits and vegetables. At the same time, we consume too many sugary drinks, too much salt and too much processed meat.

    As part of a new study published in The Lancet, researchers analyzed the diets of people in 195 countries using survey data, as well as sales data and household expenditure data. Then they estimated the impact of poor diets on the risk of death from diseases including heart disease, certain cancers and diabetes. (They also calculated the number of deaths related to other risk factors, such as smoking and drug use, at the global level.)

    "This study shows that poor diet is the leading risk factor for deaths in the majority of the countries of the world," says study author Ashkan Afshin of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. Unhealthy diets are "a larger determinant of ill health than either tobacco or high blood pressure," he says.

    So which countries do best when it comes to diet? Israel, France, Spain and Japan were among the countries with the lowest rates of diet-related disease. The U.S ranked 43rd, and China ranked 140th. It should be noted that there were data gaps for intake of key foods in some countries, so some estimates could be off.

    "Generally, the countries that have a diet close to the Mediterranean diet, which has higher intake of fruits, vegetables, nuts and healthy oils [including olive oil and omega-3 fatty acids from fish] are the countries where we see the lowest number of [diet-related] deaths," Afshin says. And as we've reported, the Mediterranean pattern of eating is linked to a reduced risk of heart attacks and memory decline.

    I asked Afshin which ranking surprised him and why. "Mexico is interesting," Afshin told me. The country ranked 11th on the list. On the one hand, people in Mexico consume a lot of whole grain corn tortillas, he says — and whole grains are beneficial. But on the other hand, "Mexico has one of the highest levels of consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages." It's hard to say how the benefits of whole grains may influence the risks of too much sugar, but Afshin says it underscores a problem seen in many countries: the overall pattern of eating could be improved.

    Of course, there are obstacles to eating well, including access and affordability. As the Trump administration and U.S. lawmakers debate whether able-bodied people who don't work should be entitled to public food assistance, it's clear that many people around the globe struggle to afford healthy foods.

    And at a time when 800 million people around the globe don't get enough to eat, and 1.9 billion people weigh too much, it's important to remember that hunger and obesity are both forms of malnutrition. And the costs are staggering. Consider a recent report from the Center for Strategic and International Studies, which notes: "Worldwide, malnutrition costs $3.5 trillion annually, with overweight- and obesity-related noncommunicable diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, adding $2 trillion."

    Globally, these findings may serve as a reminder that when it comes to ending hunger and improving health, people don't just need food. They need nourishment. If you fill up on a diet of packaged snacks made from refined-carbohydrates and sugary sodas, you may get the calories you need. But those calories will put you on a path toward disease.

    So, what would happen if everyone around the globe began to eat a healthy diet, filling three-fourths of their plates with fruits, vegetables and whole grains? We'd run out. Yep, that's right. A recent study published in the journal PLOS One by researchers at the University of Guelph found that there would not be enough fruit and vegetables to go around.

    "We simply can't all adopt a healthy diet under the current global agriculture system," says study co-author Evan Fraser, director of the Arrell Food Institute at the University of Guelph. Fraser says we produce too much fat, too much sugar and too many starchy products. So, food companies and farmers play a role, too. "At a global level, we have a mismatch between what we should be eating, and what we're producing," Fraser told me.

    Perhaps that's why the authors of the new Lancet study say their findings point to the need for coordinated, global efforts. Improving diets won't be easy: A range of initiatives may be needed, including nutrition education and increased access to healthy foods, as well as rethinking agricultural production.

    sauce https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt...JAcfQ56mS3XFPA
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  112. #1912
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    Here's another article about diet on a global basis, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

    What we aren't eating is killing us, global study finds
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    I'm glad to see Burger King offering some plant based stuff!

    Worth noting the Impossible Burger was tested on animals and is pretty far from a health food.

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    Short film "73 Cows". Great story, really well done. No animals harmed.

    https://vimeo.com/293352305/descript...cSdmdiXWe1YaIQ

  116. #1916
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    ^ Heart-wrenching, thought-provoking and uplifting all at the same time.

    I really hope they’re both doing well and the farm is flourishing.
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  117. #1917
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    Vegans have a 'healthier biomarker profile'

    Over recent years, vegetarianism and veganism have experienced a boost in popularity.

    Although people might switch to a plant-based diet for a range of reasons, many choose this path for its health benefits.

    For instance, there is some evidence to suggest that a diet that includes fewer animal products reduces the risk of colorectal and prostate cancers.

    Also, vegetarianism appears to reduce the risk of diabetes and help control the condition for those who already have it.

    There is also evidence to suggest that adopting a vegetarian diet can boost weight loss.

    Why the benefits?
    Scientists are steadily unpicking how plant-based diets can improve health. It is clear that there are many factors involved.

    One obvious place to start is that vegetarians and vegans do not eat red meat or processed meat products, both of which experts consider to increase the risk of cancer.

    As well as choosing not to eat meat, people who follow a plant-based diet also tend to consume more vegetables, fruits, and nuts. With this increase in plant matter comes a similar increase in nutrients, fiber, and other potentially beneficial compounds.

    Vegetarians and vegans also typically have higher levels of compounds with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity, such as carotenoids and flavonoids, in their bodies. According to the team behind the new study, these chemicals protect against cell damage and chronic diseases.

    Also, vegetarians are likely to have higher levels of lignans and isoflavones in their blood serum; experts believe that both of these can protect against cardiovascular disease and cancer.

    Recently, a group of researchers at Loma Linda University School of Public Health in California took a detailed look at the metabolic changes that a vegetarian diet can bring. They published their findings in The Journal of Nutrition.

    The scientists wanted to understand whether dietary choices made a significant difference to the levels of disease-fighting markers in blood, urine, and fat tissue. To explore, they recruited 840 participants from five dietary categories:

    vegans, who consume no animal products
    lacto-ovo vegetarians, who consume eggs and dairy more than once per month but consume no meat or fish
    pesco-vegetarians, who consume fish once or more times each month but avoid meat
    semi-vegetarians, who eat meat more than once per month but less than once each week
    nonvegetarians, who eat meat at least once each week


    The analysis
    The scientists analyzed plasma, urine, and adipose (fatty) tissue from each of the participants. They tested for a range of markers, including carotenoids, isoflavonoids, saturated fat and unsaturated fats, and vitamins.

    As expected, the vegan group had the highest levels of bioactive markers that prevent disease.

    For instance, the highest levels of carotenoids, isoflavones, and enterolactone were present in the vegans, followed closely by vegetarians.

    Vegans also had the highest levels of omega-3 and the lowest levels of fatty acids.

    "An awareness that a healthier biomarker profile is obtained with a plant-based diet should motivate people to be proactive about dietary habits that promote good health and prevent disease."
    Lead study author Fayth Miles, Ph.D.


    Also, interestingly, Miles explains that the "results for semi-vegetarians look very similar to [those of] nonvegetarians."

    The study involved a large number of participants, which gives the findings weight. However, it is worth noting that the scientists only took tissue samples once for each participant.

    Also, they do not know how these biomarkers might fluctuate depending on nondietary factors, such as an individual's metabolic rate and their microbiome.

    The findings are good news for those who follow a plant-based diet, but the study will also be useful for researchers. Currently, scientists depend on participants to report their dietary intake using food diaries, which is not always reliable. As the study authors explain:

    "Under- or overreporting is common, attributable to subjects' perceptions of social desirability, poor recall, questionnaire design, and other issues."

    However, if researchers can develop a reliable way of assessing diet using biomarkers, it may help validate findings and avoid some of the issues that come with self-reporting.

    Understanding how nutrition affects health is a complex area of study; no two people eat the exact same diet. Hopefully, by understanding the biomarker profiles associated with different foods, it might be easier to pick out links between variations in levels and increased risk of disease.

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  118. #1918
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    Unhealthy diets now kill more people than tobacco and high blood pressure, study finds

    Poor diet is associated with 1 in 5 deaths worldwide, according to a new, large study. That's equivalent to 11 million deaths a year, making unhealthy eating habits responsible for more deaths than tobacco and high blood pressure.


    "Poor dietary habits, which is a combination of high intake of unhealthy foods, such as red meat, processed meat, and sugar-sweetened beverages and a low intake of healthy foods such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains, and seeds, overall causes more deaths than any other risk factors globally," study author Dr. Ashkan Afshin, an assistant professor of Health Metrics Sciences at the University of Washington, told CBS News.

    The study, published in the journal The Lancet, tracked trends in consumption of 15 dietary elements from 1990 to 2017 in 195 countries. These included diets low in fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds, milk, fiber, calcium, seafood omega-3 fatty acids, polyunsaturated fats, and diets high in red meat, processed meat, sugar-sweetened beverages, trans fatty acids, and sodium.

    An analysis found that an estimated 11 million deaths were attributable to unhealthy diets in 2017. The causes of these deaths included 10 million deaths from heart disease, 913,000 deaths from obesity-related cancers, and nearly 339,000 deaths from type 2 diabetes.

    Diets high in sodium, low in whole grains, and low in fruit together accounted for more than half of all diet-related deaths around the world. Out of the 195 countries studied, Israel had the lowest rate of diet-related deaths; Uzbekistan had the most. The U.S. ranked 43rd.

    Focus on eating more healthy foods
    Strikingly, the researchers found more deaths were associated with not eating enough healthy foods rather than with eating too many unhealthy foods.

    "While historically the conversation around diet and nutrition has been focused on a high intake of unhealthy foods, mainly salt, sugar and fats and reducing their consumption, our study shows that in many countries, the main problem is low intake of healthy foods," Afshin said.

    For example, not eating enough whole grains was the leading dietary risk factor in several countries, including the United States. High sodium was the leading risk factor in many Asian countries, while a diet low in fruits was the biggest problem in sub-Saharan Africa and low intake of nuts and seeds ranked first in Mexico.

    On the flip side, consuming too much red meat, processed meat, trans fat, and sugar-sweetened beverages were also among the risk factors.

    Afshin said these findings have major health implications. "This concept of increasing intake of healthy food should be added to current policy debates for improving diets," he said. "It's important both policy makers and the food industry work together to be part of the solution to increase the consumption of not only fruits and vegetables but also whole grains, nuts, seeds, and legumes."

    He said instead of just focusing on messages that people should avoid unhealthy foods like processed meat and sugary drinks, "the ideal scenario would focus on healthy replacements for unhealthy foods. That should be the focus of public health interventions."

    The authors note several important limitations to the study. While the research uses the best available data, there are gaps in the data available for intake of key foods and nutrients around the world, which increases the statistical uncertainty of these estimates.

    Still, they conclude that people in almost every corner for the world could benefit from rebalancing their diets and consuming more healthy foods and less unhealthy foods.

    In an accompanying editorial, Professor Nita Forouhi of the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine said that despite the limitations, the study's findings "provide evidence to shift the focus, as the authors argue, from an emphasis on dietary restriction to promoting healthy food components in a global context."
    sauce https://www.cbsnews.com/news/unhealt...uJSI9dVCVmGxx4
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  119. #1919
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    What to Eat Instead of Meat

    There’s been lots of news coverage over the last while that hasn’t been exactly favourable to the meat industry. Processed meats were classified as a group 1 carcinogen, and red meat was tagged with the ‘probable’ label in terms of cancer-causing ability. Papers have come out talking about the environmental toll animal agriculture takes on this planet. I’ve talked about the differences in how animal proteins react in the body versus plant proteins. Even Canada’s new food guide emphasizes choosing plant-based proteins. All of this may have you looking for a little something else to fill your plate. So, I’m here to help with some suggestions for great meat substitutes. Let’s take a look at what you can eat instead of meat.

    Mushrooms
    Mushrooms make a great substitute for meat. They are low in fat, calories and cholesterol free, making them a much healthier option. Mushrooms are a really versatile food with a pretty neutral flavour. This makes it easy to marinate and spice them as you wish. They sub in nicely in dishes like shepherd’s pie, pasta dishes and more. Varieties like king oyster mushrooms work really well in any meal where you’d typically use shredded meat. Portobello mushrooms are also a popular choice. They work well sliced into a stir fry, or fajitas, or marinated and grilled up as a portobello burger or portobello steak.

    Tofu
    Tofu is another great versatile food. It’s a great source of protein, iron and calcium. It comes in many forms, which allows it to be used in multiple ways. Soft or silken tofu is great for dips and adding to smoothies. Anything where a smooth consistency would work well. Firm or extra firm is great for crumbling into tofu scramble or tofu crumbles. They also work well for tofu steaks or cubes. Tofu also has a very neutral flavour. This allows you to use it in both sweet and savoury preparations.

    Tempeh
    Tempeh is another good substitute that is high in protein as well as minerals like iron, calcium and magnesium. It’s made from fermented soybeans that have been pressed into a block. The result is a texture that is firmer and meatier than tofu. That meaty texture makes it a popular choice as a meat substitute. It can be sliced into tempeh steaks or strips or even chunks that resemble ribs. It can also be flavoured any way you like, which is why tempeh bacon is totally a thing. Strips work great on sandwiches, wraps, salads and even pizza.

    Beans
    Beans, beans, the magical fruit… Laugh all you want, but these beauties are full of powerful nutrition. They are packed with protein, fibre and all kinds of vitamins and minerals. In case you’ve forgotten, fibre does all kinds of great things for your body, and most people don’t get even close to their recommended daily intake. They help to feed the good bacteria in your gut and can blunt the effect of sugars, even in the meal consumed after them! That’s a pretty awesome superpower.

    Beans are an easy sub in a lot of dishes. They work really well in burritos, soups and stews, rice dishes or even just tossed on top of a salad or bowl. You can also slip beans into baked goods like brownies, and make hummus from them. Versatile and full of goodness. What’s not to love?

    Lentils
    Lentils come with all the same health benefits of beans, in a smaller package. They make a great starting point for those who have a hard time with beans, as they are smaller. Certain varieties, like red lentils or split peas, are, as the name suggests, split. This allows them to break down nicely in a soup or stew, adding some nice creamy texture as well as some filling bulk to the dish. They sub well in dishes like shepherd’s pie or pasta sauce. You can even form them to make things like lentil loaf or lentil meatballs. They also work great added to salads or bowls.

    Seitan
    Not exactly a whole food, seitan is made from vital wheat gluten. While it is not suitable for those with gluten intolerance, it is a popular choice among those who can tolerate gluten. This is due to the fact that once properly prepared, seitan’s texture most closely resembles meat. It’s also neutrally flavoured, so you can spice it up any way you like. Seitan can be used in a number of ways. I’ve even seen it pass convincingly as ‘steak’ or ‘chicken wings’. It’s high in protein and iron, but not something I’d suggest to eat every day. More of a once-in-awhile novelty.

    Eggplant
    Eggplants, also known as aubergines, are low in fat, cholesterol free and rich in fibre and antioxidants. With its meaty texture and umami flavour, it makes a great substitute for meat. You’ve probably seen it used in many Italian dishes, like eggplant parmesan. It can also be sliced and grilled for sandwiches and wraps, or even stuffed and baked.

    Jackfruit
    If you’ve never tried jackfruit as a meat substitute, then you are missing out. It comes in a giant fruit that requires a little work to break down. Once cooked through, jackfruit is typically shredded and has a texture remarkably similar to pulled pork. It can be cooked in whatever marinade you like and generally works best as a shredded meat substitute.

    Cauliflower
    Oh, cauliflower. One of my favourites. This cruciferous vegetable is very low in fat and calories, but just brimming with nutrients like vitamin C, vitamin K and folate. It also contains some pretty amazing antioxidants with cancer-fighting abilities. As such, you should definitely try adding cauliflower to your daily cruciferous veggie intake.

    You can season and roast a whole head of cauliflower like a roast, or slice it and grill like a steak. Cauliflower florets are also delicious roasted in the oven to add to salads and bowls. My favourite preparation is probably the cauliflower hot wing. Yes, I said hot wings. Coat those lovely little florets and bake them in the oven. They are seriously delicious.

    Potatoes
    Potatoes are one of the most satiating foods out there. You’ve seen them prepared in lots of different ways. Typically, as a side, such as scalloped potatoes, mashed potatoes roasted potatoes or oven fries. Or even twice baked, like these delicious gems.

    Who said potatoes need to be relegated to the ‘sides’ section of the menu? I mean, they do work well as an all-purpose side, but they can be used for so much more than that. If you think a potato can’t be considered a main dish then you’ve never loaded up a baked potato or sweet potato. I love to top these with greens, beans, and all kinds of sautéed vegetables. Add a little drizzle of your favourite sauce and you’re good to go with a hearty and satisfying meal.

    Quinoa

    Quinoa, technically a pseudo-grain, makes a great substitute for meat in many dishes. It’s naturally gluten-free and full of protein, fibre and lots of important minerals. It can be added to soups and stews to add some bulk, tossed onto a salad or bowl, or even formed into balls to make quinoa bites.

    I personally love adding some beans, spices and sautéed veggies and using that mixture in place of taco meat.

    Nuts
    Nuts and nut butters are high in protein, which makes them a great substitute for meat in your diet. They also contain other important minerals, in differing amounts, depending on the nut. Minced up, nuts like walnuts can work really well to add some texture to a sauce you’d typically add meat to. Just a word of warning, that while full of healthy fats, nuts are pretty high in fat and calories. So perhaps not a sub you want to be using every day if you’re trying to release some weight.

    Soy Curls
    Soy curls are basically dehydrated strips of soy, made completely from soybeans, with no added fats or flours. They are high in fibre and protein, which makes them a great meat substitute. I would file these under that category ‘minimally processed’, which means these are a-okay on a whole food, plant-based diet. Nothing harmful added, and nothing healthy taken away.

    They come dehydrated, and after rehydrating, can be added to a number of different dishes. Their flavour is rather neutral, so you can season in any style you prefer. They have a meaty texture, similar to chicken, so these would be well accepted by any non-vegans you may have to feed.

    Carrots
    Right about now you’re thinking I’ve lost my mind, but I promise you I haven’t. Carrots made the list for one main reason, carrot dogs! Now, I know this sounds like some crazy hippie shit, but seriously, give it a try. Once marinated and cooked through, the taste and texture are remarkably similar to a hotdog, without the saturated fat, nitrates and, oh yeah, carcinogens, you get with the old version.

    If you’re feeling fancy, you can also try carrot lox. Carrots sub really well for salmon in this classic, brunch-style dish.

    The Bottom Line
    There you have it, lots of alternatives to meat that you can use in your next meal. There are other meat substitutes on the market, but I’ve tried to list the least processed alternatives here. Many packaged alternatives are either highly processed or contain oils. They also tend to be more expensive than simple plant foods.

    Whether you’re new to plant-based eating or just trying to reduce the amount of meat in your diet, these ideas should help spark some creativity in your kitchen. Don’t be afraid to open your mind a little and change your outlook on what needs to be on your plate. It can take some getting used to, as many of us grew up with meat as the main part of our meals. But just because it’s always been, doesn’t mean it always must be. Experiment and get creative, before long you’ll be rocking the meat-free dishes.

    sauce https://mentalforlentils.com/meat-su...elDhEDJ8307NWc
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  120. #1920
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    Carrot dogs!? I have never heard of this one. Will have to give them a try.

  121. #1921
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Carrot dogs!? I have never heard of this one. Will have to give them a try.
    They are a big hit when my wife makes them for a big event.. they go fast and everyone talks about them the rest of the day.

  122. #1922
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    Interview with Kevin Smith and Rich Roll.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-igwbehn.jpg

    About 610,000 people die of heart disease in the United States every year. That means America's number one killer claims 1 out of every 4 deaths.
    . . . . .
    Not all heart attacks are fatal. But when your heart's left anterior descending artery becomes 100% blocked, the result is a massive heart event known as The Widowmaker.
    Few survive it's devastating clutch.
    . . . . .
    Kevin Smith is the rare exception that proves the rule.
    . . . . .
    The arch villain in his own personal superhero comic book narrative, Kevin's Widowmaker nemesis failed in it's dastardly quest to claim his young life. Instead, like Spiderman in the aftermath of that fateful bite, it made our protagonist hero stronger -- more convicted about purpose, family and art.
    . . . . .
    One might even say it gave him superpowers -- a new life animated by an urgent productivity fueled by positivity. An emboldened creativity. And, more than anything, a spirit ennobled.
    . . . . .
    This week's guest beat the odds. But this should come as no surprise for those well versed in the Kevin Smith canon. Because Kevin has always been an outlier. An exception to the rule. A fiercely independent voice who has been successfully cutting against the grain for as long as he can remember.
    . . . . .
    Today the charismatic master storyteller shares his most amazing tale to date -- the story of Kevin Smith.
    . . . . .
    As a long time fan of Kevin, it was an absolute delight and honor to spend a few hours with him. I love everything about this exchange. I hope you do too.
    Enjoy✌🏽🌱 - Rich
    sauce

    https://www.richroll.com/podcast/kev...Y53VHP-V7TXOLo
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  123. #1923
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    Boxed Mac n' Cheese Contains a Chemical You Don't Want to Eat


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    Anyone who's pondered the powder inside boxed macaroni and cheese has probably intuited that it's not terribly healthy. There's just something about powdered food products that sets off alarm bells. A new report, though, suggests a more concrete reason to be wary: That cheese powder may contain phthalates, a group of chemicals linked to birth defects and learning and behavior problems in children.

    The study, from a group of organizations that make up the Coalition for Safer Food and Processing, examined 30 cheese products, which were bought in grocery stores in the United States and shipped directly to a testing lab. All but one tested positive for phthalates, with the highest concentrations found in the cheese powder in boxed mac and cheese; ten varieties of mac and cheese were tested (including some labeled organic), and all showed high levels of phthalates.

    "The phthalate concentrations in powder from mac and cheese mixes were more than four times higher than in block cheese and other natural cheeses like shredded cheese, string cheese, and cottage cheese," Mike Belliveau, executive director of the Environmental Health Strategy Center, told The New York Times.

    One org in the coalition, the Environmental Health Strategy Center, along with three other advocacy groups (Ecology Center, Healthy Babies Bright Futures, and Safer States), urges consumers to pressure manufacturers to ensure their products are phthalate-free. It's directing that pressure at Kraft Foods, which makes most of the two million boxes of mac and cheese sold every day in the United States. The groups believe that if Kraft takes action, smaller producers will follow. It's worked before—the company recently removed artificial dyes from products aimed at children following a petition from consumers. (Kraft did not respond to Tonic's request for comment, nor did it respond to the Times.)

    Phthalates aren't intentionally added to food products. Instead, they're found in plastic materials such as tubing (where they're added to increase flexibility) used in food processing. From there, and from some types of packaging, they can seep into food. In an effort to keep children from consuming phthalates, the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission has banned six types of them from children's toys. Europe has gone further, banning them from products that contact fatty food, which is especially good at absorbing phthalates. The Food and Drug Administration allows them to be used, classifying them as indirect food additives.

    Research suggests that relatively small amounts of phthalates can disrupt hormone production. Specifically, they block testosterone production in pregnant women, which can affect the reproductive development of male fetuses, leading to birth defects, infertility, low sperm count, and a heightened risk of testicular cancer later in life. Exposure to phthalates in young children has been linked to learning and behavior problems, including aggression and hyperactivity.

    "Mounting scientific evidence links phthalates to problems with brain development. Pregnant women's exposures to these chemicals in products and food may put their babies at higher risk for learning and developmental disabilities," Maureen Swanson, director of the Healthy Children Project at the Learning Disabilities Association of America, said in a statement.

    Unfortunately, phthalates are called "the everywhere chemical" by the National Institutes of Health, which advises consumers trying to avoid exposure to "support companies committed to producing phthalate-free products." For now, that also means avoiding boxed mac and cheese.



    Correction (7/13/2017): A previous version of this story said that nine out of ten boxes tested contained phthalates. In fact all varieties of mac and cheese tested contained the chemicals.


    sauce https://tonic.vice.com/en_us/article...6YiD75BS_FT0gw
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  124. #1924
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    6 TIPS FOR LOSING WEIGHT ON A VEGAN DIET

    Up your protein, lower your soy, and as always: go for the greens

    According to a study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, individuals who follow a vegan diet for approximately 18 weeks shed, on average, four pounds more than those who follow animal-based diets. While this fact is great for anyone looking to lose weight, conversion to a plant-based regimen and weight loss are not always synonymous.

    Many who switch to a vegan diet for weight-loss reasons often find themselves filling the meatless void with an array of plant-based processed food. Luckily, a veg diet is so much more than packaged food that just happens to be animal-free, especially for those looking to lose weight. By following these six tips, you’ll fit into your favorite pair of jeans in no time, all while doing good for animals and the environment.

    1. Review the vegan food pyramid
    The foundation of the vegan food pyramid is greens and vegetables followed by fruit and whole grains. This is an updated version of MyPyramid—the food guide that replaced the Food Guide Pyramid in 2005—which emphasized grains, bread, cereal, and pasta as the foundation of a good nutritional regimen. Although the vegan food pyramid serves as a guide, caloric intake and portion control are key factors for any healthy weight-loss program.

    2. Eat greens
    The versatility of spinach, broccoli, Swiss chard, bok choy, Brussels sprouts, and zucchini makes dark leafy greens a wonderful addition to any meal. These foods are ideal for weight loss because they are the “most nutrient-dense healthy items” and “are extremely low in calorie and high in fiber,” says Lisa Odenweller, CEO of Santa Monica-based superfood café Beaming. The high-fiber content keeps you satiated throughout the day while helping you avoid unhealthy snacking. Other high-fiber options include fruit (be mindful of the sugar content) and raw tree nuts (almonds, walnuts, and cashews), which are packed with protein and fiber and can help lower cholesterol.

    3. Up your protein
    Consumption of protein-rich food is vital in many weight-loss programs because protein fills you up faster; thus, you need less food to be satisfied. According to Stephanie Goldfinger of vegetarian website Cooking for Luv, proteins are available in many forms, which makes them convenient to incorporate into meals because they can be eaten raw or cooked quickly. Protein powders are ideal for a grab-and-go breakfast or mid-day smoothie, while other plant-based proteins such as tempeh, beans, lentils, quinoa, and oats are versatile and can serve as the main component of a veggie burrito, salad, or stir-fry.

    4. Limit processed soy

    Soy products can be the easiest and most convenient “go-to” items when transitioning to a vegan diet. Soy isn’t necessarily unhealthy, but it is imperative that attention be paid to the amount of processed products in a meal plan. For instance, a tofu scramble for breakfast, soy veggie burger for lunch, and pad Thai with tofu for dinner is excessive. Instead, choose vegan cheese made with nuts, a black bean burger, or a pad Thai with vegetables and tempeh for whole-food versions of your favorite foods.

    5. Prepare healthy meals
    Meal planning is a vital component to ensure proper nutrition and weight loss, and, thankfully, supermarkets now sell pre-packaged vegetables that are table-ready in minutes. Examples of fast-and-easy dishes include quinoa bowls with tempeh; a mixed stir-fry blend of broccoli, carrots, and mushrooms; eggplant cutlets with marinara sauce, vegan cheese, and basil; and soba noodles with greens. If these meals are beyond your scope, meal delivery services such as Purple Carrot and meal-planning services such as Forks Meal Planner provide easy-to-follow recipes that are pre-measured and dietitian-approved.

    6. Get exercise and stay hydrated
    Healthy meals, water, and exercise are key components for any successful weight-loss program. People should engage in 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity weekly in order to burn calories and lose weight. High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) is a form of cardiovascular interval training focusing on alternating short periods of intense anaerobic exercise with less-intense recovery periods. To achieve maximum results, HIIT should be practiced three times a week and supplemented with jogging or hiking, says Jorge Cruise, trainer and author of Tiny and Full. And don’t forget to stay hydrated! Drinking a minimum of 64 ounces of water daily keeps your body cleansed, which improves fitness and overall health.

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2018/6/6-tips-fo...Cw3n0K5d5KfZPg
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  125. #1925
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    Not specifically vegan/vegetarian but an interesting article:

    The Land of Immortals: How and what Japan's oldest population eats

    A few highlights incase you don't want to go to the link:

    Nearly two-thirds of the residents of Okinawa are still functioning independently at age 97. That meant they were in their own homes, cooking their own meals and living their lives fully -- at nearly 100 years old!

    The elders there are less likely than their counterparts in the United States to have heart disease, dementia or certain cancers.

    Remember this term: hara hachi bu. Translation: Stop eating when you are 80% full. With all the talk about calorie restriction, this notion is often hard to incorporate into your life, especially in a "clean your plate" culture.
    With hara hachi bu, the philosophy is that you should still be a little hungry when you push the plate away.


    I'm not very good at hara hachi bu, even though I lived in Japan.
    By continuing to browse my posts, you agree to send me cookies.

  126. #1926
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    6 TIPS FOR LOSING WEIGHT ON A VEGAN DIET
    I recently went oil-free and I'm losing weight while eating my fill. That coincides with not eating tofu, since it's sticks to the pan so badly without oil.

  127. #1927
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    6 TIPS FOR LOSING WEIGHT ON A VEGAN DIET



    4. Limit processed soy

    Soy products can be the easiest and most convenient “go-to” items when transitioning to a vegan diet. Soy isn’t necessarily unhealthy, but it is imperative that attention be paid to the amount of processed products in a meal plan. For instance, a tofu scramble for breakfast, soy veggie burger for lunch, and pad Thai with tofu for dinner is excessive. Instead, choose vegan cheese made with nuts, a black bean burger, or a pad Thai with vegetables and tempeh for whole-food versions of your favorite foods.
    Limit processed soy, but replace it with processed vegan cheese, veggie burger, or lower processed tempeh? That doesn't seem to make sense to me. I do agree that tempeh is a better alternative to tofu, but unless the cheese and burger are made in house or are home made, they are just as processed.

  128. #1928
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    Interesting read, thanks! I think this helps point out one of the bigger downfalls of the western world which is that we are always looking for a fix to an issue instead of seeing the entire picture. The Okinawans have an entire lifestyle that allows them to lead healthier lives. Personally, I am working toward that myself. My diet has always been good, but I need to ride more, and work less. I also need to move out of the city.

  129. #1929
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    A Guide to Sustainable Eating
    Have you considered the effects of what you eat on the planet, and made changes that will protect not only the Earth but also your health and the well-being of generations to come?

    I suspect most of you already do many things to help preserve the viability of the planet we all call home. Perhaps you recycle glass, plastic and paper and compost organic waste; shop with reusable bags; rely heavily on public transportation or bicycles or, failing that, at least drive fuel-efficient cars.

    But have you given serious thought to the planetary effects of what you eat and made changes that will protect not only terra firma and surrounding waters but also your health and the well-being of generations to come?

    In January, The New York Times described a comprehensive new report from the EAT-Lancet Commission on Food, Planet and Health. It was compiled by 37 scientists and other experts from 16 countries, with the aim of establishing a global food economy that could combat chronic diseases in wealthy nations like ours and provide better nutrition for poor ones, all without destroying the planet. The scientists’ goal was to outline a healthy sustainable diet that could feed the nearly 10 billion people expected to inhabit the world by 2050.

    For more than a century, most Americans have been eating far too high on the hog for the sake of their own health and the health of the planet. In 1900, two-thirds of our protein came not from animals but from plant foods. By 1985, that statistic was reversed, with more than two-thirds of our protein coming from animals, primarily beef cattle. They consume up to eight pounds of grain to produce one pound of meat and release tons of greenhouse gases in the process while their saturated fat and calories contribute heavily to our high rates of chronic diseases.

    As Dr. Walter C. Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and a contributor to the Lancet report told Nutrition Action Healthletter, “We simply cannot eat the amounts of beef that we’re now consuming and still have a future for our grandchildren.”

    In an editorial, The Lancet wrote: “Intensive meat production is on an unstoppable trajectory comprising the single greatest contributor to climate change. Humanity’s dominant diets are not good for us, and they are not good for the planet.”

    The Lancet report does not insist that everyone become a vegetarian or vegan, but does set as a goal that people in wealthy countries limit consumption of red meat — beef and lamb in particular — to one 3-ounce serving a week, or one 6-ounce serving every two weeks. You can be somewhat more generous with pork, poultry and fish, which are better for your health and less damaging to the earth. The grain-to-meat ratio for poultry and hogs is only about 2.5 to 1, and the fat in fish is mostly unsaturated and high in omega-3 fatty acids.

    But you would do best for your health and the planet by gradually adopting a diet that derives most of its protein from plants — including legumes and nuts — with farmed seafood as your primary animal food along with moderate amounts of poultry and eggs. The fact is, we don’t need nearly as much protein as most Americans now consume. Studies in both animals and people have shown that high-protein diets limit longevity.

    Chickpeas and lentils account for a large percentage of the protein in my current diet, which has gradually become heavily plant-based. A favorite recipe starts with 2 cups of cubed butternut squash and 1 cup of coarsely chopped onion tossed with 1 tablespoon of olive oil, roasted on a sheet pan at 450 degrees for 20 minutes. Combine this with a 15-ounce can of drained chickpeas tossed with 2 teaspoons of curry powder, ¼ teaspoon coarse salt and 1 tablespoon olive oil that has been roasted separately on a sheet pan for 15 minutes. Yum! For more ideas, check out Menus of Change 2018 conference recipes.

    I often have what some may consider an unusual breakfast — soup laden with baby spinach and/or kale and roasted baby carrots, and a salad supper with salmon, tuna, low-fat chicken sausage, beans or chickpeas for protein. An alternate breakfast consists of slices of banana topped with peanut butter. Hummus on whole-wheat bread or crackers with grape tomatoes is a favorite lunch or snack.

    Another critically important change is in our consumption of carbohydrates, nearly half of which come in the form of nutrition-deficient unhealthy carbs: mostly refined starches like white bread and white rice, added sugars and potatoes, all of which contribute to the rampant incidence of obesity and Type 2 diabetes in this country. Nearly all my carbohydrates come from beans, whole-grain breads and milk, and I’m gradually decreasing consumption of my favorite treat: low-fat ice cream.

    As Dr. Willett pointed out, “Switching from refined starches to whole grains doesn’t make a big difference to the environment, but it does for your health.”

    My biggest failing vis-à-vis the EAT-Lancet dietary advice is the amount of dairy products — primarily nonfat, lactose-free milk and nonfat yogurt — I consume. Dr. Willett suggests only one serving a day while I usually consume three, making dairy a large portion of my protein and calcium intake.

    Suggestions about dietary fats mimic those you’ve been hearing for years: stick with unsaturated vegetable oils like olive, canola, soybean and corn oils, but steer clear of palm oil, which is high in saturated fats and its production is responsible for massive destruction of tropical rain forests needed to protect both the earth’s climate and diversity of wildlife.

    Coconut oil is currently enjoying a moment in dietary fame; even though it is a highly saturated fat, the particular type of fat in coconut oil gives a greater-than-usual boost to blood levels of HDL cholesterol, which is considered heart-protective. Dr. Willett suggests limiting it to occasional use, perhaps for Thai cooking or (do we dare?) making a pie crust or other baked goods that call for a solid fat.

    The EAT-Lancet Commission emphasized that its advice to eat more plant-based foods and fewer foods from animals is “not a question of all or nothing, but rather small changes for a large and positive impact.” It pointed out that “foods sourced from animals, especially red meat, have relatively high environmental footprints per serving compared to other food groups,” which Dr. Willett called “unsustainable.”

    But even if environmental issues are not high on your list of concerns, health should be. As the commission concluded, “Today, over two billion adults are overweight and obese, and diet-related noncommunicable diseases including diabetes, cancer and heart diseases are among the leading causes of global deaths,” risks now being exported worldwide.


    sauce https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/08/w...Ad6xbrwGRAfM5k
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  130. #1930
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    Since going vegan /plant-based 5 years ago, I get asked this often. The short answer is "plants" but here is another explanation

    PROTEIN REQUIREMENTS FOR VEGANS—KEY RECOMMENDATIONS

    From the 1970s to the 1990s, people widely believed that vegetarians and vegans ran severe risks of protein deficiency. Much of this concern arose from the first bestselling vegetarian advocacy book, Diet for a Small Planet (published in 1971), which offered protein recommendations that, in hindsight, were needlessly stringent.

    Today, many vegans show disregard for the topic. In fact, many some vegans dismiss all concerns about protein intake. But belittling the importance of protein is as unwise as believing that vegans are taking grave risks with their health. The truth is that while it’s easy for vegans to get plenty of protein, it’s also easy to come up short. And in fact, it’s fair to assume that many vegans fall far short of achieving an optimal protein intake. So if you believe that protein needs don’t merit attention you could be setting yourself up for trouble.

    Perhaps the main source of confusion about this topic relates to a dire medical condition called kwashiorkor. The reason you may never have heard of kwashiorkor is because it arises from an extreme protein deficiency, which basically unheard of in thriving parts of the world. It’s impossible to develop kwashiorkor without a diet that’s extraordinarily protein deficient. In fact, kwashiorkor only appears in areas of famine, or among people with severe eating disorders. Relatively tiny amounts of protein are all it takes to avoid kwashiorkor, so for obvious reasons this deficiency disease is unheard of in the vegan community.

    But just because you don’t have kwashiorkor doesn’t mean your protein intake is even close to ideal. What’s more, even blood tests can’t reliably tell you if your intake is a bit short of ideal. Instead, there are a variety of symptoms that may be associated with deficiency:

    chronic fatigue
    high blood sugar or triglyceride levels
    inability to maintain sufficient muscle mass
    depression
    While there are countless terrible things about meat, milk, and eggs, it’s undeniable that all these foods are rich in protein. So if you stop eating animal products and don’t replace them with vegan foods that are protein-rich, there’s a possibility that your intake will decline from adequate to insufficient. Fortunately, just a little effort can ensure your protein needs are nicely met on a vegan diet.

    RECOMMENDED PROTEIN SOURCES AND DAILY INTAKE
    VeganHealth.org recommends a daily intake of 1 to 1.1 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. In practice this means a 68 kilogram (150 pound) adult needs to take in about 70 grams a day. What’s more, much of this protein ought to be rich in the amino acid lysine. Beans are rich in lysine, whereas rice, wheat, and nuts are significantly lower in this amino acid.

    If you crunch the numbers and see how this advice translates to everyday eating you’ll discover that you may need to make a concerted effort to cover your needs. One way to step up your intake is to get into the habit of incorporating rich protein sources into the majority of your meals, including foods like:

    Soy milk
    Tofu
    Seitan (Wheat Gluten)
    Beans, including lentils and split peas
    Nuts & peanuts
    Green peas
    Orgain and other vegan protein powders
    Quinoa
    Buckwheat
    Clif Bars and Probars
    One food that is surprisingly low in protein is commercially-made almond milk. The stuff generally contains loads of sugar but very little protein. Soy milk is therefore typically a better choice for people wanting to boost their protein intake. In fact, it’s common for soy milk to have about six times more protein than almond milk!

    TIPS FOR STEPPING UP YOUR PROTEIN CONSUMPTION
    If you don’t like the taste of beans or you have trouble digesting them, it can be a challenge to get sufficient protein on a vegan diet. Our beans page offers advice about how to prepare beans in ways that maximize digestibility. You may find that tofu, tempeh, and soymilk easier to digest than other bean-based foods. Alternately, nuts, seeds, and quinoa are all rich in protein, and easily digested.

    Protein powders can be a godsend to anyone who can’t tolerate beans or nuts. They can give you a big dose of protein, in a form that’s more digestible than meals made with beans. Most brands of protein powder deliver about 20 grams of lysine-rich protein per scoop. Orgain makes an inexpensive all-organic vegan protein powder, and it sells for about half the price of some comparable organic brands. Buy a shaker cup and you won’t have to dirty a blender each time you prepare a serving.

    Adding just a few protein-rich meals to your cooking repertoire may be all it takes to boost your intake to adequate levels. There is an entire cookbook devoted to these sorts of vegan meals. This book contains more than 100 recipes, each based on protein-rich foods like beans, nuts, quinoa, tempeh, and tofu.

    It’s reasonable to speculate that many people who fail to thrive on a vegan diet aren’t eating sufficient protein. Since meat is loaded with protein, a vegan who becomes protein deficient would doubtless feel better within days of putting meat back into the diet. The best way to ensure that you don’t develop a deficiency is to keep an eye on getting sufficient amounts each day. A little attention and vigilance is all it takes to avoid problems down the road.



    sauce and links: https://www.vegan.com/protein/?fbcli...XX3P07Km6PX718
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  131. #1931
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  132. #1932
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    Throwback Thursday! Looking waaaaaay back

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  133. #1933
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    Haha! Pour out a little beet juice.

    I like to think early humans were very knowledgeable about their natural surroundings, even if understood through myth/taboo/shamanism etc rather than science.

    Some Neanderthals were vegetarians who used natural forms of penicillin and aspirin as medicine

  134. #1934
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  135. #1935
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    Why plant protein is better for you than animal protein

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    It’d be great if a burger-a-day diet was healthy. Don’t get me wrong—it’s not the worst. You’ve got protein in there and hopefully some veggies on top (and on the side) , and even some fiber from the roll (you used whole grain, right?).

    Unfortunately, study after study shows that meat as a protein source just isn’t that healthy. It’s far better to get that necessary protein from plants. And yes, that association is a correlation, not a causation. There are some legitimate reasons that plant-based protein sources like beans are a healthier alternative to bacon. The researchers aren’t saying you can’t or shouldn’t indulge in a thick Delmonico or a flame-grilled cheeseburger. Rather that you should enjoy them in moderation. Generally, research shows that less animal meat is better than more, in terms of long term health. You don’t have to love tofu, either (it’s not the best plant-based protein anyway), as long as you strive to eat more of your protein from the ground and less from animals.

    Here’s a deeper dive into why:

    Plant protein has more nutrients and fiber (though not all of the amino acids)

    Animal meat is known for its many nutrients. If you eat a variety of animal meats (light and dark, not just beef, as well as various organs), you can take in all the amino acids you need to manufacture your own bodily proteins plus vitamins like B12, niacin, thiamine, B5, B6, B7, and vitamins A and K.

    But here’s the thing: If you swap all that animal protein for an equally diverse diet of plant-based proteins like nuts, seeds, and beans, you are no worse off. That’s because these foods are also packed full of a similar spectrum of nutrients. The biggest difference is vitamin B12, which most plants cannot produce on their own. You can get B12 from edible seaweed and in fortified cereals, though the easiest way is through supplementation or by eating animal products.

    Given their equal vitamin profile, Andrea Giancoli, a registered dietitian in California says plant-based proteins are far healthier than their meat counterparts. That’s because, pound-for-pound they pack more nutrients into fewer calories. They also have one thing that animal proteins completely lack: fiber. (That’s of course except for things like tofu, which is processed, Giancoli notes.) Let’s not forget the fiber. Fiber aids in digestion, promotes a healthy gut microbiome, and is strongly associated with lower cardiovascular disease risk.

    People who eat plant proteins in part have healthier habits

    Meta-analyses that compared people who eat animal versus plant proteins consistently find that, even after adjusting for other influential factors like socioeconomic class, weight, and exercise habits, those who eat plants tend to live longer, healthier lives. They tend to have less cardiovascular disease and fewer cancer cases, though especially the cancer association tends to drop away once other factors have been controlled for. Despite all that controlling, though, there’s still an association with living a longer life with fewer heart problems. There are almost certainly some small factors contributing to the association. People who eat plant proteins may see their doctor more regularly and thus get better preventive care. Maybe they tend to live in quieter, less polluted places.

    Since correlations still exist between eating plant proteins and overall health, even after controlling for other factors, meta-analyses have generally concluded that lifestyle factors alone can’t account for the correlation. One recent such analysis in the Journal of the American Medical Association noted that “Substitution of plant protein for animal protein, especially from processed red meat, may confer a substantial health benefit” and advised that policies promote plant proteins.

    Meat has more saturated fats

    Another reason that steak isn’t great for you: the fat that often accompanies it. Fat is part of why steaks and burgers are delicious—it adds mouthfeel and flavor. But it also tend to clog up your heart. “[With plant proteins] you get less saturated fat and no cholesterol,” Giancoli explains, “so you’re getting that benefit as well.”

    Saturated fats are those that are solid at room temperature and tend to contribute to cardiovascular disease (though not as much as trans fats) because it drives up your total cholesterol levels. That may, in the long run, tip the scales towards the LDL (low density lipid) side, which is what clogs up arteries. Foods like nuts, avocados, and fish have far less saturated fats than red and other dark meats. As such, they are dubbed healthy fats.

    Processed, red meat is carcinogenic, and grilled meat may be too

    You probably heard about the massive World Health Organization (WHO) report a few years ago proclaiming that processed, red meats were carcinogenic. Colorectal cancer in particular has been associated with eating red meat, and so have pancreatic and prostate cancer. Processed meats, like bacon and sausage, also contribute to colorectal cancer. Even grilled meat is known to have some carcinogenic compounds in it (those black char marks are where they mostly lie); seared meat has a similar effect.

    In the grand scheme of cancer, meat isn’t the biggest player. Recent estimates by the Global Burden of Disease Project, a subset of the WHO, put the number of annual cancer cases from red meat at 50,000. That’s compared to 200,000 from air pollution, 600,000 from alcohol, and one million from tobacco. But it’s not nothing.

    If we’re taking an exclusively long-range, zoomed-out, big picture view it’s fairly undeniable that getting your protein from plants would be healthier overall. But nutritionists like Giancoli are also adamant about one other important thing: Food should be enjoyable. We shouldn’t spend our lives gorging only on ice cream and pizza, but if you love burgers you should have them. Not every night—just sometimes. The key to a successful diet, as many dieticians will tell you, is balance and moderation. And beans.

    sauce https://www.popsci.com/plant-protein...LPRgGGI#page-2
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  136. #1936
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    I'm 5 years vegan (vegetarian since 20) plus doing weightlifting (ie crossfit) 6 days/wk, mountain biking (2 x's /week) and running (approx 50km/week). Not easy when you're over 50 with a full time career but it works for me. For me eating plant based isn't complicated. I have plenty of strength and energy and feel very fit and healthy. This is an interesting article

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-58376325_2358782257699545_251624241038884864_n.jpg

    How to build muscle on a vegan diet

    When articles proclaim that “veganism is growing in popularity,” it’s not just because Instagram and Youtube makes it feel that way. It’s because veganism is, in fact, growing in popularity.

    Some fast facts:

    On Dec. 30, 2018 more than 14,000 people formally promised (by signing up through this website) to not eat animal products in January. Participation in Veganuary has more than doubled every year since the campaign began in 2014.

    Last year, restaurant consulting group Baum + Whitman identified plant-based food as a major trend for 2018. “That’s still true” for 2019, the copywriter(s) note [PDF], adding that this year lab-grown meats “look like profound long-range game changers.” (The brief writer also describes cows as “prolific poopers,” so BRB going to hire them to write for Popular Science.)

    In 2017, Nestle—whose brands range from Hot Pockets to Coffeemate to Haagen-Dazs to Digiorno—also identified plant-based foods a trend the company, in the words of its Executive Vice President of Strategic Business Units, “believe[s] is here to stay and amplify."

    6 percent of U.S. consumers now claim to be vegan, up from 1 percent in 2014. That’s a 500 percent increase, or a difference of 1.6 million people.

    Ariana Grande is vegan.

    If you are one of the millions of folks who now call themselves vegan (or plant-based or whatever) and you have divulged this fact to anybody, you have probably been asked about your protein intake. People may have wondered about your muscle mass, or your strength. And it’s not a totally unreasonable concern. Generous protein intake is essential for maintaining and building muscle. Eggs, meat, and dairy make up roughly 62 percent of the protein consumed by U.S. adults—and that number may actually be greater when you consider that 8 percent of the protein consumed “could not be classified” (hot dogs??). The remaining 30 percent is plant protein, the largest dietary source of which is bread, which doesn’t exactly have a reputation for being protein-rich.

    When I transitioned out of animal products a year ago—there are many science-backed reasons to reduce your animal product intake—the move seemed to run counter to my goals for athleticism and overall beefcakiness (pun intended). I’ve drained hours researching what humans need to build muscle optimally. When I tried to find research on how people who don’t eat egg whites, whey protein powder, or 93-percent-lean ground beef can optimize their gains, the Google Scholar well ran dry.

    But even without recent or replicated peer-reviews papers, we have proof enough that getting buff with plants is, in fact, possible. There are enough vegan bodybuilders and Olympic athletes to show us it can be done. But how? I asked four experts and compiled their knowledge below.

    Our panel: (1) Dr. Anastasia Zinchenko, a vegan bodybuilder, powerlifter, and coach with a PhD in biochemistry and books full of high-protein bake recipes. (2) Jordan David, a vegan bodybuilder, health coach, and founder of Conscious Muscle, which sells coaching, apparel, and supplements. (3) Dr. Rachele Pojednic, an assistant professor of nutrition at Simmons University. (4) Kendrick Farris, a vegan weightlifter who represented the U.S.A. in the 2008, 2012, and 2016 Olympic Games.

    It’s worth noting that you don’t need to follow their guidelines to get adequate nutrition. These people are experts on gaining maximum strength and/or muscle mass, so they're giving advice on getting jacked—not on simply being healthy. Humans actually do not need very much protein to stay well. But if you want to get buff with plants, read on.

    How much protein the aspiring buff vegan should eat
    As previously mentioned, the survival of our species does not require as much protein as many Westerners are led to believe. Adequacy, according to the United States’ recommended dietary allowance, is just 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. So, for example, a person who weighs 170 pounds (or 77 kilograms) should eat about 62 grams of protein (that’s 77 x 0.8). Most people (especially meat eaters) get that without even really trying. A peanut butter sandwich on wheat bread, for example, has about 18 grams of protein.

    But how much protein should people eat if they want to get ripped? “It depends on the training stage,” Zinchenko says. “Usually people who are new to lifting can build muscle faster than those who are already advanced. So a beginner lifter should eat more protein. But I usually recommend the same for all stages of training, because more protein doesn’t hurt anything.”

    Zinchenko, who shares tips on her website Science Strength, recommends vegans eat 2.4 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight (or about 1.1 grams per pound). That’s a lot higher than what governmental organizations recommend, but her clients want to bulk up, not simply be healthy. And muscle gain requires the amino acids in protein. (More on that below.)

    People who go to David for coaching are prescribed 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight, which shakes out to just a bit less protein than Zinchenko prescribes. Pojednic, a nutritionist, recommends training athletes get anywhere from 1.6 to 2.2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight.

    For context, a 170-pound individual would consume 185 grams of protein on Zinchenko’s plan, 170 grams of protein on David’s plan, and 123-169 grams of protein on Pojednic’s plan. That difference in protein consumption equates to roughly two protein shakes, or a block and a half of tofu.

    The difference between vegan proteins and proteins that come from animal products
    If you aren’t vegan, Zinchenko says, you can get away with eating 2.1 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight, because the amino acid profiles in animal products are slightly better for making muscle. Pojednic notes that amino acid composition is “one of the key distinctions” between a vegan and an omnivorous diet.

    Both Zinchenko and Pojednic call out amino acids leucine and lysine, in particular. Animal proteins generally have more of these amino acids than plant proteins (here’s a graph), which is significant because these building blocks seem to be particularly good drivers of muscle protein synthesis. You can boost your levels by incorporating a supplement, which Zinchenko recommends, though Pojednic notes that there are plenty of vegan sources of leucine: soy isolates (like soy protein powder), seaweed and spirulina, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, and tofu.

    “It’s not just about getting enough protein,” Zinchenko says, “The distribution of amino acid types is also important. It’s like building a house. It must have windows, bricks, and doors. You can have all the bricks in the world, but without a door, it’s not going to be a house.”

    That doesn’t mean you need to make sure each serving of protein includes a mix of all the necessary amino acids, Pojednic says. If you’re eating a variety of foods throughout the day, there’s no need to pair up rice and beans for every meal. Your body can still put all the pieces together.

    Fiber and protein bioavailability
    Even if your lunchtime salad has all the nutrients you want, your body may not be absorbing them. Some foods are harder for the human digestive system to turn into nutrients. Compared to meats, eggs, and dairy, vegetal proteins are not as bioavailable, meaning your body might not actually get to use all the protein contained in the raw spinach you scarfed.

    Whole (also known as unprocessed) foods, which are recommended by the USDA, contain fiber and other substances that can limit absorption in the small intestine. “If you eat a raw vegan diet, you may need to aim for 2.7 grams per kilogram of body weight, which is just an insane amount of broccoli and beans,” Zinchenko says.

    Whole foods generally take longer to digest, which is why serious muscle-builders may want to chug a protein shake on a relatively empty stomach—and why both David and Zinchenko recommend some sort of protein supplementation. Pojednic suggests it too, particularly if your stomach can’t handle a full meal after lifting.

    Do vegans need to supplement?
    Vegans need to take a B12 supplement. Most of the B12 humans get in their diet comes from animal products, as a result of microorganisms being processed in the guts of cattle and sheep. Without foods from those critters, it’s a lot harder to get adequate B12, which means vegans rely on fortified plant milks and cereals or supplementation. (Unless they are really into eating seaweeds like spirulina or dried nori, which contain B12.)

    Otherwise, no, you don’t need to use a protein shake or branched chain amino acid powder—but they can make it a whole lot easier to get your protein in. Otherwise, 150 grams of protein a day (without just oodles of carbs) can be overwhelming.

    The ideal ratio of vegan protein sources
    David was a bodybuilder before he went vegan. In fact, he was “a total meathead.” His transition to vegan bodybuilding was simple: replace meat with meat substitutes. He is a “big proponent of tempeh” and usually advises his clients to eat two whole foods meals (like black beans and veggies or lentil soup), one meat substitute meal (like tacos with beefless ground), and one or two shakes.

    Zinchenko encourages vegan lifters to “err on the side of caution” and eat about 50 percent of your protein from legumes (beans, peas, soy, etc.), 25 percent from grains, and 25 percent from nuts and seeds to make sure you’re getting adequate amounts of the necessary amino acids.

    Meal timing
    “The most recent recommendations clarify not just how many grams of protein you should eat, but also how those grams are pulsed throughout the day,” Pojednic says. “Scientists are thinking now that there’s only a certain amount of protein your muscles can uptake and utilize in one sitting. If you flood your system with amino acids, at some point they’re a little bit wasted.”

    Aim to get 0.25 and 0.4 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per meal. Or, to put it way simpler, space out your protein over 3 or 4 meals a day, not just all at once in a mega smoothie.

    The other science-backed tip is to make sure you’re eating 20-30 grams of protein within 30 minutes (up to an hour is probably fine) of training. “The literature shows that ingesting both protein and carbs in that window promotes muscle growth and recovery, which helps you stay up on your training regimen.” Yes, that can be a protein shake—but it can also be a peanut butter sandwich.

    The science is a little bit muddier for eating before and during training. Pojednic says to go with your preference, and how much food you want in your digestive tract while you’re doing heavy squats. Overloading your G.I. system is particularly easy for vegans, whose foods contain so much fiber. You can definitely get a tummy ache from eating a salad before training, because all the blood is “shunted away” from your digestive organs in favor of, say, your quads. If you don’t want to eat before training, but want to make sure you’ve got enough sugar in your system to get the most out of your workout, Pojednic recommends fruit juice.

    But the most crucial aspects of gaining muscle have nothing to do with being vegan.

    It’s not all about getting enough amino acids. You’ve got to eat enough calories to gain mass, and you’ve got to train hard. Farris, who went plant-based in November 2014 (between Olympics appearances), is a world-class athlete who happens to be vegan—and he doesn’t track his protein at all. Still, he was able to “make some gains and, more importantly, stay healthy.” He says a vegan diet has let him recover faster. “If you can do that, you can do more work. You can beat your body up more. Simply, just train.”

    (It’s worth noting that part of the reason Farris had no qualms about changing his diet while in a high point of his career was because he spent his prime lifting years (19-22) gaining strength without reliable access to any type of food at all. “If I could lift and do it all when I didn’t have access to regular meals, how was I going to get weaker eating enough food but switching out the ingredients?”)

    In case that doesn’t drive the point home, know that every single person I spoke to for this article mentioned the importance of simply eating enough food.

    “A big problem for vegans is that they can easily under eat,” Zinchenko says. “Especially active people who eat a lot of whole foods. Without calories, your body can’t make muscle.”

    “The main thing is high-volume weight training and getting adequate nutrients,” David says. “That’s it. There are no shortcuts. The harder you hit it, the more you feed it, the more it will grow.” (I believe we were talking about butts at this point in the conversation.)

    "Obviously diet is going to give you that tiny push at the end, but the training and the dedication is really what’s going matter in the long term for high-level athletes,” Polojic says.

    Oh, and for what it’s worth, we sorely need more research on vegans. “Even the studies that examine vegan protein powders are not done on vegans,” Zinchenko says. “If there is somebody who would like to donate money to study vegan muscle growth, I would be happy to run the study.”


    sauce https://www.popsci.com/vegan-diet-we...zPEuToY#page-3

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-58382234_2360126974231740_4578405356232769536_n.jpg

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    Vegan Engineer Predicts 'UK Will Be Vegan By 2030'

    Vegan Engineer Predicts 'UK Will Be Vegan By 2030'
    https://www.plantbasednews.org/post/...-uk-vegan-2030

    The researcher suggests animal agriculture will 'financially collapse' when the UK has a vegan population of 15 percent

    Vegan engineer, Tom Milner, has predicted that the UK will be vegan by the year 2030.

    Dubbed as 'The Vegan Engineer', Milner conducted a survey of more than 2,800 vegans to find the rate at which veganism is skyrocketing.

    The survey, which asked participants only four questions - length of time being vegan, age, gender, and location - demonstrates how 82.6 percent of respondents turned vegan in the last five years.

    'Exponential growth curve'
    Milner also attributed the spike in new vegans transitions during December-February to the success of the Veganuary movement.

    Overall, the survey shows an 'exponential growth curve' with the vegan population doubling every two years since 2011.

    If this growth continues at its current rate, Milner claims the UK's vegan population will reach around 15 percent by 2030 - enough to cause the animal agricultural industry to 'financially collapse' according to DR Melanie Joy.

    'The entire population becoming vegan'
    "This seems reasonable to me because 15 percent of the population being vegan would mean there were even more significant numbers of vegetarians, pescatarians and meat reducers," Milner said.

    "With such a drop in demand for meat, dairy, and eggs it would be very difficult for any animal product based business to survive.

    "2030 is, therefore, my prediction for a financial crippling of the UK animal agriculture industry and the entire UK population becoming de facto vegans. This is actually a slower growth rate than the Finder survey results which indicated 5.5% by the end of 2019."

  138. #1938
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    12,000 DOCTORS FILE LAWSUIT AGAINST USDA TO GET FECAL MATTER OUT OF MEAT

    This week, medical group Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) filed a lawsuit against the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) regarding the removal of fecal matter from meat products. Currently, the USDA prohibits visible fecal matter on meat, stating it can be removed during the trimming process.

    PCRM—which is comprised of 12,000 medical professionals who advocate for a plant-based diet—contends that fecal matter is currently present in meat products that are available to the consumer. The new lawsuit is a measure to compel the USDA to act on a petition PCRM filed in 2013 after conducting independent tests on 120 chicken products sold in 15 supermarkets across 10 cities—48 percent of which contained fecal matter. “We often see birds going down the line with intestines still attached, which are full of fecal contamination,” a federal inspector is quoted saying in the lawsuit. “If there is no fecal contamination on the bird’s skin, however, we can do nothing to stop that bird from going down that line. It is more than reasonable to assume that once the bird gets into the chill tank (a large vat of cold water), that contamination will enter the water and contaminate all of the other carcasses in the chiller. That’s why it is sometimes called ‘fecal soup.’”

    The lawsuit demands that the USDA remove labels that tout the term “wholesome” from packaged meat and, because contamination is “common and even expected,” according to the lawsuit, replace it with messaging that warns the consumer of possible fecal contamination. “USDA misleads consumers every time inspectors slap a ‘wholesome’ label on contaminated food,” Deborah Dubow Press, associate general counsel for PCRM, who authored the lawsuit, said. “Consumers should be horrified to know that USDA’s standard for wholesomeness is ‘no visible feces.’” On Friday, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention linked ground beef to the E. coli outbreak that sickened 109 people across six states. E. coli is only found in fecal matter.

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/4/12000-doc...Ov9rDekeWClHeM
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  139. #1939
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    Sexy Fruit... happy hump day!

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  140. #1940
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    Beyond Meat is going public. Investors are betting on a new future for food.

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    Beyond Meat, the plant-based meat company, is going public next week.

    The company sells burgers that contain no meat, but taste like they do. Its stated goal is to fix our food system. Its initial public offering (IPO) is the latest sign that alt-meat is going mainstream — and that’s a big deal.

    It’s been a good few years for Beyond Meat. National chains including Del Taco, Carl’s Jr., and T.G.I. Friday’s have started carrying their products. They’ve also found their way onto grocery store shelves at Whole Foods, Kroger, and Target. In total, Beyond Meat says its products are available in more than 35,000 outlets, from hotels and college campuses to grocery stores and sports stadiums. Sales have been growing fast — last year the company reported revenues of $87.9 million, up from $32.6 million in 2017.

    Now, the company has filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission for an IPO, scheduled for next week. They’ll sell shares in the company for between $19 and $21 per share, allowing them to raise $183 million for additional manufacturing facilities, research and development, and sales. If their stock sells at the high end of that, the company would be valued at $1.2 billion. They’ll be listed on NASDAQ as BYND.

    Founded in 2009 by CEO Ethan Brown, the Los Angeles-based company’s products first hit supermarket shelves in 2013. Its rapid rise — food is not an easy industry to break into — reflects intense consumer demand and investor interest in meat alternatives. The company has never been profitable, and lost $29 million in 2018, but its rapidly growing revenues made it a good bet to many investors — as did its positioning on the frontier of a transformation of our food system.

    “Beyond Meat was the first company to really set its sights on creating meat from plants that could compete on the basis of the things that meat eaters like about meat,” Bruce Friedrich of the Good Food Institute, which works on policy and investment surrounding meat alternatives, told me. “Before Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods, there was really this sense that plant-based foods was for vegetarians. People like Ethan Brown said, ‘No, we can make plant-based foods that meat eaters like just as much.’”

    Brown will soon have a billion-dollar company to prove it. And while it’s the first plant-based meat company to go public, it looks likely that it won’t be the last. The trend that brought Beyond Meat racing to its billion-dollar valuation and IPO are just getting started — and that has the potential to be game-changing, not just for the industry, but for the world.

    Plant-based meat alternatives are getting big

    There’s a lot wrong with our food system. Producing meat by raising animals on factory farms produces tons of greenhouse gases, and many analysts think we can’t tackle climate change without tackling the enormous emissions that go into agriculture. Animals in close quarters are fed low-dose antibiotics constantly so they don’t make one another sick, which contributes to antibiotic resistance, a huge threat on the horizon for public health. And animals on factory farms are routinely subjected to intense cruelty and conditions that disgust the average American consumer.

    That’s what inspired people to start working on meat alternatives — and it may be what’s inspiring the consumer enthusiasm that has buoyed them in recent years. Products like veggie burgers, fake chicken, and soy and almond milk are growing in popularity and market share — and even better, they’re getting tastier and harder to distinguish from animal products.

    New breakthroughs in food science have made it easier to imitate the flavor and texture of real meat. While early veggie burgers were almost exclusively purchased by vegetarians, Brown says that 93 percent of Beyond Meat customers buy regular meat too — suggesting the company has succeeded at making something that appeals to meat eaters.

    Beyond Meat was among the pioneers of this new generation of plant-based meat, which aimed to replace bean-based veggie burgers marketed mostly to vegans. Now, they’ll be the first plant-based meat company to have an IPO. It’s a remarkable success for the company. It’s also remarkable because food companies rarely go public, Friedrich told me: “The food industry is highly centralized, and most exits are mergers or acquisitions by large food conglomerates.”

    Last year, there were rumors that industry giant (and Beyond Meat investor) Tyson Foods was considering buying the company. Beyond Meat stayed independent, though. A few months later, the company added the chief financial officers of Coca-Cola and of Twitter to their board, signaling that it was getting the expertise on-board that it needed to become a huge public company.

    The rest of the plant-based meat industry has been thriving too. Qdoba announced last week that it would be serving Beyond Meat competitor Impossible Foods. Earlier in April, Burger King launched the Impossible Whopper. Industry giants Tyson and Purdue are pursuing their own plant-based product lines. A few years ago, the Impossible Burger was available in a handful of restaurants — now it can be found in more than 5,000.

    “There’s a sense that there’s a movement going on that’s much bigger than any one company,” Brown told Vox two weeks ago.

    The interesting thing about that movement is that plant-based meats don’t have to displace all animal meats in order to make a big difference. Every burger replaced with a Beyond Burger has an impact on CO2 emissions, demand for factory farming, and demand for antibiotics. The more the plant-based meat industry grows, the more those impacts will be visible — and that might, in turn, itself fuel more interest in plant-based meats. Beyond Burger’s team doesn’t just believe they’ve found a niche — they say they’ve figured out the “Future of Protein.” Here’s hoping they’re right.


    Sauce https://www.vox.com/future-perfect/2...stainable-food

    I have never tried Beyond Meat but I am curious. Since I am not a meat eater and haven't been for over 40 years, I can't compare it to meat eg texture

    Some consumers feel the price is steep. I believe livestock farming gets subsidized.

    Hopefully as the products get more popular there's more demand and they'll become cheaper.
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  141. #1941
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    I am not a fan of their burgers. I did try their brat style sausages they other day, and was pleasantly surprised. I was never a big sausage fan when I was a meat eater some 20 years ago, but these were quite tasty. Do they feel and taste like real meat? I have no idea, but my meat eating gf liked them. The weird thing about them is that they make fat in the pan when cooked. It is really quite odd.

  142. #1942
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    Thanks for your comments dubthang

    I like the taste and texture of veggie patties. Beyond meat is high in protein and low in carbs so it's a good healthy choice for anyone. I just haven't had a chance to try it in pattie or sausage form.

    I went vegan for 2 reasons, health, and animal welfare. But health was first.
    The more we can make copycat meat products that can actually replace meat, the more people will switch over.
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  143. #1943
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  144. #1944
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    A good rebuttal to antivitamin forces

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  145. #1945
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  146. #1946
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  147. #1947
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  148. #1948
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    4 Caffeine Myths Debunked

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    Caffeine is right up there with salt and water as one of the bedrocks of the human diet. In fact, caffeine is the world's most frequently consumed ingredient. You can find it in coffee, tea, soda, chocolate, alcohol, ice cream, pain relievers, and breath fresheners. It's even finding its way into unexpected places like specially formulated sunflower seeds, beef jerky, oatmeal, and, yes, water. And, of course, caffeine is in lots of sports nutrition products.

    And why not? No matter how you consume it, caffeine can increase your mental acuity, improve your mood, and ratchet up your performance. What's not to like? But, given its popularity inside the gym and out, you'd think we'd all know everything about this wondrous substance. And yet the caffeine myths persist. Here's my take on four of the most common ones.

    Myth 1: Caffeine Causes Dehydration
    Most people who drink coffee regularly know from experience that caffeine can have a strong diuretic effect, meaning it can make you urinate. If you partake in activities that make it hard to continually replenish your fluids, this can be cause for concern since dehydration and fluid loss can affect athletic performance.

    But, since most people get their caffeine from drinking coffee, black tea, or a pre-workout, the water they consume as a part of those beverages makes up for some of this fluid loss. Studies have found that a 155-pound person can drink as many as 7 cups (about 600 milligrams of caffeine) of coffee a day without experiencing a significant increase in fluid loss.

    Even if you did experience increased urination or fluid loss, you'd just have to drink an extra 8 ounces of water or so for every 100 milligrams of caffeine you consume. Some people who drink a lot of coffee can even build up resistance to the potentially dehydrating effects of caffeine.

    Myth 2: Caffeine Is Bad For Your Heart
    There is a traditional belief among cardiologists that caffeine consumption can lead to cardiovascular disease, but studies show that is not true for people who consume normal amounts of it.

    A study of almost 50,000 coffee drinkers found no association between moderate caffeine intake (set at 10 cups per day in this study) and cardiovascular disease. A Harvard University study also found no association between coffee consumption and coronary heart disease

    Ultimately, the devil is in the dose. If you're drinking three pots of very strong coffee each day, you may want to cut back on your consumption, but 2-3 cups a day won't hurt.

    Myth 3: There's No Caffeine In Decaf Coffee
    When people who enjoy coffee are sometimes asked to avoid it for various reasons (allergies, interactions with other medications, certain illnesses, during pregnancy), they usually switch to decaffeinated coffee. But "decaffeinated" isn't the same as caffeine-free. The U.S. Food & Drug Administration regulations specify that coffee makers must remove 97 percent of the caffeine for a coffee to be considered decaffeinated. University of Florida researchers found up to 15 milligrams of caffeine in 16 ounces of a commercial "decaffeinated" beverage. That's not zero caffeine, but it is close.

    Myth 4: Caffeine Is Addictive
    It isn't uncommon to develop a tolerance to caffeine, which is why so many people need to drink more and more of it to get the same buzz. If you no longer get that familiar high from your cuppa joe, cut back on your intake for a few weeks.

    Having said that, if you stop abruptly, you may experience withdrawal symptoms such as headaches, irritability, and difficulty concentrating in the short term.

    The good news is that these symptoms are usually short-lived. Once you start up again, the symptoms should diminish and your heightened sensitivity to caffeine reemerge. The less-than-good news is that along with this renewed caffeine sensitivity can come side effects, including sleep disruption, restlessness, and heightened feelings of stress.

    Before you hit the gym, there's nothing more helpful than the kick you get from a good pre-workout. Just pay attention to how it—and caffeine in all its forms—affects your performance, sleep, appetite, and mood. As they say: Moderation in all things—including moderation.


    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...LbuMXwej7YBO1o
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  149. #1949
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    While I like the Beyond Burgers I have had, I find them to be very salty tasting- could be the place I eat it.

    My wife felt the same from that place but does like the ones she gets from Carl's Jr.

    The Beyond Tacos at Del Taco are OK... but the best I have had are the asada tacos from the "La Taqueria Vegiee SD" taco truck- OMG... so good...
    "The free press doesn't serve the government, it serves the governed."

  150. #1950
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    Meat Producers File Official Complaint Against Beyond Meat With Canada Food Inspection Agency
    They're saying "plant-based meat" is false representation...


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    The Quebec Cattle Producers alongside the Union of Agricultural Producers of Quebec have filed an official complaint with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency to stop the "Beyond Meat" brand from using the phrase plant-based "meat" on their products.

    Beyond Meat burgers and other vegetarian products became available in Canadian grocery stores at the beginning of this month, while their burgers have been for sale at quick-serve franchises like A&W for months.

    The meat producers are making the claim that calling these vegetarian products "meat" is a method of "false representation," according to TVA Nouvelles.

    The meat producers are hoping the Canadian Food Inspection Agency will side with them and stop plant-based food producers from using the word "meat" in their advertisements - which would likely mean the removal of the word "meat" from all packaging.

    In the TVA Nouvelles article the president of the Producteurs Agricoles du Quebec makes the statement that in his experience, "meat comes from an animal" and he's worried using the word "meat" for plant-based products will "lead to confusion."


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-oiwbdip.jpg

    The primary concern, according to the President of the PBQ, is that plant-based products don't have the same nutritional value as similar looking meat-based products.

    He also notes that meat products are "completely pure," while the plant-based patties, for example, are "a processed product" made in California with "about forty ingredients."

    To their credit, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency does, in fact, define "meat" on their website as the "edible part of a carcass" - which does imply animal involvement in the production process.

    However, the claim that consumers are going to be confused or mislead by the use of the word "meat" is weak. Most people eating these products know full well there are no animal by-products involved - that's exactly why they're eating it.

    sauce https://www.mtlblog.com/news/canada/...uIKXRH9fjR0h5Q
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  151. #1951
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    Another reason .... Thanks, I’m vegan

    Your Meat-Heavy Diet Might Be Giving You 'Keto Crotch'

    You know all of the jokes, yeah? Like how you can tell if someone is vegan, or if someone does Crossfit, or if someone is convinced that a room filled with essential oil diffusers is just as effective as all of those silly-billy vaccines? The answer to all three is “Don’t worry, they’ll tell you about it, and they’ll post on Facebook about it, and they’ll angrily comment on all of the posts you’ve made complaining about it until you ultimately have to report them for hate speech.”

    But the keto diet requires a slightly different punchline for its slightly different side-effects. Given that ketosis can cause your breath, your pee, and everything else that comes out of any number of your orifices to have a strong odor, you don’t need to tell anyone that you’re on keto; we might already be able to smell it. (BUT YOU LOOK GREAT, AUNT BRENDA. REALLY.).

    According to Women’s Health, some women on the keto diet have noticed that their personal areas have a more distinct smell, a phenomenon that has been described as ‘keto crotch.’ One thread on the r/xxketo subreddit attempted to address this topic with a desperate “HELP LADIES!” in its title. “I am very SMELLY. It started on this diet and BV (bacteria vaginosis) just popped up with a vengeance,” a user named imisswaffles wrote. “I’ve read [it] could be KETO CROTCH (yeast die off/hormonal changes with the diet), like getting smelly breath? I’m only 2 weeks in. No other symptoms but smell.”

    Several other Redditors said they’d noticed the same thing (about themselves, not about that particular Reddit user), and were able to share some rational-sounding advice. “Make an appointment with your [gynecologist] ASAP,” one person responded, before suggesting that the unpleasant situation could be caused by not showering or changing into non-sweaty clothing immediately after a workout. “Hot and moist areas are breeding grounds for bacteria,” she added.

    That echoes what one gynecologist told Women’s Health as well. Dr. Jessica Shepherd said that any diet—not just the keto one—can change a woman’s vaginal pH, which might affect the way it smells. Another gyno said that any other changes, like rashes, abnormal discharge, or an unpleasant itch, should be mentioned to a medical professional. (The subtext there is “Don’t just type about it on an internet forum, even if you use all capital letters to write the word HELP.” Oh, and this is a good time to re-remind you not to put parsley in your vaginas either.)

    And sorry, gentlemen, but you might not be exempt from your own keto-related genital issues. A post on r/keto that doubly specified “For guys” and “Male” suggested that some men may have problems with dryness down there. “Take some of that coconut oil we all have on hand and lather up,” a person named Mr_Apocalyptic_ wrote. “I do that with dry skin due to cold air on my legs and such. It works like magic and your twig and berries region will smell like a tropical getaway.”

    Well, we’ve all learned something today, mostly that there are worse things than your former college roommate telling you about the Crossfit Open in great detail.

    sauce https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/n...YcYLDcPjxEkP_o
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  152. #1952
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    4 reasons you should eat more mushrooms

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    Even setting aside magic mushrooms, our favorite fungal fruiting bodies supposedly have some spectacular healing properties. Search for the health benefits of mushrooms and you’ll turn up pages of info about how they can treat or prevent everything from cancer to heart disease.

    But as a savvy reader, you might wonder how much of the hype is really true. Should I be eating mushrooms all the time? Or is this all just overblown? We dug into the science and came up with four excellent reasons to eat your ‘shrooms.

    They’re one of the few vegan sources of vitamin D (kind of)
    You only need 10 to 15 minutes of sunshine three times a week to get your necessary dose of vitamin D, but if you’re still running low you can supplement with food sources. The only problem? They’re all from animals. Fatty fishes (or fish liver oil) and fortified dairy products are the main repositories. Some cereals are fortified with it, but they don’t pack much of a punch. Mushrooms, on the other hand, produce vitamin D naturally and in abundance. One study estimates that a 100-gram serving (that’s 3.5 ounces) would give you 50 to 100 percent of your daily dose. There’s just one problem: they only make vitamin D if they’re exposed to UV light. According to studies about the vitamin D content of mushrooms, fresh mushrooms should get plenty of exposure. But many commercially available sources are grown in the dark, then shipped around in closed containers. Some large growers do intentionally irradiate their crop, however.

    They’re full of fiber and low in fat

    By weight, many mushroom species are at least 50 percent carbohydrates (many are well above 60 or 70), and though we think of carbs as starchy or unhealthy, most of the carbs in mushrooms are actually fiber. A mushroom’s cells have all kinds of non-digestible carbohydrates, which is what we call dietary fiber, and that fiber fuels the healthy microbes in your gut.

    As a bonus, they also have other nutrients like selenium, copper, niacin, phosphorous, and potassium—all elements important (in small amounts) for your health. Cooking mushrooms helps release these, so toss those ‘shrooms in a frying pan before chowing down.

    They might help stave off cancer, heart disease, and neurodegenerative diseases (but we're not sure yet)
    There have been a number of studies claiming to find links between mushrooms and various diseases. Some note that people who eat more mushrooms tend to have lower rates of cancer or heart disease, while others look at how specific nutrients isolated from mushrooms affect cells in the lab. Various components are anti-inflammatory, for instance, and others purportedly fight tumors or protect the nervous system. One recent study linked mushroom consumption to less cognitive decline in old age.

    But these claims lack solid proof. A meta-analysis of such studies concluded that most were poorly designed, had small sample sizes, failed to replicate their work, and had troublesome statistics. The authors wrote that it was unwise to extrapolate the results of these mushroom studies to humans, and advocated for better clinical trials to investigate whether fungal food can actually improve our health.

    Another analysis, this time focusing on mushrooms as used in traditional Chinese medicine, not only concluded that “there is no scientific evidence to support the effectiveness of these preparations in the treatment of human disease,” but also warned about potentially dangerous contaminants in mushroom-based herbal medicines.

    It could very well be that the associations we see between people who eat more mushrooms and better health are just that—associations. Much like those who eat plenty of leafy greens or folks who consume nuts on a daily basis, they may just live healthier lives in general. Or maybe mushrooms really are helping! Maybe they do have chemicals that help stave off cancer or Alzheimer’s. Or maybe they’re nutritious and full of fiber, and that’s all part of the type of healthy diet we already know reduces your risk for a wide variety of disease.

    No one is quite sure yet.

    They’re delicious!
    Here’s the thing: mushrooms are definitely nutritious, but they’re also just darn tasty. Sauté up some onions and mushrooms in a little butter with a sprinkling of salt and try to deny it. And apart from foraging for them yourself (please don't do this unless you're properly trained!), there’s really no reason to eat less of them. So go for it. Mushrooms don’t need to be some kind of superfood that staves off brain plaque or protects your cells from cancer for it to be a good idea to eat more of them. Remember: no one food is going to make or break your diet. Enjoy some mushrooms if you like, and don’t worry about it if you don’t.

    sauce https://www.popsci.com/mushrooms-hea...vkY4XC8#page-2
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  153. #1953
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  154. #1954
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    Doris Day was an actor, singer and vegetarian... and animal champion. From refusing to work on set when animals were mistreated, to personally rescuing and finding homes for countless animals — she left a legacy of pure integrity and love.

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    R.I.P. Apr 3, 1922 - May 13, 2019 (age 97)
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  155. #1955
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  156. #1956
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    Processed food is unhealthy; we know that. More research why and how

    Processed food really does make you gain weight


    You probably already know that processed food is bad for you. Twinkies, after all, are not eaten for health, but for the joy of chewing yellow sponge cake injected with non-perishable cream. But it might surprise you to know that there's never been any real data to back this up.

    Most researchers and nutritionists theorized that ultra-processed food makes you overeat, on top of being high in calories, sugar, and fat while being low in fiber. To test that hypothesis, researchers at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases recruited 20 volunteers, evenly split by gender, and kept them in a special wing of the NIH Clinical Center for 28 days straight. Nutrition studies are often plagued by having too many variables you can’t control for. People who eat more processed foods also tend to have other factors that might influence their health, like having less money to pay for healthcare or less time to spend exercising. Just observing the general traits of folks consuming junk food won’t get you to any definitive conclusions—you can only ever get associations.

    So instead of just observing what people ate, the NIH researchers prescribed and controlled every single meal, plus the amount of daily exercise the participants got. For the first two weeks, half of the group ate a diet rich in veggies, whole grains, and other unprocessed food, while the other half ate ultra-processed stuff. Every meal contained twice as many calories as the person would actually need to maintain their body weight, and everyone was told to eat as much or as little as they wanted. Then the groups swapped menus for the last two weeks of the study, which was published this week in the journal Cell Metabolism.

    The most important part of this study, though, is that the meals were matched on their macros. Whether you were on the processed or unprocessed week, each meal had roughly the same number of carbs, fat, protein, fiber, sugar, and total calories. The researchers couldn’t match more specific categories, like added sugar or saturated fat, simply because it’s hard to find chips and fruit juice that are as low in those unhealthy nutrients as whole foods are.

    Even eating these macro-matched meals, the folks eating ultra-processed food consumed an average of 508 calories more per day, mostly in the form of carbs and fat (protein intake remained the same, as did total fiber and total sugar consumption). Those extra calories added up to about 0.9 pounds of extra weight at the end of the two weeks compared to their baseline. In the end, though, they came out even—folks eating only unprocessed food lost an average of 0.9 pounds.

    Part of this difference may have been from changes in appetite. While participants were downing whole foods, the hormones controlling appetite—PYY and ghrelin—shifted to favor less hunger. And it may also have had to do with the speed at which they ate. Chowing on processed stuff made folks eat faster, both in terms of grams and calories. Because it takes a while for your brain to get the signal that your stomach is full, eating too quickly can make a big difference in the total amount you consume.

    Interestingly, the participants’ glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and average blood glucose levels all remained unchanged. The researchers think this might have to do with the physical activity the participants engaged in. Prior research has suggested that exercise can temper the glucose response, though that’s not why the volunteers were prescribed physical activity. Most studies of metabolism involve being trapped in a hospital for days, where you’re mostly sedentary. The exercise in the study was just meant to match the amount of activity one would get on an average day in the outside world, so it was very low intensity—just three 20-minute bouts of cycling at 30 to 40 percent of their max heart rate. If even that amount of working out can influence glucose metabolism, that’s a great sign for promoting even small amounts of exercise.

    Of course, none of this solves the systemic reasons that some people overindulge in junk food. As the researchers point out, processed foods cost less in both time and money, both of which may be in short supply if you’re not wealthy. But whatever level of whole-food-iness you can afford, this study suggests it’s well worth the investment.


    sauce https://www.popsci.com/processed-foo...zXJFYtY#page-2
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  157. #1957
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    Neat story. I'm sure there is a vegan cyclist out there with the same goals.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-9w9a4762.jpg

    WHEN A VEGAN RUNS ACROSS AMERICA, HERE’S WHAT HE EATS

    Robbie Balenger is running across America. That’s 3,200 miles, in 75 days, averaging just under 45 miles each day. Beyond one heck of a runner’s high, he took on this self-imposed challenge to spread the plant-based word. Accompanied by a bright blue camper van displaying the NadaMoo! vegan ice cream and the dairy-free nonprofit Switch4Good branding, he’s running to leave a lasting impression and prove that one can accomplish incredible physical feats when powered by plants. We were curious about what his nutrition plan looked like, so we caught up with Balenger and his crew to see what makes up his 8,000-calorie days.

    Meal Planning is Non-Negotiable
    When running across the country on a vegan diet, there is no choice but to meal plan. Balenger’s nutritionist (and soon-to-be sister-in-law) Jackie Howard shared her immaculate nutrition spreadsheet with us. The exceptionally detailed tool laid out every single edible item accompanying him on the trip including the caloric content, serving size, cost, and more. A few items that caught our eye were Soylent, Daiya Mac and Cheese, a variety of naturally made vegan gels and electrolyte drinks, smoothie ingredients, and various Bobo’s products such as the Toast’r Protein Pastries. Howard is an athlete in her own right, having accomplished several endurance challenges such as hiking the Appalachian Trail and “dabbling in the 50k trail running scene.” In regards to her “giant spreadsheet with tons of tabs,” Howard told VegNews, “I was able to adopt this planning sheet from my Appalachian Trail spreadsheet template. I customized the sheet to be tailored specifically for Robbie’s Run. Once we had the ideas housed in an organized fashion, we shared it with the whole crew; it makes it much easier to make any tweaks needed to the original plan.”

    A Note on Macros
    Athletes are trained to view nutrition through the lens of macronutrients—protein, carbs, and fats. While vegan athletes understand that micronutrients are truly their secret weapon, Howard was kind enough to break down the macros to help us plebeians understand the basics. She explained: “[Balenger] consumes a lot of good fats (1.5-2 cans of coconut milk per day!) trying to get plenty of carbs as well (oats, tortillas, and pasta). Peanut butter, cashews, and leafy greens all contribute to his protein. We are working under the basic assumption that when you get enough calories on a whole foods plant-based diet it is impossible to be protein deficient.” There you have it. That’s where he gets his protein. Moving on.

    The Essentials
    Despite the orthodox runner’s diet of gels, powders, and bars, Balenger consumes most of his nutrition in the form of whole foods. This requires equipment. He told VegNews that his camper is equipped with three burners, a mini-fridge and freezer, and the holy grail of all kitchen equipment: a Vitamix. The crew relies on these simple appliances to prepare his morning oats, blend up superfood smoothies, and whip up a hot meal when he gets in for the night. Howard also let us in on a secret: the fridge is vital to keeping the beer cold, something that helps Balenger wind down after a long day of running. Another end-of-the-day treat is a spoonful or two of NadaMoo! The vegan ice cream brand is a sponsor, which means Balenger and the crew always have several pints in stock. Balenger noted that Maple Pecan is his favorite flavor and enjoys it on occasion. He joked that Elliot Preater, his crew-based running buddy from the UK, dives into a bowl every day (NadaMoo! hasn’t made it to the UK … yet!).

    An 8,000 Calorie-Day of Food
    Balenger’s early morning begins with coffee and a loaded bowl of hot instant oats made with chia seeds, maple syrup, bananas, walnuts or peanut butter, and raisins. Throughout the day of running, he takes in a plant-powered smoothie every ten miles and a form of carbohydrates (such as fruit or Pringles—he needs the salt) every five miles. He also fuels with Soylent, vegan cheese quesadillas, Spring Energy Gels, and tofu wraps. We were surprised when he mentioned his hydration routine. “I don’t drink a lot of water,” Balenger noted. “I mostly drink Skratch,” which is a natural vegan hydration mix that provides key electrolytes. For dinner, Balenger enjoys a meal prepared by his crew, many of which consist of Outdoor Herbivore vegan-friendly camping meals; however, on occasion, the crew will order takeout if available. “In small towns, we seek out Thai places. Those are always vegan-friendly. However, I just had a beet burger at Three Carrots in Indianapolis, and that was good. Also, the Flagstaff [AZ] vegan scene is on point. The Thai food there was absolutely fantastic.” When asked if he was tired of any particular road food, he sighed and replied, “I’m just tired of eating. The constant eating and the amount of food … it’s just a lot.” However, Balenger did admit to daydreaming about one specific meal back in his hometown of Denver, CO: seitan wings from City, O’ City. Further, when he completes his journey in New York City (tentatively predicted for May 29), he’s looking forward to trying the pizza at Matthew Kenney’s Double Zero. Balenger was a pizzeria restaurant manager in his former life and remains a self-proclaimed lover of all (vegan) pizza.

    The Mission
    Balenger has put more than just miles past him. He has served his purpose to change the way people think about plant-based fuel. However, he was surprised to find that “Everyone is really aware of [veganism]. It’s something people are thinking about or at least have even just heard about even in extremely rural areas.” He noted that many of his non-vegan friends who came out to run with him went home and either adopted a fully vegan diet or at least made significant changes to be “more conscious” eaters. Looking ahead, Balenger hopes to use his platform to continue spreading the plant-based message through endurance events. Whether he’ll be attempting another fantastic challenge or aiding others, Balenger is in it for the long haul.

    To track Robbie’s Run, see the Robbie's Tracker . He invites anyone to run a mile or a marathon with him as he completes the final few weeks of this adventure. His crew also encourages all to send him virtual kudos by following him on Instagram @RobbieBalenger and engaging with his daily posts and stories. Finally, to run with Balenger on his final day (or even participate in the Central Park celebration with complimentary NadaMoo! ice cream), RSVP to the event’s Facebook page or join the vegan pizza and ice cream party at Screamer’s Pizzeria the following day.


    sauce https://vegnews.com/2019/5/when-a-ve...l3nMuaRW8z769w
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  158. #1958
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