Too much magnesium ?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: client_9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    940

    Too much magnesium ?

    Hey,
    I got really nauseous, lethargic and dizzy on a ride today.
    Had to head back to the car.
    I'm thinking the cause was too much magnesium.

    I now realize I took all of these in a 2 hour period:
    - A multivitamin (w/ magnesium)
    - A magnesium supplement
    - 4 capsules of Sport Legs

    D'oh!
    I learned my lesson.
    Be careful.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,313
    Magnesium acts as a stool softener, so the fun part may be just beginning for you bro.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    2,350
    Depending on the type of magnesium. You may not even have obsorbed much What you listed doesn't sound like the results of too much.

  4. #4
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    14,748
    We administer more Mg than that to constipated patients. You'll just piss out any excess that your body doesn't absorb. No worries.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: client_9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    940
    Maybe I just overdid it.
    First ride since November.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MSU Alum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    4,500
    Quote Originally Posted by client_9 View Post
    Maybe I just overdid it.
    First ride since November.
    Yeah...you pretty much described my normal ride!

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    405
    Quote Originally Posted by client_9 View Post
    I got really nauseous, lethargic and dizzy on a ride today.
    Sounds like what happens to me when I bonk.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    2,350
    Quote Originally Posted by client_9 View Post
    Maybe I just overdid it.
    First ride since November.

    I just did the same thing. Though I had enough of everything and bonked anyway. When you have a long layoff, the body is no longer efficient at exercise, probably just burned/sweat away everything.

  9. #9
    Captain Climber
    Reputation: Jem7sk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    997
    Quote Originally Posted by client_9 View Post
    Maybe I just overdid it.
    First ride since November.
    A good way to tell if you took to much Magnesium is to ask yourself, "Did I shit my pants?"

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    130
    I think the citrate version of Mg is what draws the extra water into your bowels.
    Off topic kinda, but I had a Mg deficiency, and after taking lots of supplements ( all dif kinds) Magnesium lotion is what really worked!

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    481
    magnesium should be in balance with other electrolytes like potassium, salt and calcium. And an imbalance can cause some nausea. So even if there is not magnesium overload, there could still be imbalance.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JKDjEdi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    449
    You took the pills 2 hours before your ride?

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  13. #13
    XC iconoclast
    Reputation: richj8990's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    1,988
    You are probably a protein type and need more calcium than magnesium. I don't know the exact mechanism but your blood pH may have gone too high. I had a similar thing happen with 667 mg/day of magnesium. I take 100mg/day now and everything is fine (about 500mg/day calcium). Not everyone fits a 1:1 or 2:1 cal/mag ratio. Those RDA's are just plain wrong for a lot of supplements. They assume everyone is identical genetically and metabolically, like lab rats.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JKDjEdi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    449
    RDA is based off a 200lb person so if your 140...yup its gonna be way off.

  15. #15
    XC iconoclast
    Reputation: richj8990's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    1,988
    Quote Originally Posted by JKDjEdi View Post
    RDA is based off a 200lb person so if your 140...yup its gonna be way off.
    Is it really 200 lbs now? It used to be 160 lbs. Just shows how big Americans are getting.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JKDjEdi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    449
    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    Is it really 200 lbs now? It used to be 160 lbs. Just shows how big Americans are getting.
    I could be wrong, just remember hearing or reading about it somewhere,

  17. #17
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    14,748
    What you need to know about magnesium

    Your Expert Guide To Magnesium

    You already know how important it is to have a balance of essential minerals like calcium, sodium, and potassium in your body. Another important mineral you might not be as familiar with is magnesium.

    Getting enough vitamins and minerals—including magnesium—is important for a wide variety of functions in the body, including bone mineralization, enzyme reactions, and nerve stimulation. Unfortunately, many of us have magnesium levels that are too low.

    What Are The Symptoms Of Magnesium Deficiency?

    Forty-eight percent of people in the United States don't take in enough dietary magnesium, even though many food companies fortify their processed foods with this mineral.

    Magnesium deficiency has been linked to constipation, insomnia, headaches, and lower bone-mineral density. The long-term effects of some of these issues can lead to serious illness. Thus, it's important to know how this mineral works and what you can do to keep your body healthy.

    What Are The Benefits Of Magnesium?

    Stay Regular
    Everybody poops, right? Well, some do more than others, and now and then you need a little help. Getting backed up is one of many signs of magnesium deficiency.[1] Supplementing with magnesium can help you poop.[2]

    Improve Sleep
    You know sleep is important for your health, but did you know that your vitamin and mineral intake can affect how long and how well you sleep? Take magnesium, for example. It binds to a special neurotransmitter called GABA. As it turns out, a dietary deficiency of magnesium may cause a lack of quality sleep, trouble falling asleep, or both. And better sleep means better recovery, which means better muscle growth.

    Studies also show that not getting enough magnesium may lead to behavioral and psychological changes such as anxiety, aggression, and stress, all of which can also be bad for your sleep.

    Clinical trials have suggested that magnesium can help you sleep better, but it will take more research with different types of people to prove this for certain.

    Better Electrolyte Balance
    Calcium and magnesium both play an important role in controlling muscle activity. Magnesium helps with relaxation, while calcium helps with contraction. Unbalanced calcium and magnesium levels could lead to muscle cramps or spasms.[3]

    Potassium and sodium also play a role in muscle contraction, which is why heavy lifters and athletes need to be aware of electrolytes—like potassium and sodium—when they work out. Not getting enough potassium or sodium in your diet can affect your athletic performance.

    Adding more magnesium is important for your potassium levels. Potassium cannot cross the cell membrane by itself—it must have magnesium present to enter your cells. Without magnesium, your body cannot absorb and use potassium.

    Low levels of magnesium may put you at risk for potassium deficiency, which can lead to weakness, cramps, and fatigue. Increasing magnesium in your diet, through food or supplements, can prevent electrolyte imbalances and improve your performance in the gym.

    Strengthen Your Bones

    Calcium is an essential mineral for building strong bones, and you already may be taking a calcium supplement or eating calcium-rich foods as often as possible.

    In truth, many other vitamins and minerals besides calcium are also responsible for strengthening bones. Vitamin D is another key bone-building nutrient, and so is magnesium.

    Magnesium and vitamin D may increase calcium uptake and delivery, which is needed to build strong bones and teeth.[4] This is why magnesium and vitamin D are so important for bone health: If your body can't use the calcium, it can't build strong bones!

    Initial trials in fracture-prone patients with low bone-mineral density showed that magnesium supplementation may improve bone health with no negative side effects. These trials were done with a very specific population, though, and similar trials with additional populations are needed.

    How Much Magnesium Should You Take?

    Magnesium supplement recommendations range from 310-420 milligrams per day for adult men and women. Some studies have used up to 500 milligrams per day in elderly people with magnesium deficiency.

    Uptake and metabolism of magnesium is different for everybody, which is why proper dosage varies by person. If you have lower levels of magnesium or severe deficiency, you might need to take more. Start with a 200-milligram dose, and slowly increase it to see how your body reacts.[1]

    Are Magnesium Supplements Safe?


    Magnesium is safe and effective when taken properly. However, it may interact with certain medications such as antibiotics, muscle relaxers, blood pressure medications, and bisphosphonates.

    Always check with your doctor before starting a new supplement plan, even if you don't have any known medical conditions.

    What Are The Side Effects Of Magnesium Supplements?

    There are no dangerous side effects. Uncomfortable but mild side effects can include gastrointestinal pain, stomach cramping, and diarrhea. If any of these happen, try taking a lower dose.

    What Forms Of Magnesium Are Available?

    Magnesium has many forms. It can be taken orally or even absorbed topically through the skin. Epsom salts, for example, contain magnesium sulfate and can be absorbed through the skin when dissolved in a bath. A 20-minute soak in an Epsom salt bath can reduce muscle soreness and help you relax.

    Chelated magnesium is a highly bioavailable oral form of magnesium and is very similar to the magnesium found in foods. It's best for raising magnesium levels in the blood to fix overall deficiency.

    Magnesium supplements are available in pill or powder form and can be purchased online or at many drug stores.

    When Should You Take Magnesium?

    To avoid feeling tired or sluggish, it may be best to take your magnesium supplement at night, but taking it during the day also works fine for most people.

    How Can You Get More Magnesium In Your Diet?

    You can naturally increase blood levels of magnesium by eating foods that have a lot of it. Dietary sources of magnesium are better used by the body than supplements.

    Food sources of magnesium include leafy green veggies like kale and spinach, black beans, and nuts and seeds like pumpkin seeds and almonds.

    Add a leafy green salad to your lunch, add beans to your favorite side dish, or just munch on seeds and almonds for a snack.

    Eating a lot of different magnesium-rich foods will help raise your magnesium levels over time, putting you on the path to better overall health and well-being.

    Wrapping Up

    Magnesium supplements are safe and effective for most people. They're a good idea if you don't get enough of magnesium from food. Taking a magnesium supplement may help you sleep better, get the most gains in the gym, keep your bones strong, and help you stay regular.


    sauce: https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  18. #18
    101
    101 is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    402
    FYI: The primary ingredient in sport legs is Magnesium, so the OP took 6 "doses" of magnesium.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    27
    You may be taking too much magnesium. The recommended dose of magnesium per day is about 350mg (more on doses on Canadian Pharmacy). Once you start going over that you begin to see similar symptoms if you were magnesium defficient.

Similar Threads

  1. Litech Magnesium Frame
    By robn30 in forum Weight Weenies
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 02-20-2017, 10:35 PM
  2. painting magnesium lowers?
    By austinb89 in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-08-2011, 02:02 AM
  3. A ? about steel and ?'s about magnesium.
    By Mountain Cycle Shawn in forum Frame Building
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 02-27-2011, 08:28 AM
  4. xx vs marta sl magnesium
    By JoshS in forum Weight Weenies
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-11-2011, 06:34 PM
  5. Epi Magnesium Rocker pits?
    By Borinken in forum Ellsworth
    Replies: 102
    Last Post: 10-13-2006, 01:47 PM

Members who have read this thread: 42

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.