Riding food for Irritable Bowel Syndrome- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Riding food for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    I'm wondering if anyone out there has experience dealing with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and maybe has some does and don't of what to eat while riding.

    I'm getting ready for the Chequamegon 100 this weekend and my IBS has flared up on me. I did a 42 mile ride this weekend and my belly was miserable the whole time. I was meaning to ride another 10 or so miles, but decided to call it quits early. I'm not sure I could tough out the pain for 100 miles.

    I'm working on diet, rest and taking Zanac this week, hoping symptoms go down by Saturday. But I'm worried that even if I feel well at the start line, that it may flair up mid-ride.

    You should never try something new for a big event, but I'm considering trying Tailwind energy drink because it suppose to be really simple and easy to digest.

    Any thoughts?
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  2. #2
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    sorry for my bad english...
    I aslo have problems with IBS, and my problems amost got away by only eating the suggested fod in the fodMap..

    FODMAP Food List | IBS Diets

    Try it and try to find som highcarb fods to bring on your rides!
    Bikes.
    HT - Allebike mb29er -11
    FS - Trek Top Fuel 9.8SL -16

    http://www.anderssvensson.org
    http://www.TeamMurphy.se

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    ...You should never try something new for a big event, but I'm considering trying Tailwind energy drink because it suppose to be really simple and easy to digest.

    Any thoughts?
    Sorry to hear about your IBS. I have known quite a few people who have struggled with it. Best success stories I know had to do with controlling diet very carefully. Hope you can overcome this problem!

    I am a Tailwind Trailblazer (ambassador) and have lots of experience training and racing with TW. I think it's great, obviously, and I think it would be reasonably safe even without having experience with it prior to race day. It is KEY that you get your proportions right and take in the correct amount per hour. Your small intestine can absorb about 200 calories per hour. Anything you take in over what YOUR small intestine can absorb will overflow into your large intestine, which obviously can cause problems regardless of whether you have IBS. No more than 3 scoops per 24 ounce bottle (that's the bigger size). A stick pack in a smaller bottle is a good place to start (2 scoops).

    I wish you the best of luck. I have heard that the Chequamegon is a tough one, even if you don't have health problems. I bet it will be hot too! If you feel like you are behind on hydration so that you are needing to drink more, reduce the concentration of your TW mix. 200 calories regardless of how much water.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  4. #4
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    Is the 200 calories per hour specific to Tailwind? I have always heard 300-350 calories per hour should be the goal for intake, I usually shoot for 300 myself.

    My current/previous plan is to have two camelback bladders, one on my back, another in a frame bag and then more 'traditional' trail food, Clif bars, Honey Stinger waffles and hammer gel along with a little bit of real food of some kind in the pockets of the camelback.

    I'm not super keen on putting sports drink into my bladder(s). So, if I'm going to try Tailwind, I'm considering just one bladder of water and 5 bottles of Tailwind, with just a couple additional solid food items in case I get hungry. That puts a lot more weight on my back though, 2 bottles and my tool kit in addition to the water in the camelback.
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  5. #5
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    Anders, I'll look into the FODMAP diet, I'm not so sure it makes sense for me though. I see things that definitely upset my stomach such as kale, broccoli and spinach on the "good" list, and things that don't *seem to* bother me at all, like avocado, cous cous and beans on the "avoid" list.

    Obviously, I have a lot more reading to do and 'experimenting' on myself.

    EDIT: Also, chocolate is on the "good" list. Chocolate is a huge trigger for me. I'm a bit of a chocolate fiend so I'm playing with fire regularly, I think excess chocolate this past weekend was a trigger for this bout.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    Is the 200 calories per hour specific to Tailwind? I have always heard 300-350 calories per hour should be the goal for intake, I usually shoot for 300 myself.

    My current/previous plan is to have two camelback bladders, one on my back, another in a frame bag and then more 'traditional' trail food, Clif bars, Honey Stinger waffles and hammer gel along with a little bit of real food of some kind in the pockets of the camelback.

    I'm not super keen on putting sports drink into my bladder(s). So, if I'm going to try Tailwind, I'm considering just one bladder of water and 5 bottles of Tailwind, with just a couple additional solid food items in case I get hungry. That puts a lot more weight on my back though, 2 bottles and my tool kit in addition to the water in the camelback.
    Wow, you're carrying quite a bit for an organized event. Aren't there any aid stations on course? If you can get water out on course, carry less of that, or at least I would.

    I ride with a pack that has clear water and refill a bottle on my frame from that. All I need is powder. I can make 3 bottles out of a full pack, leave with one full for a total of four with no water refill.

    I checked the TW site and yes, 200 is on the low end of the scale. But 350 is likely too much, especially if you are having lower GI issues. Everybody is different, some people can probably process more calories per hour than others.

    Here's the statement from TW:

    What’s important to understand is that even though you may be burning 500+ calories/hour, your body physiologically can only process 200-300 calories per hour. So, in general, we recommend starting off with 200-300 calories/24oz of water/hour for 2+ hour workouts, and 100-200 calories/24oz of water/hour for activities less than 2 hours. Listen to your body. If you are feeling hungry dial up the amount of calories, if feeling overly satiated/full, dial it back. The right amount may also vary based on the conditions (think temperature and humidity) and length and your intensity (how long, how hard, how far). When it’s hotter than your usual training temperature, keep the same calorie rate per hour, but increase water to thirst.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  7. #7
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    There is one aid station at mile 62, and that's it. That and the fact that 95 of the 100 miles are singletrack are why its considered difficult.

    I drink 25-30% more water than most people, so I'm looking at 200oz minimum to make it 62 miles, with temps in the low 80's, probably a little more just to be safe. I've done some bikepacking so I'm used to carrying a lot of water with me, I just prefer to keep the weight on the bike if I can.

    I'm thinking less is better as far as calorie consumption is concerned with this IBS issue. I used to plan for 350 per hour but only actually eat 300 or a little less. In this case I'm thinking starting at 200/hr sounds good and just eating some solid food if I need a little extra.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473 View Post
    There is one aid station at mile 62, and that's it. That and the fact that 95 of the 100 miles are singletrack are why its considered difficult.

    I drink 25-30% more water than most people, so I'm looking at 200oz minimum to make it 62 miles, with temps in the low 80's, probably a little more just to be safe. I've done some bikepacking so I'm used to carrying a lot of water with me, I just prefer to keep the weight on the bike if I can.

    I'm thinking less is better as far as calorie consumption is concerned with this IBS issue. I used to plan for 350 per hour but only actually eat 300 or a little less. In this case I'm thinking starting at 200/hr sounds good and just eating some solid food if I need a little extra.
    One aid station does make it pretty critical that you start with plenty, sounds like you've totally got that handled.

    Good luck sir. Hope your race goes great and your IBS comes under control.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  9. #9
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    I lost some of my colon to cancer so eating on the trail is very dicey for me. I simply avoid eating solids before and during a ride. I pretty much live on Gu or Cliff Bar chews and goo packs. As my intensity went up and the rides got longer I needed more fuel. After reading recommendations for Tailwind I purchased a bag and I am very satisfied with the results. I feel more energized on those longer rides instead of drained. I still eat the goo and chews but the Tailwind added that something else I was missing. Now I can skip breakfast and still pull of a multi-hour ride without feeling weak.

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