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  1. #1
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    Post Ride Recovery Drink....what to take ..

    Looking for a post ride recovery drink...something to minimize the soreness and recovery time.

    I keep a pretty active schedule ....

    ride dirt three times a week ...15-20 miles per ride...90% flat terrain so pedaling most of the time.

    jog three times per week, on riding days, 1.25- 2.25 miles per jog.

    on none riding days

    I workout ...whole muscle group exercises...bench press, lat pulldowns, squats, and shoulder shrugs. I usually do 5 sets of 10-12 reps..

    Also core work on these days - ab rolls, planks, and lower leg lifts.

    Sundays I rest.

    I generally feel good, but my legs, since I use almost everyday, can be sore at times.

    I always take a quality whey protein shake after riding and working out, but looking for something more. I have been reading about BCAA to aide recovery ...seems like a good idea

    What are some great recovery drinks some have used to minimize soreness and recovery time...?
    You cannot go against nature, because when you do, its part of nature too.

  2. #2
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    Not cheap, but Scratch Labs recovery drink is awesome... much of that is because it goes down easy after a hard ride as long as you have cold water to mix it with.

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    Believe it or not, best recovery drink is chocolate milk. Pretty much every research not founded by certain sport drink company, has pretty much same results.
    Another thing... nowadays people move a little bit and they think they need same stuff as pro athletes that are training 8+h/day and completely different intensity. I'm sure manufacturers of all sorts of supplements would want you to think so, but reality is, for average recreational "athlete" none of this is needed. For this what you are doing (based on what you wrote), normal food without any suplements would do more then good enough.
    And solution for "sore legs at time" is a bit of "training planning". When I was still racing in pro sport (xc skiing), I had 2 days a week off. Those rest days are as important as hard intervals training or long endurance sessions. So instead of thinking about which supplement can reduce sore legs, plan your training sessions a bit. Change what you are doing, include some short and fast staff, take day or two, or even a week off when you feel like sh**t etc. It will make more then some fancy recovery drink
    Primoz

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    As Primoz mentioned Chocolate milk has seen some advancement in studies but most of the studies have pitted it against Carbohydrate based drinks, a few of the leading studies have been done here at Texas A&M.


    Recovery is all about timing, you have a limited time frame to introduce nutrients into your system, from the minute you stop exercise the clock begins to tick and couple that with how your body absorbs nutrients and its own time clock is ticking. Getting simple carbs and sugars are great but your body will need proteins too. There are several companies that have recovery focused products, "Hammer Nutrition Recoverite" , Scratch Recovery drink", "Pacific Health Labs EnduroxR4" . All will say the same to ingest a certain amount immediately after exercise and again 30 to 40 minutes afterwards for maximum effectiveness.


    As for what works best for me: I make damn sure that I'm taking in plenty of liquids and electrolytes before, during, and after workouts. As soon as I complete a workout/ride I have a protein and carb based drink 18-20 oz and then again 30 minutes afterwards.


    If you are always sore cut your training back a notch and concentrate on recovery and rest, overtraining is your worst enemy.
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  5. #5
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    Thanks for the suggestions so far...

    I did not know that Skratch Labs made a recovery drink....I was planning looking into TailWind's recovery drink, seems to get positive reviews, will look into Skratch too. I know they are both expensive, but if they even aide somewhat to minimize soreness and recovery time, I believe it is justified.

    Another factor I am fighting against is age, getting real close to the half-century mark, so I am aware that certain body processes may take longer..ie recovery.

    I have thought about just doing a 3 day schedule-- workout day, ride day, and rest day, but this would be a last resort. Abandoning a Monday through Sunday schedule really complicates everything because of familial obligations and work. The one big positive is a rest day every 3 days, but when I compare it to my current weekly schedule it means 33% less riding or working out.

    Yet, I do understand listening to the body. Sometimes I want to ride an extra 5 miles or run that extra mile, but I back off. It is a fine line, in my eyes, between pushing yourself and being soft.

    I actually carry a small, blue Igloo cooler packed with cool water in my car when I go for a ride. As soon as I finish riding, or working out, I take my whey drink as I have read numerous articles about the "glycogen" 30 minute window. Many years ago, I actually mixed my protein with chocolate milk. I really don't recall why I stopped?

    Wholeheartedly agree about hydration. I drink lots of water. I hear cyclist often talking about hydrating themselves leading up to a long ride, but I am constantly drinking water. At home, my water pint container is always close by, ready to take a sip from. I must fill that thing 7 or 8 times a day.

    Now I am thinking at looking into some cycling specific recovery drinks, Skratch or Tailwind, and some fast release/slow release protein for my workout days.

    Just looking for something that leads to improvement....
    You cannot go against nature, because when you do, its part of nature too.

  6. #6
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    My wife and I are in our mid-60's and end rides with a cold 12 oz. V8 from a cooler in the car. Really nice for electrolytes. We ride at high altitude 7 to 10,000', so dehydration and electrolyte replacement is a big deal for us. And, as said, chocolate milk.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by primoz View Post
    Believe it or not, best recovery drink is chocolate milk. Pretty much every research not founded by certain sport drink company, has pretty much same results.
    Another thing... nowadays people move a little bit and they think they need same stuff as pro athletes that are training 8+h/day and completely different intensity. I'm sure manufacturers of all sorts of supplements would want you to think so, but reality is, for average recreational "athlete" none of this is needed. For this what you are doing (based on what you wrote), normal food without any suplements would do more then good enough.
    And solution for "sore legs at time" is a bit of "training planning". When I was still racing in pro sport (xc skiing), I had 2 days a week off. Those rest days are as important as hard intervals training or long endurance sessions. So instead of thinking about which supplement can reduce sore legs, plan your training sessions a bit. Change what you are doing, include some short and fast staff, take day or two, or even a week off when you feel like sh**t etc. It will make more then some fancy recovery drink
    True words. I also kind of like having sore legs. I'm on a 9 day streak too, so I guess I violate all the rules. Many of my recent rides have been in mid 90 degree weather. The electrolyte thing is a concern, but I absolutely hate sucking down as many or more calories as I burn in a ride or workout. In a similar vein to your "normal food" thought (which I agree with), I'm amazed at the gallons of carbs people will ingest while claiming they are on a supplement system.

  8. #8
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    I've often done chocolate milk. Recently I've been going with Chocolate Almond milk. I'm not sure if it has all the same benefits, my blood sugar was high a couple of years ago so I try not to ingest too much sugar and the almond milk claimed 40% less. I have a habit of drinking a lot of either one.
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  9. #9
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    giving the Choco a try....again ...

    Went out and bought some chocolate milk....giving it another go ...

    Post Ride Recovery Drink....what to take ..-img_4020.jpg
    You cannot go against nature, because when you do, its part of nature too.

  10. #10
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    Why chocolate milk is a great post-workout snack (but maybe not the best)

    In a post-workout haze, it can be hard to come up with a good snack. That means if you want to refuel properly, you’ll want to prepare in advance. And that means you’ll need to figure out a snack before you even start your workout. And who has time for that?

    Luckily for you, it’s actually not that complicated. But to understand what your body needs post-workout, we need to first talk about what workouts do to you.

    Whether you’re running or lifting weights (or anything in between) your body is essentially using its glycogen stores to fuel your exertions. Glycogen is the stored form of glucose, which is the main molecule that your cells break down in order to produce energy. Most of your glycogen hangs out in your liver and skeletal muscles. When you deplete it, you hit what athletes generally call “fatigue”—you’ve run out of your most immediate, convenient form of energy, which makes you feel physically exhausted (because you quite literally are).

    People who can store more glycogen in their muscles can exercise for longer, and you can increase that capacity through training. You can also, to some extent, provide your body with carbohydrates in advance to provide a source of energy other than glycogen, but it’s a tricky balance between supplying a bit of extra fuel and diverting precious resources toward your digestive tract. “You want your body's blood flow to be going to your muscles, not your digestive tract during your workout,” explains Jessi Haggerty, a registered dietician and trainer in Somerville, MA. That’s why pre-workout snacks full of fiber and fat generally aren’t helpful: they take a long time to digest.

    After you exercise, your body starts replenishing its glycogen stores and repairing or building new muscle, depending on how strenuously you worked them. This is what the post-workout snack is supposed to help with—pack the glycogen back in and build back muscle. That means you need two basic components: carbohydrates and protein. The latter is more important if you’re performing resistance exercise.
    This is why chocolate milk gained a reputation as a cheap alternative to expensive protein drinks for athletes, especially weightlifters. It has plenty of carbs, both in the milk (lactose is a sugar) and in the chocolate syrup or mix you add in, plus it has protein from the dairy. It’s not necessarily the best possible snack, but it’s got a good balance of the stuff you need (and it tastes good).

    “A fast-acting protein works best, however for the recreational athlete and competitive as well, chocolate milk may be fine. You just need to drink a bit more to get the same protein content,” says Jay Hoffman, a professor in the Sport and Exercise Science program at University of Central Florida. Plus, he explains, the combination of the ingredients can have a cooperative effect. “The chocolate content will active insulin which will increase amino acid and glucose uptake, [which is] important for enhancing recovery from exercise.”

    That’s not to say that everyone recommends chocolate milk specifically. “I personally wouldn't recommend chocolate milk because it tends to contain refined sugar with an inadequate amount of protein. However, some people prefer it because it does contain both carbs and protein,” says Nora Minno, a registered dietician and trainer in New York City. She says that it is true that studies show dairy proteins might be especially helpful for workout recovery because they have plenty of leucine, one of the essential amino acids involved in creating new proteins, and because of the way our bodies absorb the other amino acids in fluid-based dairy foods. It seems to work better than soy-based proteins, for instance, as well as better than general carbohydrate options. As Hoffman points out, research suggests that this is because of the whey protein in milk, which our bodies absorb quickly.

    A few studies have actually tested whether chocolate milk is a good recovery snack. One from 2013 said it was “optimal for exercise recovery and may attenuate indices of muscle damage.” Another from 2006, which compared chocolate milk to simple fluid recovery versus another carbohydrate-based drink found that chocolate milk helped athletes replenish their energy faster than the other carb option, though the fluid recovery worked just as well.

    The key, really, is the carb-protein combo—and that you consume the snack somewhere between zero and two hours post-workout. Some studies suggest sooner, as in within 30 minutes, may be better, but there’s no conclusive answer.

    As for how much, the International Society for Sports Nutrition recommends keeping the ratio around 3:1 or 4:1 carbohydrates-to-protein. Incidentally, and though it depends on the kind of milk you use and the amount of syrup added, this is about the ratio inside chocolate milk: roughly 8 grams protein plus 24 grams carbohydrates. But it doesn’t have to be chocolate milk, especially if you’re vegan or hate chocolate. Minno says the general rule of thumb is around 1 to 1.5 grams of carbohydrates per kilogram of bodyweight. You should also keep the protein limited to around 20 grams, perhaps slightly more or less depending on your bodyweight, because you simply can’t absorb and make use of much more than that.

    If all those numbers are intimidating, try figuring out several snack options in advance so you know what works and won’t have to be googling for nutritional information after a long run. Here are some ideas to get you started:

    • 7 oz of 2% greek yogurt plus a cup of blueberries and a drizzle of honey gets you at least 20 grams protein and around 30 grams of carbs.
    • ⅔ of a cup of almonds plus a banana get you 15 grams of protein and around 30 of carbs
    • A turkey and cheddar sandwich gets you just shy of 20 grams of protein, plus about 30 grams of carbs, assuming you use whole grain bread.



    Whatever you like and decide on, make a habit of eating something you know has the right fuel to resupply your muscles. Make it easy on yourself, and enjoy the results.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ottoreni View Post
    Went out and bought some chocolate milk....giving it another go ...
    Nothing wrong with chocolate milk if you don't mind the added sugar, but plain whole milk is all you need. The low fat thing isn't helping your recovery.

    If you are sore much of the time then you're probably not being honest with yourself about how much recovery you need, and/or the quality of your recovery.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sapva View Post
    Nothing wrong with chocolate milk if you don't mind the added sugar, but plain whole milk is all you need. The low fat thing isn't helping your recovery.

    If you are sore much of the time then you're probably not being honest with yourself about how much recovery you need, and/or the quality of your recovery.
    Agreed. I doubt most bodies can use as much refined sugar as chocolate milk or most other drinks have. White milk has quickly metabolizing protein and enough carbs to go on until I can eat a proper meal.
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  13. #13
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    The best post workout recovery snack is beer, jerky, and Cheetos. Everything else is just a junk food fad.

  14. #14
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    Why not a high quality whey protein powder and dextrose? Wouldn't that be the fastest digesting sources of protein and carbs?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    Why not a high quality whey protein powder and dextrose? Wouldn't that be the fastest digesting sources of protein and carbs?
    10grams of EAA (not BCAA) and 60grams of HBCD carbs. This can be expensive if bought at GNC but if ordered through companies like True Nutrition is not.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ottoreni View Post
    Went out and bought some chocolate milk....giving it another go ...
    The Skratch Labs mix is basically chocolate milk w/ probiotic. It's not cheap but then chocolate milk of decent quality is also pretty expensive.

    I've been adding NOW brand BCAA to it and I feel it makes a big difference to gulp it down right after a ride, even if I'll be eating 30-60 minutes later. It also keeps me from overeating later, especially after the addition of the BCAAs.

    So far Skratch + BCAA powder is working better than anything else I've used.

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    Didn't know about chocolate milk, that is great. I would also add some B complex, works wonders and is fast acting.

    Cheers

  18. #18
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    Check out this chocolate milk I found at the store it must be super duper stuff 🤣


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    Agree with much of what has been written in the thread including being smart about training, Skratch for recovery, and possibly chocolate milk. Many individuals are now shying away from dairy for various reasons such as GI upset, so for some chocolate milk doesn't always work well.

    OSMO also makes a good recovery drink and worth looking at.

    However one of the most underrated parts of recovery is sleep. Ensuring you are getting high quality and adequate sleep will do wonders for both recovery but also energy levels. I'm always amazed how much more riding I can handle when I'm on vacation and away from daily stressors and reduced sleep. Having good sleep habits to optimize the rest you get is also important. This includes watching how much alcohol and caffeine you take in, particularly in the evenings. Trying to sleep at the same times each night, etc. Unfortunately life is hard to control, but trying to manage things as best you can will help you reach both your mental and physical peaks.

  20. #20
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    For a long time my go-to recovery drink was always chocolate milk. I would often freeze it the night before and keep it in the cooler during the race. That way it was a slushy when I got done with the race.

    For almost the past year I've been using Tailwind's Rebuild. I like the taste and it seems to sit a little better in my stomach than the milk after a high intensity or super long ride.

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    I typically make my own protein drink with a 4:1 ratio using some type of nut milk, banana, and egg or vegetable-based protein since I don't drink milk. I've also found that when I am doing long training days or riding hard 5-6x per week it makes a big difference to do an epson salt bath at night and sleep in well made compression gear. I'm a fan of the 2XU compression recovery tights. I've had a bunch of injuries so I do whatever i can to keep the body moving!

  22. #22
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    One scoop Optimum Nutrition vanilla whey, and one scoop frost blue Gatorade. Knock it back as soon as I get off the trail and to my truck.
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    Quote Originally Posted by HotHead View Post
    One scoop Optimum Nutrition vanilla whey, and one scoop frost blue Gatorade. Knock it back as soon as I get off the trail and to my truck.
    How does it taste?

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    Data. Very few people pay attention to it. People like to believe what they want to believe.

    "Recovery drinks" have been around for a while now after the advent of gator aide. The term "electrolytes" entered our vocabulary about 1965. The data showed that athletes who exercised intensely for over 2 hours (like marathon runners)needed something to feed their cells to prevent them from feeding on themselves. Gatorade was proven to be able to accomplish this task. This was confirmed by repeated trials many many times by independent clinicians. Along comes the milk industry who sponsored 1 study to see if chocolate milk would do the same thing as gator aide. That one study (funded by the milk industry, mind you) proved that it did. Probably any sugar drink will have similar results. Someone has to pay for these studies, which means there usually must be a profit motive in order for there to be a study. There may well be numerous other options that accomplish similar goals that have not sponsored any studies.

    If you don't exercise intensely for 2 hours or more you may not "need" sugar or salt replacement. Most of our modern society gets far too much sodium compared to potassium or magnesium. You may have a greater need for anti-inflammatory drinks.

    Considering the natural anti-inflammatory and antioxidant capacity of tart cherries, it is plausible that cherry juice or cherry consumption before, during, and after strenuous exercise may have a protective effect to reduce muscle damage and pain. In fact, a recent study of demonstrated efficacy for cherry juice in decreasing symptoms and strength loss following eccentric exercise induced muscle damage.

    Other anti-inflammatory foods?

    •Green leafy veggies
    •Blueberries (Quercetin)
    •Pineapples (papain)
    •Wild-caught salmon (omega 3)
    •Chia seeds and flaxseeds (omega 3)
    •Turmeric (circumin)

  25. #25
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    Most get way too much sugar from processed foods too including sports drinks. From what I have learned, if the refined sugars (e.g. corn syrup, cane sugar, fruit juice) don't accompany fiber, the digestion is so fast that it is converted to insulin and may as well be a toxin. I would be interested in how much time we have before that happens and how much refined sugars our bodies can actually use for exercise.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNTall View Post
    Most get way too much sugar from processed foods too including sports drinks. From what I have learned, if the refined sugars (e.g. corn syrup, cane sugar, fruit juice) don't accompany fiber, the digestion is so fast that it is converted to insulin and may as well be a toxin. I would be interested in how much time we have before that happens and how much refined sugars our bodies can actually use for exercise.
    +1
    The best recovery drink for 99% of people is ... wait for it... H20!

  27. #27
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    Forget chocolate milk, go bigger. Milk + Cocoa Pebbles. Don't forget to structure your life around always riding at least 2 hours each time, and live the man/woman child dream. lol... reminds me of my dad putting ice cream in his Weight Watchers shakes.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by willowbeast View Post
    How does it taste?
    Fantabuloso!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNTall View Post
    Most get way too much sugar from processed foods too including sports drinks. From what I have learned, if the refined sugars (e.g. corn syrup, cane sugar, fruit juice) don't accompany fiber, the digestion is so fast that it is converted to insulin and may as well be a toxin. I would be interested in how much time we have before that happens and how much refined sugars our bodies can actually use for exercise.
    The insulin spike due to the sugar is actually a good thing at this time. It forces your muscles to take up the protein when they need it for rebuilding.
    Thus, one scoop Optimum Nutrition WHEY and one scoop Gatorade.

    Skratch Labs does well with their recovery mix also. They use cane sugar for many of their products. Pure and simple.
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    Quote Originally Posted by k.b. View Post
    Data. Very few people pay attention to it. People like to believe what they want to believe.

    "Recovery drinks" have been around for a while now after the advent of gator aide. The term "electrolytes" entered our vocabulary about 1965. The data showed that athletes who exercised intensely for over 2 hours (like marathon runners)needed something to feed their cells to prevent them from feeding on themselves. Gatorade was proven to be able to accomplish this task.
    Protein is needed to prevent catabolism, not electrolytes.
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    Quote Originally Posted by HotHead View Post
    The insulin spike due to the sugar is actually a good thing at this time. It forces your muscles to take up the protein when they need it for rebuilding.
    Thus, one scoop Optimum Nutrition WHEY and one scoop Gatorade.

    Skratch Labs does well with their recovery mix also. They use cane sugar for many of their products. Pure and simple.
    Your muscles may like the insulin spike but your pancreas and liver are working overtime and getting tortured.

    Research confirms that when you take high GI carbs along with fast-digesting protein, such as whey, after workouts, insulin levels soar even higher than when just high GI carbs are consumed.

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    I like the isagentix pre-workout/ post workout drinks followed by a meal shake. The pre workout one is amazing in terms of the boost it gives.

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    Not a drink, but on those 90 degree days an ice cream cone hits the spot. LOL
    Last edited by scycllerist; 10-19-2018 at 02:51 PM.

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    I drink between 3 and 4 gallons of chocolate milk a week. Always have it after workouts (riding or weight lifting).

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