Wheelbuilders in NC- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    mwv
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    Wheelbuilders in NC

    Can anyone recommend a shop or individual to build some wheels? Preferably in the Triad or Charlotte area. I have inquired with a few shops but no replies.

    My first option of some of the online builders don't have the combinations of hubs (and hub configs) and rim options I would like. So providing some of this appealing.

    I need to learn to do this myself maybe

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  3. #3
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    This is something easy to learn. In fact, very easy if I can find the link with the method my friend showed me. Good to know how to do so you can true or repair your wheel yourself in pinch. I'll go find that link.

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  4. #4
    mwv
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy G. Parrish View Post
    This is something easy to learn. In fact, very easy if I can find the link with the method my friend showed me. Good to know how to do so you can true or repair your wheel yourself in pinch. I'll go find that link.

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    I've wanted to learn for a while. For some reason it's the only thing regarding bike mechanics that intimidates me.

    I'm confident to do a repair enough that it's close and sound.

  5. #5
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    https://www.scribd.com/doc/26719057/...Wheel-Building

    See page 66. This method allows you to easily stop and start if you have to tend to something else.

    You may need to find a spoke tensioner if you are OCD about it. I didn't use one. You should recheck/retrue after first few rides. I used olive oil on the nipples.

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  6. #6
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    Semi-finished product. I put new hubs and spokes on old set of hoops.

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  7. #7
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    And you don't need a truing stand. I simply put the wheel on the fork/frame and centered it accordingly. This will get your dish spot on. I used an Irwin quick clamp to provide a stationary reference to rim when truing. I don't have pics of that, however.

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  8. #8
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    Like anything else there are the right tools for the job. You don't need a stand or tensionometer to learn. However if you want the best result as possible you might want to have the proper tools.

  9. #9
    mwv
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    They will be for a touring bike that I will be on nearly daily for a long time. That's my reason for not really wanting to learn on this pair

  10. #10
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    Crazy no shop has replied. Maybe try going in and talking with some of the mechanics and get an idea of how comfortable you are with their work. They will likely have suggestions for you if the don't do it in house. Most shops charge $35-$50 per wheel for the labor plus materials.

    I know it's not local, but I've used prowheelbuilder.com and Speedgearbike (Facebook presence only) and have had great results. There's also some great wheelbuilders on this site...hubsessed, southern wheelworks to name a couple.


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  11. #11
    mwv
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    I won't get in to my opinion of the communication issues I've been experiencing trying to find a place to take my money .....thats a whole story itself and why I ask here.

  12. #12
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    Andy or Alex at Chainheart Cycling can build you whatever you want. Andy has more experience building wheels than just about anybody. Being honest...he doesn't have to do cheap work, so he doesn't really like doing it. So, if you're looking to build something with deore hubs and used rims (otherwise known as re-using a bent nail, btw), they may not be your shop.

    In Charlotte- seems this place is el recommend-o.

    No*Gas Wheels

  13. #13
    mwv
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    Thank you

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    Niner Jet 9 RDO, Scalpel 29, XTC 650b, 04 Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Trek Rigid SS - No suspension, no gears....no problem

  15. #15
    mwv
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    It can be, yes. I'm weighing options.

    If anything I would be providing some new Hope 4s.

  16. #16
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    Would second learning yourself. Buy Roger Musson's book for abt $12, print it, stick it in a 3 ring and roll.

    Wheelbuilding book for cycle wheels

    Seriously wouldn't use "they are long term touring wheels" as an excuse. That's perfect. I bought this PDF abt 3 years ago and went through it with a buddy. I've now built 3 wheelsets (2 trail and a DH), acquiring parts for my 4th and first road bike build.

    Musson does a great job explaining every aspect of wheel building and how to build some of the required tools. If you do go this route, I would highly recommend getting the right tools for the job, including a truing stand. Consider it a one time investment to save hundreds on wheels over your life time.

    I personally love working on my own wheels, having the flexibility to replace spokes if one pops or relace to a new rim after a couple hard seasons of Pisgah thrashing.

    It's hard for me to consider buying wheels now, and esp wheels that I can't work on myself. Example...I want to want some I9s, but buying a set of quality budget hubs from BikeHubStore and a set of rims for an online steal, I can be in a pretty killer wheelset for <$400.

    Sorry for the word vomit but I really do love working on wheels and love seeing people get past the cloak of difficulty this aspect of bike wrenching has on it. You got this!!! Shoot, at least buy the PDF and read through it a bit before you decide

    ANNNNND lastly, if all this is for nought, Frank at Frank's Cyclery in Raleigh is absolutely aces on wheel builds. He built a set for me in 2010 that I just sold on a bike in 2016, still rolling strong.
    Last edited by Lithified; 08-14-2017 at 05:43 AM.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwv View Post
    I've wanted to learn for a while. For some reason it's the only thing regarding bike mechanics that intimidates me.
    +1

    Quote Originally Posted by Lithified View Post
    Would second learning yourself. Buy Roger Musson's book for abt $12, print it, stick it in a 3 ring and roll.

    Wheelbuilding book for cycle wheels
    While I've seen many recommendations for Musson's book, this is the convincing I needed. I'm going to purchase the PDF, pick up the right tools and commit to learning over the winter.

    I have a local friend who builds wheels who always comments, "I can't believe you haven't learned to build wheels..."

  18. #18
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    you won't be sorry: No*Gas Wheels — No*Gas Wheels

  19. #19
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    There is a bike mechanic school in Asheville where you can take a wheel building class and build your own wheels. No better way than that imho.
    Progression is fine just remember to respect your roots.

  20. #20
    zod
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    Quote Originally Posted by jstuhlman View Post
    What he said....and Mike Brown. NoGas Wheels are freaking bomb-proof

  21. #21
    My Ti
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    Did you ever find someone? I know a reputable wheel builder that I can put you in touch with, send me a message if you are still looking.
    Shakenbake

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