New Bike for WNC area- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New Bike for WNC area

    I am looking for a new bike to ride in the WNC area. My family just bought a house in the spruce pine area of NC. I was curious what type of trail riding is in the area? I would like to get in to some more gravity style of riding if the area is good for it. I was thinking of either getting some longer travel AM bike or maybe something in the Freeride Category. Right now I currently ride a hardtail and live in SC. Also can anyone recommend a good shop in the area??
    I am really not asking for specific bike brand help but more what type bike would work for the type of trails in that area.
    Thanks for your time!

  2. #2
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    Come see us at Boone Bike. Sounds like you would enjoy an aggressive trail bike or an all mtn bike. I love my Enduro for the riding we have. Get up with some locals and check out Wilson Creek. You are also close to the Asheville scene, Brevard, Black mtn etc.

  3. #3
    Jamin, Applesause, No?
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    all mountain dw-link bike

  4. #4
    ohhman
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    +1.....Mojo HD.

    [QUOTE=Senor StrongBad]all mountain dw-link bike[/QUOTE

  5. #5
    rsa
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    I'm another believer of the dw hype. My recommendation would be a 5" travel 26er or a 4" or so 29er. I demo'd a specialized 29er and an ibis mojo. Greatly preferred the mojo except for the smaller wheels. Ended up with a Turner Sultan- great bike for pisgah.

    I think you will regret a freeride bike when going uphill, especially coming from a hardtail.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for all the help!!!
    So I guess the 2011 Transition Bottlerocket with AM Hammerschmidt I was eying would not be a great idea.

  7. #7
    ohhman
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    Owned one for a while... Super Fun, but seat tube too short for long grinders to the top.

    The Covert is awesome!

  8. #8
    pronounced may-duh
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    We have had this same discussion recently. I think the consensus was to find a bike that your comfortable climbing with. 90% of the ride time you will be going uphill.

    Personally, I like a 5-6" travel bike that is built light and climbs well. low gearing for the steep tech climbs. Most find the big ring is useless in Pisgah. Good brakes and big tires for the DH. The Mojo sounds perfect.

    But it takes all kinds. I see people all the time on fully rigid SS bikes. Occasionally, I see some folks with heavy DH sleds and full armor.

  9. #9
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    I had a bottlerocket for 2 weeks. Definitely not the bike for Pisgah.

  10. #10
    zod
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    Spruce Pine is a great area. Right betwixt Pisgah proper and Wilson Crik. I hate you. What others said, 5 to 6 inch FS rig. 1x9 is perfect but on occasion in some areas I wish I had granny but not enough to run the extra weight of front drivetrain.

  11. #11
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    Ibis Mojo HD or Gary Fisher Rumble Fish

  12. #12
    Jamin, Applesause, No?
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    The new Ibis Mojo SLR looks sweet too. I also like the new Pivot mach 5.7 and the Firebirds. I also hear good things are coming from Titus OnOne.

  13. #13
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    I just wanted to check if there was any other suggestions as the 2012 are coming out.

    what about the Yeti SB-66 or the 2012 Specialized stumpy fsr EVO???
    Our house is will be done being built in the middle of october

    Thanks everyone!!
    Dan

  14. #14
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    Santa Cruz Butcher. I'm a big fan of single pivot bikes. You don't have to flip ProPedal levers all the time, and they are durable. I would say get a Heckler, but only with a coil shock. DW links don't need ProPedal either, but I have no experience with durability other than Ibis' bearings don't last all that long.

  15. #15
    ohhman
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    True single pivots are for the 90's when tv's still were cube shaped.

  16. #16
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    @ Salmansp Since you are a pivot dealer what about a Firebird??

  17. #17
    ohhman
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    Depends on what you like. I'll break it down a bit:

    Pivot: 5.7 heavy on the anti-squat. Firebird- too heavy for price, excellent for the downhills.

    Mojo HD- excellent climber/descender. Not the most poppy bike, more plush. (favorite bike ever owned)
    Sl-r about perfect for those who balance up and down.

    Transition covert - sturdy, bobs a bit, FR worthy at AM weight

    Transition Bandit: currently testing one. So far, most fun f/s bike I have owned. Poppy, playful and pedals well. Not as stiff as HD.

    Rocky Slayer- what a speci. Enduro should be. 85% less bob (doesnt need a brain, rider has one for buying anything else, less weight and better parts for price

    Stumpy: nice but fsr is old school. Let the patent go. Move forward, wouldn't need a brain(bandaid for made pedal bob) if it could keep up with the Jones'

    Butcher, and 575... Link actuated single pivot... Plush, though; Not the most efficient pedalers

    Nomads, blur, tracer, etc... Great bikes, but need to own swiss screw machine to afford replacing the lost bolts, bearings, washers, and what ever else falls off/out. Some of my favorites over the years

    Giant trance, reign... Very much DW style, but the frames are weird geometry (for me)

    Trek ex or remedy.... Split pivot goodness with too much bontrager stuff

    Turners: DW- very nice. Overall solid. Way too pricey for non industry rider.


    Overall: trail/AM is owned by the boutique brands.
    29ers for trail/am is for those that can manage a clydesdale. Lot of bike to maneuver.
    Hardtail: stickle or transAM

  18. #18
    Support Pisgah Area Soba
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    Been Riding my Turner Sultan 4.9 inch running a 140mm Front fork for about 1 month now. So far it is an amazing bike that I have used for all day epics and 50 miles races. I have yet to bottom the shocks out and what a blast to ride. Climbs with no issues in and out of the saddle. This is also my first 29er and resisted it for years coming from a Turner Flux and a Trek Carbon 9900. I see no issues with cornering and if anything switchbacks are now easier. At first I felt the BB was to high, but the more I ride it I don't even notice it and it clears just about everything.
    Pisgah Area Sorba - Web Site Communications
    http://www.pisgahareasorba.org/

  19. #19
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    @ salmansp Thanks for all the help! I am interested in the mojo hd is it possible to get one under 3000.00 mark? Do you keep any in stock.
    Thanks dan

  20. #20
    ohhman
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    Quote Originally Posted by [H]acksaw View Post
    @ salmansp Thanks for all the help! I am interested in the mojo hd is it possible to get one under 3000.00 mark? Do you keep any in stock.
    Thanks dan
    Not possible on a new complete, but frame and fork yes. I keep them in stock. I should have a new med and large in the next few days. Had 2 leave last week....

    Used under 3 is possible. Like all new carbon trail bikes. $2500 for a frame is starting price.

    Covert and slayer under 3 is easier

  21. #21
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    How is the covert for climbing since it is a single pivot?

  22. #22
    ohhman
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    With the pivot on the seat stay, the spring rate is much different than a true one piece single pivot. I have 3 good friends that swear by them for Pisgah, Dupont, and some light DH. I really enjoyed mine.
    They are great for the down, and go up quite well. Euros are killing it on the mega-enduros riding coverts. I have one at the shop. Come check it out.

  23. #23
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    Ok this sounds like it may be the best way to go. What type of pricing are we looking at on a covert v3 build Med. I would send you a PM but I dont have enough posts yet

  24. #24
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    Thanks for the PM

  25. #25
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    I need two more posts so I can reply (10)

  26. #26
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  27. #27
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    I really like my Rocky Mountain Altitude 29er. Seems to handle Pisgah,Dupont,& Bent Creek quite well. Only limiting factor has been rider.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by salmansp View Post
    True single pivots are for the 90's when tv's still were cube shaped.
    Not even close. They pedal almost as well as anything out there, are extremely playful and fun on the downhills, and can be built quite light. They do take a bit of time to set up correctly, but I'll take the playfulness and simplicity over anything else out there.

  29. #29
    ohhman
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    Glad the simplicity works for you.

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