Lesson for us all.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Keeping it Real Since 1971!!

  2. #2
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    Thanks for sharing. Itís good to read and learn from it. Itís also good to police ourselves. If you see someone or your crew being an a$$, tell them to shape up.

  3. #3
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by bandit350 View Post
    Thanks for sharing. Itís good to read and learn from it. Itís also good to police ourselves. If you see someone or your crew being an a$$, tell them to shape up.
    From what I've noticed in more than one place that can be a bit of a destination (national/international destination trails as well as regional destinations), these problems usually don't come from the locals who have skin in the game.

    Even this article put the onus on visitors, which isn't hard to do when you've got a destination trail system served by very small towns. Not a whole lot of locals riding bikes out there compared to the number of visitors.

  4. #4
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    I don't think locals are the majority of the issue here. In general, people in this area are nicer and more accommodating towards others than anywhere else I've lived. That culture extends towards being on bikes, for the most part.

    Having lived in bigger cities, the social culture is very different and it bleeds over into the mountain biking community. In places like Atlanta and Charlotte, they are indifferent towards one another and other trail users, often hostile towards the latter. The rules of the trail are also different, some of the city parks actually give bikes the right of way. I spoke with some equestrians outside of Atlanta who told us that in several years of being there, we were the first mountain bikers they encountered that stopped and dismounted.

    I expect some don't know because the rules differ where they are, but they are the minority, the rest are just indifferent towards others and sometimes entitled. I've had bad encounters with fellow riders from these areas, I can only imagine how that extends to other trail users.

    The "Be nice, say hi" thing is rooted in experiences (albeit a bit on the cheesy side, I prefer "Don't be a dick"). I doubt the people here are part of the problem, it's those coming from out of town and I'm not sure how you police or correct that.

  5. #5
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    Most bikers that I come in contact with or ride with have a pretty good attitude towards other users (not biking) and usually prefer to let non cyclist have the right of way. As we all know and can see from the article on PB and the forum below on MTBR it does not take much to have access to trails denied by a bad interaction. Most people who do not ride can get an opinion of mtn bikers as a reckless group. I have seen riders get totally rude (at city parks) with people for going slower (including kids on beginner trails) like it's going to ruin their day if they slow down just a bit. Not sure if they are trying to become fastest guy on strava, but if its not a race on a closed course we should really be mindful of other trail users. Most people who grant access to trails are not mtn bikers and will not put up with careless/rude actions.

    Below forum on the same subject:
    https://forums.mtbr.com/vermont-new-...s-1123649.html
    Keeping it Real Since 1971!!

  6. #6
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    I don't know if some of the riders I have ran into in Pisgah are local or not but definitely they need schooled in trail etiquette. Several occasions there have been riders bombing down as I am climbing without even beginning to slow down, don't say hello, sorry, anything. WTF?

    I always make a point to slow down or stop entirely when a climber is coming up because...that's the right (and obvious) thing to do.

    Of course the sight lines are sometimes not the best and it's easy to startle a hiker or biker but damn, make an effort to slow up and apologize. People are normally cool if you make the effort.

    I can't believe there haven't been more formal complaints about mountain bikers on trails around here. It could be that 25 years of biking makes me old and curmudgeonly.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by pryde1 View Post
    I don't know if some of the riders I have ran into in Pisgah are local or not but definitely they need schooled in trail etiquette. Several occasions there have been riders bombing down as I am climbing without even beginning to slow down, don't say hello, sorry, anything. WTF?

    I always make a point to slow down or stop entirely when a climber is coming up because...that's the right (and obvious) thing to do.

    Of course the sight lines are sometimes not the best and it's easy to startle a hiker or biker but damn, make an effort to slow up and apologize. People are normally cool if you make the effort.

    I can't believe there haven't been more formal complaints about mountain bikers on trails around here. It could be that 25 years of biking makes me old and curmudgeonly.
    Agree. In the summer, I really only like to ride a place like Dupont during the weekdays and not weekends. Too many riders with little etiquette thinking they are the next Gwin during the weekends.
    It is the Right of the People to Alter or to Abolish It.

  8. #8
    Big Mac
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    If we could just eliminate the douchebags.


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