Jumps on Ingles Field ?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Jamin, Applesause, No?
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    New question here. Jumps on Ingles Field ?

    has anyone had trouble with the 2 jumps at the end of Ingels Field. I took Ingels Field down from 5 points yesterday after riding Greens lick and coming back up. (No problems hitting all the jumps on Greens lick) . The 2 jumps at the very bottom of Ingels Field nearing the gravel road about through me off my bike. Has anyone else experienced these jumps and had big problems on them? Is there someone I can contact to re-do them so they are safer? or do I just need to hit the brakes more? My friend who was right in front of me must have cleared 5ft off the first one and I almost ate it over the handlebars following. Again, we had no problems on any of the jumps down Greens lick. Please let me know your thoughts?

  2. #2
    Drinker w/ Riding Problem
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    Not to be a dick but, those aren't jumps. They're Rolling Grade Dips to keep the water from flowing straight down the trail creating huge ruts down the center.

    Rules of the Trail " ride within your limits".. If you're hitting elments of the trail and are out of control... then you are not riding within your limits



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  3. #3
    Its got what plants crave
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    Maybe you should modify your skills instead of the trail.
    Ocala Mountain Bike Association - www.omba.org

  4. #4
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    There are no officially built jumps on Ingles Field, Green's Lick, or any USFS trail in this area.
    There are water diversion features that happen to make great jumps- ain't we lucky?

    The water diversion features on Green's Lick were built by Trail Dynamics, a locally owned company that took into account the primary users (mtb's) when designing their water diversion features.

    The water diversion features on Ingles Field were built by a different company who are essentaily a spin-off from existing USFS crews. They had no requirement and may not have taken into account user expereince of their water diversion features.

    Pisgah Area SORBA has done some work on the water diversion features you are referencing. They cannot be totally "fixed" without moving the trail, using machines, and/or building structure of some kind, IMO- this would require submitting specific plans for approval through the Ranger District and/or the expiremental forest. This is possible for the water features here, IMO, because there has likely been a few EMS responses- that's the kind of data that is necessary to get "plans" approved.

    I'd worry, however, that the "response" to a request to make the water diversion features safer for users would be to gravel the section of trail up to the bench. Always remember that almost every "trail" in Bent Creek is actually a road in the USFS inventory and can be treated as a road by the expiremental forest at any time.

  5. #5
    "Ride Lots" Eddy Merckx
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    Quote Originally Posted by Senor StrongBad
    Is there someone I can contact to re-do them so they are safer?
    wow.
    "Big Gulps huh?...Allllriggghhht....Welp, See ya later!"

  6. #6
    Jamin, Applesause, No?
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    Mike Brown - Thanks for the well thought out response. I did not realize that the 2 trails were done by different groups. That would make sense why Greens lick "Water Features" were so much fun at full speed and Ingles Field were so bad at speed.

    Jim 311 - The skills I have plenty of. It is the experience of the trail and my understanding of who and how it was created that lacks. This was my first time down the trail and while everything up to the end was managed in the 20mph range. These 2 features at the end stuck up on us. I am always looking to push the envelope and have ridden enough to know when it is my skills that are in question. I do not think it so much a modification of skills so much as it is a knowledge of the upcoming terrain. Nothing up until that point told us that these 2 "Features" would have to be taken with more caution then the "Features" on Greens lick. I do not know if I read your response wrong and you meant good, but it sounds to me like your a "one upper" and a person who likes to put others down, I would suggest you work on your "response Skills." : )

    Brado - I see you on almost every one of these forums. HA. Not sure if it is that you patrol them more than anyone else or that the ugly face you use sticks out the most. I appreciate reading a lot of your responses in other forums. You seem like you have a lot of knowledge. Riding at your limit is all well and good when you know what to expect. But pushing your limits can be a great learning tool for progress, especially when it comes to Mountain Biking. As for being out of control... that is questionable. My friend behind me does not know how I did not eat it. I just told him I relaxed a didn't panic which allowed me to roll out of it. Keep control of your front wheel and the back usually follows.


    All in all I think it comes down to knowing now that both trails where created by different folks. I will remember to slow it down next time when turning by the tables. I will also keep in mind that all the trails there will have similar looking features that will act way different when you hit them. I guess I was hoping that they could become as cool as the ones on Greens Lick. (Which by the way I have only done twice)


    Thanks!

  7. #7
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    I have lots of trouble with jumps too. Last time I was riding out there I went SO close to flipping over the bars it was very scary! I definitely think we should take those jumps out of the trail.

    In fact, that trail is really hard to go up too! I think we should consider paving portions of it or maybe even laying down wood to help with the traction. There are plenty of graders out there on North Boundary Rd...it wouldn't be very hard for them to plow up Ingles Field at least until that first bench area. Or better yet, maybe they could just come down the trail!! That steep section near 5 points is REALLY hard too. There are also some challenging rocks and a few wall rides that should be removed. That kind of stuff is way too dangerous for a public mountain bike area like Bent Creek.

    Last time I was following my buddy down Ingles Field, he went head over heals off that last jump. It was really scary! He had to have been at least 2 feet over the jump so he was really high in the air and when he landed he just went right over. I thought we were going to have to call a helicopter to get him out! We even got video of it!! Check it out:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVnnu...layer_embedded

  8. #8
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    The OP seems to be making the point that when trails are too consistent in their features, users are fooled into thinking that every upcoming feature will be just like the ones they've just encountered. It's a problem with people, not a problem with trails.

    Old school trails often have some flowy and some slow sections, some smooth, some extremely rough. On these trails (and all trails) riders have to expect anything. I do not want trails that are completely consistent from one end to the other.

    Trail builders, such as Woody, have taken to adding progressively sharper curves, rises, and chokes prior to sharp turns, steep, and slower sections to encourage the rider to slow down. Honestly, every rider should be doing this without any engineered cues. That said, these features do save a lot of people from injury.

    The solution? Keep things just as they are. Mountain biking is dangerous if you're not careful.

    (not meant as a slam to the OP)

  9. #9
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    D.F.L. - Guess what common sense isn't?
    Edit: Otherwise, I completely 1000% agree with you.

  10. #10
    Official Cooler Inspector
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    The current conditions ARE an improvement. I gained my initial membership to The Clavicle Club there in '98. It used to be a huge mound that was "intended" to keep the 4-wheelers off the old road bed when you could drive and camp back here.
    Now you're cast of steel and cast aside. Broken dreams maybe, but you haven't died

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Brown
    D.F.L. - Guess what common sense isn't?
    Edit: Otherwise, I completely 1000% agree with you.
    Makes an AS.S out of U and ME?

    We had this discussion about the bottom of Airstrip. We were snarky, the poster felt insulted, and the grade dip was altered and then completely redone... Shows what we know!

    Everybody be careful out there.

  12. #12
    Big Mac
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    Quote Originally Posted by Senor StrongBad
    Mike Brown - Thanks for the well thought out response. I did not realize that the 2 trails were done by different groups. That would make sense why Greens lick "Water Features" were so much fun at full speed and Ingles Field were so bad at speed.

    Jim 311 - The skills I have plenty of. It is the experience of the trail and my understanding of who and how it was created that lacks. This was my first time down the trail and while everything up to the end was managed in the 20mph range. These 2 features at the end stuck up on us. I am always looking to push the envelope and have ridden enough to know when it is my skills that are in question. I do not think it so much a modification of skills so much as it is a knowledge of the upcoming terrain. Nothing up until that point told us that these 2 "Features" would have to be taken with more caution then the "Features" on Greens lick. I do not know if I read your response wrong and you meant good, but it sounds to me like your a "one upper" and a person who likes to put others down, I would suggest you work on your "response Skills." : )

    Brado - I see you on almost every one of these forums. HA. Not sure if it is that you patrol them more than anyone else or that the ugly face you use sticks out the most. I appreciate reading a lot of your responses in other forums. You seem like you have a lot of knowledge. Riding at your limit is all well and good when you know what to expect. But pushing your limits can be a great learning tool for progress, especially when it comes to Mountain Biking. As for being out of control... that is questionable. My friend behind me does not know how I did not eat it. I just told him I relaxed a didn't panic which allowed me to roll out of it. Keep control of your front wheel and the back usually follows.


    All in all I think it comes down to knowing now that both trails where created by different folks. I will remember to slow it down next time when turning by the tables. I will also keep in mind that all the trails there will have similar looking features that will act way different when you hit them. I guess I was hoping that they could become as cool as the ones on Greens Lick. (Which by the way I have only done twice)


    Thanks!
    I'm confused. You talk about your mad skills and "pushing your limits", but when faced with a feature that gives you a hard time, you want to make it easier! Simply put, you were riding beyond your abilities on a trail you were not familiar with.

  13. #13
    pronounced may-duh
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    Don't feed the trolls. There is nothing wrong with the trail. Use your brakes. Any rider can roll that section of trail. If your such a newb that you don't know how to ride safe then I apologize, but come on dude, the trail is just fine. If you wrecked then you have only yourself to blame.

  14. #14
    When did you get here?!?!
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    The problem is the OP wasn't riding a 29er!

    Check out this ride log post from last year...
    You can please some people sometimes but you can't please all the people all the time.
    ERIC'S RIDE LOG

  15. #15
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! New Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by pisgahproductions
    The problem is the OP wasn't riding a 29er!

    Check out this ride log post from last year...

    This should be part of your gear check: 29er ok

    26? not ok

  16. #16
    Gabe.....
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    All of ya'll should have a 29'r mountain fixie in the stable so that everything becomes "dangerous".....
    "Roll your own..........." http://smokebikes.com/

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by pisgahproductions
    The problem is the OP wasn't riding a 29er!
    Be specific: and SS 29er that's easy to push up every sweet DH in Pisgah.

  18. #18
    Jamin, Applesause, No?
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    Never been on a 29er I liked better then my 26er. i only saw 1 guy out there on a 29er and he did not like it (it was a giant if that makes a difference). Where are all the 29er's at? I did some Riding up in Md last month and everyone was on a 29er but they didn't have hills like BC does?

  19. #19
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    Make them safer?..."fix" them?...be more consistent? Really!? sorry to be an ass, but go back to playing video games if you want every trail jump to be the same. Then you can "hit the same sequence of buttons" and land perfectly every time. Otherwise, learn to ride within your limits. If you hit that jump without enough time to judge it, and hadn't seen it before, and wreck...well, that's your problem, not the trail's.

  20. #20
    That's Special
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    Where's the Love

    Quote Originally Posted by motobutane

    26? not ok
    I ride a 26" hardtail and I don't have any skills and I can still ride Bent Creek. I'm good like that.

  21. #21
    Jamin, Applesause, No?
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbmb65
    I'm confused. You talk about your mad skills and "pushing your limits", but when faced with a feature that gives you a hard time, you want to make it easier! Simply put, you were riding beyond your abilities on a trail you were not familiar with.
    You are confused. I never said I had "mad skills" or that I wanted to make anything easier or that I had a hard time. If it was easier I was looking for, I wouldn't have climbed so much that day and would be asking to have some rocks removed from my path and some chair lifts to the top. I was simply asking if others thought it unsafe in my initial post, which was not worded the best. I thought it was an unsafe feature but now I think different. Now after reading some good responses I understand the trails up there a little better. I am just trying to be pro active. Sometimes it just takes another point of view and a question to make changes for the better and sometimes it is just plain annoying. I am here to learn not to burn. You should familiarize yourself better with reading and understanding view points and work on that confusion part in your brain, which I am sure sneaks up on you all the time. PS - I carry a saw in my back pack every time I ride, so that when I come across a fallen tree that is throat high and can't be jumped, I can cut it out of the way. Not to make it easier but to make it safer.

  22. #22
    Drinker w/ Riding Problem
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    Quote Originally Posted by Senor StrongBad
    You are confused. I never said I had "mad skills" or that I wanted to make anything easier or that I had a hard time. If it was easier I was looking for, I wouldn't have climbed so much that day and would be asking to have some rocks removed from my path and some chair lifts to the top. I was simply asking if others thought it unsafe in my initial post, which was not worded the best. I thought it was an unsafe feature but now I think different. Now after reading some good responses I understand the trails up there a little better. I am just trying to be pro active. Sometimes it just takes another point of view and a question to make changes for the better and sometimes it is just plain annoying. I am here to learn not to burn. You should familiarize yourself better with reading and understanding view points and work on that confusion part in your brain, which I am sure sneaks up on you all the time. PS - I carry a saw in my back pack every time I ride, so that when I come across a fallen tree that is throat high and can't be jumped, I can cut it out of the way. Not to make it easier but to make it safer.


    your original post was fine up until the point you said/asked this:

    Quote Originally Posted by Senor StrongBad
    Is there someone I can contact to re-do them so they are safer? or do I just need to hit the brakes more?
    i think you know the answer to that last question.

  23. #23
    Spoke Breaker!
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlavC
    Make them safer?..."fix" them?...be more consistent? Really!? sorry to be an ass, but go back to playing video games if you want every trail jump to be the same. Then you can "hit the same sequence of buttons" and land perfectly every time. Otherwise, learn to ride within your limits. If you hit that jump without enough time to judge it, and hadn't seen it before, and wreck...well, that's your problem, not the trail's.
    Exactly!

    I am a fat, out of shape, old (well older than some), and a n00b on my bike. And I have a great time on these trails...

  24. #24
    Jamin, Applesause, No?
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlavC
    Make them safer?..."fix" them?...be more consistent? Really!? sorry to be an ass, but go back to playing video games if you want every trail jump to be the same. Then you can "hit the same sequence of buttons" and land perfectly every time. Otherwise, learn to ride within your limits. If you hit that jump without enough time to judge it, and hadn't seen it before, and wreck...well, that's your problem, not the trail's.

    No need to apologize for what you are, you are a product of your upbringing.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Senor StrongBad
    No need to apologize for what you are, you are a product of your upbringing.
    Actually, I'm a pretty nice guy who rarely gets in middle of stuff like this...but sometimes I hear or read something so ridiculous that I just have to call someone out on it. I "apologized" because I was kind of being a smart ass, not really an ass per se...just making a joke because what I was reading was almost too stupid to be anything other than a troll...but people never cease to amaze me. And, as I was afraid, this appears to be a case of:

    <object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/8suVjclu8Zo&amp;hl=en_US&amp;fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/8suVjclu8Zo&amp;hl=en_US&amp;fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbmb65
    I'm confused. You talk about your mad skills and "pushing your limits", but when faced with a feature that gives you a hard time, you want to make it easier! Simply put, you were riding beyond your abilities on a trail you were not familiar with.
    I think the OP should look up the Dunning–Kruger effect.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlavC
    I think the OP should look up the Dunning–Kruger effect.
    Thanks for providing a 'learning opportunity' in a thread that had turned into a rock-throwing...

    TZ
    Geriatric mountain biker and trail maintainer... ...with digital braking!

  28. #28
    banjo plunker, wrench
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrailZen
    Thanks for providing a 'learning opportunity' in a thread that had turned into a rock-throwing...

    TZ
    Excellent!
    any time spent riding a bicycle is re-cycled goodness....

  29. #29
    Jamin, Applesause, No?
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    Hope

    Quote Originally Posted by FlavC
    I think the OP should look up the Dunning–Kruger effect.
    Good point. I was actually thinking about that yesterday during my ride. I had a buddy take a look at some of the things I was doing wrong while jumping and he help me fix a couple of my problems. Believe it or not I have been riding for a long time, started with some bmx and freestyle in late 80's early 90's, then mountain biking in 95. Along with that I grew up at skate parks and street parks around the Baltimore area, skating every afternoon. So what has happened is all the "mad skills" (which i do not have) I thought I had were being used in the wrong places at the wrong times and in the wrong ways. It is hard to think that you don't know how to jump when you grew up jumping so much. It was there in my mind but my body just wasn't performing it anymore. After about 3 jumps my friend was able to see that I have been pulling up my front wheel up before the edge of the jump causing my front end not to get airborne and my rear end to fly up out of control. I use this technique to keep up speed on more flowy down hills and had been using it so much I had forgotten how to take a real jump. Hopefully it will be fixed with some more practice. But at least I know now were the problem is.

    Thanks for everyones help. I know some of you were just trying to be mean but I try to listen to what you are saying anyways. When you grow up jumping everything in sight you think you still know how to jump when you get older, my bad! I guess that is why you see all those people on AFV falling on there A$$es playing on their kids bikes. I am going to be that parent when my kids get there first bikes!

  30. #30
    Its got what plants crave
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    We cool man, we cool.
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