How many locals ride tubeless?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    How many locals ride tubeless?

    I am considering making the jump to tubeless but would like to know what fellows riders in my area like using on the local terrain here in western NC. Please post a comment and what tire/wheel setup you run, and also if you use a stans tubeless kit or similar or if you use a ghetto method.
    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    i ride a superfly with i9 and arch wheels and i cant tell the diff either way i do use stans sealant and have to check the air about every time i ride it looses a little not sure if it worth it or not

  3. #3
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    I definitely do in the back. I am running gorilla tape on Mavic 521 rims with Continental Mountain King Protections. I am really happy with it. The sealant I have settled on is tubeless slime from Walmart with purple sparkles added from my wife's crafts kit.

    It works!

    Oh yeah, and no flats in 2 years. I have paid for the cost of the conversion just by the money saved on tubes.

  4. #4
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    I'm running WTB dual duty fr rims and WTB Prowler tires ghetto tubeless. The only flat I've gotten was when I ripped my rear sidewall at the top of Green's Lick. I wasn't happy. I won't go back to tubes on a mountain bike.

  5. #5
    drunken pirate
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    I use tubes. My problem with tubeless is you need to carry two tubes just in case. So instead of carrying those two tubes in pack I just carry them in my wheels
    More Trails, Not Less

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  6. #6
    Big Mac
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    Quote Originally Posted by driftwood
    I use tubes. My problem with tubeless is you need to carry two tubes just in case. So instead of carrying those two tubes in pack I just carry them in my wheels
    So, you don't carry spares? What, do you carry a patch kit? I say to each his own. I will say that, knock on wood, I have not had a flat since going tubeless 2 yrs. ago. I went tubeless because I got tired of way to common flats. Worth the mythical hassle in my book.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainbiker24
    I'm running WTB dual duty fr rims and WTB Prowler tires ghetto tubeless. The only flat I've gotten was when I ripped my rear sidewall at the top of Green's Lick. I wasn't happy. I won't go back to tubes on a mountain bike.
    Man that sucks, I bet that was a long walk down from Greens Lick.

    What do you guys do when a sidewall rips? Will a tube inserted into the tire be enough to get you back to your car or no? Does the sealant fill sidewall tears?

  8. #8
    Its got what plants crave
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    Tubeless rules. I prefer UST wheels and tires.
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  9. #9
    pronounced may-duh
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    I use tubeless and it's amazing how they never get flats. The UST and tubeless ready tires usually have very strong casings.

    I use UST or tubeless ready wheels and tires. I also use the Stan's sealant. It's a very trail worthy dependable set up. I'm not sure it's lighter but it's very reliable. I still carry a spare tube, patch kit, tire boot, pump, etc...

    The last few tubes I have used on the trail are ones I have given away to other people with flats.

  10. #10
    Jamin, Applesause, No?
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    I run a UST small block 8 2.1 on the back and a UST Nevegal 2.35 on the front. The wheels are UST crossmax. I use no sealant. I use to have a flat every week or so becuase of pinching. I have not had a flat in the past 6 months. I use to keep my PSI up at 42 but now run it as low as 25 with absolutly no problems. They grip so much better then my old set-up.

  11. #11
    pronounced may-duh
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    Quote Originally Posted by Senor StrongBad
    run it as low as 25 with absolutly no problems.
    Be careful with the super low pressures especially if your a big dude. I'm just under 200lbs and I have folded A UST tire off the rim in a hard turn with low pressures. When your going fast and the tire comes off, it's not pretty. Anything under 30 PSI is risky for me. I usually have mine between 30 -35 PSI

  12. #12
    Its got what plants crave
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    I'm a lightweight.. can generally run 26-27 PSI in a non-tubeless tire on a tubeless rim. I can get away with lower on a UST tire and UST rim, especially if it's higher volume. I have run as low as 22-24 pounds without major problems.
    Ocala Mountain Bike Association - www.omba.org

  13. #13
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    I'm a lightweight, I weigh 160 with gear. I run kevlar bead ardents(2.4 front, 2.25 rear) on Industry nine hubs laced to mavic 823's with two scoops of stans per tire. I run 28 psi in the front and 30 in the rear. All you need is a compressor and patience. During the summer you might want to refresh your sealant often. Sealant dries up faster in the heat. I would like to run ust tires but they are heavier than kevlar, cost more, and for the most part are only available in a sticky compound that I would shred in less than a month. I get 6 months out of 60a maxxis.
    Oh and kendas suck by the way, especially for tubeless, paper thin sidewalls and high rolling resistance.

  14. #14
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    How can I tell if my rims are UST compatible or not? They're Bontrager Ranger rims.
    Also, how easy is it to add sealant to a tire once it is mounted? I read where people have to add sealant from time to time.
    Last edited by gsxunv04; 06-14-2010 at 04:25 PM.

  15. #15
    pronounced may-duh
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsxunv04
    How can I tell if my rims are UST compatible or not? They're Bontrager Ranger rims.
    Also, how easy is it to add sealant to a tire once it is mounted? I read where people have to add sealant from time to time.
    UST is a mavic thing. It will have a UST label on the rim.

    Bontrager makes a tubeless ready wheel. It has a special rim strip that covers the spokes.

    Adding the sealant is easy, Just pop the tire off, pour in the sealant and pop it back on. Some people have trouble getting the tire to air up. You need a floor pump or a compressor.

  16. #16
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    I'm running UST tires and rims with stans on my bike and my wife's. Air compressor is pretty much mandatory when mounting and inflating new UST tires. If you enjoy maintaining your own bike then you shouldn't have any problems mounting and running your own tubeless. You just need to do the research. We've have no flats in 3 years (knock on wood).

  17. #17
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    I have been running a 2.4 Ardent in front with a Crossmark(sometimes Ignitor) in the back. Normal pressure is 28/29 psi in the front and 30-32psi in the back. I run tubes and have not flatted all season. Before that set up I ran Nevegal in the front and a Karma in the back. Similar psi with tubes. Ran that set up for two years and only had 2-3 flats in that time. I am 200lbs and ride a hardtail 29er. With those set ups and results it is hard for me to go to the trouble of setting the wheels up tubeless. Of course knowing me I will convert one day just to say that I did. I might mention too that of those flats none were pinch flat related, all were torns. I have been running 28 mm Blunt rims and I really think that is why I can get away with the lower pressure and zero pinch flats. One thing is for sure I will never ever ride any rim that is less than 28mm.. Next set up will likely be the Velocity P-35 or the some Gordos.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snototter
    I have been running a 2.4 Ardent in front with a Crossmark(sometimes Ignitor) in the back. Normal pressure is 28/29 psi in the front and 30-32psi in the back. I run tubes and have not flatted all season. Before that set up I ran Nevegal in the front and a Karma in the back. Similar psi with tubes. Ran that set up for two years and only had 2-3 flats in that time. I am 200lbs and ride a hardtail 29er. With those set ups and results it is hard for me to go to the trouble of setting the wheels up tubeless. Of course knowing me I will convert one day just to say that I did. I might mention too that of those flats none were pinch flat related, all were torns. I have been running 28 mm Blunt rims and I really think that is why I can get away with the lower pressure and zero pinch flats. One thing is for sure I will never ever ride any rim that is less than 28mm.. Next set up will likely be the Velocity P-35 or the some Gordos.
    ... and what Snotrotter doesn't mention is he's butta on the trail ...

    I run Kenda Karmas front and rear, on DT Swiss rims converted with Stans rim strips and sealant. The only trouble I have is when the tires wear out and they start to get torn on rocks. The only times I've run tubes this year, I've flatted.

    If you blow out a sidewall, you need to boot it before you put a tube in. Carry a dollar bill or a similar-sized piece of a tyvek race number and then be very careful on your way home ...

  19. #19
    Jamin, Applesause, No?
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    Quote Originally Posted by epicmtbruce
    I'm running UST tires and rims with stans on my bike and my wife's. Air compressor is pretty much mandatory when mounting and inflating new UST tires. If you enjoy maintaining your own bike then you shouldn't have any problems mounting and running your own tubeless. You just need to do the research. We've have no flats in 3 years (knock on wood).

    An air compressor is not needed. I have mounted 6 tubeless tires with a handpump/floorpump and absolutly no problems. It is a high quality handpump/floorpump though. All tires wher Kenda, some small block 8 2.1's, some Nevegal 2.1's, and some nevegal 2.35's. They have been on Crossmax and Shimano wheels.

  20. #20
    Jamin, Applesause, No?
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    New question here.

    Quote Originally Posted by Maida7
    Be careful with the super low pressures especially if your a big dude. I'm just under 200lbs and I have folded A UST tire off the rim in a hard turn with low pressures. When your going fast and the tire comes off, it's not pretty. Anything under 30 PSI is risky for me. I usually have mine between 30 -35 PSI
    What kind of rim are you running them on? Is it a UST or did you have to set it up later to accept tubeless?

  21. #21
    pronounced may-duh
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    Quote Originally Posted by Senor StrongBad
    What kind of rim are you running them on? Is it a UST or did you have to set it up later to accept tubeless?
    UST rims & UST tires

  22. #22
    pronounced may-duh
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    Quote Originally Posted by Senor StrongBad
    An air compressor is not needed. I have mounted 6 tubeless tires with a handpump/floorpump and absolutly no problems. It is a high quality handpump/floorpump though. All tires wher Kenda, some small block 8 2.1's, some Nevegal 2.1's, and some nevegal 2.35's. They have been on Crossmax and Shimano wheels.
    I also use a floor pump and it works fine.

  23. #23
    Its got what plants crave
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    If you use UST rims and UST tires a floor pump is all that's needed to seat the beads. If you use other combos, you *MAY* be able to seat with a floor pump but unlikely. If you're using Stans wheels or anything with a rim strip it is not a UST setup and will probably require a compressor to seat.
    Ocala Mountain Bike Association - www.omba.org

  24. #24
    WNC Native
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snototter
    I have been running 28 mm Blunt rims and I really think that is why I can get away with the lower pressure and zero pinch flats. One thing is for sure I will never ever ride any rim that is less than 28mm.. Next set up will likely be the Velocity P-35 or the some Gordos.
    Snototter- I agree with you. I have yet to make the switch on my bikes (not saying I won't try it at some point).
    I have 38mm KH rims on my SS and really don't see any reason to move away from tubes on it. It's rigid and I can run 22-25lbs safely with being over 200lbs.
    "I ride to clear my head, my head is clearer when I'm riding SS. Therefore, I choose to ride SS."~ Fullrange Drew

  25. #25
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    I used to get lots of flats, from both thorns and pinching. I like the traction and ride that lower pressures give and this eventually lead to flats.

    I tried a Stan's rubber rim strip conversion, but it was a total flop. If i ran low pressures, hitting rocks and roots irregularly would cause the tire to 'burp' air, losing 5-10psi. I'd have to stop and pump it back up, anyway.

    Stan's rims (NoTubes) are a whole different story. Zero issues and you can run standard tires and Tubeless-ready (more rubber at the bead) models. End result is better traction, less rolling resistance, better ride, and no flats. And it tightens and tones your abs.

    Whatever you choose (the bontrager rims with tubeless strip are also great), I recommend tubeless with an added sealant like Stan's.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by D.F.L.
    And it tightens and tones your abs.
    This claim from Stan is the only reason I converted. Thanks to Stan I now have the stamina to go "all the way." Just ask D-****z.
    BS'ing less, riding more.

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  27. #27
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    Converted this year to Stan's 355's and never going back! I'm a big guy (205 lbs) and had to run close to 40psi to avoid pinch flats. Now running <30 psi and the tires hook up on everything. Took a hard fall during the burn24 and broke the seal, it closed back up and just had to add some more air to be back in business. I'm also running standard tires and not UTS versions with no issues. All hail Stan's!

  28. #28
    I like Squishy Bikes
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    I'm about 165lbs, not too heavy on my equipment
    I run WTB Stout & MX at around 25-30psi with the help of these:

    http://paradigmhosting.net/yes_tubes/
    A dirty book is rarely dusty

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maida7
    Bontrager makes a tubeless ready wheel. It has a special rim strip that covers the spokes.
    My wheels have a ribbon in the inside, I saw it when I replaced my stock tires. Is this the special rim strip or do all wheels have a ribbon?

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by crossboy
    If you blow out a sidewall, you need to boot it before you put a tube in. Carry a dollar bill or a similar-sized piece of a tyvek race number and then be very careful on your way home ...
    Got a desciption of how to go about this process?

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsxunv04
    My wheels have a ribbon in the inside, I saw it when I replaced my stock tires. Is this the special rim strip or do all wheels have a ribbon?
    All non-tubeless wheels come with either a plastic or cloth strip that covers the spoke holes in the rims to prevent the tube from puncturing on the metal. This strip does not seal the holes for tubeless, and if you're planning on converting to tubeless you will need to install a Stan's strip or a bmx tube ghetto style.

  32. #32
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    Thanks, I think I will try the 20" tube route

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