Anybody have luck with rim repair?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Big Mac
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    Anybody have luck with rim repair?

    My rear i9 enduro 305 has a dent bad enough that I canít get a new Maxxis to seat. Itís less than a year old. Anybody tried to bend a big divot? Whatíd you use? Adjustable wrench? Did it work? Pretty bummed. I suppose I could tube it for the short term, but would like to get more than 10 mos out of it. Thanks.


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  2. #2
    EAT MORE GRIME
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    well, your only option is to bend it back, or send to i9 for repair/new rim or have a wheelbuilder replace rim

    just get on it with a nice flat adjustable wrench and maybe a popsicle stick so you don't gouge the metal on the edges of the wrench flats

    pics would be nice
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  3. #3
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    I do it pretty regularly using a crescent wrench. Go slow, work from edge of dent to middle, make several passes. Keep an eye for stress crack. Stop before its "perfect". Ive heated the area up before also, but not sure if that's necessary.

  4. #4
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    Never had to do it with any of mine that I recall, but have for a few other people and yes, adjustable crescent wrench with some tape on the jaws or the popsicle stick idea would work. Just take your time and don't go balls to the wall straight off and you should be able to get the bead back out good enough to seat the tyre tubeless, but might be a good idea to put some sealant where the dent is. Still though, even if you manage to get it straight, while it could last for years, the material is fatigued so getting a spare rim to relace just in case would not be a bad idea, that way if it does fail, down time is minimal and having a spare rim around is always good.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaXCarp View Post
    I do it pretty regularly using a crescent wrench. Go slow, work from edge of dent to middle, make several passes. Keep an eye for stress crack. Stop before its "perfect". Ive heated the area up before also, but not sure if that's necessary.
    Yep... Crescent wrench will do the trick. Ive bent out dozens of rim dings over the years this way and it works fine.

    Put a really thing flat piece of wood or metal on the outer side of the rim between the wrench and rim. In my experience I9 rims are soft and you may end up denting the rim with the wrench before the ding is bent out all the way. spreading the load over a wider surface keeps that from happening.

    A company called Morningstar used to make a tool for pulling out rim dings. If you can find one of those snatch it up cause the guy making them went insane and met an untimely end... Toolmaker Paul Morningstar Found Dead in Booby-Trapped California Home - Mountain Bike Review- Mtbr.com

    The Popsicle stick suggestion is spot on...
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  6. #6
    EAT MORE GRIME
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    and since this is an i9 wheel and i9 spokes, the spoke prep they use is boiled linseed oil.

    if you end up relacing/rebuilding on the same hub with i9 spokes...get a can of it at the hardware store.

    warning: do not leave any rags, wipes, or paper towels with linseed oil on it laying around, linseed and rags is the #1 source of workshop spontaneous combustion stories. immediately wash those rags, or store in a metal closed container filled with water. even one rag laying in the open that has linseed oil on it could self ignite.
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  7. #7
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    I've had good luck in the past putting the bead surface into my bench vice and gently flattening the dented area. I screw pieces of wood into the holes in the vise that are there for that purpose to stop damage and be very very gradual- you want to bring the dented area into plane with the rest of the rim without distorting the bead hook. Have also used the crescent wrench method successfully.

  8. #8
    Big Mac
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    Thanks for the tips. After looking at it in the daylight, it seems itís actually compressed more than dented, or bent over. The bead hook is in plane, but the edge dips down. Itís odd.


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  9. #9
    since 4/10/2009
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    the bead hook in the damaged spot looks like it's curled in a touch more than the rest. I think that's about all you'll be able to address in this case. That dent/hop isn't going to be otherwise repairable, so your overall success might be limited.

    I did the crescent wrench method once many moons ago with some success. The rim eventually cracked in that spot a few years later, though.

    I think I see cushcore in your future...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I think I see cushcore in your future...
    Huck Norris, for the money, is the best thing out there IMO. Prevents rim dings and damaged tires like the OP experienced. I run them in the rear wheel on all my mountain bikes and haven't dinged a rim or destroyed a tire since.... Even on those Spencer Gap tombstones haha.

    Super easy to install and lightweight too. I can run normal EXO casing with these and its lighter than DD casing and prevents rim dings...

    WIN!
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  11. #11
    Big Mac
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    Cush core is food for thought. Iíve considered them, but balked at added weight, which sounds like a nonissue, so it does seem theyíre in my future.


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  12. #12
    Big Mac
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    I took the wheel to i9. Theyíre doing me a solid. I used an adjustable wrench to straighten the sidewall, but I couldnít get the compressed divot out, so no matter what I did, it seemed temporary. Now to look into cushcore.


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  13. #13
    Big Mac
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    Quote Originally Posted by Banjopickin View Post
    Huck Norris, for the money, is the best thing out there IMO. Prevents rim dings and damaged tires like the OP experienced. I run them in the rear wheel on all my mountain bikes and haven't dinged a rim or destroyed a tire since.... Even on those Spencer Gap tombstones haha.

    Super easy to install and lightweight too. I can run normal EXO casing with these and its lighter than DD casing and prevents rim dings...

    WIN!
    So you use them only in the rear?


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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbmb65 View Post
    So you use them only in the rear?


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    Yeah... no need on the front in my opinion. I haven't (knocing furiously on wood) flatted or dinged a front wheel in years... On the other hand I've been through 2 DHRs and 1 Agressor in the last 7 months... all from hard hits causing the tire bead to rip due to being mashed against the rim bead. One of those DHRs being a DD casing. The rest EXO.

    Huck Norris is keeping my riding ding free so far after 1 month of use. I've actually started to charge into rocks again and normal hits I feel in the bike that would have totally caused me to ding the rim and flat before feel like butter now.

    11/10 recommend them for guys plagued by rim dings...
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  15. #15
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Banjopickin View Post
    Yeah... no need on the front in my opinion. I haven't (knocing furiously on wood) flatted or dinged a front wheel in years... On the other hand I've been through 2 DHRs and 1 Agressor in the last 7 months... all from hard hits causing the tire bead to rip due to being mashed against the rim bead. One of those DHRs being a DD casing. The rest EXO.

    Huck Norris is keeping my riding ding free so far after 1 month of use. I've actually started to charge into rocks again and normal hits I feel in the bike that would have totally caused me to ding the rim and flat before feel like butter now.

    11/10 recommend them for guys plagued by rim dings...
    Don't think they make 'em big enough for my Bucksaw yet. I'd put one in the rear tire of that bike if I could (65mm carbon rims, 3.8" tires).

    But I'll definitely getting some sort of protective insert on the Guerrilla Gravity Pedalhead I'm building up as a 29er. Last time I rode a hardtail (15yrs ago), I was hard on rims. Will also just keep it to the rear tire. I've also never had trouble with a front tire.

  16. #16
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    I didn't think to take a before picture, but it was very similar to the damage on your rim. I thought about it for a while and found a pair of vice grips. Perfect tool for the job. Especially when the edge needs to be pulled back.

  17. #17
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    Thought I'd follow up on this, since I had to do it again thanks to Big Rock, Cedar Rock, or shortly somewhere after. Took before pictures this time.

  18. #18
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    Drifting a bit, riding a Boost QR rear wheel, I need to preserve it because it's damn near impossible to find a replacement. I've been looking at the Cushcore but balked at paying $75 bucks for a piece of foam.The Huck Norris is $35 bucks for a piece of foam, certainly not a great value but if it saves a rim...

    Anyone use both and feel strongly one way or the other?

  19. #19
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamatt View Post
    Drifting a bit, riding a Boost QR rear wheel, I need to preserve it because it's damn near impossible to find a replacement. I've been looking at the Cushcore but balked at paying $75 bucks for a piece of foam.The Huck Norris is $35 bucks for a piece of foam, certainly not a great value but if it saves a rim...

    Anyone use both and feel strongly one way or the other?
    I put Huck Norris in the rear of my hardtail build.

    I've notably bottomed the tire out on the insert a couple of times on some ugly square-edged rocks since I built the bike and it's definitely prevented rim and tire damage on such occasions. One thing Huck Norris doesn't do is change the way the tire "feels" whereas Cushcore reportedly makes a notable difference by supporting the sidewalls of the tires more. If it matters, there's a lighter, more xc version of cushcore now, and I've read good things about the Vittoria Airliners, too.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamatt View Post
    Drifting a bit, riding a Boost QR rear wheel, I need to preserve it because it's damn near impossible to find a replacement. I've been looking at the Cushcore but balked at paying $75 bucks for a piece of foam.The Huck Norris is $35 bucks for a piece of foam, certainly not a great value but if it saves a rim...

    Anyone use both and feel strongly one way or the other?
    See this thread. All kinds of low cost, garage shop ideas.

    https://r.tapatalk.com/shareLink?url...7&share_type=t

  21. #21
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    Knipex pliers FTW.

  22. #22
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    CushCore /end thread. Ridden most of them and CushCore is far and away the best available. Most durable, best rim protection and improved ride quality.

  23. #23
    loud hubs save lives
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    After denting my I9 trail rims bad enough i replaced them with spank oozy 345 rims, which are extremely close to the enduro rims ( as they should be because theyíre made by same company )


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