Norco Revolver efficiency- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    23

    Norco Revolver efficiency

    I got an offer to get a Norco Revolver FS 9.3 from 2016 in good condition for EUR 1500. So I am very intrigued. Unfortunately the bike is a few hours away. So before I make the trip to even test it out I read some reviews and most people say it is not efficient on smooth climbs.

    I want to do some marathons with it and here in the Alps that often means climbing on fireroads and only descending on Singletracks. On the singletracks is usually where I gain most time, therefore the Rvolver intrigues me, because it might add to my strength on the downhills

    So my question is, do you need to constantly grab for the lockout on the Revolver or is the "pedal bob" in the reviews exaggerated. Does the middle position of the Monarch allow for efficient climbing, or will it lose some power without lockout.

    Again, I understand it is really good on singletracks over roots and rocks, but am curious about the smooth trails/roads.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    25
    I ride smooth (gravel) trails and roads locked out, but the mid position is pretty fine too......of course if you are hammering it uphill, it's better to be locked out fully, but no deal-breaker. The bike is fast and efficient, I have a 7.1 FS.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    23

    Norco Revolver efficiency

    I did buy the Norco Revolver. Did a short testride on mixed terrain and I definitely need to spend some time setting the correct pressure on that Monarch RL (which has no "middle" or "trail" setting).
    Open Mode is fine in trails, as was expected and a reason why to buy this frame. But on a road it does indeed bob. There is no hit against the pedal, but you can see the suspension work even on smooth terrain. Now how much it actually costs and how much of this is psychological is another discussion....and there is always lockout. Nino Schurter once said he use the lockout hundreds of times in a race, so I guess we can too.
    I will work on the correct sag and rebound and then come back here with my findings. But seeing what this bike wins (Crocodile Trophy women, Canadian XC elite men) I guess it is not the bike´s fault and can be solved.
    Last edited by alpi69; 11-26-2017 at 05:24 PM.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jamas1395's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    205
    I’ve been working on this also

    I came from Scott Bikes with the Twinloc lever. The single pivot design on the Scott really makes a lever necessary.

    I have a 2018 Revolver with the Monarch R/L. I started with 20mm of sag thinking that was most efficient. After a month of riding I increased the sag to 25mm....this was much better.

    I primarily race marathon/Ultra Endurance distance so the terrain varies from tight single track to a paved highway. For 95% of the races I do think the stock shock will be fine. Riding on long gravel and smooth trail with the shock in the open position it feels as efficient as the Scott in trail mode. If you mash the pedals or stand up and go crazy the bike will “bob” any FS bike will.

    You can put the XX monarch shock with the lockout and that will give you a remote lockout.

    I was convinced I needed a rear shock lockout but after riding the bike more and more I think I might be ok without it, personally I like not having a lever to mess with and just ride the bike.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    23
    Thanks for the input. Unfortunately we have cold and snow here now, so i cannot work on my setup.

    I agree with you that 95% of the time this is no issue. I took 14 seconds off a PR (8 mins overall on relatively smooth trail and rough gravel, with 15% avg-gradient) on my first ride when I just tried to work out some positioning. So the bike is crazy fast somehow.

    On long fireroads there is always the lockout lever, but just like you, I might just leave it. I ride roadbike also and have a fairly smooth pedalstroke. If I feel I need to change anything I might consider the DT Swiss R414 shock, which has a rigid lockout and gets high praises.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Davide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,947
    I have a 27.5 (Rev)Olve(r) and it bobs, a lot, but the bob is actually worst over roots and rocks. Like all the Horst I owned if you run into a sharp obstacle on the uphill with the shock open the bike blows through its travel and saps momentum, it just stalls. Or, if you run the shock with more compression it easily looses traction.

    Now, when I say that the bike bobs a lot I mean that it bobs a lot if you set it up with a normal 20-25% sag (some people mention 30% ... not so sure how that can work it leaves you with what ... 70 mm of travel with little compression? ). Put the sag at 10% and it is a different story. You are riding a somewhat glorified hard tail (it ain't plush!) but what a nice little rocket! Push on the pedals and off its goes, put the blue lever in the middle and you still get an extra boost. And of course you can lock it (this is with the FOX float shock). That is the way I ride it. Fork at 20% sag, and shock at 10%.

    So, if the intent is riding fire roads I think you would be very happy with the bike. She is my "smooth trail" bike and I am always eager to pick it up because it is so fast.

    You mention singletrack descents so keep in mind that the Olve is limited on the downhill. Sure you can do a lot with it, but compared to a proper trail bike (I have a IBIS HD3, which at 150 mm travel actually climbs much better than the Olve on technical terrain and does not bob) it is simply scary downhill ...
    Last edited by Davide; 02-06-2018 at 01:46 PM.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jamas1395's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    205
    Quote Originally Posted by Davide View Post
    I have a 27.5 (Rev)Olve(r) and it bobs, a lot, but the bob is actually worst over roots and rocks. Like all the Horst I owned if you run into a sharp obstacle on the uphill with the shock open the bike blows through its travel and saps momentum, it just stalls. Or, if you run the shock with more compression it easily looses traction.

    Now, when I say that the bike bobs a lot I mean that it bobs a lot if you set it up with a normal 20-25% sag (some people mention 30% ... not so sure how that can work it leaves you with what ... 70 mm of travel with little compression? ). Put the sag at 10% and it is a different story. You are riding a somewhat glorified hard tail (it ain't plush!) but what a nice little rocket! Push on the pedals and off its goes, put the blue lever in the middle and you still get an extra boost. And of course you can lock it (this is with the FOX float shock). That is the way I ride it. Fork at 20% sag, and shock at 10%.

    So, if the intent is riding fire roads I think you would be very happy with the bike. She is my "smooth trail" bike and I am always eager to pick it up because it is so fast.

    You mention singletrack descents so keep in mind that the Olve is limited on the downhill. Sure you can do a lot with it, but compared to a proper trail bike (I have a IBIS HD3, which at 150 mm travel actually climbs much better than the Olve on technical terrain and does not bob) it is simply scary downhill ...
    Maybe the 27.5 feels different than the 29er?

    Or perhaps the 2018 valving is different on the rear shock but I have had the exact opposite experience on my Revolver.

    I have been on single pivot bikes for several years and they always felt like they stalled over obstacles going uphill on tech(y) single track but the Revolver doesn’t feel that way to me at all.
    I did race a 27.5 wheel size bike for a year back in 2015 and it definitely felt different and handled different than the 29ers I was used to.

    But at the end of the day the old saying “perception is reality” is so true. What feels great to someone might feel terrible to someone else.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: brentos's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    1,756
    Quote Originally Posted by jamas1395 View Post
    Maybe the 27.5 feels different than the 29er?

    Or perhaps the 2018 valving is different on the rear shock but I have had the exact opposite experience on my Revolver.

    I have been on single pivot bikes for several years and they always felt like they stalled over obstacles going uphill on tech(y) single track but the Revolver doesn’t feel that way to me at all.
    I did race a 27.5 wheel size bike for a year back in 2015 and it definitely felt different and handled different than the 29ers I was used to.

    But at the end of the day the old saying “perception is reality” is so true. What feels great to someone might feel terrible to someone else.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I'm with you on this one. I almost commented last night, but had to think it over.

    I think the bike excels on rough climbs..on smooth climbs there is some bob, yes. But it isn't really too perceptible, you have to look for it. Mine was 2017 29er w/ Monarch RL.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Davide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,947
    Quote Originally Posted by jamas1395 View Post
    Maybe the 27.5 feels different than the 29er?

    Or perhaps the 2018 valving is different on the rear shock but I have had the exact opposite experience on my Revolver.

    I have been on single pivot bikes for several years and they always felt like they stalled over obstacles going uphill on tech(y) single track but the Revolver doesn’t feel that way to me at all.
    I did race a 27.5 wheel size bike for a year back in 2015 and it definitely felt different and handled different than the 29ers I was used to.

    But at the end of the day the old saying “perception is reality” is so true. What feels great to someone might feel terrible to someone else.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Yes, the 29 might be different, everybody is indeed different in their likes, and my bench mark is also different: the HD3 is simply incredible when it comes to traction on technical climbs. But I might try to tune the shock, don't know what volume spacer it has inside, and I am light at 165. I might even see what happens installing a longer stroke shock

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    23
    So, started this thread and finally got to ride the bike a few times. Spring is here. Yay!

    Set the SAG to 25% as is recommended by Norco. This took care of the "bob". On the uphill I did tests with and without lockouts and it ended up being faster in the "open" position on fireroads. So let´s say it is not slower. Weight and fitness is more of an issue than the Horst link here. So i will only use lockout on asphalt climbs, which happen in European marathons often.

    Conclusion: It is not as efficient as some designs like on the Giant or Corratec bikes; but it is better than most single-pivot bikes, which all need lockouts frequently (Schurter says hundreds of times in a worldcup race).

    But what really amazes me is the efficiency in trails and downhill. I am pedalling now where on my old bike I had to coast at times (but pedal strikes roots still sometimes). And on a built Enduro trail I was able to ride it with the rigid seatpost, where before I needed a dropper to actually be able to ride with my skills. I wasn´t faster, but once my new dropper post arrives I will shed a few seconds per minute on the downhills alone.

    Super stoked about this bike. Now just need to get the weight down, because the 9.3 version has some weak parts on it (Recon fork, heavy wheels, cheap brakes)

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    23

    So here is my finished marathonready Revolver.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Similar Threads

  1. 120mm fork on new Norco Revolver FS?
    By slipstream in forum Norco
    Replies: 54
    Last Post: 02-14-2018, 02:12 PM
  2. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-12-2018, 09:54 PM
  3. My new Norco Revolver HT 7.1
    By Bikerector in forum 27.5
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-13-2014, 07:30 AM
  4. 2013 Norco Revolver 1
    By BigGK in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-05-2014, 05:56 AM
  5. 2012 Norco Revolver 1 review
    By robot in forum Norco
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-30-2012, 07:10 PM

Members who have read this thread: 14

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.