Pivot Bearing Replacement RIP 9- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Pivot Bearing Replacement RIP 9

    I have a 2010 frame that I built up 2 years ago and I'm needing to replace the bearings. I've ordered them from Niner but I can't find any write-ups for DIY replacement. Does anyone have any experience replacing these? I need guidance about tools used and/or created as well as any other advice.

    I found what looked to be the perfect tool for the job:

    Bearing extracting assembling tool---PATENTED---For Bike - YouTube

    But received this email after placing my order:

    Hello due to the extremly high litigation culture its the only place in the world our product insurers will not allow us to sell to. There are no exceptions to this.

    Currently its uneconomical to add America to our policy as it would triple our insurance bill (which also currently covers the entire business, staff, public and buildings liability) which is a crazy amount but reflects the risk of selling to USA.

    We are hoping in the future we will set up a separate entity which is insured in the USA to supply goods there but it is still several years away sorry. We have been in constant discussions with our insurer about the issues and we are working with them to resolve them. we have sent a full refund.

    Yours
    The Superstar Team


    Superstar Components LTD / Tibolts.co.uk
    Superstar Components - High spec parts for peanuts
    Tibolts.co.uk - Titanium Bolt Upgrade Kits for Mountain bikes - NEW Official sponsor of Cannondale-Vredestein Team. Helping to create some of the lightest bikes on the world cup circuit.
    Under Construction

    [email protected]

    0845 4 75 8338

    David Whitehouse
    Superstar Components Ltd
    Unit 9
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    Newark Road
    Lincoln
    LN5 9EJ

  2. #2
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    Attaboy-

    Extracting bearings can be done by gently tapping them out from behind with a punch, moving each tap around the perimeter of the bearing. This obviously can damage the units but since you are replacing them it's not much worse than using some types of extractors. Just don't force them out at an extreme angle and damage the bearing bore in the aluminum.

    You can use a metric socket the same size as the bearing outer diameter as a driver to GENTLY AND CAREFULLY tap the new units into place with a plastic mallet. Alternately, a home-made press can be constructed with a bolt/nut and two washers of the correct bearing diameter... simply tighten the bearing into the bearing seat. As long as whatever tool you select is pushing on the OUTER diameter of the bearing (don't dent the seals!) the balls/races will not be damaged.

    Not to say that good tools don't make the job easier - they do! But these methods work well if you go slowly. Call 877-NINERXC if you have any tech questions. Bearing specs for your frame are available in the Niner Tech Encyclopedia that can be downloaded numerous places on our website.
    .........

    Peace,
    Niner Bikes

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  3. #3
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    Thank you! I was hoping there might be a simple solution. That sounds doable. I'll give it a try and perhaps post a writeup.

  4. #4
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    IF you are going to have a full suspension bike for the foreseeable future, then you really should consider buying the correct tools for the job.... I bought the bearing extrator kit and bearing installation kit from Real World Cycling... and I am sooooo glad I did.

  5. #5
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    Does that have all u need for the rip? I'm in if it does. I managed without it but now know proper tools would save hours.

  6. #6
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    I looked over the RWC site and there are various tools for bearings. Looks like there is a separate set for installing that's $220 and another for removing that's $189. Is that what you have?

    Rather pricey. Couldn't justify that price. That tool I referenced was about $60 us after shipping.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by attaboy View Post
    I looked over the RWC site and there are various tools for bearings. Looks like there is a separate set for installing that's $220 and another for removing that's $189. Is that what you have?

    Rather pricey. Couldn't justify that price. That tool I referenced was about $60 us after shipping.
    Yep, pricey, but quality tools... I have been acquiring the tools as I need them. I know have:

    Blind Bearing Puller Set: $189.00
    Enduro bearing Press Tool: $219.00
    Enduro Outboard BB Bearing Puller/Press Tool: $120.00
    RWC Rear Shock DU bushing and needle bearing tools: $25.99/$21.99
    RWC Outboard BB Cup Tool: $59.95

    These were to supplement my Park Tool collection...

    I look at them as investments. I build and do all the upgrades/maintenance on our bikes, and I will only have to buy these tools once. The Puller and Press sets have allow me to pull/press every bearing on the bike... That's why I have headset removers, installers, star nut installer, crown race removal and installation tools, etc, etc... At some point, I will add the frame, drop out, et al. frame tools and also the BB and head tube cutters, and the brake boss facing tools, et al.

    I JUST bought/made all the tools I need to build my own wheels...

    It's just my thing... I know that if I do it, it will be done right and to my standards.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by cautery View Post
    Yep, pricey, but quality tools... I have been acquiring the tools as I need them. I know have:

    Blind Bearing Puller Set: $189.00
    Enduro bearing Press Tool: $219.00
    Enduro Outboard BB Bearing Puller/Press Tool: $120.00
    RWC Rear Shock DU bushing and needle bearing tools: $25.99/$21.99
    RWC Outboard BB Cup Tool: $59.95

    These were to supplement my Park Tool collection...

    I look at them as investments. I build and do all the upgrades/maintenance on our bikes, and I will only have to buy these tools once. The Puller and Press sets have allow me to pull/press every bearing on the bike... That's why I have headset removers, installers, star nut installer, crown race removal and installation tools, etc, etc... At some point, I will add the frame, drop out, et al. frame tools and also the BB and head tube cutters, and the brake boss facing tools, et al.

    I JUST bought/made all the tools I need to build my own wheels...

    It's just my thing... I know that if I do it, it will be done right and to my standards.
    I'm very similar in that I do all maintenance I can myself (want it done correctly -- actually enjoy it). I built this bike up myself 2 years ago and have done all maintenance since. What may be different is that I have only one bike and will need them infrequently. My other concern is the way technology shifts, I'm not as confident in purchasing tools as I used to be. For example, the new RIP 9 RDO doesn't need bearing tools at all.

  9. #9
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    I did mine with the "toolset" being recommended by Niner, no issues. I bought bearings from RWC, I couldn't swing the cost of the pullers.

  10. #10
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    You can use the materials to your advantage and make the job a lot easier. The aluminum expands a lot more than the steel of the bearing race when it's heated. A toaster oven (or regular oven) works great.

    Look the part over and take out any circlips ahead of time, put it in the oven at about 350-400, wait about 20 minutes (one beer), it should have a nice consistent heat soak. Now you have to move fairly quick...

    I like to use a bench vise or press over a hammer when possible. It gives a more controllable pressure. Find a tool that is slightly smaller in diameter than the bearing you're pressing out (sockets, sockets and washers, etc.) - it should make contact with the outer race of the bearing. Don't press on the inner race or balls if possible. Make sure it's a little smaller - I've pressed a socket into the bore. Once... Son of a *****... The old bearing should just about fall out...

    Put the new bearings in the freezer the night before, put the empty suspension part back in the oven. Wait about 20 minutes (one more beer) - the new bearing should need just a little pressure to go in...

  11. #11
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    Houston, we have a problem

    It's been about 6 weeks since I replaced my RIP 9 bearings. I'm already hearing that same clicking sound I heard before I finally isolated it to my bearings. The bearing were shot as I inspected them after removal. One was almost seized. I don't believe I ride in overly harsh conditions. It's mostly dry here in Central Tx and my last bearings lasted a long time before they became noisy. But, it is the same exact sound (only occurs under pedaling load) and the very sound that went away once the bearing were replaced (by that point I had already replaced pedals and bottom bracket). Any help?

  12. #12
    MoJo Moto
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    ....check your rear drop outs.
    Ride Hard or Ride Home Alone.

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