Why run anything else than 5" travel on fantom?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Why run anything else than 5" travel on fantom?

    I set up my fantom on 5" travel (bolt closest to seat tube) and it got me to thinking - why would anyone run less travel since there is no weight penalty? Maybe the rear shock is more progressive at 3 or 4" travel? Thats the only possibility that I can think of. Maybe less travel makes the frame stiffer for fast XC riding, but then again, you can just put more air into the 5" setting...

  2. #2
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    Because you need to match the rear travel to the front. If you had a 80mm fork (or the lowest adjustable setting on the Reba that comes on the Team) you would not want to be running 5" of travel. It would change the height of the rear end and make the head angle different. So basically it depends on how you have the bike setup.
    2015 Niner Jet 9 Carbon
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  3. #3
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    Thanks

    That makes sense. So are you thinking the following:

    3" rear travel -> 80mm front fork and less
    4" travel -> 80-110 mm travel
    5" travel -> >110 mm travel?

    I can see how the rear end sits higher with more travel. I might try 4" of travel just to compare how the bike handles. I dont think Id ever try 3" of travel...

  4. #4
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    Yeah, the list you made is probably about right. Just like how a longer fork can make the head angle slacker (slower steering), the more travel in the rear will make the head angle steeper (faster steering).
    2015 Niner Jet 9 Carbon
    2014 Focus Raven 27R
    2017 Lynskey GR250
    2016 Niner BSB
    1987 Haro RS1

  5. #5
    Big Gulps, Alright!
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    If you were racing. I'm willing to bet an adjustable travel fork like the Tora would fit that bike well.
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    Founder at North Atlantic Dirt, riding & writing about trails in the northeast.

  6. #6
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    I might have misunderstood you but I think you may it have it backwards. You said the travel position closest to the seat tube gives you the most travel, that position gives you only three.

  7. #7
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    The position closest to the seat tube gives you 5" travel. bringing the shock closer to the pivot point (fulcrum) allows the greatest wheel movement with the smallest shock travel. Imagine the rocker arm on the fantom as a see-saw. The center bearing as the center of the see-saw. Rear wheel on one end and shock on the other. If you have limited shock travel, you can get more wheel travel by bringing the shock closer to the pivot point. At least that is the way I rationalized it...

  8. #8
    Uncle
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    Bump!!!

    Just bought this frame, but I don't have a U-turn / Talas type fork, but I have a few others here ready to go -- a couple of lighter 80mm forks, and a couple of heavier 100mm forks. This if for my GF who doesn't ride hard (yet...) but could benefit from both 100mm and from the lighter fork, so hopefully some folks can chime in:

    Anyone ride theirs at 3" rr / 85mm fr at all times? I'm leaning towards a 100mm fork for it, but I'm hoping someone current owners can let me know how they spend the majority of time riding theres: What travel setting rear, and front, what types of trails, etc.

    Thanks much.

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