Help Deciding, Narrowed down to These Motobecane Bikes- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Help Deciding, Narrowed down to These Motobecane Bikes

    Hi Everyone,

    I'm looking to get a HT and have my budget set at max $800. I'm looking to ride mostly fireroads around Southern California area (and trails if I can find any). I've narrowed down the choices to the ones below ($499 - $799). I'd like to know if there are other brands with similar components that are comparable?

    I'd like to get at the bare minimum Alivio components as I've heard they are the bare minimum for an enthusiast. I'm not too familiar with Sram components and where in the Shimano hierarchy they compare to. Education here is also appreciated

    One thing I see different is that the $499 rims are not tubeless or tubeless ready while the $599+ are. Would I really benefit from going tubeless?

    And in terms of upgradeability, would I have no issues upgrading say the forks later on, or even the drivetrain, or altogether replacing the frame with these bikes??

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...antom29_x4.htm

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...m29_expert.htm

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...tb-tcs-xvi.htm

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...mp-tcs-xvi.htm

  2. #2
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    Here is the hierarchy for SRAM vs Shimano. I just searched Google.

    Mountain bike groupset comparison: Shimano vs. SRAM
    '15 Niner Jet 9 Carbon
    '19 Karate Monkey
    Motobecane Boris
    Raleigh Willard 3, Furley & Militis 3 (SS)
    Nashbar Carbon Road

  3. #3
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    Id get the white Fantom29 Comp. Nice bike for the money. the brakes and rear derailleur really suprised me with their specs! I went into the local Specialized shop and looked at a Hardrock for $849 before tax that was just total junk components compared to this one.

  4. #4
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    My vote would be for the fantom trail at $600. suntour XCM fork, while not great, is ok, and performance wise, it's not that far off the rockshox XC30. The rockshox is just serviced easier and has adjustable rebound. The XCM still has rebound, just not adjustable.

    If you're just getting into riding, and like to wrench, another option for an acceptable bike at decent price point is the motobecane 429. Not a great parts list, but a good price for what you get, you can go out and ride it like crazy, upgrade parts as you see fit.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

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    I would vote for either of the last 2 with the major difference being the fork. When I was looking in the same price range a few years back, one thing that was very important to me was having the ability to lock out the fork on the fly when going from off-road to paved roads. I steered clear of anything with a Suntour XCT fork for that reason. They may have XCT models now that have an on-the-fly lockout, but from what I gathered before they were all the model where you had to stop, get off the bike to unload the fork, then lock it out. of course, if that doesn't matter to you then the first 2 bikes would probably be fine as well, just my opinion.

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    Thanks for all the inputs guys!

    Yes i am handy and plan to work on the bike myself.

    How does the last 2 bikes compare to its name brand competitors?

    If I upgrade the forks later on, would I have problem with compatbility? Maybe Rebon or Fox forks...

  7. #7
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    One of the better bang for your bike LBS stores is Giant (although specialized is doing a lot of sales right now too). comparing the 27.5" Giant Talon 3 against the motobecane trail.
    Giant costs $700, moto costs $600.
    Same fork, similar drivetrain (alivio 9-speed vs. deore 9-speed), similar brakes (tektro hydraulic vs. tektro hydraulic), and similar tires. The rims on the moto are better, and will go tubeless with the WTB tires real easy. The Giant will probably go tubeless, but might take a little more effort.

    So, what does that extra $100 get you other than the tire/rim combo? LBS service, initial setup, adjusted bearings, proper gear alignment, someplace you can bring the bike when you have issues but not the time to fix it.

    If you like to wrench, hard to argue with just doing it yourself to save time and money. However, the price difference isn't that high that you should ignore what bikes the LBS's have. A lot of the time, they don't make that much on the bikes. check out some LBS's and get a feel for what the LBS's can offer you beyond the bike sale. That is what justifies the extra cost.

    In general, LBS brand bikes after any sales/markdowns will be about 20%-30% higher than comparably speced bikesdirect bikes. On the low-mid end bikes, that's not a whole lot. On the high end bikes, it makes a difference. Have to be careful about what BD is offering vs. what the other LBS's are offering on their bikes. A good example is BD's wheel hubs. Once you get into the possibility of upgrades, you want a bike that can take a tapered fork (which the moto fantom trail and comp can do), and have 15mm thru-axles (which they do not).
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  8. #8
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    After researching the best "bang for my buck" I bought a Fantom 29 Comp in Matte Gray. I've ridden it about 150 miles at this point and love it. Sadly, no single track or other trails yes, but otherwise, it's great.

    I shopped for a while and once a bike-enthusiast friend explained the levels of the components, I realized I would get a whole lot more for my money with the Fantom line versus a comparable-in-price Trek / Giant / Specialized.

    I talked to the LBS before making the purchase and they were cool with me not buying a bike from them. They said they make more on repairs and service than the bikes themselves, so that's what I did. Once I got the bike, took it down to them and they went through everything, essentially rebuilding the bike. Greased everything that needed to be and tightened everything to spec. Cost me $105 and I know it was done right.

    I say go for the Trail or Comp, but my overall choice was the Comp. I hope it helps.

    Pics below. I did swap out the WTB Nano for WTB Slick Comp while I'm training for stamina / strength.








  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    One of the better bang for your bike LBS stores is Giant (although specialized is doing a lot of sales right now too). comparing the 27.5" Giant Talon 3 against the motobecane trail.
    Giant costs $700, moto costs $600.
    Same fork, similar drivetrain (alivio 9-speed vs. deore 9-speed), similar brakes (tektro hydraulic vs. tektro hydraulic), and similar tires. The rims on the moto are better, and will go tubeless with the WTB tires real easy. The Giant will probably go tubeless, but might take a little more effort.

    So, what does that extra $100 get you other than the tire/rim combo? LBS service, initial setup, adjusted bearings, proper gear alignment, someplace you can bring the bike when you have issues but not the time to fix it.

    If you like to wrench, hard to argue with just doing it yourself to save time and money. However, the price difference isn't that high that you should ignore what bikes the LBS's have. A lot of the time, they don't make that much on the bikes. check out some LBS's and get a feel for what the LBS's can offer you beyond the bike sale. That is what justifies the extra cost.

    In general, LBS brand bikes after any sales/markdowns will be about 20%-30% higher than comparably speced bikesdirect bikes. On the low-mid end bikes, that's not a whole lot. On the high end bikes, it makes a difference. Have to be careful about what BD is offering vs. what the other LBS's are offering on their bikes. A good example is BD's wheel hubs. Once you get into the possibility of upgrades, you want a bike that can take a tapered fork (which the moto fantom trail and comp can do), and have 15mm thru-axles (which they do not).
    Awesome, awesome info. Thanks so much for that!

    So pretty much, the price gap between higher-specced bikes are more significant than lower-end bikes, name brand vs BD?

    Also, how significant is having tapered headtube? And in terms of fork upgrades in the future, would I have to buy taper-specific forks?

    Knowing this would help me eliminate the first 2 bikes as they don't have tapered headtubes.

    Regarding thru axle, could I just upgrade the axle or is there frame limitation?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fniner View Post
    After researching ......
    Thank you for the post! Couldn't have been better timing--I just emailed BD to ask for actual photos of the matte gray of the 29 Fantom Comp.

    And are you saying this bike is not capable of singletrack / trail? Or you just haven't tested it on those terrains yet?

    PS. what made you choose the Comp over the Trail?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobaX View Post
    Thank you for the post! Couldn't have been better timing--I just emailed BD to ask for actual photos of the matte gray of the 29 Fantom Comp.

    And are you saying this bike is not capable of singletrack / trail? Or you just haven't tested it on those terrains yet?

    PS. what made you choose the Comp over the Trail?
    Wow, I didnt see the matte gray, cool looking bike. Again, I would go with the comp just because it already has a great spec list, including the fork, brakes, and derailleurs. Its funny to me how a lot of Motobecane purchasers on these threads buy one of these bikes because of the bang for the buck, but then do expensive upgrades (up to or more than the original purchase in some cases) and negate the good deal they just got! upgrading is expensive! more expensive in many cases (on bd bikes anyways) than just buying it with the componentry already on it because now your buying the fork you don't really want, AND the fork you really want!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cc in Hawaii View Post
    Its funny to me how a lot of Motobecane purchasers on these threads buy one of these bikes because of the bang for the buck, but then do expensive upgrades
    Always buy the bike you want, not the one you can upgrade. I bought mine with the plan of upgrading the fork and brakes, but that's because I already had the replacement fork and brakes. All other upgrades are because of wear and tear. If you ride, you should beat up a bike. If you don't beat up your bike, ride more.

    Tapered head tubes are common for better forks, and if you plan on keeping the bike long enough to need a new fork, get one with a tapered head tube. A straight steer tube still works though, so I wouldn't avoid one. especially if the frame uses a zerostack headset with a straight steer tube. A zerostack headset can be converted with an external lower cup to use a tapered steer tube.

    Thru axle forks are a worthwhile upgrade, but once again, I wouldn't avoid a bike with a QR. They worked for 30+ years before thru-axles came out. If you have an option at similar price points, try to get one with a thru-axle. Related note, for a full suspension bike, always look for a thru-axle on the rear. A rear axle QR sorta works if it's clamped down super tight, but a thru-axle works a lot better.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobaX View Post
    Thank you for the post! Couldn't have been better timing--I just emailed BD to ask for actual photos of the matte gray of the 29 Fantom Comp.

    And are you saying this bike is not capable of singletrack / trail? Or you just haven't tested it on those terrains yet?

    PS. what made you choose the Comp over the Trail?
    I'm sure it's very capable on singletrack and trails, but my skills aren't quite capable yet. I'm sure it will do just fine. It's really a great setup.

    As far as the choice, I rode a bike at the LBS with SRAM Guide R brakes and one with Tektro hydraulic (don't remember which ones) and loved how the Guides felt. Also, I wanted a 3x10 instead of 3x9 based on current trends. Again, this was my first "real" bike, so I definitely bought overkill for my skill level, but it's something that will last and I can ride the crap out of.

    Last deciding factor was a purely aesthetic one. I didn't like the matte green on the Trail and they didn't have a 21" in the other colors. So matte gray on the Comp is what I picked.

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    You should also checkout the fantom 29 X7 at $800 that comes with a rockshox 30 gold tk and sram x7 drivetrain. Earlier this month I was looking for a mtb in about the same budget range as you ended up getting the X7 over the fantom 29 comp. I've only ridden it a few times but the fork is much better then the suntour xct I'm used to riding.

    Save up to 60% off new Mountain Bikes - MTB - Motobecane Fantom 29 X7 Rockshox SRAM 3x10SP, WTB TCS Tubeless Compatible, 29er Mountain Bikes
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Help Deciding, Narrowed down to These Motobecane Bikes-2016-04-21-12.42.32.jpg  


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    Quote Originally Posted by Jameo View Post
    You should also checkout the fantom 29 X7 at $800 that comes with a rochshox 30 gold tk and sram x7 drivetrain. Earlier this month I was looking for a mtb in about the same budget range as you ended up getting the X7 over the fantom 29 comp. I've only ridden it a few times but the fork is much better then the suntour xct I'm used to riding.

    Save up to 60% off new Mountain Bikes - MTB - Motobecane Fantom 29 X7 Rockshox SRAM 3x10SP, WTB TCS Tubeless Compatible, 29er Mountain Bikes
    I almost went with that one over the Comp. I got it in my head that I needed a tapered head tube and the name brand stem and handlebars. I'm about to swap both the stem and handlebars out, so I guess those didn't really matter. The tapered headtube, well, I don't know what it was like without one.

    The air forks would've been a nice upgrade over the coils of the XC30. Give and take, I guess.

  16. #16
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    Great fork upgrade (and general parts upgrade) for $200. Does not allow for a future tapered fork, but once again, not a deal breaker if you don't plan on doing a major fork upgrade. Rockshox forks are easily serviceable, and with proper oil changes and service, will last years and years.

    My one recommendation if you buy any bike with a QR fork, replace the front skewer with a shimano style internal cam skewer. They are higher quality and allow stronger clamping force which reduces flex. The stock BD skewer's are acceptable, but could be better.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    Great fork upgrade (and general parts upgrade) for $200. Does not allow for a future tapered fork, but once again, not a deal breaker if you don't plan on doing a major fork upgrade. Rockshox forks are easily serviceable, and with proper oil changes and service, will last years and years.

    My one recommendation if you buy any bike with a QR fork, replace the front skewer with a shimano style internal cam skewer. They are higher quality and allow stronger clamping force which reduces flex. The stock BD skewer's are acceptable, but could be better.
    Will I lose out without a tapered headtube? Are they designed that way to provide more durability and increased handling?

    Like Jameo, I've also got in my head that I need a tapered heatube because I've always heard they were better.

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    Disclaimer; I've never ridden a mountain bike with a tapered head tube more than on a demo ride at the trails. Those bikes were $4000 full suspension bikes, so hard to compare to my mid level hardtail.

    I will say, I don't have any problem riding my bike with a straight steer tube. Would a tapered steer tube be better? Yes, it will allow a slightly stronger fork and frame design.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    Disclaimer; I've never ridden a mountain bike with a tapered head tube more than on a demo ride at the trails. Those bikes were $4000 full suspension bikes, so hard to compare to my mid level hardtail.

    I will say, I don't have any problem riding my bike with a straight steer tube. Would a tapered steer tube be better? Yes, it will allow a slightly stronger fork and frame design.
    Awesome, so now narrowing it down to 2 choices...

    Save up to 60% off new Mountain Bikes - MTB - Motobecane Fantom 29Elite
    Save up to 60% off new Mountain Bikes - MTB - Motobecane Fantom 29 X7 Rockshox SRAM 3x10SP, WTB TCS Tubeless Compatible, 29er Mountain Bikes

    For the same price of $799, I'm either choosing a better fork (RockShox Recon Gold vs RockShox XC30) or a tapered headtube (Motobecane Fantom29 Comp)...

    I'm just going to assume the Sram X7 drivetrain is on the same level as the Shimano Deore/SLX...?

  20. #20
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    Comparing other parts and capabilities.

    XC30silver vs. XC30 gold, The gold wins. it's an air fork with alloy stanchions. Easily a pound lighter or more. If your a featherweight or a clyde, always go for an air fork because the stock springs won't adjust for your weight. If you're "average" weight, the spring forks are ok if you're willing to take a weight hit. Springs are also bullet proof. You never have to worry about the spring losing air. Springs don't leak. A lot of people also like the way springs feel. A progressive spring rate is predictable vs. an air compression rate that can be affected by temperature (which will change during a ride).

    SLX vs. X7. both are about the same so a personal preference. Neither are clutch derailures, which is kind of lame considering how many 10-speed derailures are clutched now. Personally, I like the shimano because the downshift can be push or pull of the small button, while SRAM only has the thumb push option. SRAM is usually lighter because they don't have a display window. SRAM also has a longer cable pull ratio, so their shifting can be dialed in easier if something is out of whack. I completely bent up an x9 derailure and hanger, straightened it back out by hand and had almost perfect shifting for 8 of the gears.

    Guide vs Avid DB3 brakes. guide wins. Newer technology and I haven't heard many complaints about them. I hear a lot of complaints about the DB3's though. They are still good breaks, just not as good as Guide.

    WTB Bronson vs. WTB nano tires. If you're doing smooth dirt/asphalt/XC, the nano's are great. If you're doing mud/loose dirt/AM, the Bronson. The Bronson is heavier, but if you're pointed down a hill, that's fine. They're also wider, which gives better traction in corners. Both are good to go tubeless on the WTB rims. They seat easily and the beads lock into the rims. Either bike, add tape and go tubeless.

    handlebars/seatpost/stem: The 29 comp wins. Lighter weight Ritchey instead of the OEM ones, plus the handlebar is wider. It's still not as wide as I'd like, but it works with the stock stem, which is also longer than I'd like.

    Geometry: The fantom x7 has shorter chainstays, a 71 deg headtube angle, and shorter wheelbase. Good for XC trails. It's a pretty steep HT angle for going downhill. The fantom comp is also more of an XC bike, but a 70 deg headtube and longer chainstays/wheelbase. Not much longer though, so I really wouldn't hold it against them. I personally prefer a longer wheelbase for XC and trail climbing otherwise I can get my center of balance behind the real wheel too easily. Personal preference though.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    Comparing other parts and capabilities.

    XC30silver vs. XC30 gold, The gold wins. it's an air fork with alloy stanchions. Easily a pound lighter or more. If your a featherweight or a clyde, always go for an air fork because the stock springs won't adjust for your weight. If you're "average" weight, the spring forks are ok if you're willing to take a weight hit. Springs are also bullet proof. You never have to worry about the spring losing air. Springs don't leak. A lot of people also like the way springs feel. A progressive spring rate is predictable vs. an air compression rate that can be affected by temperature (which will change during a ride).

    SLX vs. X7. both are about the same so a personal preference. Neither are clutch derailures, which is kind of lame considering how many 10-speed derailures are clutched now. Personally, I like the shimano because the downshift can be push or pull of the small button, while SRAM only has the thumb push option. SRAM is usually lighter because they don't have a display window. SRAM also has a longer cable pull ratio, so their shifting can be dialed in easier if something is out of whack. I completely bent up an x9 derailure and hanger, straightened it back out by hand and had almost perfect shifting for 8 of the gears.

    Guide vs Avid DB3 brakes. guide wins. Newer technology and I haven't heard many complaints about them. I hear a lot of complaints about the DB3's though. They are still good breaks, just not as good as Guide.

    WTB Bronson vs. WTB nano tires. If you're doing smooth dirt/asphalt/XC, the nano's are great. If you're doing mud/loose dirt/AM, the Bronson. The Bronson is heavier, but if you're pointed down a hill, that's fine. They're also wider, which gives better traction in corners. Both are good to go tubeless on the WTB rims. They seat easily and the beads lock into the rims. Either bike, add tape and go tubeless.

    handlebars/seatpost/stem: The 29 comp wins. Lighter weight Ritchey instead of the OEM ones, plus the handlebar is wider. It's still not as wide as I'd like, but it works with the stock stem, which is also longer than I'd like.

    Geometry: The fantom x7 has shorter chainstays, a 71 deg headtube angle, and shorter wheelbase. Good for XC trails. It's a pretty steep HT angle for going downhill. The fantom comp is also more of an XC bike, but a 70 deg headtube and longer chainstays/wheelbase. Not much longer though, so I really wouldn't hold it against them. I personally prefer a longer wheelbase for XC and trail climbing otherwise I can get my center of balance behind the real wheel too easily. Personal preference though.
    Thanks so much for summing up the benefits of each bike for me!

    Which spring would be included in the Rock Shox silver from BD A since different body weight would need different rates?

    Also, I heard whatever spring I get, I need to make sure I get the full suspension travel. Again, without being able to test in person, i wouldn’t know which spring to get?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobaX View Post
    Thanks so much for summing up the benefits of each bike for me!

    Which spring would be included in the Rock Shox silver from BD A since different body weight would need different rates?

    Also, I heard whatever spring I get, I need to make sure I get the full suspension travel. Again, without being able to test in person, i wouldn’t know which spring to get?
    I believe the stock spring is rated for riders around 140-160lbs. Although they are fairly easily swapped out. Also the current model XC30 has a factory set rebound where the 30 gold on the X7 is adjustable. I'm still debating myself whether I should've gone with the Fantom Comp instead of the X7. In retrospect you really can't go wrong with either one though as long as the bike is the right size.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jameo View Post
    I believe the stock spring is rated for riders around 140-160lbs. Although they are fairly easily swapped out. Also the current model XC30 has a factory set rebound where the 30 gold on the X7 is adjustable. I'm still debating myself whether I should've gone with the Fantom Comp instead of the X7. In retrospect you really can't go wrong with either one though as long as the bike is the right size.

    This is such a difficult decision to make...

    Are certain forks only compatible with tapered headtubes? Are there non-tapered headtube versions of those exact same forks?

    Thing that's holding me back from getting the X7 is the:
    1. non-tapered headtube

    2. avid 3 brakes (had a horrible time truing the rotors by myself so they don't make a noise.. ended up taking it to LBS)

    3. sram drivetrain (i've only had experience with Shimano and feel more at home with their hierarchy of parts)

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobaX View Post
    This is such a difficult decision to make...

    Are certain forks only compatible with tapered headtubes? Are there non-tapered headtube versions of those exact same forks?

    Thing that's holding me back from getting the X7 is the:
    1. non-tapered headtube

    2. avid 3 brakes (had a horrible time truing the rotors by myself so they don't make a noise.. ended up taking it to LBS)

    3. sram drivetrain (i've only had experience with Shimano and feel more at home with their hierarchy of parts)
    Tapered headtubes are the new standard for forks but that only really matters if you plan to upgrade your fork down the road. Honestly I'd buy a new bike before spending close to what the bike cost new to upgrade the fork. I doubt the average rider could tell between a tapered fork and non tapered in a blindfold test.

    My avid db3's on my X7 did make some noise for the first few rides but are settling down now. From what I read some slight rubbing is normal at first and the pads need to break in.

    I felt the same way about ordering a sram equipped bike. So far I'm pretty satisfied with it. The shifts feel a bit more defined & snappy then the acera bike that I came from. Also the derailleurs were easier to dial in then my old bike. Its hard to say whether you'd like it or not though.

    Also I forgot to mention that the fsa crankset on the X7 is a 44-32-22 where the Comp is a 42-32-24. So the X7 would have a bit wider range of gearing as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jameo View Post
    Tapered headtubes are the new standard for forks but that only really matters if you plan to upgrade your fork down the road. Honestly I'd buy a new bike before spending close to what the bike cost new to upgrade the fork. I doubt the average rider could tell between a tapered fork and non tapered in a blindfold test.

    My avid db3's on my X7 did make some noise for the first few rides but are settling down now. From what I read some slight rubbing is normal at first and the pads need to break in.

    I felt the same way about ordering a sram equipped bike. So far I'm pretty satisfied with it. The shifts feel a bit more defined & snappy then the acera bike that I came from. Also the derailleurs were easier to dial in then my old bike. Its hard to say whether you'd like it or not though.

    Also I forgot to mention that the fsa crankset on the X7 is a 44-32-22 where the Comp is a 42-32-24. So the X7 would have a bit wider range of gearing as well.

    Gotcha.

    Can any of these Motobecane HTs withstand some drops to have a little fun in? I want to ride mainly XC with some fun on the side... Mild drops, bunny hops, wheelie, Jumping on benches, etc...

    Just came across this thread where the guy's Motobecane Outcast ($349) had its frame snapped in half after just doing some bunnyhop on flat land.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobaX View Post
    Can any of these Motobecane HTs withstand some drops to have a little fun in? I want to ride mainly XC with some fun on the side... Mild drops, bunny hops, wheelie, Jumping on benches, etc...

    Just came across this thread where the guy's Motobecane Outcast ($349) had its frame snapped in half after just doing some bunnyhop on flat land.
    But that guy admitted he hucked it a lot over the previous year, 5 foot drops on a lightweight alloy hardtail. Not what it was designed for. I'll take mine of 1' drops all day, but 1' to 5' is a huge difference if you're not landing right. Any frame can break in time with abuse.


    For the other items above:
    1. non-tapered headtube. Both work, not going to find high quality replacment forks in straight tube in the future. In time, getting a new bike really is cheaper than upgrading parts.

    2. avid 3 brakes (had a horrible time truing the rotors by myself so they don't make a noise.. ended up taking it to LBS). Properly bed the brakes, and make sure the rotor is trued. Truing a rotor is easy with a couple cresent wrenches.

    3. sram drivetrain (i've only had experience with Shimano and feel more at home with their hierarchy of parts) SRAM works well, so I wouldn't avoid it. A lot of high end bikes use SRAM.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  27. #27
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    The Fantom X7 is out of stock, ahhh!

    My only option at $799 now is the Fantom 29 Comp... But the reviews on the RockShox XC30 is so bad!

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobaX View Post
    The Fantom X7 is out of stock, ahhh!

    My only option at $799 now is the Fantom 29 Comp... But the reviews on the RockShox XC30 is so bad!
    Bike Island Bikesdirect's scratch and dent site has some Fantom X7's still in stock if they have your size. You get a nice discount as long as you can live with some cosmetic issues. I bought a beater roadbike from them 2 years ago and its still holding up after 800 miles.

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