Fly Team 29 Ti XO - New owners' club- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Trail Ninja
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    Fly Team 29 Ti XO - New owners' club

    So, who else pre-ordered this bike and received it? How'd assembly go? Impressions?

    I got mine late this afternoon and took most of the evening getting it assembled and tuned up. It required a lot of work surprisingly. The box came in good condition, doesn't look like it was dragged or dropped or had anything gouge into it or have anything poking out.

    Unpacking took a good amount of time. 4 staples and some tape was all that was between the box and the bike. The bike comes out in 3 pieces, the seatpost + seat, the front wheel, and everything else with the handlebar dangling by the cables. There's a box with manuals in the bottom. There's paper/plastic on everything almost, each frame tube, the fork, the seatpost, the handlebars, caps on the wheel axles, and a cap/spacer on the fork dropouts.

    For installation, I took out the manuals, but tackled the parts I knew first: seat post + seat, disc rotor on the front wheel, front disc brake caliper (some may need to check out the manual, for CPS installation method), front wheel into fork, headset + stem + handlebar (do it in that order, else your front end will be rickety... need to tighten the top cap before you tighten the stem), cable into rear dérailleur, air into tires.

    Issues I ran into:

    - I noticed there was some brake rub in back. I tried to twist the pad contact barrel on the lever to fix it, but it didn't do anything, so I took out the rear wheel and shoved the pad spacer in it and tried to push the pistons in. I cycled the brake levers to check movement and the pads moved in, but they stayed in (I assume that's Avid's self adjusting pad feature at work). I had to force them apart again, but had to use a flat head screwdriver this time. I reinstalled the rear wheel and cycled the brake, but nothing happened. I then noticed there was brake fluid leaking from the lever, so I quickly washed my hands and used a damp tower to wipe up the mess. I assumed it was coming from the little screw (bleed port) on the contact barrel, but didn't have a torx that small, but a small 3mm hex worked to tighten it up (manual says hex works, but it really does look like a torx head). I suspect it may have been because I held the boot when I was turning the contact barrel and loosened the compression nut. I bled it with a kit and made sure everything was tight and it worked.

    - The shifting was a bit off. Despite going through the full range of the limit screw. There's chain rub on the front dérailleur plates when in the big chainring and in the smallest and biggest cog in the back. I thought I had it tuned out after fiddling with how much of cable the dérailleur was biting, but during a ride I heard it rubbing on the big ring and smallest cog.

    - The stem is 100mm +/- 6d and the handlebars are 560mm wide and flat with 5d sweep. Waaaay too narrow for my tastes. I swapped out the bars to a FSA K-Force 660mm riser bar (~$60 on eBay) and I had a 90mm Sunline XC-1 stem. I was thinking about going down closer to 70mm, but I think I'll just get a zero setback seat post. I felt pretty stretched out, since the top tube is relatively long.

    - The seat post is kind of short on a 15.5" for a 5' 7" rider. I'm at the min insertion line and not quite yet at the optimum height. I'm not sure if the seat post is 350mm or smaller, but I wouldn't be surprised if it were shorter to help make advertised weight. That and the front end is rather high... the saddle is still below the handlebars quite a bit. Going to need a longer seat post for sure. The Velo Skye seat kind of rattles when you jiggle the rear... sounds like a loud plastic shell echoing after getting hit, so I'm sure it's the seat. Seat post is clamped down tight on it.

    - I dialed in my Reba like how I did the one on my previous 29er. At 140 riding weight, I set it up for 85 psi in pos and 75 in neg with rebound set 2 clicks away from fastest. I deflate the chambers 1 at a time, pump air in the positive then negative (I use Topeak Pocket Shock DXG pump). I checked the sag and got about 25mm, which is just how I like it. It felt kind of soft, so I redid it with 85psi in negative as well, and it felt a bit better the second time around and still got 25mm of sag.

    Update: not its maiden ride, but my first night ride (it got dark right after) and first ride with my camera with me.















    Climbs pretty well. Once I got comfortable, it started to rip. The Elixir CRs have noticeably more power than BB7s and I was daring to go faster down the rocky descents. Not sure if I trust the tires yet for this terrain. I'll play with the tire pressure to see if I can get more traction and better tracking. They're bouncing all over with 35 psi and felt kind of squirmy with less; I think I'd rather have bouncy than squirmy. I think it'll feel complete once I get my seatpost in next week.


    Update: rode it up and 1600' mountain. Cleared climbing up some sections I haven't yet and messed up on some. It had rained, so it was somewhat slick, but the Small Block 8s hooked up. Bombed down at night and it was really hairy and flatted since I think I overheated the brakes and was getting brake fade and went through some boulders way too fast and pinch flatted before rolling into some thick brush near the bottom.











    Last edited by Varaxis; 09-29-2010 at 08:18 PM.

  2. #2
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    You're not supposed to use hydraulic brakes without a rotor or bleed block in them. You introduced an air bubble into the system, and then when you pried the pads back you compressed the system again, so it leaked out of the bleed screw since it had nowhere to go (maybe the bleed screw was a bit loose too). I might be wrong though.

  3. #3
    Trail Ninja
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    How does air get in? I figured it might have been overfilled from the factory and had a bit of pressure in it causing the pistons to be midway through its stroke at rest. The brake rub was very obvious (so bad I knew something was up if I couldn't tune it out normally). It's normal for the pads to self adjust without the rotor in there and it's part of the procedure to replace the pads to push the pistons back by force. I guess it was dumb of me to check it's movement to see how far the pistons would return, since I'm relatively new to this system (played with other hydraulic disc brakes). The pressure had no where to go, after I forced the pistons back, but leak out the weakest seal in the system, which happened to be the lever in this case. It's inoperable since too much leaked out when it "blew", so that's why I figured I should redo the bleed procedure.
    Last edited by Varaxis; 09-22-2010 at 08:06 AM.

  4. #4
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    The Elixirs have "CPS" mounting which are all those washers around the bolts. That is the self adjustment. You unscrew the bolts just a bit while having the rotor in the brake, and then press down on the brake lever and tighten the bolts up. It's in the brake manual, I did this just the other day on my new Team. As to how air gets in, I'm not sure -- I might be wrong on that. I know for sure you don't want to squeeze hydraulics with no rotor in there, that is why many brake system levers lock out by pushing them forward, such as my Juicys. I don't know why the Elixirs don't have the lockout, maybe they don't suffer from the same issue because my friend pressed down on his brakes on his Spec Epic with no rotor in there and it locked the brake pads, but he didn't need a bleed.

  5. #5
    Trail Ninja
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    Yea, I know of that CPS method as described in the manual. You need to take it further though and make sure the wheel is in the drop outs as straight as can be as well, else you'll get "bent rotor" syndrome, in which it rubs at a certain part of its rotation and people begin to think their rotor is bent. I actually positioned my front caliper by hand, since the CPS method wasn't working perfectly.

    When it's rubbing all the way around like in the case of my rear brake... heh, I'm really not that flustered about it. Overbleeding brakes is a skill and something some riders actually prefer, for short throw and such, but is more prone to drag. The rear brake actually works a little bit, not totally inoperable, but I'm not going to trust it on a descent. I waited this long for the bike and I can wait a bit longer for the bleed kit to come (waiting for a longer seat post to come in as well).

    Took it for a test ride after I had everything tuned and torqued. I found that I needed to retune the fork, since it was bottoming out too easily from just lifting my wheel off the ground. Had to redo the cleat positioning on my shoes, since my right foot wasn't quite used to the extra width of the chainrings and started to ache. The front brake is really weak--I guess I need to break it in to get it to bite more. Shifting is accurate, though not as smooth as I would imagine. No better than my old Shimano XTR parts from 10 years ago and definitely loud and clunky. When tuning, it took a bit of effort to get the chain from rubbing on the front dérailleur on the big ring + the two extremes in the back, but I got it with a mm to spare.

    Once I get the rear brake bled and my new seat post, I'll start taking the bike on some trails. I splurged on an Easton EC90 on eBay, since they're selling for 70-90+10 S/H (they weigh ~200g and I was originally opting for a Thomson Elite 27.2 410mm which costs 90 and weighs 290g).


    Random thoughts: feels odd to be on a bike so new that you have to spread the drop-outs on the fork and rear end in order to drop your wheel in. I went to the SRAM site to see if the cassette was alloy or steel (it's steel, just shiny; I'm used to seeing Shimano cassettes) and noticed the picture of the 1070 is wrong. The cassette on mine looks more like their picture of the 1050, since the 36 tooth cog has similar cutouts. I then noticed that only the dérailleurs and shifters are XO... the rest is X9 or off brand stuff (FSA, Ritchey, etc).
    Last edited by Varaxis; 09-22-2010 at 06:41 PM.

  6. #6
    It's carbon dontcha know.
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    The cassette will have the model on the lockring.

  7. #7
    Trail Ninja
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6thElement
    The cassette will have the model on the lockring.
    Yea. That's why I'm saying the SRAM site seems wrong, since I see mine says 1070 and looks like the 1050 more than what they're showing as the 1070. On second look, I guess it's just because they're not showing their 12-36 1070 and instead showing 11-28 and that the 36T simply looks like that.

    Yea, I take that back. I'm sure that's the reason why the pictures look off.

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