DS 700 assembly advice- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    7

    DS 700 assembly advice

    At the suggestion of a friend I bought a DS 700 from Bikesdirect.com. After my purchase I was concerned by some negative 'reviews' I'd seen over the internet. Anyway, I am happy to find a forum of owners who seem to be relatively happy with their purchase.

    I should be receiving my bike within a few days, but I'm not sure if I should attempt the assembly myself or pay a LBS to do it for me. I'm certain I can put the thing together according to the instructions, but would I need a more experienced hand with the tuning?

    I've read that many people are dissatisfied with the DS 700's rear shock. Is there anyone out there that is satisfied with this shock? If not, is it so darn useless that buying a new rear shock is the only way to go? If a new rear shock is in the stars for me, what would be the best choice for under fifty bucks?

    Thanks,
    Andrew

  2. #2
    Bushwacker
    Reputation: Starkonian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    465
    Sure Andrew,

    It bolts together fairly easily. You'll need some allan and torxs bits. Make sure everythings all tight. Print these front and rear/derailleur adjustment instructions for reference and adjust the gears http://www.parktool.com:80/repair/readhowto.asp?id=75 You'll be ready to roll and you saved $75.

    Your best bet is to replace the rear spring for now. Look on the 700 threads for info on that. Ride it for a while and if you want to up the performance level signifantly upgrade the fork and shock. See mine and others for what we did.
    When I'm not windsurfing, I'm mountain biking

  3. #3

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    12

    DS 700 assembly advice

    Hi Andrew,

    I rode my 700DS for the first time today and made some fine adjustments to the brakes and the front derailer. The most challenging thing for me to get adjusted properly was the front derailer. I used my Crankbrothers bicycle multi tool and a Sheffield pocket multi tool to assemble the whole bike. I received my bike this past Thursday night and now have it functioning properly, I think, Saturday evening. I did wrap most of the frame in black vulcanizing silicone tape to make the bike more stealth like in appearance and added quite a few accessories like Lizard Skins Fork boots, rear suspension spring boot, chain stay cover, Topeak Defender RX rear fender, front and rear lights, rear view mirror, Greenfield rear kick stand. I really took my time and I also watched some YouTube videos on properly adjusting a threadless headset. I don't think I need to take my bike to the LBS for any reason. I was pleased also to see my bike was fitted with WTB Speeddisc aluminum wheels instead of the other brand that the bike used to be speced with.
    The short ride I went on today was down mostly dirt roads with washboard bumps. I did not really think the bike was too stiff in the rear but I would have to swap out springs to see what I would like best. This is my first suspension bicycle of any kind. I really love the Rapidfire 9 shifter for the rear cassette. I did not have to adjust the rear derailer at all. People have mentioned also that the seat tube is too long, but in my situation the seat tube is too low or too short. The tube is marked with minimum insertion depth and I had to raise my seat tube above that minimum mark to be comfortable. I would like to post some photos of my rig, but I don't have a digital camera at the moment. Stay tuned and I will add some pics. I pull a black and yellow Burley Nomad trailer with it too and will be adding a Honda engine and a Staton chain drive with the Nuvinci CVT hub in the next few weeks if all goes well for me at work.

    Cheers!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    7
    Thanks for your input. I think I can handle it. My bike is scheduled for delivery on Monday. I'll let you know how it goes. Thanks again.

  5. #5

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    12

    Best of luck to you!

    I was told by my LBS owner that he has never seen a straight or true disc brake rotor. He told me the mechanical disc brakes are more low maintenance than hydraulic and that they work well if adjusted properly. He told me also that he has a special tool for straightening the untrue rotors if I wanted or needed to adjust mine to stop the pads from rubbing. I have not noticed a real problem yet but I only went for a short ride last night. Will post more feedback on my brakes after my ride to town today. This forum has really helped me get my bike up a running in no time flat.

    Thank you!

  6. #6

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    12

    Comments after first ride to town.

    My rear derailer needed some fine adjustment and the LBS did that for me today. It was skipping gears. No big deal! Also the front disc caliper needed 2 U-shims under the mounting bolts. The pads were rubbing on the top on one side and at the bottom on the other side. 2 U-shims on the outside under the bolts corrected the angle of alignment to the disc. Now I can close the gap more tightly without the pads rubbing. The LBS only charged me $10.00 for my visit today. I think it was well worth it.

    I found out that I don't like the WTB Speed V seat. It's too narrow for me so I will put a Terry seat on it with a gel cover. My left inside thigh went numb on my 20 mile ride today to and from town. My hands fell asleep on the way back. I think I need to raise my handle bar about 3 inches if possible and get some cushier grips. I have been looking at one of those wrap around handle bars because it gives a lot of room for various hand positions and more space of accessory mounting.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    7

    Shock suggestions?

    Ten bucks sounds pretty reasonable for some fine tweaking and adjustment. I'll take the assembly of my bike as far as I can and, if it seems to need more, I'll bring it to the lbs. Hope he'll be as reasonable as yours.

    I am preparing myself in the event I find the 850# shock too hard. After checking things out, I most likely will opt for the Fox spring at forty bucks. I'm 5'7" and weigh 150#. Any suggestions what would be the appropriate size shock for me?

    I'm curious to know your impression after a twenty mile trek? Since ordering my DS700 my mind has been vacilating back and forth (mostly from reading the posts on this forum) on whether I did the right thing. Anyway, that's a moot point right now. Although I have noting to compare the DS700 with, I'll probably have my own review to offer tomorrow night.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    7
    BTW, I'd like to see a photo of your bike with the silicon tape. Personally, I would rather have an all black bike with no markings. If I could cover the makring with the tape, I'd probably go for it.

  9. #9

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    12

    Rear spring weight and silicone tape.

    Every once and a while I will feel or hear my rear shock compress and extend when I hit a significant bump. I personally would rather add a seat post shock rather than lower the spring weight of my rear shock. I plan to add a 4 stroke engine to the rear of my bike and it weighs 17 lbs. I weigh 180 pounds with clothes on. I don't have a digital camera at the moment to post any pictures but I will post some when I get a camera. The black tape is available from Duck brand under the product name of WRAP-FIX TAPE. You can also get it from Harbor Freight tools by the name of X-treme tape if I remember correctly. At Harbor Freight it was priced at $3.99 for 10ft roll and at my local ACE Hardware store it was $7.49 for 10ft. roll I think. This tape becomes a solid covering once it is stretched and wrapped. I wrapped the tubes on all the aluminum rear end, the MOTOBECANE tube, one side of my front forks, and the upper frame tube starting at the neck to about half way down into the valley. I wrapped the seat post as well to cover that marketing and to make my various accessory clamps stick in place better. I really like the end effect of this tape. It protects the nice finish on my bike and tones down the visual impression of the bike as well. I think Batman would be happy with it...LOL!

  10. #10

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    12

    silicone tape link

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=96807

    I think 5 rolls is what I needed to tape what I wanted to tape. I used 4 and still have one side of my front forks to wrap.

  11. #11
    Bushwacker
    Reputation: Starkonian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    465
    [QUOTE=alerra]Any suggestions what would be the appropriate size shock for me?/QUOTE]

    500lb spring would be about right for you.
    When I'm not windsurfing, I'm mountain biking

  12. #12

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    12

    First Ride to Work Today!

    I pulled my Burley Nomad trailer to work today with my Moto 700DS. I wanted to see how the bike felt on the bumpy dirt roads I travel to work each week day. The bike is definitely faster and more comfortable on the wash board and bumpy dirt roads especially when not pulling the trailer for my lunch hour. I was terribly slow going home, pulling some tools loaded in my trailer. My commute home is mostly all up hill. I will replace the stock WTB Speed V seat with a Terry saddle and Gel cover. I think I am going to try a Nashbar Trekking handle bar and an adjustable stem. I should have ordered the medium frame and I am 5'6" tall. I ordered the small. I can definitely ride the bumpy dirt roads faster on the fs MOTO than my hard tail Schwinn....happy about that!

    Steven

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    7
    I received my DS 700 on Monday. Assembly and tuning was a breeze. After three rides I'm overall satisfied with the deal. As others on this forum have noted, the rear shock is next to useless and the Cane Creek headset is a cheap immitation. One issue I've noticed that others haven't been mentioned is that the shifters crowd out the area on the grips. My hands, which are probably smaller most most people, do not fit comfortably on that small area. Anyone have a suggestion on how to address this problem?

  14. #14

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    12

    Have you ridden the bike hard yet?

    Quite honestly, I have not ridden my bike hard yet because I am still getting used to it. I have ridden the bike down a rough dirt road as hard as I can on the way to work, but I have not ridden the bike as if I was out to play. When I rode the bike to work down a rough dirt road the rear suspension did respond as I would expect a suspension to perform. My Schwinn hard tail mountain bike beats me up but the Moto 700DS smooths out the ride. I have no real complaints thus far. Tomorrow I will pull my Burley Nomad trailer to work with the 700DS just to give it another run and I will push it as hard as I can ( 5'6" and 180 lbs/muscular). I have a feeling that a lot of the reviews of the 700DS are by novices who don't really even ride their bikes hard. Maybe they should have purchased "beach cruisers" with spring seats! Ride your bike hard, and then judge the rear suspension! Anyway, I am happy at this point with the rear spring on my 700DS. Stay tuned!


    Steven

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.