Black or Silver Thomson to go w/ my Fly Ti?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Black or Silver Thomson to go w/ my Fly Ti?

    The stock seatpost that came w/ the Fly Ti SUCKS (have to torque the heck out of the bolts to get seat to not turn into an unwanted probe) so I'm going to replace it w/ a Thomson Masterpiece at some point in the near future.

    My question is: What color? Black or Silver? Does anyone have any pics of the Fly Ti w/ the silver Thomson Elite or Masterpiece seatpost?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    My other bike has a Masterpiece and my Fly ti is arriving today. I can probably get you a pic in a week if it's the same diameter.

  3. #3
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    is it a silver masterpiece? I think I know what black will look like well enough.

    Thanks!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by cconely
    The stock seatpost that came w/ the Fly Ti SUCKS (have to torque the heck out of the bolts to get seat to not turn into an unwanted probe) so I'm going to replace it w/ a Thomson Masterpiece at some point in the near future.
    Hey, saying Ritchey WCS sucks is fightin' words!

    In switching out my seatpost to carbon fiber (to further dampen ride shock and ripple), I found it was necessary to rotate the seat post collar 180-degrees to the seat tube notch in order to torque it accurately and effectively. I think the notch might be cut a little too wide.

    So if rotating the collar doesn't work for you, or you're still set on getting a different seatpost, as for silver vs. black, I'd go for whatever is on sale, with a preference to black. Unless you're doing something *very* wrong, you're not going to be looking at the seatpost while you're riding, and you'll probably learn to live with whatever you end up getting anyway.

  5. #5
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    Silver for sure. Not only will it match the frame better but Thomson posts are lifetime investments and the black anodizing can become worn over time from use. The surface of the silver will get worn too but not be as worn. I would also switch to a silver Thomson stem too if I had the money to upgrade the cockpit all at once.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim FtCO
    Hey, saying Ritchey WCS sucks is fightin' words!

    In switching out my seatpost to carbon fiber (to further dampen ride shock and ripple), I found it was necessary to rotate the seat post collar 180-degrees to the seat tube notch in order to torque it accurately and effectively. I think the notch might be cut a little too wide.

    So if rotating the collar doesn't work for you, or you're still set on getting a different seatpost, as for silver vs. black, I'd go for whatever is on sale, with a preference to black. Unless you're doing something *very* wrong, you're not going to be looking at the seatpost while you're riding, and you'll probably learn to live with whatever you end up getting anyway.
    the post doesn't slip in the frame, but he seat won't stay put w/o really cranking on the seat clamp bolts.

    I hear you on getting whatever is good and on sale, but this is going to be my 'buy exactly what you want' bike as opposed to my 'buy what's on sale' bike. I know black will look okay, but I'd really like to see some pics of one w/ one of thomson's silver posts. Or one of the Deda Zero 100 polished metal posts.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by cconely
    the post doesn't slip in the frame, but he seat won't stay put w/o really cranking on the seat clamp bolts.
    Sorry, I see the word "seat" and I think "seatpost," as I use the term "saddle" to refer to that which you are calling "seat."

    So you are referring to the saddle rail bolts. Make sure you are starting the bolts with an equal amount of thread, since if you start one bolt already threaded much higher than the other, you could bottom out that bolt before you get adequate torque, which may not be compensated by tightening the hell out of the other. Also, tighten each bolt in alternation, e.g., tightening one bolt say an eighth to a quarter turn, then switch to the other, tightening it an eighth to a quarter turn, and then back to the other, etc. When done correctly, both bolts should be threaded about the same distance.

    And you are using a torque wrench, yes? If I recall correctly, the saddle rail bolts on Ritchey WCS are clearly marked with a 5nm spec (mind you, that is the LIMIT). Hopefully you haven't stripped the bolt threads from possibly over-tightening them , in which case you might want to try some Loc-Tite (Blue strength) to help take up some slack. While torque wrenches are, generally, expensive, some more than others (check www.pricepoint.com for a couple of models sold under their Sette house brand), that expense is much more worthwhile to spend on tool that will save you from having to replace parts and components damaged from improper torquing. And, when you consider "parts and components" refer to your own body as well as your bike, the cost becomes even more of a worthwhile investment. I've read comments about people poo-poo'ing using torque wrenches because they "know it by feel" and what not, but for even and especially bike shop wrenches who adopt this attitude, it's not only unprofessional, but it's also dangerous and irresponsible.
    Last edited by Jim FtCO; 09-01-2009 at 01:57 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim FtCO
    Sorry, I see the word "seat" and I think "seatpost," as I use the term "saddle" to refer to that which you are calling "seat."

    So you are referring to the saddle rail bolts. Make sure you are starting the bolts with an equal amount of thread, since if you start one bolt already threaded much higher than the other, you could bottom out that bolt before you get adequate torque, which may not be compensated by tightening the hell out of the other. Also, tighten each bolt in alternation, e.g., tightening one bolt say an eighth to a quarter turn, then switch to the other, tightening it an eighth to a quarter turn, and then back to the other, etc. When done correctly, both bolts should be threaded about the same distance.

    And you are using a torque wrench, yes? If I recall correctly, the saddle rail bolts on Ritchey WCS are clearly marked with a 5nm spec (mind you, that is the LIMIT). Hopefully you haven't stripped the bolt threads from possibly over-tightening them , in which case you might want to try some Loc-Tite (Blue strength) to help take up some slack. While torque wrenches are, generally, expensive, some more than others (check www.pricepoint.com for a couple of models sold under their Sette house brand), that expense is much more worthwhile to spend on tool that will save you from having to replace parts and components damaged from improper torquing. And, when you consider "parts and components" refer to your own body as well as your bike, the cost becomes even more of a worthwhile investment. I've read comments about people poo-poo'ing using torque wrenches because they "know it by feel" and what not, but for even and especially bike shop wrenches who adopt this attitude, it's not only unprofessional, but it's also dangerous and irresponsible.
    I've got a Craftsman torque wrench and the appropriate Park Tools drivers in my garage that I tend to use for most critical wrenching, but the last time the seat (saddle ) decided to stick it's nose up my butt I was on the trail, so my multi-tool was all I had. the blue loc-tite is a pretty good plan, though. have to picks some more up if I can't find any lying around.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by gdpolk
    Silver for sure. Not only will it match the frame better but Thomson posts are lifetime investments and the black anodizing can become worn over time from use. The surface of the silver will get worn too but not be as worn. I would also switch to a silver Thomson stem too if I had the money to upgrade the cockpit all at once.
    yeah, a silver stem would be pretty sweet, too.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by cconely
    yeah, a silver stem would be pretty sweet, too.
    I am going to put a silver Thomson stem on my steel hardtail and when I get a Fly Ti later this year move the Thomson to it and add a Thomson post. As of now this is my steel hardtail build...

    Its built with older XTR, Race Face Cranks, Marathon fork, ergonomic grips, Avid Ultimate levers and brakes with Nokon cables. I only have $620 into it and it rides like a $1300-$1500 bike.

    I am about to get some silver King hubs laced to Mavic 819 rims for my Fantom DS and when I get the Fly Ti I will probably just use them for that bike too until I have no other upgrades that I want to do to either my Fantom DS or my Fly.

  11. #11
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    I have black Masterpiece on Fly Ti, and together with a black seat collar (I got KCNC, smaller and lighter then stock) it looks very nice.

    Notice that straight Masterpiece has less setback then the stock post. Depending on your fit you may need to get a setback Masterpeice.

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