26er Vs. 29er Weight?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    26er Vs. 29er Weight?

    So I'm looking to purchase a bike and would like to do some racing with it. I'm 6'2"(ish) and I have a few questions.

    Between a 26er and 29er, How much of a difference is 7 lbs going to make?

    Will the benefits of a 29er outweigh it's weight?

    I was all gung-ho about the Fantom 29er Pro SL
    https://www.bikesdirect.com/products...om29pro_SL.htm

    but then I saw the Fly 9357
    https://www.bikesdirect.com/products...7_wht_2100.jpg

    I know the best bet would be to ride both, but give me your opinion on what would be a better trail bike with some light race duty (oh and I also have an 03 Cannondale Jekyll 600) Thanks.

  2. #2
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    The first thing you need to do is ride a 29er (if you haven't already). That should answer your question pretty quickly.

    Given your height, you may well enjoy the added smoothness and speed the bigger wheels provide.

    That said, 7 lbs. is a huge difference on the trail. Why else would guys spend hundreds or even thousands trying to lighten their bikes by even a pound? Try out some lightweight bikes locally and you'll see what I mean.

    I think the 29er Pro SL looks like an awesome deal for $1000. The other bike you compare it to is 50% more money though. Not really a fair comparison.

    For me, I first decided that I wanted a 29er after test riding some at LBS. It then came down to deciding between the 29er Pro SL ($1000) at about 28 lbs and the Fly Team Ti 29 ($1800) at under 24 lbs. I decided to go with the more expensive bike. Even though it cost $800 more, I realized it would cost me a lot more than that to lighten the Pro SL by 4 lbs. I couldn't be happier with my decision.

    If however, you don't wind up being sold on the 29er concept after some test rides, I would suggest you go with the lightest 26" bike you can afford. Just be sure to ride some decent quality 29ers before deciding. I test rode some 29er bikes at about $1000 at LBS that didn't feel great. It was once I test rode the Gary Fisher Superfly that I knew I had to have a lightweight 29er.

    Hope this helps a little.

  3. #3
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    I recently purchased my Ti 29er and I love it. She clears EVERYTHING. Its complete blast to ride especially when you put even wider tires like the Stout 2.3 that I have on mine shes a tank. The saddle and grips are garbage but you expect that from most. Im so glad I pu the extra money into it. It does look even better in person then on the site. As soon as I get my new saddle ill post picks.

  4. #4
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    Go to mbaction.com and check out the Breckenridge Firecracker 50. Both womens and mens 1st place were atop 29ers. Also read Richard B Cunningham's Happy Trials in the August 2009 issue.

  5. #5
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    Ouch and some more 29er love!

    In this month's Mountain Bike Action, Richard Cunningham devotes his "Happy Trails" section to the 29er movement.

    Some excerpts:

    "...the truth is impossible to ignore -- the 29-inch hardtail is superior to its smaller-wheeled cousin in all corners of the cross-country performance envelope. It rolls faster, climbs better, descends with measurable improvement in control, and the larger-wheel format nearly approaches the rough-terrain capabilities of a four-inch-travel, dual-suspension 26er. In short, if you prefer a hardtail, your first and only choice should is a 29er -- unless you ar simply too short to fit between two 29-inch wheels and maintain an ergonomic pedaling position on the bike."

    "All of the 29er's technical barriers have been flattened. Folks like Niner have ironed out weight, wheel-strength, tire design, geometry issues and proper gearing."

    "Add a few inches of rear suspension to the 29er equation and it will mock any 26-inch suspension bike with less than five inches of inches of travel. After that point, however, physical complications related to swinging a huge wheel int the seat tube bolck the 29er from further encroaching into the territory of the 26er."

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by PSpuza
    So I'm looking to purchase a bike and would like to do some racing with it. I'm 6'2"(ish) and I have a few questions.

    Between a 26er and 29er, How much of a difference is 7 lbs going to make?

    Will the benefits of a 29er outweigh it's weight?

    I was all gung-ho about the Fantom 29er Pro SL
    https://www.bikesdirect.com/products...om29pro_SL.htm

    but then I saw the Fly 9357
    https://www.bikesdirect.com/products...7_wht_2100.jpg

    I know the best bet would be to ride both, but give me your opinion on what would be a better trail bike with some light race duty (oh and I also have an 03 Cannondale Jekyll 600) Thanks.
    I got the Fantom Pro SL 29er and my first impression is FORGET 26" bikes.

    Of course I am not worried about racing and weight.

    Weight wise it "feels" lighter than my older Trek 4500 and shipping weight was 34 pounds in box, so figure 29-31 pounds for the bike. It's not a tank at all.

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