2009 Motobecane Fantom Team rear cassette?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    2009 Motobecane Fantom Team rear cassette?

    I am looking at buying one of these greatly due to price/value of specs. I am new riding and am wondering if I decide to change the cassette to a 11-34 will I also have to replace the rear derailleur?

  2. #2
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    You won't need to change the derailleur but you might need a new/longer chain.
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  3. #3

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    Longer Chain

    My Fly 29er TI came with a 12-27 rear cassette which I'm told is definitely a "road vs mtn" cassette and pretty useless here in Utah. I replaced it with an XT 12-34 cassette ($99 list price) which made a big improvement.

    The chain I left as-is--which being shorter:
    a. Makes it shift much faster
    b. Makes it impossible to use the two largest positions on the rear cassette when using the largest position on the front cassette--which you don't need anyway since the middle position covers these same ratios.

    The bike is amazing at any price..but a steal at $1799. In addition to the cassette change I had to replace the stock flat 22" aluminum handlebar (way too narrow) with a 27.5" Carbon for $120 which also made a big difference in shock absorbing when riding rocky trails.

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    I've kept my cassette (and everything else) stock. I've riden some pretty steep grades and cannot imagine needing any other ratios. Heck, lots of guys are riding single speed these days. I guess it depends what you are comfortable with.

    I agree that the handlebars are narrow. That was my first observation when riding it. I'm considering a switch, but haven't actually done so yet.

    My suggestion is to leave the cassette alone until you get a chance to try it out.

  5. #5
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    I too live in utah, I have a motobecane fly ti. I left the 11-27 cassette on and I haven't had any problems with it. I have climed puke hill easily with the cassette
    "If you brake, you don't win" - Mario Cipollini

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    Loud rear Brake

    My rear brakes produce this large vibrating noise--the whole rear frame shakes the sound is loud. I've taken out the brake pads twice, sanded them, and reinstalled---no luck. The noise keeps returning.

    Anyone else having louder-than-usual brake noises that won't go away with the Motobecane 29 Fly Ti bike?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainBiker9
    My rear brakes produce this large vibrating noise--the whole rear frame shakes the sound is loud. I've taken out the brake pads twice, sanded them, and reinstalled---no luck. The noise keeps returning.

    Anyone else having louder-than-usual brake noises that won't go away with the Motobecane 29 Fly Ti bike?
    There is a great article in a recent Mountain Bike Action which shows how to adjust the Avids. I did so on mine and it worked great. My front brake was squealy at first and I cured it. My rear started squealing after I got a flat and changed the tube. I need to realign them.

    It seems like they are very sensitive to alignment.

    I will try to scan the article tomorrow and post.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frontsight
    I am looking at buying one of these greatly due to price/value of specs. I am new riding and am wondering if I decide to change the cassette to a 11-34 will I also have to replace the rear derailleur?
    Chain length on my Fly Ti was quite generous. Would be enough for 32, not sure for 34. If it is a GS derailleur, granny to 12 will rub.

    You can either replace chain if it is short, be careful with cross-chaining, or replace the 44t ring with 40t.

    Better yet just ride with 12-27 - it is more then twice lower gear then singlespeeders use. More then enough.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the replies.

  10. #10
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    I'd also appreciate it if you scanned that article - I can't figure out how to get my avids adjusted properly either.

  11. #11
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    Guys...sorry about the wait.

    Here is the tech article:

    http://img27.imageshack.us/i/binder1.pdf/

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    mind emailing that article to me?
    please pm
    thanks

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainBiker9
    My rear brakes produce this large vibrating noise--the whole rear frame shakes the sound is loud. I've taken out the brake pads twice, sanded them, and reinstalled---no luck. The noise keeps returning.

    Anyone else having louder-than-usual brake noises that won't go away with the Motobecane 29 Fly Ti bike?
    I've had the same problem.

    and it's not your typical squeaking brake either. it is such a violent vibration it sends chills up and down your spine! I isolated it to the chain stay on the non-drive side. I tried everything within reason to solve it - but it seems to be an issue related to the harmonics from the sum of the parts.... I tried different types of brake pads, nylon washers to isolate the disk, nylon washers to isolate the caliper, truing the wheel and spoke tension, tightening the skewer, wrapping the stay in an old inner tube (this had limited success). The only time i got the thing to totally go silent was to fill the weep hole in the chain stay with water and then tape the hole to keep the water in..... went for a ride... silence. drained out the water... arrgghhh!!! i've even considered filling the stay with expandable urethane foam. But i can't seem to bring myself to that point.

    Mike from BD worked with me to try and solve it. He swapped brakes for me under warranty - but to no avail (same model of brake). Finally he sent me a rotor from hayes, at my request, and the noise and vibration was reduced (but not eliminated). The hayes rotor is a few mill thicker and it changed the dynamics enough to help a bit. Contact him to see what he can do for you. I sent him a PM on this forum and he responded quickly.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by trebor_strebor
    I've had the same problem.

    and it's not your typical squeaking brake either. it is such a violent vibration it sends chills up and down your spine! I isolated it to the chain stay on the non-drive side. I tried everything within reason to solve it - but it seems to be an issue related to the harmonics from the sum of the parts.... I tried different types of brake pads, nylon washers to isolate the disk, nylon washers to isolate the caliper, truing the wheel and spoke tension, tightening the skewer, wrapping the stay in an old inner tube (this had limited success). The only time i got the thing to totally go silent was to fill the weep hole in the chain stay with water and then tape the hole to keep the water in..... went for a ride... silence. drained out the water... arrgghhh!!! i've even considered filling the stay with expandable urethane foam. But i can't seem to bring myself to that point.
    You are not alone: http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=425196

    For some reason some Avid's are prone to turkey gobble noises. Plenty of threads in the brake forum. Plenty of advice. Does not seem dependent on the frame brand.

    People have not solved that.

    My ultimates are quite. I have replaced rear rotor with a G3 140mm though. But I have also got plenty of experience setting them up.
    Last edited by Broccoli; 07-20-2009 at 12:05 PM.

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    Rear Brake Noise Solved

    My bike shop replaced the pads with some special type of "no noise" pads for $20. They tried everything else before that---and I agree the noise was a blood-curdling vibration that terrified the moose and rattlesnakes.

    Sorry I don't know the brand of pads--but the bike shop is Jan's in Park City UT 435-649-4949

  16. #16
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    dudes- this ain't no defect in the brakes or rotors

    nor a defect in the frame

    the only source of the vibration - is the rotor and caliper relationship during braking
    if at the right frequency, it will excite the frame's or wheel's harmonics which amplify the vibration causing an even louder noise

    BUT the SOURCE remains the vibration coming from the rotor/caliper relationship under braking

    If you damp the vibration in the frame - you are merely ducking the issue

    I had some that were silent for a few days -

    then I bled and re-adjusted the caliper while it was on the bike instead of using the proper spacer

    It then howled just like you guys talk about

    turns out the caliper pistons were not moving in sync and not centered is what was causing the oscillating force on the rotor

    So if yer having this prob- it aint no defect

    Man up and properly adjust your rotor and caliper relationship!


    Ps - does not hurt to make sure all your other pieces are tightened up too

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by AltRox
    There is a great article in a recent Mountain Bike Action which shows how to adjust the Avids. I did so on mine and it worked great. My front brake was squealy at first and I cured it. My rear started squealing after I got a flat and changed the tube. I need to realign them.

    It seems like they are very sensitive to alignment.

    I will try to scan the article tomorrow and post.
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  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldassracer
    dudes- this ain't no defect in the brakes or rotors

    nor a defect in the frame

    the only source of the vibration - is the rotor and caliper relationship during braking
    if at the right frequency, it will excite the frame's or wheel's harmonics which amplify the vibration causing an even louder noise

    BUT the SOURCE remains the vibration coming from the rotor/caliper relationship under braking

    If you damp the vibration in the frame - you are merely ducking the issue

    I had some that were silent for a few days -

    then I bled and re-adjusted the caliper while it was on the bike instead of using the proper spacer

    It then howled just like you guys talk about

    turns out the caliper pistons were not moving in sync and not centered is what was causing the oscillating force on the rotor

    So if yer having this prob- it aint no defect

    Man up and properly adjust your rotor and caliper relationship!


    Ps - does not hurt to make sure all your other pieces are tightened up too
    That's what I discovered with my Windsor Cliff 29 Team's Juicy 7s. The rear brakes gobbled something fierce. I was shocked at how far out of alignment they were. Disappointing considering I would have hoped that Cycle Spectrum would have done a better job setting it up.

    The fronts squeak a bit. I think they rotors may be slightly warped.

    Bob

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by foglesre
    That's what I discovered with my Windsor Cliff 29 Team's Juicy 7s. The rear brakes gobbled something fierce. I was shocked at how far out of alignment they were. Disappointing considering I would have hoped that Cycle Spectrum would have done a better job setting it up.

    The fronts squeak a bit. I think they rotors may be slightly warped.

    Bob
    if you bought it from a shop and paid for it to be setup - take it back
    simple eh?
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldassracer
    if you bought it from a shop and paid for it to be setup - take it back
    simple eh?
    Even simpler is to setup your brakes after you get the bike. Takes about two minutes.

    Then you bed them in. Riding with misaligned pads makes its harder to properly bed them in after aligning. I found out that the key is to do it right the first time.

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