2 New Dawes Haymakers (1500 and 1000)- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    2 New Dawes Haymakers (1500 and 1000)

    Well, still waiting for our schedules and weather to coincide to take these bikes out on their first trail ride, but I'm tired of waiting for that and will post my initial impressions about these bikes. So here we go...


    2011 Dawes Haymaker 1500

    Bike arrived, but I didn't assemble it right away. Can you believe I actually waxed the frame before I finished assembling? I use Klasse acrylic for both my vehicles and any other thing that I'd like to add an easy-to-clean finish to. Made sense to me, at least until I got into it and found out how many darn cables and obstacles were in the way, even for a partially assembled bike. Oh well, it won't hurt anything, and I was very careful around the brake rotors and pads.

    The bike came with the rear wheel mounted, and really only needed the front wheel installed, handlebars mounted, and pedals installed. Took a little effort getting the front wheel centered beofre the wheel rotor would fit into the front brake caliper, but adjusting the QR skewer once or twice did the trick. Adjusting the fron brake to allow the wheel to turn smoothly took a little effort as well, but not too difficult.

    I probably took 1.5 hrs assembling the bike, adjusting front then rear brakes, and front and rear derailleurs and shifters - I wasn't in a hurry, and was more or less getting to know the modern mountain bike, and mine specifically. Turn a quick spin on it in the street, and found most shifts to be very smooth. Chain skipped a few times, so I adjusted the cable tension a hair and re-checked the gears. Achieved very good shifts in all gear combos with the bike upside down, and my ride around the block proved to be "good enough for me", at least until the cables stretch a bit and I need to re-adjust.

    I also bout my son a Haymaker 1000 after mine had arrived so that I would have a mountain biking companion. Seeing that his dept store B<X bike was 4 years old, mom let me bump the budget a bit for his bike this time. I'm sure there is no big difference in workmanship in terms of how these bikes were assembled, but his front wheel fit into the brakes very nicely on the first try. 30 seconds later I had his front brakes adjusted and tested. I noticed the rotor had a slight wobble to it, and I bent it back into near perfect shape with an adjustable wrench. That allowed me to tighten the pads further, requiring even less shifter movement before braking forces were applied. This bike was definitely going together quicker!

    And so it did. But alas, my luck ran out when it came time to adjust the shifting. Because of what I assume is attributed to the lesser derailer and shifter components on this bike compared to the 1500, I spent almost 3 hours monkeying with the shifting. All but may 20 minutes was spent working the front derailler. I had to bend the FD a couple of times to eliminate chain rub in all gears combos for the middle chainring. Maybe worthe the extra $100 in setup time alone to move to the 1500! But when I was done, I was pretty happy that the shifting was as good as this bike can get, and really quite good in all "normal" gears (all middle chainring gears, plus 3 straightline gears for each of the other two chainrings). I did have to adjust the idler pulley tension quite a bit to eliminate it from contacting the largest two sprockets when those gears were selected.

    On both bikes, I checked the wheel trueness, and while not perfect, I decided there wasn't much to be gained at this point in time. I will likely check the tension for uniformity on both bikes before long, probably over the long weekend.

    The 1500 is a 19" frame, and all assembled with stock pedals and no reflectors weighed I'll call it 32.3 lbs. I weighed it 4 times to the nearest pound with me on it, 2 readings of 32 lbs, 2 of 33 lbs. The Haymaker 1000 is a 15" frame, and I weighed it twice, both reading 31lbs.

    So far, I'm quite happy with the bikes, but look forward to really getting them tested soon. For anyone considering the Haymaker, as long as you are comfortable doing your own maintenance and adjustments, you really can't beat the bang for the buck with these bikes.

    A final selling point for me was the fact that Dawes includes shipping BOTH WAYS on any warranty work you need to go that route. I saved the two boxes that the bikes shipped in just in case, but am hoping to never need them.

    Here are a few pics. The orange bikes is the 19" 1500, and the yellow one is the 15" 1000. Note the 1500 had been ridden once on a very muddy dirt road the day before. The bike was cleaned up, but of course the tire treads have lost that brand new appearance.











  2. #2
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    I don't know why I like the orange color on your D 1500.. Something about that color just leaves a good impression on me.

    My son is only 3 years old... I can't wait to ride some trails with him.

    Have fun & ride safe!

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    Thanks on the comp on the color. My wife and kids liked the orange for "younger people", but thought i should get the grey. So I picked the orange, and I do like it. Kind of makes it tough to hide it in the woods if I want to plan a kayak-bike excursion though!

  4. #4
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    Hey, I'm looking into buying the 1500 as well. It seems like the best deal under $500. But, I can't get a straight answer on the stand over heights.

    The 19" 1500 states a height of 30" on the sale page but also specs 28.5" in the detailed geometry page.

    http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/..._geo_chart.htm

    I was wondering if by chance you could measure or approximate the stand-over height of your 19" 1500. I am around 5'8 to 5'9 and have an inseam of 31" I am debating between the the 17" and the 19". If the stand-over height of the 19" frame is actually 28.5", I'll go with that one. The effective TT length appears to be about the same for both according to the geometry chart, I'm not sure if that is correct either.

    Thank you for sharing.

  5. #5
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    I just measured my 19" at the point on the top tube where the cables become encased, and it is about 28.5". I have my tires pumped up close to max pressure since I've only had it out and about the neighborhood. The top tube has a pretty good angle to it as you can see.

    My old Raleigh was almost 31" SO, so I was comfortable going with the 19" at 5'10", 32" inseam pants. I think this frame runs a tad smaller than "normal" for its size.

    Good luck!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssabin View Post
    I just measured my 19" at the point on the top tube where the cables become encased, and it is about 28.5". I have my tires pumped up close to max pressure since I've only had it out and about the neighborhood. The top tube has a pretty good angle to it as you can see.

    My old Raleigh was almost 31" SO, so I was comfortable going with the 19" at 5'10", 32" inseam pants. I think this frame runs a tad smaller than "normal" for its size.

    Good luck!
    Thank you for taking the time to measure, I greatly appreciate it!
    Last edited by cyberey66; 05-28-2011 at 05:58 AM.

  7. #7
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    First Real Ride

    Well, my son and I made it out on first real ride today on these bikes. Biggest mistake - leaving at noon with only a banana for breakfast and no food in the pack! Rode 10.5 miles to the trailhead at Island Lake, rode both loops (15+ miles), and headed back home. Took a shortcut on the way home to save some time and distance, logged 32 miles on the day.

    The bikes worked well. I noticed on the mtb trails my seat wasn't super tight and was falling down a bit and had to fix that. quite a lot of mud on the trail, although not too bad considering the weather lately. My son rode his through about 100 yards of chainstay-high water at the end of the first loop, so we'll see how his bottom bracket holds up.

    Didn't get a chance to fully clean up the bikes when we got home due to the tornado warnings, so we'll have to catch that tomorrow - got the worst off mine though.

    This was my first ride with a front supsension, and although it was much better than my old shockless fork, I'm wondering if I should swap the coil in the Dart 2 for the heavier one - I'm almost 200 lbs exactly, although if I keep this up, that's bound to come down!

    So far, very happy with the bikes! In my case, the bike is in much better shape than the rider!

  8. #8
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    The orange reminds me of the Charger orange of the muscle-car era.
    Maybe a football jersey "01" on the side? LOL I like the color also.
    Those are 'sealed' bearings right?

  9. #9
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    Yes, sealed cartridge for BB. I told him not to do it, but he saw a guy do it right before us, and how do you tell a 12-year old no on his first real mountain bike ride?

  10. #10
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    do the disc brakes work well on the 1000?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssabin View Post
    And so it did. But alas, my luck ran out when it came time to adjust the shifting. Because of what I assume is attributed to the lesser derailer and shifter components on this bike compared to the 1500, I spent almost 3 hours monkeying with the shifting. All but may 20 minutes was spent working the front derailler. I had to bend the FD a couple of times to eliminate chain rub in all gears combos for the middle chainring. Maybe worthe the extra $100 in setup time alone to move to the 1500! But when I was done, I was pretty happy that the shifting was as good as this bike can get, and really quite good in all "normal" gears (all middle chainring gears, plus 3 straightline gears for each of the other two chainrings). I did have to adjust the idler pulley tension quite a bit to eliminate it from contacting the largest two sprockets when those gears were selected.
    You had to do it to me. I have been debating on which Haymaker to get my 12 year old. Each step up is definently "worth it" in better components. The fork upgrade alone covers the price differences I think. But I am trying not to get carried away on a bike for a 12 year old and convince myself the 1000 will do fine. IMHO the 1200 looks far and away the best. The black and gold is awesome. But still, trying to convince myself the 1000 is good enough. Then you have to go and tell me the extra set up hassles you had with the 1000. Now I really want to go with the 1500
    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    Screw the search function... you're new, ask the question(s). If anyone gets thier undies in a bunch it's thier problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash Test Dumby View Post
    You had to do it to me. I have been debating on which Haymaker to get my 12 year old. Each step up is definently "worth it" in better components. The fork upgrade alone covers the price differences I think. But I am trying not to get carried away on a bike for a 12 year old and convince myself the 1000 will do fine. IMHO the 1200 looks far and away the best. The black and gold is awesome. But still, trying to convince myself the 1000 is good enough. Then you have to go and tell me the extra set up hassles you had with the 1000. Now I really want to go with the 1500
    IMO. My advice is spend the extra money...the fork on the 1000 is not too good. A rigid front end would be better than what comes on it. Just my 2 cents.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmas View Post
    IMO. My advice is spend the extra money...the fork on the 1000 is not too good. A rigid front end would be better than what comes on it. Just my 2 cents.
    If the bike were for me it would be a no brainer. Everything I have heard sais the Suntour on the 1200 is horrible, haven't found too mujch about the RST on the 1000, but I have to assume its worse. The Dart 2 on the 1500 isn't exactly a standout, but at least its a reliable pogo stick, unlike the Suntour which has horrible seels that require constant replacement. But I am looking at this for my 12 year old, he only weighs 95 pounds currently, and I am struggling to scrape up the money. Momma wont let him dip into his savings to pay the upgrade, so we are kinda stuck. Probably going to have to be the 1000 or a 2010 Gravity Base Camp 2.0 off Ebay. The Gravity has the same RST fork, but better components overall, so it will probably win out unless we come up with the extra $120 for the 1500.
    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    Screw the search function... you're new, ask the question(s). If anyone gets thier undies in a bunch it's thier problem.

  14. #14
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    Well, got to go out for a ride with my son on Father's Day, and the Haymaker 1000 seems to be holdong its tune just fine. Really, I spent a lot of effort getting the front derailleur adjusted to be quiet in as many gear combinations as possible. I probably could have saved myself a bit of time and just made sure the 2nd ring up front was quiet with all rear gear settings, but I did get it better than that.

    I watched my son on his 1000 descend a VERY steep (but maybe only 20 feet long) descent, and his brakes were locked and he was doing a controlled slide until he got comfortable enough to gain some speed. The brakes seem to be more than adequate for a 100 lb. kid.

    In my case, I am hoping that we can take care of this bike and give it to a younger sibling in a few years. But it's only another $100 for the upgrade to the 1500, and I am very happy with how that is riding - hasn't missed a shift yet! But I don't think my 12 year old would appreciate the better components at this point, and yes, even his Cappa shocks are doing well at damping the bumps. If your kid has only ridden dept store bikes to this point, the 1000 will likely be "enough" of a bike for him/her to get into the sport and will likely outlast him/her fitting it!

    Good luck on your purchase decision!

  15. #15
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    Oh yea, I have to question the premise that the 2010 Gravity has better components than the Haymaker 1000. Looks like pretty equivalent to me, and one could even argue that the 1000 has a better FD, and better tires. Now given that the Gravity is $30 less than the Haymaker 1000 (shipped), it's probably an arguably better value, but I wouldn't say the components are better.

  16. #16
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    Ssabin, I would have to agree, the specs between the Haymaker 1000 and Gravity are too close to really say ones better, but the Gravity is cheaper and my son likes the white color. I kind of wish I had jumped on the 2010 Haymaker 1200 when it was available since its Dart 1 at least isn't known for horrific seals like the Suntour on this years 1200. Really want to just step up to the 1500 though.
    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    Screw the search function... you're new, ask the question(s). If anyone gets thier undies in a bunch it's thier problem.

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    I see you have a 9-year old too. I would think if the color were liked by both kids, either bike should last through 2 children. Tough decision! Good luck!

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    I see you have a 9-year old too. I would think if the color were liked by both kids, either bike should last through 2 children. Tough decision! Good luck!

  19. #19
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    Ssabin, I noticed that on the Haymaker specs they say the 13" frame is for people 4'9" to 5'3" and has a standover of 26.5". Butttt, the Specific Geometry chart (listed in mm) converts out at a standover of 23.5". I assume the 26.5 is correct, it would be inline with other 13" frames. If you don't mind could you take a rough measurement so I can be more confident what I am getting.
    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    Screw the search function... you're new, ask the question(s). If anyone gets thier undies in a bunch it's thier problem.

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    My son is 5'1" and I bought him the 15" model and think it fits him great. His seat is raised up quite a bit to keep his knees from being bent too far.

    I think the main web page lists the standover height as the height of the top bar some standard distance in front of the seat, whereas the specific geometry charts measure the standover height vertically from the middle of the bottom bracket. Still,I measured his standover vertically through the bottom bracket and it seemed to be about 26.5", which is more than the spec geom chart. It's tough to get that accurate without a lot of work as the top tube is at a fairly good angle with the smaller frames, and I'm just holding the bike up with one hand and measuring with another. But I think I measured to within 0.5", and might have over-measured just a touch.

    If your son is 5'1" or taller, it's most likely a 15" that would fit best. I would hate to see my son's leg angles with a 13" frame - seat would have to be at the top.

  21. #21
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    Sorry, I thought I had read that your frame was 13". My son is still well under 5', technically he still should be on a 24" wheeled bike. But he is close enough that no way in heck am I buying a 24"er. Its almost tempting to go with a 15" frame because the actual differences are pretty small and it would last slightly longer before he outgrows it. But then his little brother is very small and I would definently have to buy him something between his 20" wheeled Raptor and a 15" framed bike when he is ready to move up. Unfortunately it is impossible to know exactly how fast the two boys will grow, so its pretty hard to accurately judge their upgrades.
    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    Screw the search function... you're new, ask the question(s). If anyone gets thier undies in a bunch it's thier problem.

  22. #22
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    Ok, so I think the wife is gonna kill me, but after mentioning the small actual difference between 13" and 15" frames I went back to Ebay and took another look at what's available in a 15" frame. And I found the 2010 Windsor Cliff 4900 for $370 including shipping (only 2 left), the same price as a 2011 Haymaker 1200. And the specs equal or better the 1500 across the board. Both have Dart 2 forks. Cliff has deore/deore xt derailleurs, Haymaker has deore/deore slx. Cliff has Deore 9 speed shifters, Haymaker has Alivio 8 speed. So unless the 2 Cliffs sell in the next 2 hours one is coming to my home.

    Of course, since the shifters and derailleurs are better than on my DB Overdrive some part swapping just might be in order, can't be putting the 12 year old on better equipment than me now. He just might whip me on the trail.
    Quote Originally Posted by STT GUY View Post
    Screw the search function... you're new, ask the question(s). If anyone gets thier undies in a bunch it's thier problem.

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