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  1. #1
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    rebuild Schwinn MOAB or new beginner?

    I'm currently riding my Dad's old Schwinn MOAB. IIRC its a 1999 MOAB, not sure of the version. My dad rode it for several years, and a few years ago my brother inherited it.

    It barely hangs in there thanks to the fact that it was a pretty decent bike, back in the day, but it definitely needs some help. I'm comparing it to a few friends' bikes, one being an entry-level Scott, the other a mid-level GT.

    I'm trying to decide it is worth putting a little bit of money into upgrades to help this bike keep up with newer bikes, or if I should just tough it out and save that money towards a new bike. My issues with the MOAB are: the front fork is worn out. It still have some travel, but it is very stiff. The old rim brakes dont work very well, I have to REALLY pull on the back brakes to even begin to slow the bike down.
    If I can put a newer fork on it (I don't know what, if any, are compatible) and a good set of brake pads, I think I could really get some more miles on this bike.

    And finally, I'm looking to see what beginner bike I should start saving toward. I'm leaning towards a GT Karakoram. Is a new beginner bike going to give me any advantage over an old mid-level bike? (I feel like the answer is yes, given the feel of both the Scott and other GT that I've been on with even not-so-great SR forks.)

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by armyjeffries View Post
    I'm currently riding my Dad's old Schwinn MOAB. IIRC its a 1999 MOAB, not sure of the version. My dad rode it for several years, and a few years ago my brother inherited it.

    ...

    I'm trying to decide it is worth putting a little bit of money into upgrades to help this bike keep up with newer bikes, or if I should just tough it out and save that money towards a new bike. My issues with the MOAB are: the front fork is worn out. It still have some travel, but it is very stiff. The old rim brakes dont work very well, I have to REALLY pull on the back brakes to even begin to slow the bike down.
    If I can put a newer fork on it (I don't know what, if any, are compatible) and a good set of brake pads, I think I could really get some more miles on this bike.
    Unless you do a lot of trail riding and want another SF,
    you could get a steel rigid fork from Bike Nashbar for @ $50. I got one for my '96 Moab (the cheapie stock RST 171B suspension fork had worn out). It's a nice fork because it can fit a 26" or 700c wheel in it.
    Plus, the brake bosses are still 'lower' on it, @ the 26" level, so if you wanted to mount 700c wheels later, you could just mount long V-brakes
    (Promax P-1's for 650b or Starry brand 110mm, etc), and adjust the pads to whichever wheelsize you'd use (26", 700c, 650b).

    Thing is, it has a threadless 1 1/8" steer tube, so unless the 1999 Moab is threadless, you'd need a new stem and handlebar...

    I just got one for my bike (I mainly ride on pavement),
    just painted it to match the bike
    (it comes w/ matte/flat black primer-type finish).

    For brake pads get some Kool Stops.
    Somehow the salmon ones are supposed to be the best:
    not sure why or if just anecdotal...

    If you ever decide to get new brakes (such as V-brakes, linear-pull)
    for it, you can get long-arm, wide-adjust brakes on ebA for $30-$50. These are evidently popular in Taiwan, as most all the sellers I've found are listed as Taiwan.

    I recently bought a set of Promax P-1's for $46
    (UPDATE: the P-1's are too short for the 'Moab-29' project, but
    would probably work fine for a conversion to 650b rims)

    then found a longer set (Taiwan seller on 'ebA')
    with wider range for $35 (ttl, free ship): 45mm of pad adjust, 125mm arms
    (UPDATE: these are what's needed for the Moab 26"-to-29 conversion,
    paired with a Nashbar rigid fork).

    Then you could pair them with
    Avid levers (Speed Dial or FR-5), will cost:
    @ $15 for a pair of FR-5's or
    @ $25-35 for a pair of Speed Dial levers.

    I will post on how the Promax P-1's work out
    (UPDATE: too short for the 29 project, but should work fine for 650b rims),
    as I am going to try 700c wheels in my Moab's frame (with 40-45mm width tires).

    In summary, getting a new fork and pads should be doable...
    don't what what the best deal on suspension forks are though.
    Last edited by 2wTrekr; 11-25-2015 at 08:43 AM.

  3. #3
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    I'm kinda thinking about these two.

    https://www.performancebike.com/imag...-GYB-ANGLE.JPG

    https://static.jensonusa.com/images/...4/G00017T6.jpg

    Or for $50 more. This GT Karakoram.

    DB is a 27.5
    GT is a 29er

    I want a 27.5, but the gt is I think a lot nicer bike for the money

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by armyjeffries View Post
    I'm kinda thinking about these two.

    https://www.performancebike.com/imag...-GYB-ANGLE.JPG

    https://static.jensonusa.com/images/...4/G00017T6.jpg

    Or for $50 more. This GT Karakoram.

    DB is a 27.5
    GT is a 29er

    I want a 27.5, but the gt is I think a lot nicer bike for the money
    At first glance of the two, I liked the DB, but

    I like the straight-line aesthetics on the GT where the top-tube meets the headtube,
    although the design on the DB may be a stronger design...

    After comparing& contrast of the two, I think I'd go with the 29er...you could always run 27.5 wheels in it if you wanted...
    on the other bike, some 29/+ wheels might not fit in the 27.5 frame...

    I think the GT (29er) not only looks good, but would offer the most versatility
    wheel-wise (wheel-diameter compatibility).

    P.S. Speaking of Schwinn Moab, I should be posting a thread soon,
    regarding a 26-to-29 conversion I'm doing with my '96 Schwinn Moab 3...
    it will include pics and parts list (essential parts and optional upgrades).

    Basically, the result of the project will be a bike that can run wheels ranging from 26, 650b, 700c/29," with a simple pad adjust on wide-travel linear-pull (V) brakes.

  5. #5
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    Interested in this. I've been looking, figuring with black friday upon us, is find a deal on a new one. Still looking at the normal diamondback overdrive or apex. But if this can be done within a price range that's reasonable, I'd love to breath some new life into this bike!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by armyjeffries View Post
    Interested in this. I've been looking, figuring with black friday upon us, is find a deal on a new one. Still looking at the normal diamondback overdrive or apex. But if this can be done within a price range that's reasonable, I'd love to breath some new life into this bike!
    You'll need a set of V-brakes (aka 'linear-pull' brakes), long-arm, and wide-adjust.
    The only set I've found (reasonably priced), was from a Taiwan-seller on 'eBA,'

    for 36.50 USD (included shipping):
    125mm arms
    *** 4.2cm (42mm) pad adjust (most important,
    to reach larger diameter rims from the 26" bosses)

    $36.50 + free shipping

    'eBA' item# 151418794250
    You can also do a search for >>> New Taiwan made Patent Alloy V-Brake

    Looks like there's 6 colors too.

    --------------


    Might be able to swap on your existing SS fork,
    but I swapped to a Nashbar rigid mtb fork (50 USD) ---


    search >>> Nashbar Rigid 26-in. Mountain Bike Fork

    optional: FSA #15 heavy duty "DH Pro" headset (@ 30-40 USD on 'eBA')


    --------------

    You'll want to have good levers for the V-brakes. Good choices are:

    * Avid FR-5 (15-20 USD on 'eBA'), or
    * Avid Speed Dial (30-35 USD on 'eBA')

    Good deals on cables are just about anywhere, so don't pay too much!

    -------------

    Once you have your bike hooked up with the above,
    you should be able to run:

    * 700c wheels, maybe up to 40mm.
    It's a *close* fit unless you run skinny/road tires.

    * 650b wheels
    You should be able to run a 47(or wider)-622 tire with this diameter,
    in the Moab frame

    -------------

    I'll leave the wheel shopping to you.
    Should be good deals out there on halfway-decent
    'rim-brake-only' wheelsets.
    I opted for Sun Rhyno Lites 36H. Here's a couple other examples:

    eb# 281861237676 (quando hubs)
    eb# 331681016661 (1 left as of this post)


    Going to throw one last coat of paint on my Moab fork-swap.
    I'll post pics once it's all together...

  7. #7
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    so what did the OP do?

    I would have gone with the rigid nashbar fork and some of the koolstop brake pads mentioned above. bikepedia says that the moab uses a 1 1/8" threadless headset, so nothing additional to buy there. I'd also get a new front tire that's wider to help make up for the loss of a suspension fork.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  8. #8
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    OP got a new bike for Christmas. Scott Scale 770. Black/yellow. Love it! Still have the schwinn sitting around. May help my brother build it up.






  9. #9
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    Good bike. Is the XCR fork a coil or air spring? Still using the stock pedals? If you don't plan on going clipless and have grip/traction issues with feet sliding off, a good set of bike shoes makes a world of difference. It also looks like the brakes/shifters are pointing down a lot more than I'd expect. Everybody likes a different cockpit setup though.

    I'd still set the Schwinn up with a rigid fork. You can sometimes get that nashbar one at $40 when they have a sale. There are times that a rigid 26" is just fun, especially with jumps. If you don't want to spend the money on brakes, I've somewhat had luck using a rasp type file to remove a couple millimeters of the old brake pad surface. It exposes new brake material that hasn't been dried out from sun/time/weather. And a little steel wool on the wheel's rim to remove old dried on junk. Not guaranteed to help, but it's free and can't hurt those pads. Ultimately, best to replace the pads though.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  10. #10
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    Pics, conversion of Schwinn Moab 3 (1995-96 model)

    Basically what was done
    was a few component modifications,
    in the 'main categories' of brakes and steering,
    result of which allows the bike to run wheelsets up to 700c (and with @ 40-42mm wide tires).

    The stock cantilever brakes were replaced
    with extra long V-brakes
    (125mm arms, 44mm of travel/adjust).
    These brakes were obtained from a Taiwan seller on 'eBA,' for 36.50 for the set, to cover both wheels. Price included free shipping; took @ 2-3 weeks to arrive.

    Along with the new extra-long V-brakes, I also replaced the stock brake levers, with Avid FR-5 levers, and added new Jagwire brake cables.

    The stock front RST 171b suspension fork (threaded type) was replaced with a Kona Project Two fork, non-disc option, with rim-brake bosses. The axle-to-crown distance of this fork is 410mm.

    Because this fork is threadless, I also had to replace the stem to a threadless type. I then opted to also replace the handlebars, based on a thicker more commonly available 31.x size. I might have been able to get away with keeping the stock/threaded headset (steer-tube width is a standard 1 1/8" ), with the right 'top-riggings, spacers etc, but I chose to go ahead and replace the headset too, replacing the stock with an FSA DH Pro No. 15. It's a burly headset which can be obtained for @ 30 to 40 bucks U.S.

    The wheels are Sun Rhyno Lite (622-27), with CST E-Series Reach tires, which are a slick road tire with a wicked etched-and-cut tread detail. Rated for E-bikes, these are tough slicks, ragin' rip-roarin' cafe-bike style for your pedaled commuter. These tires are 700c x 40 (622-42), but also available
    in a 26" size, of similar width.

    Okay, on to the pics:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails rebuild Schwinn MOAB or new beginner?-img_20160304_022820.jpg  

    rebuild Schwinn MOAB or new beginner?-img_20160304_023834.jpg  

    rebuild Schwinn MOAB or new beginner?-img_20160304_024037.jpg  

    rebuild Schwinn MOAB or new beginner?-img_20160304_024105.jpg  

    rebuild Schwinn MOAB or new beginner?-img_20160304_023414.jpg  

    rebuild Schwinn MOAB or new beginner?-img_20160304_024333.jpg  

    rebuild Schwinn MOAB or new beginner?-img_20160304_024541.jpg  


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