Special People (a big thank you).- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Special People (a big thank you).

    The main loop and expert section at Blue Mound State Park are now completed and I thank all who have helped for the years that it took to get this far.

    A very special thank you goes to Randall Zander, his mom, aunts, friends and his Dodgeville scout troupe 357! Randall is an Eagle Scout candidate who wanted his civic project to be special and lasting. He chose to work at Blue Mound State Park and help us (Capital Off-Road Pathfinders) finish the main loop at Blue Mound State Park.

    After 2 days of hard work we finished the main loop and expert section which is a great thing for area riders and hikers and for those who have worked hard for years to make this happen.

    The efforts of Randall's family and friends made reaching reaching the camp ground more special than we ever imagined. Extra hugs and kisses go to Randall's mom who after a hard first day of work got up extra early to start day 2 by baking cookies and muffins for all and a birthday cake for Walter! Special thanks also goes to the Zanders' friend Cindy who with family, 60 cows to milk and a full-time job took time to help. With just a little bit of instruction Cindy and Randall became expert trail cutters.

    The help we've received from groups such as scouts and REI has been much appreciated and very heart warming, and especially so if one factors in the generally poor participation from the many bikers and a few bike businesses who benefit from the resource.

    Blue Mound is now THE best trail system in S. WI, and we're only a little more than 1/2 way done with the master plan. Please consider helping finish it and you'll have the one off the best trail systems in the Midwest period. Join the WORBA, and the Club MTB Capital Off-Road Pathfinders email list (http://www.clubmtb.com) for announcements.

    Thanks again.

    Photo = Randal, his mother Julie, and his spcial aunts and friend.
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  2. #2
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    Thanks.

    Thank you to all the trail builders. Last time I rode Blue Mound was 2 years ago. Sounds like it's definitely worth another trip now. How nasty is the "expert" section?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by wi1trackrider
    Thank you to all the trail builders. Last time I rode Blue Mound was 2 years ago. Sounds like it's definitely worth another trip now. How nasty is the "expert" section?
    Not 5-10 foot drop nasty, but the place is what's left of a mountain that the glaciers couldn't shave off and packed with rocks and trees and gullies. Nothing that one can't walk around. The first loop is not difficult. If you can ride the harder sections you won't be schooled if you travel to other parts of the country. Just not a simple ride with no challenges like the Kettle Moraine trails if you ride in S. WI.

    Anybody and any bike can ride it, but I find it the most fun with my trail bike and single speed bikes that have large tires and Bomber forks opposed to my racer type bike. Plenty of folks ride racer type bikes but I can't believe they successfully smack into large sharp rocks, and there are places where I did endo after endo with my racer bike that are almost a simple bump with my trail bike.

    Also know that the project is only around 50% of the master plan so all you need to do to make it what you like is join the volunteers, and all you need to do to get it done faster is volunteer and encourage others to do so.

  4. #4
    Witty McWitterson
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    This is looking good. I'm moving to Viroqua here in August, and seeing Blue Mound is promising indeed. Thanks for the work. I hope I can help out once i move in. I'm sure I won't be turned down!
    Just a regular guy.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bitflogger
    Not 5-10 foot drop nasty, but the place is what's left of a mountain that the glaciers couldn't shave off and packed with rocks and trees and gullies. Nothing that one can't walk around. The first loop is not difficult. If you can ride the harder sections you won't be schooled if you travel to other parts of the country. Just not a simple ride with no challenges like the Kettle Moraine trails if you ride in S. WI.

    Anybody and any bike can ride it, but I find it the most fun with my trail bike and single speed bikes that have large tires and Bomber forks opposed to my racer type bike. Plenty of folks ride racer type bikes but I can't believe they successfully smack into large sharp rocks, and there are places where I did endo after endo with my racer bike that are almost a simple bump with my trail bike.

    Also know that the project is only around 50% of the master plan so all you need to do to make it what you like is join the volunteers, and all you need to do to get it done faster is volunteer and encourage others to do so.
    I was under the impression that Blue Mound, much like Kettle Moraine was a glacial deposite, not the remnants of a mountain as you have described. I've also been told that the soil compositions were fairly similar? If this is the case what is being done to prevent the erosion problems that they have at Kettle Moraine?

    I have a similar situation in Northern IL where I would like to build trail, but the Land Manager insists that because the area is a glacial deposite the soil is too fragile for sustainable trail. Any info you could pass on would be appreaciated.
    bus driver wanna be

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by gofast
    I was under the impression that Blue Mound, much like Kettle Moraine was a glacial deposite, not the remnants of a mountain as you have described. I've also been told that the soil compositions were fairly similar? If this is the case what is being done to prevent the erosion problems that they have at Kettle Moraine?

    I have a similar situation in Northern IL where I would like to build trail, but the Land Manager insists that because the area is a glacial deposite the soil is too fragile for sustainable trail. Any info you could pass on would be appreaciated.
    It's made of chert and dirt. Seeps and rain make for muddy spots, but it packs hard once we're in a normal summer. The place is not at all like S. Kettle Moraine trails or riding. No baby skulls, not sandy, and not roller coaster trails on the fall line. The trails are of a sustainable design and construction style that comes from IMBA guidelines and trail building course. The trails done by our club were fine when hard rains wrecked others in the park. Check it out and have the land manager you mention do the same.

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