Good WI bike shops? (Kewaskum)- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    487

    Good WI bike shops? (Kewaskum)

    All of the LBS I've been to around the westbend/kewaskum area are crappy wheel-and-sprocket type stores where no one really knows what a bike is, let-alone cares to do anything but business with you. Does anyone know of any shops around my area that are worth going to?

    My friend couldn't even pick up a standard rim at either of the shops in WB. They told him it was kind of a "special order" item.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    77
    Leran to fix bicycles by yourself. Yes I know thay this sounds as a flip, easy to say comment but other than the most extreme repairs, self sufficiency is a good tool to possess.

    I got into fixing my own bikes pretty much the same way you are asking for a different shop. Back in 1979 I took my Motobecane road bike to a local shop to have a problem with a skipping cog to be fixed. When I got the bike back the cog still skipped. So I diagnosed the problem myself (there was a link in the chain that was tight). I went back to the same shop, bought a chain tool, and fixed the problem myself.

    I will grant you that there is a lot more of "space shuttle" technology in bicycles today, but if you start with the basics and know about the point of no return (will what I am about to do irreversably screw up my bike) I think you will be OK. For instance, all bolts, screws, and other sundry parts should readily thread into place, and if they do not something is wrong and you should back off. A torque wrench is a must.

    Investing in the proper tools to fix bikes is no small investment, but in the long run I think that you can pay off that investment in the pride of self sufficiency and being the go-to-guy for your cycling friends.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    487
    That's all fine and dandy but knowing how to change the fork on a bike isn't going to make a new one appear on your lap.

    unless you're taking it off a bike you found chained up on the road I suppose...

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    70
    Most shops only have a very limited supply of parts for the model bikes that they sale. Therefore, almost any specific 'part' is going to be special order from most any bike shop. There are just to many different variable such as manufacturers, models, sizes, quality, price, etc. of parts out there to stock them. A good shop can get most parts in a day or two if it is something available from a more local distributor/supplier such as QBP. But a specific part like something for a fork most likely will have to be ordered from the manufacturer which is going to take longer.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    955

    Good Shop

    Fond du Lac isn't far from Kewaskum so hit up Fond du Lac Cyclery. They stock alot of stuff and if they don't have it can get it in a couple days. Sometimes next day if it's early in the day. They have a competent service department and the owner has been in the business for a long time and is a rider himself. They have a shop in Oshkosh also but this link will take you to both shops.

    http://oshkoshcyclery.com/

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    62
    SugX is right about lbs.

    I have worked in quite a few different ones across the country. The 2 hardest service parts to stock are rims and shoxs. Their are to many choices on the market. You can try to stock a few, but they are often not what the customer needs. Most shops will only stock pre-built wheels. Forks are the same when it comes to choices. Lbs can not compete with large inet dealers when it comes to suspension.
    Is it a good thing or a bad thing? To each there own thought. On one side you can get a screaming deal from an online company. Now where is the incentive for the lbs to study and stock these items. Since I moved back to WI. i have worked with customers getting specs pricing debating which fork would be best for them. spending hours with them. then they walk in the shop a few days later with some closeout they bought online. asking if I will give them a deal on installin-g it or do it for free. This is what leads most shop people to not care about aftermarket wheels, or forks. Thats just my .02

    When looking for a good shop, dont just look at what they sell, but find out what the staff rides. It will give you a better idea of the knowledge they have. If your looking for the hardcore mtn bikers head to the service dept.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    90
    SugX and crazy_bikerdude both hit it on the head. I've also worked at a handful of shops across the country (including several in Wisconsin) and most don't stock many rims or forks/shocks these days. With QBP being so proficient at getting needed parts to customers and technology changing from year to year, it doesn't make sense for shops to stock certain parts.

  8. #8
    WI. Big Boy MTBer
    Reputation: fattybikejones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    643
    As much as I like to support my LBS.. I have, more often than not been ordering my parts online. Learning to repair and upgrade you own bike is not only rewarding, but alot more economical.

    I did alot of business with Kevin Schmidt at Mountain Outfitters back when he was a Fisher / Diamondback dealer in the mid ~late 1990's
    TREK X CALIBER 6, MOTOBECANE USA MIRAGE SLX

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.