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  1. #1
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    Best Housing/Cable system for Front Shifting

    Hello fellow Maverick fans. After 1.5 years I think it's high time to replace my cable & housing for my front shifting. It still shifts precise, but it now requires significantly more thumb force (a lot more) to shift from small to middle ring.

    Is it worth it to invest in something more pricey like XTR housing/cable system? Would it provide lighter and more consistent shifting? Or can I stick to more affordable basic stuff?

    In case it matters, I am using X9 shifters and Shimano R773 (Ultegra 10 speed front derailleur) with dual chainring setup on my ML8.

    Any recommendations or experiences are very welcome.

  2. #2
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    I recommande you to buy few meters of pre-greased SIS SP41 shimano (XTR) hose with a couple of wires and a pack of ferrules ... Cheap and will give you the better performances for long time.
    Maverick ML7.2 / SC32
    Maverick ML7.5
    Maverick Durance / Duc32
    Maverick ML8 / BOS Devile

    French Maverick Breeder

  3. #3
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    Couple of tips to make it work even better.
    Not sure which year your bike is but the 09 and up bikes shipped with a small section of cable liner and a rubber sealing boot. If you dont have those, you can cut apart an old xtr cable and pull some liner out. Use the liner inside the noodle to let the cable slide smoothly along the noodle and put the rubber boot on the end of it to keep mud/water out of the liner. For more instructions... read below

    http://www.maverickbike.com/main/do/Assembly

  4. #4
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    Gore RideOn sealed cables...

    Are worth every penny at about $60 for a set (F & R). Install and forget, I don't even recall having to retention these. And even after a 2.5 hr drive in the rain (bike on rooftop), the cables were fine -- it was my X.9 shifters that needed lubing. I've had them on for a couple of years, too.

  5. #5
    Schipperkes are cool.
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    I've used the 3 different generations of the Gore cables and it's no better then Shimano SP41 housing and a SRAM 1.1mm derailleur cable.

    For the Mavs I use the interior liner of a section of Shimano SP41 4mm housing, whittle off the outer black plastic and pull away the steel wires.
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.
    I ride so slow, your Garmin will shut off.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by fizzywater
    After 1.5 years I think it's high time to replace my cable & housing for my front shifting.
    You are probably better off changing them frequently rather than getting the $$$ stuff and trying to make it last. Changing your derailleur cable & housing probably has the best cost / improvement ratio of any general maintenance you can do on your bike. You will immediately notice the difference, especially on the rear derailleur.

    If you look, $20 will get you a good kit, you can even buy the housing and cables in bulk on eBay and save a few bucks. You can get teflon coated cables, but the teflon coating will wear quickly on the tight bends. I usually get whatever is on sale when I drop by my Performance shop (Aztec I think).

    The first time you change them, measure all the pieces and make a few pre-cut kits (that will save you some time later). You might also want to experiment with the old stuff (the one you are replacing) with different lengths / routing. Most housing can be cut shorter at the bars, saving weight but more importantly getting extra long cables out of the way of branches (making your bike safer). Shorter length housing will also improve shifting (less housing to compress when you shift).

    You might also be able to make 2 sets with the amount of housing in a regular kit (YMMV here).

    If you ride in a really wet / muddy area in winter, you can make full length housing: less chances of dirt getting inside the housing, but more weight (who cares when your bike is covered with 15 Lbs of mud) and less precise shifting.

    Get a good cable / housing cutter, that will make your life a lot easier. Make sure that your derailleurs stop screws are set perfectly, that will also save you some time and grief.

    After you changed them a couple of times, it won't take more than 15 minutes from start to finish for both the front a rear.

    Some Maverick specific tips:

    As other people mentioned, Maverick recommends using some inner housing tubing on the cable going over the noodle down by the front derailleur. Never tried it, I just slap some waterproof grease in there it it works fine!

    Be extremely careful on the front derailleur that nothing hits / rubs against the shock body. It it does, it will wear through the shock body in no time and you will have to replace the whole rear triangle!

  7. #7
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    Nokon shifting system

    Hi all Maverick addicts!
    Bored of the front shifting, one month ago, I have set a Nokon shifting system on my ML7/5.
    Long mounting time, but the result is night and day!
    Much more precise shifting, especially on the front, cables completely sealed from the shifter to the derailleur.
    The bike has been subjected to hard ridings in mud and looks like new after cleaning.
    Mavericks are dream bikes, clean lines, nice hard ano, simple to maintain.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Best Housing/Cable system for Front Shifting-2009-11-21-003-2-.jpg  

    Best Housing/Cable system for Front Shifting-2009-11-21-005-2-.jpg  

    Best Housing/Cable system for Front Shifting-der_av.jpg  

    Best Housing/Cable system for Front Shifting-der_ar.jpg  

    Last edited by Frederic; 11-23-2009 at 01:59 PM.

  8. #8
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    I finally found some time during the holidays to get this done and went with Shimano SIS SP41 housing for front and rear. Ahhh...what a difference Next time I'm not going to wait 1.5 years. Since I was on a roll, I also replaced chain, cassette and chainrings on my ML8 (it was high time!!) and Ahhhhhh, nice crisp and easiy shifting all the way. Now, the only thing left to do....slap on my brand new Sram X9 midcage derailleur (to replace my current longcage model) and it will be the bomb

    Before I forget....last thing I did was getting rid of my POS rear WTB QR skewer and replace it with a DT Swiss RWS model...wow, just wow. I couldn't believe the big difference in superior clamping power with hardly any effort. If it holds up long term, I highly recommend it! I actually had to back off on the clamping power of the RWS, yet still had to file down some material on the backside of the red clamping bolt for the derailleur hanger, as the cassette lockring would start binding/rubbing on the red clamping bolt.

  9. #9
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    Fizzy, are u using a SRAM cassette/lockring? To avoid the derailleur bolt and cassette lockring from rubbing I've used a Shimano lockring instead.
    Maverick Durance Ano-DUC32/C KING/XTR
    Mav ML8 Ano-DUC32/X0
    Mav ML8-DUC32/I9/XTR
    09 Spec. Demo-Totem-Ti DHX
    Norco Team DH

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Datalogger
    Fizzy, are u using a SRAM cassette/lockring? To avoid the derailleur bolt and cassette lockring from rubbing I've used a Shimano lockring instead.
    Nope. It's a Shimano XT cassette including XT lockring. I used Sram cassette & lockring before that in conjunction with WTB QR skewer. I am attributing the rubbing to the much stronger clamping power of the DT Swiss RWS skewer that I am using now. Once I loosened the RWS quite a bit, the rubbing stopped. So I made a compromise....increased the torque on the RWS again a little, but then filed of some material on the backside of the derailleur hanger bolt.

  11. #11
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    Fizzy the clamping force is weird. If the hub is adjusted correctly you should not be able to torque the frame into it unless you are crushing the hub in between. In otherwords there should only be a small difference even if the clamping force is way higher b/c you are clamping against the locknuts which should not move. They may be maladjusted if it is moving that far. (BTW I had the same rubbing issue in the past with a SRAM cassette, but I just put a shimano lockring on and all was well)

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by sxotty
    Fizzy the clamping force is weird. If the hub is adjusted correctly you should not be able to torque the frame into it unless you are crushing the hub in between. In otherwords there should only be a small difference even if the clamping force is way higher b/c you are clamping against the locknuts which should not move. They may be maladjusted if it is moving that far. (BTW I had the same rubbing issue in the past with a SRAM cassette, but I just put a shimano lockring on and all was well)
    Hi sxotty....you're right. Once, I started looking more into it, I noticed that I had botched the bearing replacement on my rear hub, which was giving me all kinds of binding, moving and other weird symptoms on the rear. I had to redo the bearing replacement...took more time and did it right this time. All is good now. I still stand by my statement about the crappy WTB QR skewer though and am really liking my new DT Swiss RWS skewer (the only questionable variable being its longterm durability...so far so good).

  13. #13
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    I have the 10mm RWS on a DT440 hub, definitely a high degree of clamping force. I also have the quick release style RWS, they are very high quality.
    Maverick Durance Ano-DUC32/C KING/XTR
    Mav ML8 Ano-DUC32/X0
    Mav ML8-DUC32/I9/XTR
    09 Spec. Demo-Totem-Ti DHX
    Norco Team DH

  14. #14
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    Not sure I agree. I've got at least 2 yrs on my sealed rideons (long enough that I don't remember) and they still shift like new -- even after riding and driving through rain storms. I think one of the biggest benefits is that there has been little degredation in quality during that time. So, it's not really milking it. Besides I have enough trouble keeping up with maintenance so any effort deferre. Is a great benefit.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssorgs
    Not sure I agree. I've got at least 2 yrs on my sealed rideons (long enough that I don't remember) and they still shift like new -- even after riding and driving through rain storms. I think one of the biggest benefits is that there has been little degredation in quality during that time. So, it's not really milking it. Besides I have enough trouble keeping up with maintenance so any effort deferre. Is a great benefit.
    Well, the best way to actually claim that after 2 years they shift like _new_, would be to replace them with new and actually feel how much of a difference there is (quite a bit I bet). Otherwise, degradation in performance could be so gradual that it could be hard to remember what it was really like when it was "new" (especially over 2 years).

    Most people I change the derailleur cables for are just plain flabergast how much better shifting is with new cables / housing (and a good derailleur tune-up). They just don't remember how it was when it was new, got used to the degraded shifting gradually and compensated for it somehow (shift earlier, press harder, etc...).

    I personally think it's silly not to change your shifting cables (and housing) on a regular basis. It's cheap ($20), will increase your riding pleasure, performances and will reduce the chances of getting stuck miles away from the parking lot with a broken cable. It is also an occasion to inspect the shifting / gearing of the bike (chain, rings, cassette, derailleurs, etc...).

    Maintenance on a mountain bike is pretty simple and shouldn't take more than 10% of your riding time (yeah, 1 hour per 10 hours of riding) and that including washing your bike. It's a pretty worthwhile investment in my opinion (from the cost but also increased safety).

    My $0.02

  16. #16
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    I'm more of a fan of the 1% maintenance time. The Maverick hasn't needed too much. Preventative is the way to go!
    Maverick Durance Ano-DUC32/C KING/XTR
    Mav ML8 Ano-DUC32/X0
    Mav ML8-DUC32/I9/XTR
    09 Spec. Demo-Totem-Ti DHX
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  17. #17
    Kaj
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    We've seen amazing results with the new Gore system on all bikes. Durability is very high, and shifting effort is as low as any other system in the market, lower than most. It's a great upgrade and with their current 1 year warranty, you are guaranteed a solid year of great shifting.

    We've put them on about 40 Mavericks this year, and all have been happy, and I don't think we've seen any warranties.

    I had them on my cross bike this season and fully abused them, no issues.
    Kona Wo for Fat Biking, Ibis HD3 for Trail Shredding, Merckx Road bike for collecting dust

  18. #18
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    I use a bit of the red inner liner from Avid Flak Jackets to line the loop around the BB. It's teflon and does the job with no fuss. It's flexible enough, yet rigid enough to coax it into the groove without feeding it direct (which I wasn't able to do for some reason). I've replaced it 3 times since early 2007 and it rocks every shift. Just my 0.02

  19. #19
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    I've fitted SP41 outer with XTR PTFE inner recently.
    Best shifting I've ever had!
    www.bartthebikeman.wordpress.com
    fast 26" road bike, shaven Racing Ralphs as road tyres, homemade "Paul thumbies"...

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