Beware of bad dog owner at Lynn- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Beware of bad dog owner at Lynn

    Watch out for this guy:

    40-50, spanish accent, chubby, bad mustache, with 2 brown and white pit bulls.

    Rode this morning from the ballfield, on my return via sharks tooth on the hill just before that bookshelf thing off the rock face we ride i heard approaching barking. Sure enough 2 pit bulls come flying out of the woods, caught me in a spot where accelerating away wasnt an option. One got his teeth in my leg armor before I jumped off the bike. I kicked him away and used my bike as a club and fence to keep the circling dogs at bay. I did this for 2-3 minutes before this fat load rolls out of the woods saying "they are friendly". news to me...the dogs didn't let up and I was scared. The guy picks up fist sized rocks and starts throwing them at the dogs while he was screaming at them. I saw my chance picked up my ride and ran. To add insult to injury, I bent my rear mech in the mele, not sure on what as I was panicked at the time. He never once apologized.

    12 years at Lynn and besides poop on the tires, never had a problem with dogs.

    Be careful.

  2. #2
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    That idiot should be arrested. No excuse for a dog off leash. I know there are some great dogs that run leash free with their owners, but this is just ridiculous. Bad owners=bad dogs..
    Fukin dick head.
    I got bit two years ago up at the iron tower. Two woman said same thing they are friendly. I got friendly by kicking the dog ten feet away from me. And a tetanus shot the next day...
    Dopes.
    Lynn Woods:yikes:
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  3. #3
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    when i ride were theres dogs i ride with a small club end of story ive hit dogs across trails sounds mean but its better then being bitten.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scarsandtears
    Two woman said same thing they are friendly. I got friendly by kicking the dog ten feet away from me.
    I woulda kicked the women... and the dog.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by gravitylover
    I woulda kicked the women... and the dog.
    Lynn Woods:yikes:
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  6. #6
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    I was there on Sunday morning and heard some dogs barking ahead on the trail... Scared the crap outta me as I had just read your story a few hours earlier. Luckily it was just a family with a lab.

  7. #7
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    As i dog owner that rides with my dog loose these stories really bother me. Please just remember it isn't every dog and dog owner that is this way.

    From stories i've read of places i've rode, it seems Lynn is pretty bad. I associate it with the closer you are to Boston, the more undesireable the dog owners that will be on the trails.

    I get nervous that my dog would even startle someone from just running by.

    Hate to think what these two pit bulls would have done to another dog on the trail.
    Last edited by idbrian; 05-12-2011 at 07:44 AM.

  8. #8
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    No offense to pit bull owners, but I don't trust them. They are twitchy and unpredictable. My neighbor has one, and I wouldn't let my niece or nephew near it. Once you set them off, there's not stopping them. Some dogs were bred to be viscous from the very beginning. My bother has a golden, and it's the most mellow dog ever, could never be provoked, no matter what a kid would do to it. I like dogs, but most dogs owners leave something to be desired. Teach your dog to heal, why don't you.... Be the pack leader & Leave your gangsta dog at home.


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    Thanks for reinforcing stereotypes with an idiot image and an uninformed post. I am a pit bull owner, and I will take offense.

    A dumb dog owner is a dumb dog owner regardless of the breed of the dog. Any untrained dog has the potential to be a problem, and all breeds of dog have the potential to be human aggressive. Pit bulls are certainly not "unstoppable." When they are treated with kindness and discipline, and free from abuse, they are no more or less "twitchy" or "unpredictable" than any other dog. (In fact, you may be surprised to learn that pit bulls score higher on the American Temperament Testing Society's annual test than the golden retriever -- which you can read about here: http://www.atts.org/statistics.html ) Pit bulls are not inherently "gangsta" -- that is your perception of the breed, and a lot of other people's, unfortunately. (My singlespeed & I are way more gangsta than my dog is. ) My pit bull sounds very much like your brother's golden retriever in terms of how she deals with children, other dogs, and all people in general. The only things that need to look out when she's around are squirrels.

    I'm guessing your neighbor isn't someone who's well equipped to own a dog -- especially a pit bull. The owner referenced in the original post in this thread also clearly should not own dogs, especially pit bulls.

    I would be just as angry & upset as the original poster if I encountered the dogs described in that post -- and probably more so, since I try to do so much work with my own dog to counteract idiots like one who lets two untrained pit bulls roam off-leash in a public area -- confirming the fears of people who don't really know the breed.

    You may also find Malcolm Gladwell's fairly recent New Yorker article about pit bulls of some interest: http://www.gladwell.com/2006/2006_02_06_a_pitbull.html

    Rant over...

    Quote Originally Posted by Pimpride
    No offense to pit bull owners, but I don't trust them. They are twitchy and unpredictable. My neighbor has one, and I wouldn't let my niece or nephew near it. Once you set them off, there's not stopping them. Some dogs were bred to be viscous from the very beginning. My bother has a golden, and it's the most mellow dog ever, could never be provoked, no matter what a kid would do to it. I like dogs, but most dogs owners leave something to be desired. Teach your dog to heal, why don't you.... Be the pack leader & Leave your gangsta dog at home.

  10. #10
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    I don't think dogs should ever be off a leash. Especially when biking.

  11. #11
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    By getting a pit bull you are welcoming an uphill battle. Even if your pit bull is a teddy bear, owning it is still going to be harder than owning most dogs. People are going to be inheritantly 3X more nervous around your dog than any non-fighting dog, and you really can't blame them. I'm not sure if places make an exception, but all the better dog day care centers around me specifically do not allow pit bulls or pit bull mixes. The kennels we use also either do not allow pit bulls or if they do charge you more because they keep them in a cage and have to let them out seperately.

    I must be lucky to have never had a bad dog experience in my 32 years of living. Just from reading about dog experiences in Lynn Woods i'm left with the feeling that it seems to be a hot bed for bad dog owners.

    I ride with my dog loose and don't really care what others think about it. Too many arguments on these boards about it. I find it to be dumb argument when people are telling me why i shouldn't ride with my dog based on the actions of others. It makes me loathe bad dog owners even more.

  12. #12
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    You're totally right, and I went into pit bull ownership with eyes wide open, after knowing many pit bulls for years, and after getting thoroughly vetted by the rescue group from which I acquired my dog. All of which is why I bothered to reply to this thread -- so that I could correct misinformation, and just possibly open someone's mind a tiny bit. For what it's worth, I live in western Mass, and all the "better" kennels out here take pit bulls no problem.

    Please understand that what I'm saying is that calling all pit bulls "unpredictable" or "violent," etc., is the same sort of stereotyping by which people claim that all MTB'ers are Mt. Dew-drinking, trail-wrecking, stunt-building, X-Games-loving jackasses. It's a stereotype based on a few bad examples.

    I will say that I agree with Woodsguy that taking any dog riding off-leash is a problem waiting to happen -- and if / when the problem happens, it may not even be your dog's fault.




    Quote Originally Posted by idbrian
    By getting a pit bull you are welcoming an uphill battle. Even if your pit bull is a teddy bear, owning it is still going to be harder than owning most dogs. People are going to be inheritantly 3X more nervous around your dog than any non-fighting dog, and you really can't blame them. I'm not sure if places make an exception, but all the better dog day care centers around me specifically do not allow pit bulls or pit bull mixes. The kennels we use also either do not allow pit bulls or if they do charge you more because they keep them in a cage and have to let them out seperately.

    I must be lucky to have never had a bad dog experience in my 32 years of living. Just from reading about dog experiences in Lynn Woods i'm left with the feeling that it seems to be a hot bed for bad dog owners.

    I ride with my dog loose and don't really care what others think about it. Too many arguments on these boards about it. I find it to be dumb argument when people are telling me why i shouldn't ride with my dog based on the actions of others. It makes me loathe bad dog owners even more.

  13. #13
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    I have a pitbull (also a pit mix, and previously an american bulldog/pitbull) and there is not a chance I would let him off the leash in an area with people running and/or biking. I may be in the minority, but I get tired of people defending this breed as if only irresponsible owners have the crazy dogs. Each breed of dog has positive and negative traits, and if you have experience with bully breeds then you should be able to accept that some dogs have an instinct that can become unstable in an instant.

    If you came to my house and met our 1.5 yr old pitbull Roscoe, you would think he is the most adorable thing. He LOVES people, and through months of training he has learned that after a few moments of excitement greeting visitors, he should relax and lie down unless he is invited to play. People are usually amazed at how calm he is compared to our newest dog who at 1 year old is still a work in progress. I take him for leashed runs (with a stunt puppy leash...greatest thing ever) and he will run side by side with me with a big smile on his face. At night he sleeps under the covers at our feet...

    So he's the best dog ever right? A happy, smiling 65lb pitbull.......Not so fast...When he focuses on an item that he deems as "prey" there is virtually no stopping him from attempting to catch or attack it. That includes small animals, bicycles, dirt bikes, wheelbarrows, the vacuum, the lawn tractor...I can go on. Is this my fault that I haven't trained away his natural instinct? I think not. I realized this trait early on, have worked on it to keep it under control. HOWEVER, I still avoid at all costs situations where he could forget his training and go on instinct...likely getting himself, a person, or another animal hurt.

    I raised him from 3 mo old, taking him to puppy training to socialize with other breeds of dogs, large and small. We own a cat that was raised with dogs (he is never left alone with access to her in the house), yet he generally stares at her waiting for her to make any type of movement he could capitalize on. He has twice ran out the front door and chased her up a tree after seeing her on our lawn. I started riding a bike in the house when he was a puppy to see if he would be good candidate to ride with me. He attacks the front wheel as soon as it gets moving. He also attacks my wheelbarrow, attempted to attack my lawn tractor through our fenced in yard, attacked my dirt bike as I pushed it into the garage, and bit the treadmill belt when I started to run on it.

    So is it my "fault" how he acts? I don't believe so. Should I relinquish him to someone more "capable" of training him? Nope. Dogs are not people, they are domesticated ANIMALS. And no matter how well we treat them, they still have that bit of their wild descendents in them. Some maybe more than others. Not only that, but some have the wild instinct AND speed, power, and strength far greater than others. That is the case with bully breeds, and many other large dogs.

    -Gabe

    *Almost forgot to mention* Both my wife and I were attacked by dogs as children. I was left with a scar on my face, and my wife with one her shoulder and chest. NEITHER of the dogs that attacked us were provoked in any way and NEITHER dog was considered an "aggressive" breed...

  14. #14
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    So far this year I've been stopping as I see people ahead of me with dogs on the trail so I don't spook the dog. I've had enough marginal experiences over the last twenty or so years just cruising past this scenario that I decided to change my approach. It hasn't worked. In fact, it's worse. Every single time the dog has either run up and jumped on me while the owner is saying "Don't worry, he/she is friendly" or it has become an outright barkfest with me maneuvering the bike between myself and the dog. I always try to stop on the uphill side of the trail completely out of the way, even working my way into poison ivy so that I at least have the advantage of being above the dog. I decided last week when the dogs paw got caught in my jersey zipper and ripped it right down to the waist seam that the next time it happens the dog gets a kick and the owner gets a beatdown right then and there for being a moron.

    I own a dog and have for the last 40 years. I love dogs. People flat out suck.

  15. #15
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    I am not a pit bull owner, but yes at the dog park they are often times the source for trouble due to bad owners. There are tons that come though and most are great players.

    My Austrailian Cattle Dog (Red Heeler) gets mistaken for being a pit all the time, he loves animals and people...really gentle dog.

    That said...the two times he was bitten and each required surgery was by 1) a whippet and 2) a golden retriever.

    A third time a rottie mix behind a 3' fence hopped over and attacked us both on foot. Fortunately a good samaratian stopped and let my dog and I hop into his new luxury truck while it was raining all over us.

    I now carry Fox 5.3 spray.

    Also I agree with when you hear the phrase "OH DON'T WORRY HE'S FRIENDLY!/OH HE JUST GROWLS TO PLAY/ETC" be on guard. This is very common at dog park and usually those people get kicked out due to a dog overly aggressive to pets and people.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel J
    Each breed of dog has positive and negative traits, and if you have experience with bully breeds then you should be able to accept that some dogs have an instinct that can become unstable in an instant.
    Incorrect. The issue is many times poor breeding though and dogs that are mentally unstable. Just like in people but fortunately incestual relationships and usually 1st cousin level is forbidden. It can create crazy people just like crazy dogs. The breeders should stop they lines when they see this and euthanize the pups. However, they don't as aggressive / crazy ass dogs are in demand.


    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel J
    If you came to my house and met our 1.5 yr old pitbull Roscoe, you would think he is the most adorable thing. He LOVES people, and through months of training he has learned that after a few moments of excitement greeting visitors, he should relax and lie down unless he is invited to play. People are usually amazed at how calm he is compared to our newest dog who at 1 year old is still a work in progress. I take him for leashed runs (with a stunt puppy leash...greatest thing ever) and he will run side by side with me with a big smile on his face. At night he sleeps under the covers at our feet...
    This just smacks of poor training being an excuse or an unstable dog to begin with. Most dogs are great inside their homes especially knowing their owners invited the person in.

    A dog will run with an owner, thats a natural desire...a body leash though just lets the dog do whatever they want. Most larger dogs shouldn't be 'ran' though until 1 year old at least.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel J
    So he's the best dog ever right? A happy, smiling 65lb pitbull.......Not so fast...When he focuses on an item that he deems as "prey" there is virtually no stopping him from attempting to catch or attack it. That includes small animals, bicycles, dirt bikes, wheelbarrows, the vacuum, the lawn tractor...I can go on. Is this my fault that I haven't trained away his natural instinct? I think not. I realized this trait early on, have worked on it to keep it under control. HOWEVER, I still avoid at all costs situations where he could forget his training and go on instinct...likely getting himself, a person, or another animal hurt.
    This is totally your fault or the dog is insane. It's not a breed issue, it's not a prey issue. A dog that has potential to be dangerous has no business around people. Your dog going crazy on a vacuum shows a major issue already. This should have been able to be trained out in a day in a normal dog. Perhaps 2-3 follow up sessions and that's that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel J
    I raised him from 3 mo old, taking him to puppy training to socialize with other breeds of dogs, large and small. We own a cat that was raised with dogs (he is never left alone with access to her in the house), yet he generally stares at her waiting for her to make any type of movement he could capitalize on. He has twice ran out the front door and chased her up a tree after seeing her on our lawn. I started riding a bike in the house when he was a puppy to see if he would be good candidate to ride with me. He attacks the front wheel as soon as it gets moving. He also attacks my wheelbarrow, attempted to attack my lawn tractor through our fenced in yard, attacked my dirt bike as I pushed it into the garage, and bit the treadmill belt when I started to run on it.
    good god, your poor cat...do you not see the potential here for a disaster?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel J
    So is it my "fault" how he acts? I don't believe so. Should I relinquish him to someone more "capable" of training him? Nope. Dogs are not people, they are domesticated ANIMALS. And no matter how well we treat them, they still have that bit of their wild descendents in them. Some maybe more than others. Not only that, but some have the wild instinct AND speed, power, and strength far greater than others. That is the case with bully breeds, and many other large dogs.

    -Gabe
    You have proven yourself to be another clueless owner. How can you say he is a friendly dog and then go on to talk about 'well he does go batshit crazy at times, but that's just a dog being a dog".

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel J
    *Almost forgot to mention* Both my wife and I were attacked by dogs as children. I was left with a scar on my face, and my wife with one her shoulder and chest. NEITHER of the dogs that attacked us were provoked in any way and NEITHER dog was considered an "aggressive" breed...
    pretty rare to run into a couple that both were attacked separately by dogs that left scarring....sounds like a quaint story to rationalize your own dogs behavior.

    that story is plain damn messed up above.

  17. #17
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    Uhhh.. My bulldog can't lick her own ass. Any tips?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by kubaner
    Uhhh.. My bulldog can't lick her own ass. Any tips?
    Serious? We have one cat that can't, she's a doll though...almost a pest out of her love for us, our dogs and other cats. I think we all accept her stinky butt at times because of it.

    She is the modern day "foodie" she eats anything even the dry dog food. My other 6 pets manage their weight fine. She's also the only cat that basically pick my wife, myself and my dogs. She was a stray. Kept coming to us. During this time we got burglarized..a couple months later we realized she was still there even more demanding, but now pregnant. We took her in on a Wednesday, booked her spay for Friday. She popped out 4 kittens that night. My wife wanted to keep them all, but 8 cats and a dog was too much at that time. We were very selective in their new owners.

  19. #19
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    You are correct, I am another clueless owner. Thanks to your expert diagnosis, I'm giving him one day + 2-3 sessions of training to become a perfectly stable dog. When that doesn't work it's off to the vet for euthanization.

    Thanks!


    Quote Originally Posted by alkemyst
    Incorrect. The issue is many times poor breeding though and dogs that are mentally unstable. Just like in people but fortunately incestual relationships and usually 1st cousin level is forbidden. It can create crazy people just like crazy dogs. The breeders should stop they lines when they see this and euthanize the pups. However, they don't as aggressive / crazy ass dogs are in demand.

    This just smacks of poor training being an excuse or an unstable dog to begin with. Most dogs are great inside their homes especially knowing their owners invited the person in.

    A dog will run with an owner, thats a natural desire...a body leash though just lets the dog do whatever they want. Most larger dogs shouldn't be 'ran' though until 1 year old at least.

    This is totally your fault or the dog is insane. It's not a breed issue, it's not a prey issue. A dog that has potential to be dangerous has no business around people. Your dog going crazy on a vacuum shows a major issue already. This should have been able to be trained out in a day in a normal dog. Perhaps 2-3 follow up sessions and that's that.

    good god, your poor cat...do you not see the potential here for a disaster?

    You have proven yourself to be another clueless owner. How can you say he is a friendly dog and then go on to talk about 'well he does go batshit crazy at times, but that's just a dog being a dog".

    pretty rare to run into a couple that both were attacked separately by dogs that left scarring....sounds like a quaint story to rationalize your own dogs behavior.

    that story is plain damn messed up above.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel J
    You are correct, I am another clueless owner. Thanks to your expert diagnosis, I'm giving him one day + 2-3 sessions of training to become a perfectly stable dog. When that doesn't work it's off to the vet for euthanization.

    Thanks!
    As sad as it may be if a dog is trying to attack your PERSONAL cat, bikes, and wheelbarrows, etc and cannot be corrected; euthanasia is the proper option or sending them off to an aggressive dog rescue (which I am not sure any are up anymore with the economy and their donations tanking).

    I am not only a Zoology major, but I did internships with a vet that handled the zoo and private practice. There were dogs we'd get in far more dangerous than bears and mountain lions.

    One huge rottie could only be handled by the owner...we'd board him. The guy was a big time dog trainer and always said "any dog can be trained". We wouldn't let the dog out for the boarded and were not supposed too, he'd kill any one of us. One day somehow he did get out and I was trapped on top of the cages until they could subdue him and get him back in his cage.

    In the end the dog severely mauled his wife and daughter one day and he immediately changed his philosophy. When dogs were breed properly and do not have mental defects they may be stubborn, but can be trained. When a dog is not proper and overly aggressive their is a problem that often times only makes him 'owner-safe'.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel J
    I have a pitbull (also a pit mix, and previously an american bulldog/pitbull) and there is not a chance I would let him off the leash in an area with people running and/or biking. I may be in the minority, but I get tired of people defending this breed as if only irresponsible owners have the crazy dogs. Each breed of dog has positive and negative traits, and if you have experience with bully breeds then you should be able to accept that some dogs have an instinct that can become unstable in an instant.

    If you came to my house and met our 1.5 yr old pitbull Roscoe, you would think he is the most adorable thing. He LOVES people, and through months of training he has learned that after a few moments of excitement greeting visitors, he should relax and lie down unless he is invited to play. People are usually amazed at how calm he is compared to our newest dog who at 1 year old is still a work in progress. I take him for leashed runs (with a stunt puppy leash...greatest thing ever) and he will run side by side with me with a big smile on his face. At night he sleeps under the covers at our feet...

    So he's the best dog ever right? A happy, smiling 65lb pitbull.......Not so fast...When he focuses on an item that he deems as "prey" there is virtually no stopping him from attempting to catch or attack it. That includes small animals, bicycles, dirt bikes, wheelbarrows, the vacuum, the lawn tractor...I can go on. Is this my fault that I haven't trained away his natural instinct? I think not. I realized this trait early on, have worked on it to keep it under control. HOWEVER, I still avoid at all costs situations where he could forget his training and go on instinct...likely getting himself, a person, or another animal hurt.

    I raised him from 3 mo old, taking him to puppy training to socialize with other breeds of dogs, large and small. We own a cat that was raised with dogs (he is never left alone with access to her in the house), yet he generally stares at her waiting for her to make any type of movement he could capitalize on. He has twice ran out the front door and chased her up a tree after seeing her on our lawn. I started riding a bike in the house when he was a puppy to see if he would be good candidate to ride with me. He attacks the front wheel as soon as it gets moving. He also attacks my wheelbarrow, attempted to attack my lawn tractor through our fenced in yard, attacked my dirt bike as I pushed it into the garage, and bit the treadmill belt when I started to run on it.

    So is it my "fault" how he acts? I don't believe so. Should I relinquish him to someone more "capable" of training him? Nope. Dogs are not people, they are domesticated ANIMALS. And no matter how well we treat them, they still have that bit of their wild descendents in them. Some maybe more than others. Not only that, but some have the wild instinct AND speed, power, and strength far greater than others. That is the case with bully breeds, and many other large dogs.

    -Gabe

    *Almost forgot to mention* Both my wife and I were attacked by dogs as children. I was left with a scar on my face, and my wife with one her shoulder and chest. NEITHER of the dogs that attacked us were provoked in any way and NEITHER dog was considered an "aggressive" breed...

    coming from a former pitbull owner.() I agree %100 with your statements.. My dogs were awesome, but they were still animals.. have to treat them that way.. some animals may be more tolerant than other animals for different things.. ..I currently own a Olde English bulldog, he is such a wimp... i do miss my pittbuls from when i was younger...

  22. #22
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    What about my Bulldog?

  23. #23
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    just keep your damn dogs the hell away from me, and keep their damn poop off the trail

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    This post will self destruct soon...


    edit: destructed...
    Last edited by gravitylover; 05-24-2011 at 08:52 AM.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by am_dial
    I'm guessing your neighbor isn't someone who's well equipped to own a dog -- especially a pit bull. The owner referenced in the original post in this thread also clearly should not own dogs, especially pit bulls.
    This is the problem a lot of us have with put bulls. Even fans of the breed such as yourself are recognizing that this breed is harder to handle than most breeds. You never would have used the words above if this were not the case.

    Combine this with the fact that pit bulls as a breed do not offer any useful positive traits that several other, safer breeds offer, and that's exactly why some of us would prefer to see the breed just go away. If I'm wrong about this, please educate me, but in pointing this out in different forums over the years, I've not yet had anyone come back and offer a useful trait that Pits have that can't be found in other breeds. Sure, we do believe responsible owners can pobably own this breed without endangering the public, but with nothing to stop the breed's popularity with bad owners, I'll take my chances against the rogue Retriever over the Pit Bull any day.
    Last edited by Pedalphile; 05-25-2011 at 04:45 AM.
    I can barely get my mouth around it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalphile

    This is the problem a lot of us have with put bulls. Even fans of the breed such as yourself are recognizing that this breed is harder to handle than most breeds. You never would have used the words above if this were not the case.

    Combine this with the fact that pit bulls as a breed do not offer any useful positive traits that several other, safer breeds offer, and that's exactly why some of us would prefer to see the breed just go away. If I'm wrong about this, please educate me, but in pointing this out in different forums over the years, I've not yet had anyone come back and offer a useful trait that Pits have that can't be found in other breeds. Sure, we do believe responsible owners can pobably own this breed without endangering the public, but with nothing to stop the breed's popularity with bad owners, I'll take my chances against the rogue Retriever over the Pit Bull any day.

    dude you can't even quote properly, skip owning a dog.

    I don't get your positive traits thing vs safer.

    Sporting dogs used to be trained well, today training = burning your dog's flesh with your welder and putting a cat in front of them and then wondering why they somehow mauled a kid.

    IMHO anyone owning a dog fighting dog that in living in any area with major population is an idiot. Same as a trained kill dog.

    Dogs by instinct usually can protect a house outside being trained to kill any outsiders that enter.

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