Xeccon Z10 Wireless review- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Xeccon Z10 Wireless review

    New 2016 light from Xeccon: Z10 Wireless.




    It's my first experience with Xeccon products. In short, I'm impressed by high quality and advanced technology found. More details below.

    Note: click on pictures to see full-sized images in high resolution.

    Disclaimer:
    The light was provided by mtbRevolution / Xeccon for review. Conditions were, to evaluate it according to my common methods, and publish unbiased and fair opinion.

    Overview:
    Light features new 19 Watt Cree LED: XHP50 (description, datasheet). LED's max output is rated 2546 lumen: compare that to the widely-known XM-L2's 1052 lm!

    Xeccon Z10 light output is specified as 1400 lumen though, and there's strong reason: the size does matter. Light is amazingly tiny: later on you'll see comparison pictures.




    Detailed information:
    My sample is pre-production item. Full set includes all the parts except for handlebar mount (it’s not ready yet). This means that final (or perhaps, the next) model could be a bit different: now manufacturer and distributor are ready to hear preliminary feedback and opinions.

    Package:
    Comes in standard cardboard box with nice punched logo and foam inserts.



    Included are lighthead itself (with helmet mount attached), battery, EU charger, 90cm extension cord, remote control, Velcro band, and printed manual.




    Mechanical design:
    Knowing the light uses latest powerful LED, it was unexpected to me how small it is: diameter is 28 mm (except cooling fins), length 35 mm. Weight is 44g (57g with helmet mount).








    Pictures with Z10 aside of famous MagicShine MJ-808 and Yinding YD-2xU2 lights:







    Convenient 16mm-wide Velcro band (single-sided type, as opposed to more common ‘hook&loop’) is used to affix it to the helmet, the angle could be freely adjusted after that.





    Attaching the light, I’ve noted that it looks very comparable in size to my helmet-mounted Bontrager Ember rear flasher powered by two CR2032 batteries:




    Disassembly & internals:
    Aluminium (according to Xeccon's information, it's 6063-T5 Type III) case is quite well made, with O-rings in every joint. 21.75mm TIR optics (height 10.47mm) with frosted/faceted ring and clear center provides nice uniform beam of light.







    Mount is attached by two M4 flat-slot headed screws with small rubber O-rings.



    Internals are accessible from the front, after removal of bezel.







    Black plastic cone is a optic's support. The LED base (diameter 21.85mm, thickness 1.15mm) is made of copper! Next to it is an aluminium 23.2mm*1.5mm disc used as thermal distribution insert, fixed by two M2*3.8mm screws.



    Rest of case is solid piece of metal, with rectangular cavity for the driver, and a hole for the button's silicone cover of complicated shape. Outer surface have small cooling fins on the sides. All the internal surfaces involved in the heat dissipation path have thermal paste thoroughly applied.





    Cable exit is sealed with rubber collar (additionally, black silicone sealant is applied), and finally secured by plastic cover and M2.5*4mm screw. It's the best arrangement of power cord I've ever seen in Chinese lights so far. The light seems to be totally waterproof; manufacturer's IP65 rating looks true.





    Unfortunately, the power cord’s leads are not finished with shrink tube – so, the potential problem with melted insulation and bare wires almost touching one another is observed here:



    The ~20cm long cable doesn’t have AWG gauge markings. Obviously, standard USB cabling was used: note thick red & black power wires, and thinner green & white signal wires. Green is cut out; white is used as receiving antenna for the wireless control: quite smart solution!



    Xeccon’s proprietary (at least, I haven’t seen them elsewhere) square-shaped connectors are used. They’re cross-compatible with standard MagicShine round ones due to the same internal 5.5/2.1mm barrel connectors implemented in both of them – connection is secure, just isn’t watertight. That is, the pack borrowed from fellow rider could be freely used if the need arises:






    Modes and User Interface:
    Upon switching on by long 2sec button press, Low-Medium-High modes are available in sequence by short clicks, another 2-second press is Off. Mode memory retains the last selected level unless the battery is disconnected. Extra-long 3sec press invokes Strobe mode (but in fact it's merely proper 10Hz 50% duty cycle flashing, nothing similar to annoying strobe often found in other lights). Transition between levels is smooth, not instant.

    As 'Off' and 'Strobe' modes are excluded from common cycle, it's impossible to accidentally put yourself into complete darkness or go through unwanted Strobe, quite disturbing to light's user and especially to nearby riders and drivers.

    The remote control implements two selectable settings. First is a kind of 'Signal': depressing the button puts the light to the max output (regardless from previous state), and releasing returns back to the former state. Second is "The Remote" as such - i.e. remote button fully duplicate local button's functionality. Switching the remote setting from one to another performed by simultaneous pressing of both local & remote buttons for 5 sec until the light emits 3 short flashes indicating switchover is done.


    Electrical measurements:
    Power consumption is approximately 16 W on High, 7 W on Mid, and 1 W on Low with 8 Volt input. Luxmeter LX1010B readings at 1 meter distance are 3630 lux, 1560 and 240 lux, respectively. In switched off state, light draws 6.7 mA.




    Driver:
    Unmarked driver is of two-boarded design. On the top of 17*19mm main PCB second smaller 10*12mm board (wireless receiver) is mounted.





    There's no inductor, driver seems to be a kind of direct-drive one. Main U2 20-pin chip is marked S033 PHVG S16Y, also there's Q2 transistor marked AGSZ 36, two current sense R150 resistors, green and red status LEDs around the button, thermal sensor TR1, and a bunch of SMD capacitors & resistors. On the other side - 3-pin U4 chip marked 66M1, and a couple more resistors and capacitors. On secondary board, 4.8970M crystal is on top, and 8-pin chip on the opposite side (marking isn't visible without full dismantling of driver assembly). Note that due to the size of components, it’s difficult to distinguish between O and 0, G and 6, etc: no warranty for correctness of markings.

    Driver is of current-limiting variety - that is, there’s no stable power regulation: as the voltage decreases upon battery discharge, the current is still the same 2 A. I’ve tested the light starting from 8.7V, gradually decreasing the voltage using ZXY-6005s PC-controlled power supply (ignore vertical spikes caused by software sampling glitches), and being unsure if it was recalibrated after modification, connected external UT61E and VC86B meters to the same PC for increased accuracy:





    At 6.97 V, green lindicator LED changed to red; at 6.30 V light turns itself down. The reason is Vf voltage of XHP50 diode and inductorless non-boost design of driver. Such limit doesn’t allow to use modern 2.5V Panasonic-based (or LiFePO4-based) 2SxP batteries to their full capacity, but is more or less Ok for the Samsung-based pack that the light comes with, as well as for contemporary high-voltage 4.35V cells based ones.

    Some users dislike low-frequency PWM regulation often used in inexpensive lights: probably, they would be pleased by absence of that ‘strobe effect’ in Z10. Light intensity is not visibly modulated: typically I use my photodiode-based sensor for non-intrusive measurements of PWM frequency and duty cycle, but here it doesn’t detect any pulses. EMI tester GM3120 also doesn’t register any remarkable levels of electromagnetic fields: probably, users of wireless cycle computers and HRMs should be happy.






    Compare that to the popular Yinding's mid-mode picture:





    Due to small size and powerful LED, High mode causes rapid heating of light if no cooling is provided. Overheating is prevented by thermal management logic: output quickly reduced by limiting the inrush current to 0.183A (slightly more than in ‘Low' mode). Bad thing is, this is ‘one way’ action: when temperature drops to the acceptable level, the current is still limited. Reset is possible by switching the light off and back on. Temperature the light have to reach for protection triggering is about +67 °C: seems too low. I’ve even checked whether my recording DMM is reading it correctly, by using additional K-type TM-902C thermocouple and infrared DT-300 thermometer. Looks more or less in line, within 1°C deviation:





    But even at this temperature, the light is really hot to touch: be careful. One funny incident I've had with it: during some measurements, I've left the light on High for several minutes 'face to table' and ended up with smoke and smell. Fortunately, it was just table painting, burned (literally!) by focused rays emitted by light...

    [- continued in the next message due to picture limit -]
    Last edited by -Archie-; 01-15-2016 at 09:57 AM.

  2. #2
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    Optical measurements:

    I don't do beamshots, preferring instrumental measurements of light's distribution. Here's the method I use:

    The light stands on tripod at 1 meter distance from the wall. On the wall surface, I put a set of marks at different angle from center. Intensity of light is measured by luxmeter's sensor positioned at the each angle mark. For lights with complex optics, I repeat samplings on both horizontal & vertical axis, while for lights with circular optics and symmetric beam, single axis is enough.

    Note that measurements are taken on flat surface: that is, the greater is angle, the farther from the source of light the measurement point is. IMHO it's better than equidistant method with same length of beam regardless from angle, being closer to what you actually see when you're illuminating the wall with your torch.



    To avoid brightness change during sampling, light is powered by stable lab PSU, not the battery, with temperature and consumed power monitored. To prevent power change caused by thermal protection, the light was set to medium setting.

    Collected data processed with MS Excel in the two separate ways:

    1). Lux readings converted to percentage levels where 100% is the value measured at the center of beam. Then, bar graph is plotted, representing relative change of brightness at particular angle offset from center, to show distribution of light within measurements range of light cone.

    2). As human perception of difference is non-linear (Weber-Fechner law), additional graph is plotted, with absolute measured levels displayed on logarithmic scale to plot a graph.

    So, I hope obtained results could be used to illustrate both calculated and perceived picture of light distribution within beam of light measurement:






    Originally I've developed this method specifically for quick comparison of different bike lights (like in this example), but probably it's still valid for single light, too.


    Remote control:
    Oval 35*29*11mm size, semitransparent button have blue LED illuminated when pressed. It is inserted into plastic holder (similar to ones used by many cycle computers) with rubber pad and Velcro band, that could be attached to the handlebar, cyclist's wrist, or any convenient place.







    Case is held together with four 1.5*4mm self-taping screws, big silicone insert used as gasket and button's cup. Seems fully waterproof, too. Power source is two CR2016 lithium coin batteries; convenient plastic holder is added to simplify changing.





    PCB marked K3-V03. Bigger 8-pin chip marked eV1527 1410, 6-pin one F113 and 3-pin one 662T. Printed antenna is accompanied with piece of wire.





    Range is specified as 5m (2m recommended): totally sufficient for given purpose. Signal is encoded: the light is operated by its own remote previously tied to it, clicking another remote’s button doesn’t affect the light. So, no unexpected switching in group rides.


    Battery:
    Standard Xeccon ST-B1 4-cells pack, well protected from the elements. Neoprene bag with wide Velcro band adds significant amount of cushion. The pack is encapsulated in green silicone shell; inside is common 2S2P battery in blue shrink-wrap. Cells are Samsung ICR18650-26J, balanced to 4.122/4.125 volt.











    Protection PCB is of typical design with FS8502A dual MOSFETs, 6-pin IC marking is CGHZ. The only flaw is connection of wires: as in the light head, power cord’s leads aren’t protected with shrink tube – subsequently, the insulation melted during soldering: exposed wires are in dangerous proximity. Also, wire to the pack’s middle point is soldered not to the free end of spot-welded nickel stripe, but essentially to the cell’s can directly:





    Levels of overcharge and overdischarge protection for positive and negative halves are 4.25/4.26 and 3.05/3.02 Volt, respectively. Quite good. After triggering of low-voltage threshold, brief connection of charger is required to reset it.

    Capacity at 1A to 6 volt discharge is 5395 mAh. To estimate the runtime on High, I’ve also measured it in the 2A to 6.3V regime with EBC-A05 electronic load: it lasted for 2.5 hours:






    Charger:
    Labeled DSS12-0841000-B. Rated to 1A. Simple red/green indicator LED.







    Measured initial current to empty battery is 1.074 A, power consumption 11.3 W. Near end of CC phase, current is decreased to about 0.9A at 8 V and further to 0.7 A at 8.1V. Not true CC/CV algorithm, but good enough.

    Open-circuit voltage is 8.486 Volt: a bit on the high side, but still within manufacturer’s recommended range. Nice looking & compact. Become warm during initial phase of charge, but not too hot: 47 °C.


    Pro et Contra:

    Pros:
    Excellent quality of parts (copper LED base, latest model of Cree LED, to name a few).
    Nearly perfect workmanship and assembly.
    Adequate thermal path with proper use of paste
    Watertight design
    Small size
    Hidden 'Off' and 'Strobe' modes
    Powerful output
    Uniform beam
    Handy remote control
    True capacity of battery, name brand cells, good protection from moisture and shocks.
    Convenient helmet mount
    Good charger

    Cons:
    1). The only serious problem I’ve found in whole Z10 system is a direct soldering of wire to the sell’s case: it’s totally unacceptable (heating is harmful to lithium battery), and explicitly prohibited by cell’s manufacturer:
    6.1.1 The cell should not be soldered directly with leads. Namely, the cell should be welded with leads on its terminal and then be soldered with wire or leads to soldered lead.
    6.1.2 Otherwise, it may cause damage of component, such as separator and insulator, by heat generation.
    Assembly routine at the factory should be fixed ASAP.

    2). In Z10 light head, internal mounting screws are used to fix the aluminium shim only: copper LED base is pressed to the shim by optics/bezel. Using a longer screws with wider heads (or added spacers to the standard-headed screws) would significantly improve thermal transfer, by firm tightening of whole ‘sandwich’ to the case.

    3). Preparation of power cable’s wires to soldering should be improved by adding protective shrink tubing: otherwise, damaged insulation could lead to the serious problems during use.

    4). Screws used to attach the mount have flat-slotted heads. The idea noted in the manual was to use a coin as a screwdriver – but coins are typically round, while slot doesn’t looks specifically designed for such a ‘tool’, being completely flat. I think, on bike equipment Allen heads should be used instead, as hex-multitool is pretty much standard accessory for most cyclists.

    5) For remote, implementation of two quick-release systems together IMHO is pointless: the Velcro band alone is handy enough. In addition, plastic mounting bracket adds additional risk of losing the remote by accidental move, crash etc. Probably, every avid biker at least once has lost his/her cycle computer installed in identical mount: no need to use it here. Direct attachment of Velcro band to the remote (without using of intermediate QR mount) would be far more secure, without any loss of operability.

    6). Modes arrangement is fine, but one of Remote Control settings (namely, "push to High, release to the previous level") doesn’t look ideal to me. It could be used to warn oncoming traffic, but IMHO more convenient would be "one click to instantly switch from Low to High, next click switch from High to Low": similar to the typical motorist’s action when another vehicle is approaching.

    7). Thermal protection is triggered but isn’t released back even if the light is cooling down. Better to make it constantly monitoring the temperature, and return to higher output level (with some hysteresis) if conditions allows for that.

    8). Square connectors are difficult to disconnect at cold temperatures. Round (‘MagicShine-style") ones suffer from that issue, too – but you can add twisting movement to the pulling force to make disconnection easier. Also, there’s a plenty of various third-party batteries available with MS-style connectors.

    9). Battery status LEDs are active in any mode except Off. I myself prefer them to display charge level always, as long as the battery is connected. Adding blinking red to indicate dangerously low voltage level would be handy, in addition to steady red.


    Conclusion:
    Maybe my ‘Cons’ list looks longer than ‘Pros’, but this is entirely because of my intention to make that little beauty even better. Overall, it’s a great light, totally different from most budget and medium-priced Chinese lights I’ve seen. Almost every detail is an evidence of very good designing & engineering work done by manufacturer. I was pleased to discover that Xeccon staff are bikers themselves: this explains many things. They definitely want to develop a fine product specifically for the cyclists, not just quickly adapt some arbitrary flashlight’s parts and start marketing questionable thing ‘to make money fast’. I’ve heard about true Xeccon quality, but never before encountered their products myself. Well done!

    If Xeccon will fix some minor flaws mentioned above, the Z10 could become really good top-quality light IMHO.
    Last edited by -Archie-; 01-17-2016 at 11:44 AM.

  3. #3
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    And for those that want a beam shot, I have one of these as well to go along with the z11:



  4. #4
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    First a quick, "well done" to Archie. An incredibly detailed review. That said I'm not sure most people really need such a complete tear-down review. Most people just want to know the basic things like:

    1) how bright the lamp is...?
    2) What kind of beam pattern it has...?
    3) What is the usable distance throw...?
    4) What UI it has and how well it works...
    5) How does the lamp handle the heat..?
    6) does it handle exposure to water well?

    I think you answered most of those questions but it is necessary to read the whole review in order to glean the information that is the most pertinent.

    I know you said you don't like to do beam photos but almost everyone else here in MTBR land, "Lives for beam shots".
    Personally ( IMHO ) nothing is more useful for the potential buyer than a really nice beam shot done on some natural terrain.. ( snow and white sand excluded )...with references for distance.

    Nothing wrong with supplying bar graphs that show lux output but truthfully there really is no way to reference a bar graph to what the human eye will see when used in real life. The only way to do that is with beam photos on good terrain with distance markers.

    I like what I'm seeing with the Z10. My guess is that it is producing a very wide/even beam pattern. Hard to tell from tigris's photo on snow though. Can't tell distance throw at all without references. Should make a good bar lamp if it's got some throw. Would be nice if Xeccon decides to provide a "neutral white "version. Anyway, if it can out-throw a Nitefighter BT40S and do it with a single NW emitter that would be sweet. Also great that it has a UI button on the lamp ( in case the battery goes up on the remote while on a ride ) Can't wait to see the bar mount solution ( when it is available ).

    The one negative is of course the thermal circuit. I agree that there needs to be a better solution for reestablishing full power. Of course if the lamp gets a Go-pro mount for the bars perhaps there will be a direct thermal path to the bars ( via an all aluminum mount ) to help moderate the heat.

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    Thanks, Cat. Probably, I can re-structure the information and move essential data to the top. For people looking at basic properties, it will be more convenient indeed.

    As for light customization, I believe most valuable would be an option to select different optics. IMHO current one is better suited to the bar, while micro size of light makes it excellent helmet light - but more throw is required then. Second option could be warm tint, as many users like it (I myself isn't among them, though).

    Currently, thermal issue is definitely 'Number One" in list of expected changes...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    And for those that want a beam shot, I have one of these as well to go along with the z11:
    Thank you!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Archie- View Post
    ...As for light customization, I believe most valuable would be an option to select different optics. IMHO current one is better suited to the bar, while micro size of light makes it excellent helmet light - but more throw is required then. Second option could be warm tint, as many users like it (I myself isn't among them, though).

    Currently, thermal issue is definitely 'Number One" in list of expected changes...
    Yeah, would be great to have another option for optic. An optic that produced a beam pattern more designed for the helmet ( not too narrow but with great throw ) would be nice. I won't get ahead of myself though because I don't really know how far the current optic can throw.

    Looking forward, I'd like to see this technology advance to the "two emitter" stage, with emphasis on something more designed for helmet use ( i.e. more confined beam pattern, not too narrow but with great throw ) A small compact duel Led lamp pushing ~2800 lumen would be sweet. They would have to make sure the lamp had some proper finning though because it would certainly get hot really, really fast.

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    BTW, what you've described is very close to Z11 light from Tigris review.

    Comparing them side-by-side (I have Z11 too), I'd say its beam is much more suitable for helmet use. But currently it uses XM-L2, and suffer from overheating as well...

  9. #9
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    Cat, based on my testing (I have some xhp50s on the way as well) there is no way to make a "compact" xhp50 lamp suitable to helmet use. I tried about every optic I have to attempt to get a tighter beam from the z10, its not doable due to the shear size and design on the die. Its 4 xpg2 dies (literally) crammed into an xm-l2. So a small optic creates a spot but 4 separate big squares with the spot in the center where the 4 squares intersect. To keep it compact, there is no way around having a large spread beam pattern to spread the squares. Im going to test but it looks as though the bt21 head is going to be the smallest you can go to get that much output without severe heat issues, but still going to run rather hot even in cool ambient temps.

    That said, a dual version for bars would be rather SWEET. But this little z10 as a bar light is pretty awesome for being so damn small.

  10. #10
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    Great review Archie (even if it is awfully technical). Beamshot looks like a nice wide even flood! Does seem odd they designed the lighthead so small as the XHP50 really isn't suited for throw and therefore not really preferred for helmet use.

    -Garry
    "My Bike Lights" Thread on BLF teardowns, measurements, and beamshots. Moving my photos, PM or post up if you can't see them.

  11. #11
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    Actually after using it I understand and they didn't want to make an 808 basically since that's what it would take to give it throw

    After using these im starting to like the idea of having a much shallower/wider beam with the punch on the lid. I was always riding the opposite and im starting to like this way better.

    I'll be posting lumen info and such later tonight. I know what the numbers are but want to double check before sharing.

  12. #12
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    Avg Lumens 30 seconds to 60 seconds: 1404 Lumens

    Thermal Step down time on wind tunnel: 2 mins 26 seconds (not much better than Z11) @ Ambient of 18C/64F

    Mount, like Z11, needs to have at least aluminum arms. those big plastic arms covering up and insulating sruface area is killing these lights. I tested this same as Z11 with aluminum stuck in place of mounts, helps tremendously.

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    Quote Originally Posted by garrybunk View Post
    Great review Archie (even if it is awfully technical). Beamshot looks like a nice wide even flood! Does seem odd they designed the lighthead so small as the XHP50 really isn't suited for throw and therefore not really preferred for helmet use.
    Thanks, Garry. Yes, in current state, it's more like bar light. Maybe, Weight Weenies should be notified about its existence?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    Avg Lumens 30 seconds to 60 seconds: 1404 Lumens
    Nice to see manufacturer specification is precise then!

    Mount, like Z11, needs to have at least aluminum arms. those big plastic arms covering up and insulating sruface area is killing these lights. I tested this same as Z11 with aluminum stuck in place of mounts, helps tremendously.
    Totally agree.

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    Archie, you do realize the specs we have say 1000 lumens right? . The 1400 was what I messaged you guys after I put the z10 on the sphere

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    Do the lumens stay at approx 1400 for the duration of the run time or do they decrease substantially. Don't care if it's a small decrease.

    Also, can this be bought in spot form. And can this be bought w/ a 2 cell to attach to the helmet.

    This looks interesting if I can use it on the lid.

    Thx

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    Except the lumen output ?, the rest is all explained above. Answers to both currently is no. More mainly the spot matter. A round connector 2 cell pack will work fine with these connectors.



    As for the lumens, the 1400ish lumens is for the duration of the "ANSI Standardized Method", 30-120 seconds. It gets down below 1300 by the end of the test due to heat issues. We're working with Xeccon/mtbRevolution to get the matter taken care of. Best I have done (mounting Vancbiker finned gopro mount to the side of it) is kept it between 1200 and 1300 for several minutes before I stopped testing as I was just experimenting with solving heat problems.

  18. #18
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    An XPG model would help with both the heat and the spot optic.
    It would also help to empty my wallet.

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    Not xpg, to low of output. Xp-l or xp-l hi (though HI makes a really tight beam in 10 deg optics) would do FAR better, twice the lumens of xpg/xpg2.

    There is alot of options for this tiny light, but none of which would create the lumen output this has. And dual emitter light heads would still out perform it easily with very little weight penalty.

    This is what we all expected from this though, helmet light. Till we turned them on.

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    Thx T-99

    My other ? is if I do buy a standard 2 cell the connector is a bit different tho I know you said it will fit. However, my experience is sometimes the fit is not tight and the connectors don't stay connected. Can you tell me if they'll stay connected if you've tested one of the other batteries w/ the round connector.

    Thx for doing all this.

    MB

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    Thank Archie on this one, he did all the work here. Ive just been doing to lumens and such cause I have the sphere.



    Answer to your question is in the OP though and more info on that over in the Z11 thread. But works fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    Archie, you do realize the specs we have say 1000 lumens right? . The 1400 was what I messaged you guys after I put the z10 on the sphere



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    They need to get rid of that plastic piece over the top of the lamp. If the side mount screws are plastic (?) they need to make those ( as well as the mount ) out of aluminum. I realize this will up the production cost but for a lamp like this I feel it's a "must have" if you really want to control the heat when on high.

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    Well seems you have info that's more current than mine .

    Only plastic is the button, silicone. Rest of case is aluminum, screws are steel.

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    BTW here is the mode output levels:

    Low: 139 lumens
    Medium: 585 lumens

    "Burst": 1150 lumens

    Have no idea why burst is lower than max here, if your on high its more like a temporary dimmer switch.

    What I have recommended due to light size is bringing output down a bit, about 10%. Still going to have more OTF lumens than any other tiny single emitter (or using different emitter) by far, but will help with heat issues. May be enough to bring it in line. BUt not so simple to just change sense resistors on these ones. Seems output is control by more than those, so not sure how it will respond to a sense resistor change.

  26. #26
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    And heat issue sorted here, Ill get a run time/lumen output test done on this in the next couple days. I was able to quickly machine this up last night, got it painted and bent to match the case radius. Yeap, machined from flat stock, then bent it, SO MUCH EASIER than trying to machine a radius.


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    Great stuff, thank you for all the info. I came across this company today and was impressed with the quality that I was seeing in pictures. Of all the lights that they have listed on their site, this one seems to fit my needs the best. Small and light, perfect for mounting on a helmet. When will this product be ready for purchase?

  28. #28
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    Sometime next month.

    FYI this light has very little throw, it's a very wide beam, not for high speed riding as a helmet light. It's meant as a companion bar light to the z11 being used on the helmet. But if your bike packing or something that isn't high speed trail riding, it'll do pretty well on the lid

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    Sometime next month.

    FYI this light has very little throw, it's a very wide beam, not for high speed riding as a helmet light. It's meant as a companion bar light to the z11 being used on the helmet. But if your bike packing or something that isn't high speed trail riding, it'll do pretty well on the lid

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk
    Ah I see, I must have missed that in your write up, thanks for clarifying!

  30. #30
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    I didn't do the write up on this light, I just filled in the lumen output and beam shots after the original posts.

    If you want tiny and light weight helmet light with the rest of the features of this light, the z11 covers that's. On my phone so I can link the thread ATM, but I think it will fit what you want really well.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    I didn't do the write up on this light, I just filled in the lumen output and beam shots after the original posts.

    If you want tiny and light weight helmet light with the rest of the features of this light, the z11 covers that's. On my phone so I can link the thread ATM, but I think it will fit what you want really well.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk
    Bahahaha, I've been reading too many posts! Read your write up on the Z11 and made an assumption, durp. Big ups to both of you and -Archie- !

    Yes the Z11 looks more up my alley. I already run a Supernova E3 Triple 2, which takes care of my wide beam spread. Honestly though, it doesn't hurt to have a spare light as back-up, especially when they are this economically priced. I have been following the Chinese made lights for a while, and this is the first set that I am excited about and will purchase!

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    Information update: Xeccon decided to fix some imperfections found by reviewers, so mass production of new lights was delayed a little bit. Issues like thermal management, UI, mounting design etc. consumed significant amount of time to be reworked: CAD samples below illustrate some changes.

    So, the work is going; stay tuned!






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