MS, Lupine or Dinotte cable- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    MS, Lupine or Dinotte cable

    Which of these lights has the best cable/connector combo? Looking for a fairly fliexible cable with a snap-in connector. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    I've had all three.

    MS has a weak and thin cable, sturdiness is questionable, can be too easily destroyed IMHO. Though I heard later models come with a better cable.

    The Dinotte cable is sturdy, too sturdy in fact, too rigid, can be annoying on the helmet (I always felt uncomfortable with it). Had problems with the connectors too (which are - just like the MS connectors - standard DC plugs), hard to disconnect and develop contact faults, although I must add that when I contacted Dinotte about a faulty cable Rob instantly sent me three (!) cables as replacement. Talk about CS! :-)

    Lupine has the best cable, it is both sturdy and flexible, not rigid at all, it really is a quality item. Drawbacks: connector is non-standard, special two-pin (can be hard to get from anyone else than Lupine), also it is quite expensive for a cable - actually I've just checked and it costs the same as the Dinotte cable... with some Lupine lights you also get a little "dutch grease" which helps in case of wet weather contact problems.

    If I had a reliable source of Lupine connectors I'd go for them in a heartbeat, once you experience luxury it is hard to ignore it ;-) For DIY however I'm not so sure it's the best choice. I'd say start with DC, then look around if it doesn't work for you...

    btw. if anyone can tell me the name and/or has a source for these plugs... please let me know! ;-)

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    Last edited by radirpok; 02-10-2010 at 02:16 AM.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for all the info!! It sounds like the lupine connector is the way to go for me!! I was looking at some DIY connectors and by the time I got the cable, connectors, pins, etc it was just as expensive as buying the brand name cable extensions. Thanks again..

  4. #4
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    These appear to be the connectors that would work with the Lupine system. Have not found wire yet that has the silicone jacket.

    http://www.alliedelec.com/search/sea...n+relief+41316

  5. #5
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    Any particular reason you say the lupine cables are not good for DIY? Thanks.

  6. #6
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    Check this out:
    http://www.lupine.de/web/en/technology/wilma/connector

    Marketing BS? Could be... but it's cool anyway! ;-)

  7. #7
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    First thing I did when I got my Dinotte V's a few years back was chop off the cheesy 9v style battery pack connector and solder and heat shrink on automotive trailer style 2 pin connectors. They run $2-3 each and are weatherproof and very durable.
    Interestingly enough the factory cables utilized red for positive on one light and red for negative on the other. Saw that when I cut off the old ones so no big deal. If I was in QA I'd be kicking someone's [email protected]@ out the door though.
    While surely some manufacturers might use that modified part to deny you warranty service someday (I'd heard Dinotte is a stand up company so assumed they would not be so petty, after about 4 years now they still work so lucky I've not needed to find out!) if any manufacturer looked at my ex Navy avionics tech certified mil-spec style splice and denied warranty service on an unrelated fault they shouldn't be in business.
    Buy the light that you like. Go to a real electronics supplier (meaning not Radio Hack) and they should be able toy get you something durable at a reasonable cost to retrofit it. Or go to Kragen/Autozone/Pep Boys/whoever and get the trailer plugs and a $7 soldering iron, though you can do it with a lighter if you've got ghetto skills. Don't buy lead free solder on a bet. Get the full poison stuff, it's getting harder to find now but like paint or adhesives, if it can't cause brain damage with long term exposure or fits of vomiting upon ingestion, it won't work for its intended application. A good rule applicable to nearly everything in life.
    All bikes weigh 50 lbs. a 50lb. bike doesn't need a lock. a 40lb bike needs a 10lb. lock. a 30 lb. bike needs a 20lb. lock.

  8. #8
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    LOL, Lupine:

    To be on the safe side, Lupine supplies shrinking sleeves originally designed for use in armoured tanks for extra protection in more peaceable deployment.
    that's up there with Monster Cable's claims that using their RCA connnecters resulted in "increased musicality" in your hi-fi system.

    Heat Shrink Tubing: How It Was Invented, and Why We Use It

    Sure, heat shrink tubing is cool and fun to use, but have you ever wondered how it came about, what makes it work, or how many uses it actually has? If so, CableOrganizer.com can help just have a quick read through our FAQs, and you'll be an expert on heat shrink tubing in no time.

    Who invented heat shrink? What's the history behind it?

    Heat shrink tubing was originally developed by Raychem Corporation in the late 1950s, when Raychem's chemical engineer founder, Paul Cook, made use of radiation chemistry (from which his company's name is derived) to develop the two main products that Raychem was originally known for: lightweight aircraft cable, and heat-shrinkable tubing. While Raychem pioneered heat shrink polymers, today they're produced by many different manufacturers, including 3M, Sumitomo, Alpha, Canusa, and LG.
    http://cableorganizer.com/articles/h...ing-facts.html

    FWIW though that's a helluva connector Lupine's using and if that light's acceptable and you can afford it by all means go that route.

    Like most people though I've been hit and mowed down by GreatDepression.2 and can think of many places to spend a wad besides what they get. Wholly irrelevant if you have the means.
    All bikes weigh 50 lbs. a 50lb. bike doesn't need a lock. a 40lb bike needs a 10lb. lock. a 30 lb. bike needs a 20lb. lock.

  9. #9
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    The Lupine connectors are the best by far- that I have seen or used so far. The Light & Motion ones on the ARC were pretty good too and snap shut almost with a pop that pushes the air out of the connection.

    The Lupines are thicker yet more flexible. I don't like the Dinotte connectors and agree they are too rigid. On the Lupines, they say use the Dutch grease in really humid climates. In dry Colorado, I do not. I tried it once and it is so dry here that it dried up and didn't stay greasy for very long. That caused no problems but if you use too much and it dries up, it may.

    I have used the lights in a true downpour one time. It was cold and miserable and I was effing soaked with no warm gear. No water or condensation made it into the connectors and both lights worked fine. That experience lead me to the wonders of Gore Tex gloves , real wool socks, and chemical toes wamers...another story altogether.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for all the advice fellas!! I went ahead and ordered the lupine connectors because I'm not willing to sacrifice reliablity and quality in the races I do. Once I get some use out of them I'll post my findings! Thanks again!

  11. #11
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    That connector...

    Quote Originally Posted by radirpok
    I've had all three.

    MS has a weak and thin cable, sturdiness is questionable, can be too easily destroyed IMHO. Though I heard later models come with a better cable.

    The Dinotte cable is sturdy, too sturdy in fact, too rigid, can be annoying on the helmet (I always felt uncomfortable with it). Had problems with the connectors too (which are - just like the MS connectors - standard DC plugs), hard to disconnect and develop contact faults, although I must add that when I contacted Dinotte about a faulty cable Rob instantly sent me three (!) cables as replacement. Talk about CS! :-)

    Lupine has the best cable, it is both sturdy and flexible, not rigid at all, it really is a quality item. Drawbacks: connector is non-standard, special two-pin (can be hard to get from anyone else than Lupine), also it is quite expensive for a cable - actually I've just checked and it costs the same as the Dinotte cable... with some Lupine lights you also get a little "dutch grease" which helps in case of wet weather contact problems.

    If I had a reliable source of Lupine connectors I'd go for them in a heartbeat, once you experience luxury it is hard to ignore it ;-) For DIY however I'm not so sure it's the best choice. I'd say start with DC, then look around if it doesn't work for you...

    btw. if anyone can tell me the name and/or has a source for these plugs... please let me know! ;-)

    Name:  images_products_lupineparts_extension cable.jpg
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    Looks like standard two pin Molex.... pretty common in low voltage lighting. I haven't seen any DIY connectors with molded boots on them to keep the water out, tho.

    I rigged my old lighting system up with those connectors and just used heat shrink wrap to make water resistant connectors. Worked pretty well. I never had any shorts in wet weather.

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